Subjects -> ABSTRACTING AND INDEXING (Total: 31 journals)
    - ABSTRACTING AND INDEXING (10 journals)
    - BIBLIOGRAPHIES (21 journals)

BIBLIOGRAPHIES (21 journals)

Showing 1 - 14 of 14 Journals sorted by number of followers
American Archivist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 145)
The Library : The Transactions of the Bibliographical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 142)
Australian Academic & Research Libraries     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 95)
Biography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
a/b : Auto/Biography Studies : Journal of The Autobiography Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
American Periodicals : A Journal of History, Criticism, and Bibliography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Studies in Bibliography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
International Bibliography of Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
The Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Terminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Hemingway Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Studies in the Age of Chaucer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Script & Print     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Similar Journals
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Biography
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.13
Number of Followers: 20  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0162-4962 - ISSN (Online) 1529-1456
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • Disability Daily Drawn: A Comics Collaboration

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      Abstract: My daughter Simone was the first person I met with Down syndrome. I was forty-two years old. This is an astonishing statement for many reasons, but primarily because I had worked as a nurse in downtown Toronto, Canada for fifteen years. When Simone was born, the delivery room went silent. The presumed tragedy of disability, medically avoidable, had permeated the room. Simone was not a child—she was a child with a disability. The chasm was wide. I remember being as devastated by her diagnosis as the rest of our family and friends, but we got on with our lives, largely because of our four-year-old twins. We loved Simone; we didn't love Down syndrome. She needed a lot of extra help to coordinate her muscles to crawl ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Reframing "Nothing About Us Without Us": Comics and Intellectual
           Disability

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      Abstract: The slogan "Nothing About Us Without Us" expresses the urgent need felt by people with disabilities for access to voice and control in their struggle against oppression. Dating back at least to 1993 when it was used by Michael Masutha and William Rowland of Disabled People South Africa, who borrowed it from a disability rights gathering in Eastern Europe, this slogan has spread around the world as people with disabilities pressed for their rights (Charlton).1 Most recently, in About Us, an edited collection that compiles personal essays by people with disabilities that were first published in the New York Times "Disability" column, editors Rosemarie Garland-Thomson and Peter Catapano explain that their title echoes ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Graphic Confessions and the Vulnerability Hangover from Hell

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      Abstract: ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Drawing is The Best Medicine: Somatic Dis-ease and Graphic Revenge in
           Miriam Katin's Letting It Go

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      Abstract: I guess the Germans moved on and I didn't.Comics memoirs have the "potential … to open up new and troubled spaces," as Gillian Whitlock has observed (976). Miriam Katin's Letting It Go, an autobiographical comic published in 2013, opens up these spaces in spectacular fashion by telling a new story of Holocaust traumatic memory. It is at once a manic romp by her irrepressibly witty, slightly foul-mouthed—in four languages—Hungarian-American protagonist Miriam, its narrated I, and a deadly serious engagement by Katin's narrating I with the persistent injury of the Holocaust for surviving European Jews, particularly women.1 And maintaining the distinction of autobiographical theory between these two "I"s is crucial in ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • If That's What You Want to Call It: An Illustrated Rx-ay for Graphic
           Medicine

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      Abstract: I got a creative writing fellowship at Harvard to compose Fertile Mind, a book documenting a year in which I made the Baby Decision.Three days after the receipt of this letter, I suffered a euphoria-induced-insomnia-induced seizureMy MRI showed that I had a mass on my left parietal lobe, I had an awake craniotomy on 7/2/99.WE INTERRUPT YOUR REGULARLY SCHEDULED PROGRAMMING TO BRING YOU BRAIN SURGERY!!!The surgery temporarily wiped out my speech, reading, and writing. I had to tell Harvard I was no longer the same person who'd applied.Behavioral observation: Ms. Becker presented as a somewhat anxious woman who was noticeably concerned about the difficulties she was facing.She was motivated to perform well and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Drawn To History: Healing, Dementia, and the Armenian Genocide in the
           Intertextual Collage of Aliceheimer's

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      Abstract: In Dana Walrath's memoir, Aliceheimer's: Alzheimer's Through the Looking Glass (2016), cut-out pages of text from Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland give material form to figures of Walrath's mother, Alice, an Armenian woman in her late seventies living with dementia. These papier collé and pencil portraits of "Alice" guide readers through a journey of reimagining dominant medico-scientific narratives of dementia and aging. Walrath writes in the introduction:People with Alzheimer's are perceived as zombies, bodies without minds, waiting for valiant researchers to find a cure. For Alice and me, the story was different. Alzheimer's was a time of healing and magic. Of course, there is loss with ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Outsider Writing: The Healing Art of Robert Walser

