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  Subjects -> ANTHROPOLOGY (Total: 398 journals)
Showing 1 - 90 of 90 Journals sorted by number of followers
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 372)
Global Change, Peace & Security: formerly Pacifica Review: Peace, Security & Global Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 305)
Cultural Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 204)
Current Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 194)
Annual Review of Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 194)
American Anthropologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 170)
Ethnography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 96)
Ethnos: Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 90)
American Ethnologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Journal of Anthropological Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
Anthropology Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Anthropological Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54)
History and Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Journal of Social Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Journal of Contemporary Ethnography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Human Development: A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Memory Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Critique of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
American Journal of Physical Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Social Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Journal of World Prehistory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Discourse Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Qualitative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Medical Anthropology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Ethnology : An International Journal of Cultural and Social Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of African History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Anthropological Review     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Anthropology & Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Archaeology, Ethnology and Anthropology of Eurasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Anthropological Forum: A journal of social anthropology and comparative sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Medical Anthropology: Cross-Cultural Studies in Health and Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
African Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Ethnohistory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Anthropology & Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Museum Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Human Evolution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
City & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Anthropology of the Middle East     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Material Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Australian Historical Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
African and Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Ethos     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
French Politics, Culture & Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Visual Anthropology: Published in cooperation with the Commission on Visual Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Primatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Pragmatics & Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Evolutionary Anthropology Issues News and Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Anthropology & Archeology of Eurasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Anthropological Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Anthropology of Work Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Field Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Anthropology & Humanism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Latin American & Caribbean Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Culture & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Archeological Papers of The American Anthropological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Buildings & Landscapes: Journal of the Vernacular Architecture Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Mental Health, Religion & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Anthropology Now     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Cultural Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Linguistic Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Reviews in Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Dialectical Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Food and Foodways: Explorations in the History and Culture of     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Visual Anthropology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Anthropology in Action : Journal for Applied Anthropology in Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Tourism Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Ethnomusicology Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Geografiska Annaler, Series B : Human Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Anthropology News     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Asian and African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Museum Anthropology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Australian Cultural History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Anthropological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Anthropology of Consciousness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
East Central Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
E&G Quaternary Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
L'Homme     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
African American Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Cahiers d’études africaines     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
POLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Osteoarchaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
L'Anthropologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Progress in Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Anthropologie et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Antiquaries Journal, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Historical Biology: An International Journal of Paleobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asian Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Myth & Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Chinese Sociology & Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Transforming Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Focaal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Transcultural Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Anthropological Journal of European Cultures     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Collaborative Anthropologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ateliers d'anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Turcica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Gradhiva     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anthropologie et santé     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Levant     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Primates     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Human Organization     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Cultural Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal des anthropologues     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Polynesian Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Arctic Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Modern Greek Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Histories of Anthropology Annual     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Acta Ethnographica Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Oceania     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Australian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Civilisations     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cuadernos de Antropologia Social     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Terrain     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Canadian Studies/Revue d'études canadiennes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Gesture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Listening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Quotidian : Dutch Journal for the Study of Everyday Life     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Exchange     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
The Australian Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
General Anthropology Bulletin of The General Anthropology Division     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
South Asian Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Burma Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
South Asian Diaspora     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Images re-vues : histoire, anthropologie et théorie de l'art     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Anatomical Science International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revista de Antropologia     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Antipoda : Revista de Antropología y Arqueología     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Social Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Alteridades     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Social Science Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Socio-anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Quaternaire     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Behemoth     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Structure and Dynamics: eJournal of Anthropological and Related Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Transnational American Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Recherches sociologiques et anthropologiques     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Durkheimian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Zoosystematics and Evolution - Mitteilungen Aus Dem Museum Fur Naturkunde Zu Berlin     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
HOMO - Journal of Comparative Human Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cadernos de Estudos Africanos     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bulletin de l’APAD     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
L'Atelier du CRH     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Estudios Atacameños     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cahiers de l'Urmis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tabula Rasa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Antropologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indiana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Boletin de Antropologia Universidad de Antioquia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Andes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Apparence(s)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Desacatos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuicuilco     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. Ciências Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chungara (Arica) - Revista de Antropologia Chilena     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethnographic Praxis in Industry Conference     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Totem : The University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tipití : Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nuevo mundo mundos nuevos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intersecciones en Antropologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Terrae Incognitae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal for the Anthropology of North America (JANA)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Southwest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Scripta Ethnologica     Open Access  
Revista de Antropología Social     Open Access  
Mitologicas     Open Access  
Liminar. Estudios Sociales y Humanisticos     Open Access  
Avá. Revista de Antropologia     Open Access  
Treballs de Sociolingüística Catalana     Open Access  
Anthropologischer Anzeiger     Full-text available via subscription  
Mélanges de la Casa de Velázquez     Partially Free  
Recherches amérindiennes au Québec     Full-text available via subscription  
Runa : Archivo para las Ciencias del Hombre     Open Access  
Papeles de Trabajo. Centro de Estudios Interdisciplinarios en Etnolingüística y Antropología Socio-Cultural     Open Access  
Trace     Open Access  
Interações (Campo Grande)     Open Access  
Journeys     Full-text available via subscription  
human_ontogenetics     Hybrid Journal  

