Subjects -> ABSTRACTING AND INDEXING (Total: 31 journals)
    - ABSTRACTING AND INDEXING (10 journals)
    - BIBLIOGRAPHIES (21 journals)

BIBLIOGRAPHIES (21 journals)

Showing 1 - 14 of 14 Journals sorted by number of followers
The Library : The Transactions of the Bibliographical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 151)
American Archivist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 150)
Australian Academic & Research Libraries     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 98)
Biography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
a/b : Auto/Biography Studies : Journal of The Autobiography Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
American Periodicals : A Journal of History, Criticism, and Bibliography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Studies in Bibliography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
International Bibliography of Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
The Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Terminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Hemingway Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Studies in the Age of Chaucer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Script & Print     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
The Library : The Transactions of the Bibliographical Society
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.183
Number of Followers: 151  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0024-2160 - ISSN (Online) 1744-8581
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [419 journals]
  • Sex Education, Songs, and Spiritual Guidance: An Eighteenth-Century
           Servants’ Library

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      Pages: 301 - 322
      Abstract: Over the past forty years, historians of the book and of reading have sought to expand our knowledge of book use among different social classes. Peter Clark’s work on early-modern inventories and wills uncovered book ownership across a much wider demographic than previously documented, revealing the material impor- tance of books in early-modern lives.11 Jan Fergus’s research on the eighteenth-century client profiles of two provincial booksellers historicized both the local ‘reading publics’ and the economics of book ownership. Importantly, her findings included the purchases by fifty provincial servants.22 Paul Kaufman worked his way through the early library registers of commercial and subscription libraries, revealing the types of published works members had access to; and Isabel Rivers’ and David Wykes’ Dissenting Academies Online project does the same for those attending eighteenth- and nineteenth-century dissenting academies.33 More recently, Mark Purcell’s excellent survey of The Country House Library begins by reminding us of their somewhat neglected status in book history, and of the unexpected spaces and readers that can be found within them. In particular, he draws attention to early nineteenth-century servant libraries.44 In I gratefully acknowledge permission to quote from manuscripts owned by the Duke of Northumberland at Alnwick Castle, and extend my thanks to Christopher Hunwick and Lisa Little for their invaluable help with the collections. Research on this material was generously funded by the Leverhulme Trust addition, resources such as the Reading Experience Database (RED) and the work of historians of reading such as Abigail Williams, among many others, chronicle the extent of sociable reading across classes in the eighteenth century.55 Through their meticulous research, it is increasingly apparent that book use, book ownership, and even modest private libraries were much more widespread among servants, trades people, and the middling classes throughout the seventeenth, eighteenth, and early nineteenth centuries.
      PubDate: Sat, 24 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/library/fpac033
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Lost, Burned and Recovered: Tracing the Provenance History of a Copy of
           Caxton’s Golden Legend in the John Rylands Library

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      Pages: 323 - 345
      Abstract: On 29 June 1865, a fire at Sotheby’s in London destroyed extensive libraries prior to their sales.11 Among them was what was described as the Important and Valuable Library of the Late George Offor, Esq, including a copy of William Caxton’s Golden Legend (1483– 84).22 This study demonstrates that this copy, hitherto believed to be lost, managed to survive the fire and is Incunable Collection R4591 in the John Rylands Library at the University of Manchester [hereafter M].33 M is in ‘pure’ first setting and now lacks ninety-three leaves and contains 356 leaves:44 leaves e2–7; quires f–m; n1–6, o4–8; p–u; sheets x1.8, 4.5; y1–7; z– A; B1–3, 6–8; C; D2–8, E1–5, F5–8; G–L; M1–3, 5–8; N–R; S1, 3–8; T–V; X1–3, 6; Y–cc; dd1, 5–8; ee1–4, 8; ff; gg1–5.55 In the eighteenth to early twentieth centuries, individual copies were disbound, leaves were dispersed and collected, and copies were bound again. Caxton’s Golden Legend today survives in thirty-three copies and ten fragments.66 M with 356 leaves must have been ‘cannibalized’ at several points in its history, sometimes used as ‘a hospital copy’ in order to ‘sophisticate’ and perfect other imperfect copies, and sometimes its leaves must have been repurposed, circulated and sold as collectors’ items.77 The word ‘perfect’ in this context means that the copy contains all the leaves with the text regardless of the origins of individual leaves.88 The present study uncovers the hitherto unknown provenance history of M by analysing the information embedded in this copy as well as tracing the whereabouts of the leaves that originate from it, and the possible identities of the individuals who removed them.
      PubDate: Sat, 24 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/library/fpac034
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Attributing Authorship to Bodleian MS Douce 171: A Seventeenth-Century
           Comedy by Arthur Wilson