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      Abstract: What happens when literary creativity is constrained' I do not have in mind the kind of playful constraints strategically chosen by the Dadaists or the Oulipo poets—analog algorithms that have expanded the space of art and writing. Rather, I have in mind a mental or physical barrier that is externally imposed. I have in mind a suffering that many writers and academics have encountered at some point in their life: writer's block, or the painful inability to write. There is nothing to write about. Or the body refuses to write. There is a cramp, hernia, or inflammation that hurts and obstructs the flow. The hurt signals a limit to what the mind may have taken to be an infinite space—a space of thinking that writers ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Acknowledgments

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      Abstract: This collection was conceived in what Nancy K. Miller refers to in her contribution as "BCP," before the coronavirus pandemic. We had initially planned to bring together artists and scholars in an in-person workshop in June 2020 to explore and discuss the future of graphic medicine. As the pandemic unfolded, we made the decision with the Biography team to push ahead with the collection despite the loss of the opportunity to workshop our collective thinking in person, as we had planned, at the biannual meeting of the International Auto/Biography Association, which was to have been held in Turku, Finland, hosted by SELMA, the Centre for the Study of Storytelling, Experientiality, and Memory. We would like to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Graphic Medicine's Possible Futures: Reconsidering Poetics and Reading

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      Abstract: Since its coinage in 2007 by medical practitioner and comics artist Ian Williams, graphic medicine has steadily gained traction as an umbrella term for comics that explore healthcare issues, the theoretical discourse these comics engender, and the study of comics as expressive communicative tools. Embedded within comics studies, graphic medicine interacts with the interdisciplinary medical humanities, which applies insights from the humanities, the social sciences, and the arts to the study and practice of medicine. Primarily promoted as a means of engendering compassion in practitioners in training, the goal of the medical humanities is:to reconceptualize health care, through influencing students and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Conflict or Compromise' An Imagined Conversation with John Hicklenton
           and Lindsay Cooper about Living with Multiple Sclerosis

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      Abstract: This strip is part of an ongoing project using comics to express, conceptualize, and cope with my experience of living with multiple sclerosis (MS). I produced the first installment during a postdoctoral residency in University of the Arts London's Archives and Special Collections Centre at London College of Communication, roughly two years after I was diagnosed with MS. The residency also resulted in the production of an autobiographical comic, So I Guess My Body Pretty Much Hates Me Now, now held in the Wellcome Collection Library, London, and the winner of "Best One-Shot" in the 2020 Broken Frontier awards.Rather than attempting to present an unmediated voice and hand as signifiers of confessional truth-telling ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Out of Sync: Chronic Illness, Time, and Comics Memoir

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      Abstract: Time as we experience it does not hold up to close examination. Philosophers have known this for millennia—giving rise, for example, to the very different accounts of time offered by Parmenides and Heraclitus. For Parmenides, time is an illusion and only the now is real, while for Heraclitus, time is change and only change is real. However, both of these classical accounts were premised on the conviction that time as we experience it simply doesn't compute.Yet, even as an agreed upon understanding of time continues to elude us, our experience of time—a fixed now from which a past recedes and towards which a never-arriving future approaches—is our one truly shared text, our unifying fiction. We are wired to tell ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "Is this Recovery'": Chronicity and Closure in Graphic Illness Memoir

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      Abstract: Mental disorders are often recurrent, and treatment only partially effective. What does real recovery—if that's the right word—actually look like, and how can it be assessed'Healthy individuals should be able to fully recover. And we think that will be a statement we can make with great surety now that we've gotten familiar with this problem. They should be able to recover."Recovery" is the word of the moment; it connotes a return to a previous state of well-being. For many patients with chronic conditions, though, treatment aims not to restore a baseline of precarious health but to reach a higher baseline. Some of medicine's frailties are new; some are of long standing. But what the pandemic has exposed—call the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Face as Landscape: Refiguring Illness, Disability, and Disorders in David
           B.'s Epileptic

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      Abstract: In 1996 French comics artist Pierre-François Beauchard, known professionally as David B., published the first of what would become a six-volume chronicle of the personal and interpersonal, emotional, and medical effects of his brother's epilepsy. In titling the series L'Ascension du Haut Mal (The ascension of the high evil), from the outset he draws attention to the connotation of the antiquated term for epilepsy: a supernatural evil taking possession of the body.1 While many reviewers of the work in both French and English have noted that le haut mal, along with its English counterpart "the falling sickness," fell out of use by the nineteenth century due to advancements in neurology, few have gone further in their ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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