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Similar Journals
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Journal of World Prehistory
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.022
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 34  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-7802 - ISSN (Online) 0892-7537
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Global Patterns in Island Colonization during the Holocene

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      Abstract: Abstract Analysis of the spatial and temporal structure of global island colonization allows us to frame the extent of insular human cultural diversity, model the impact of common environmental factors cross-culturally, and understand the contribution of island maritime societies to big historical processes. No such analysis has, however, been undertaken since the 1980s. In this paper we review and update global patterns in island colonization, synthesizing data from all the major island groups and theaters and undertaking quantitative and qualitative analysis of these data. We demonstrate the continued relevance of certain biogeographic and environmental factors in structuring how humans colonized islands during the Holocene. Our analysis also suggests the importance of other factors, some previously anticipated—such as culturally ingrained seafaring traditions and technological enhancement of dispersal capacity—but some not, such as the relationship between demographic growth and connectivity, differing trophic limitations impinging on colonizing farmers versus hunter-gatherer-foragers, and the constraining effects of latitude. We also connect colonization with continental dynamics: both the horizontal transmission of farming lifestyles earlier in the Holocene, and subsequent centrifugal processes associated with early state formation later in the Holocene.
      PubDate: 2022-10-05
       
  • Metapopulation Processes in the Long-Term Colonization of the Andean
           Highlands in South America

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper analyses the importance of the South Central Andean High Puna megapatch, above 4000 masl, in the history of late Pleistocene exploration and colonization of the Atacama Desert, including the contrasting habitats that exist towards the hyperarid Pacific Ocean coast or the ecosystems bordering the tropical forests, on the western and eastern sides of the Andes, respectively. These ecosystems, which were firmly established by the end of the Pleistocene, are examined as key factors in the history of human peopling. The social, demographic and climate conditions associated with the peopling processes are discussed in relation to the appropriate technological, subsistence and settlement strategies developed by pioneer populations, who for their initial settlement selected highly productive patches where water and fauna converged. Based on concepts derived from metapopulation theory, all relevant archaeological paleoecological data from both sides of the Andean Cordillera are presented and discussed. It is concluded that the pioneer occupation of the high Puna megapatch was a gradual process, related to an emergent Andean human mobility system that connected a wide range of altitudinally staggered habitats. Moreover, we suggest that divergent cultural trajectories evolved since the early Holocene, affecting highland, lowland and coastal habitats.
      PubDate: 2022-07-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s10963-022-09167-x
       
  • Was the Fishing Village of Lepenski Vir Built by Europe’s First
           Farmers'

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      Abstract: Abstract It is now widely accepted that agriculture and settled village life arrived in Europe as a cultural package, carried by people migrating from Anatolia and the Aegean Basin. The putative fisher-forager site of Lepenski Vir in Serbia has long been acknowledged as an exception to this model. Here, the Mesolithic–Neolithic transition—possibly inspired by interaction with the new arrivals—was thought to have taken place autochthonously on site. Our reinterpretation, based on ancient genomes, as well as archaeological and isotopic evidence, indicates that here, too, house construction, early village society and agriculture were primarily associated with Europe’s first farmers, thus challenging the long-held view of Lepenski Vir as a Mesolithic community that adopted Neolithic practices. Although aspects of the site's occupation, such as the trapezoidal houses, were inspired by local Mesolithic traditions, it is far from certain that the village was founded by Iron Gates foragers. A detailed timeline of population changes at the site suggests that Aegean incomers did not simply integrate into an established Mesolithic society, but rather founded new lineages and households. Iron Gates foragers and their admixed descendants largely appear to have been buried separately, on the fringes of the settlement. The diet of those buried outside in pits shows no major shift from aquatic to terrestrial food resources.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • The First ‘Urnfields’ in the Plains of the Danube and the Po