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      Pages: 346 - 372
      Abstract: At the end of Bodleian Library, MS Douce 171 lies an anonymous dramatic composition. It lacks a title, but based on the names of its two protagonists Martin Wiggins refers to the play as ‘Comedy of Stella and Alexis’ (hereafter ‘Stella and Alexis’).11 The text is fragmentary, ending abruptly after the first scene of the Third Act, and the surviving portion has undergone significant authorial revision.22 While ‘Stella and Alexis’ was acknowledged by twentieth-century bibliographers, none investigated its origins in any depth. E. K. Chambers includes the play in his list of ‘Anonymous Work’, where he declares only that there is no con- nection with Philip Massinger’s Alexius, or the Chaste Lover, a lost play that was licensed in 1639.33 W. W. Greg does not discuss ‘Stella and Alexis’ at any length, but he likewise dismisses the possibility of a connection with Massinger’s work.44 G. E. Bentley provides a transcription of the Argument and Character List, but offers little by way of analysis: he comments briefly on the contents of the surrounding manuscript volume and the different hands contained therein.55 Wiggins’ catalogue entry is the most detailed treatment of the manuscript to date, although he offers no serious guess about the play’s authorship. In this essay, I propose that ‘Stella and Alexis’ is far more significant than these scholars have realized. I argue that the extant manuscript represents an authorial draft of a play by the seventeenth- century dramatist Arthur Wilson (1595–1652).66
      PubDate: Sat, 24 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/library/fpac035
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • New Fragments of Unrecorded Early English Printed Texts

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      Pages: 373 - 385
      Abstract: In 2008, in a two-part article in The Library on the collecting of fragmentary early English printed books, it was possible to describe twenty-five fragments assembled by Bodley’s librarian Bulkeley Bandinel (1781–1861) and now in our private collection, at least six of them unrecorded in STC.11 In what follows we would like to add—among a scattering of rare but recorded material—three or four more ‘not-in-STC’ fragments of some literary interest, recently acquired from other sources.
      PubDate: Sat, 24 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/library/fpac036
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Two Lost Items of Humeana

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      Pages: 386 - 393
      Abstract: Two items of Humeana—a manuscript and a book associated with the philosopher David Hume (1711–1776)—have disappeared from two different repositories in Edinburgh. The first item, formerly preserved in the National Library of Scotland, is a portion of a manuscript: the ‘Register of the Proceedings of the Curators and Keeper’ of the Library of the Faculty of Advocates. The portion concerns the period during which Hume held the keepership of the Library. The second item, formerly preserved in the National Museums of Scotland, is one of only two extant copies of Hume’s supressed Five Dissertations (1755–56). The disap- pearances are concerning, partly because of the similarity of the events leading up to the last sighting of each item. In both cases, an image of the item was commissioned for promulgation or publication, after which the physical item was reportedly lost by the commissioning repository. The following note discusses the two disappearances seriatim.
      PubDate: Sat, 24 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/library/fpac037
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Notes on Contributors

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      Pages: 394 - 396
      Abstract: Daniel Blank is Assistant Professor in Early Modern Literature, 1500–1700, at Durham University, where he researches early-modern drama as well as the intellectual culture and classical heritage of the early-modern period. His 'rst monograph, Shakespeare and University Drama, is forthcoming with Oxford University Press. His published articles have appeared in The Review of English Studies, Renaissance Quarterly, Renaissance Studies, and The Bodleian Library Record.
      PubDate: Sat, 24 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/library/fpac038
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • The Bibliographical Society

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      Pages: 397 - 402
      PubDate: Sat, 24 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/library/fpac039
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 3 (2022)
       
 
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