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      Abstract: Abstract Archaeological research is currently redefining how large-scale changes occurred in prehistoric times. In addition to the long-standing theoretical dichotomy between ‘cultural transmission’ and ‘demic diffusion’, many alternative models borrowed from sociology can be used to explain the spread of innovations. The emergence of urnfields in Middle and Late Bronze Age Europe is certainly one of these large-scale phenomena; its wide distribution has been traditionally emphasized by the use of the general term Urnenfelderkultur/zeit (starting around 1300 BC). Thanks to new evidence, we are now able to draw a more comprehensive picture, which shows a variety of regional responses to the introduction of the new funerary custom. The earliest ‘urnfields’ can be identified in central Hungary, among the tell communities of the late Nagyrév/Vatya Culture, around 2000 BC. From the nineteenth century BC onwards, the urnfield model is documented among communities in northeastern Serbia, south of the Iron Gates. During the subsequent collapse of the tell system, around 1500 BC, the urnfield model spread into some of the neighbouring regions. The adoption, however, appears more radical in the southern Po plain, as well as in the Sava/Drava/Lower Tisza plains, while in Lower Austria, Transdanubia and in the northern Po plain it seems more gradual and appears to have been subject to processes of syncretism/hybridization with traditional rites. Other areas seem to reject the novelty, at least until the latest phases of the Bronze Age. We argue that a possible explanation for these varied responses relates to the degree of interconnectedness and homophily among communities in the previous phases.
      PubDate: 2022-03-18
      DOI: 10.1007/s10963-022-09164-0
       
  • Landscapes for Neolithic People in Mainland, Orkney

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      Abstract: Abstract Neolithic occupation of the Orkney Islands, in the north of Scotland, probably began in the mid fourth millennium cal BC, culminating in a range of settlements, including stone-built houses, varied stone-built tombs and two noteworthy stone circles. The environmental and landscape context of the spectacular archaeology, however, remains poorly understood. We applied the Multiple Scenario Approach (MSA) to Neolithic pollen records from Mainland, Orkney, in order to understand land cover and landscape openness across the timespan 4200–2200 cal BC. Interpreted within a framework provided by Bayesian chronological modelling, 406 radiocarbon dates from archaeological contexts and a further 103 from palaeoenvironmental samples provide the basis for the first detailed reconstruction of the spatio-temporal patterns of Neolithic people and their environment. Major alterations to the land cover of Mainland took place from 3400 cal BC (reduction in woodland from 20% to 10%) and from 3200 cal BC (increase in disturbed land from 3% to 30%). The dramatic increase in disturbed land coincided with the Grooved Ware phenomenon and the establishment of settlements at Skara Brae and Ness of Brodgar. The upturn in the signal for disturbance communities in the pollen record may indicate an increase in the amount of land used as pasture. This accords with the archaeological record, since the Neolithic Orcadian economy probably relied heavily on cattle for subsistence. By 2800 cal BC in the core of the Orkney Mainland, most settlements appear to have been ending, with people dispersing into the wider landscape, as the MSA modelling indicates a maintenance of disturbed land, and indeed a subsequent slight increase, implying persistence of human activity elsewhere in Mainland. People exhausted themselves rather than their land; that and its varied resources endured, while the intensive social relationships and practices of the peak of late Neolithic Orkney could not be maintained.
      PubDate: 2022-03-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s10963-022-09166-y
       
  • The Use of Desert Kites as Hunting Mega-Traps: Functional Evidence and
           Potential Impacts on Socioeconomic and Ecological Spheres

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      Abstract: Abstract For almost a century there has been debate on the functional interpretation of desert kites. These archaeological structures have been interpreted as constructions for animal hunting or domestication purposes, sometimes for both, but with little conclusive evidence. Here, we present new evidence from a large-scale research programme. This unprecedented programme of archaeological excavations and geomatics explorations shows the unequivocal and probably exclusive function of kites as hunting traps. Considering their gigantic size, as well as the significant energy and organization required to build them, these types of traps are called mega-traps. Our research is based on five different field studies in Armenia, Jordan, Kazakhstan and Saudi Arabia, as well as on satellite imagery interpretation across the global distribution area of kites throughout the Middle East, the Caucasus and Central Asia. This hunting interpretation raises questions about the transformation of the landscape by human groups and the consequent anthropogenic impacts on local ecological equilibrium during different periods of the Holocene. Finally, the role of trapping in the hunting strategies of prehistoric, protohistoric and historic human groups is addressed.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10963-022-09165-z
       
  • Earliest Herders of the Central Sahara (Tadrart Acacus Mountains, Libya):
           A Punctuated Model for the Emergence of Pastoralism in Africa

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper focuses on a reassessment of the emergence of herding in Africa seen from the Tadrart Acacus and neighbouring regions in the Libyan central Sahara. The paper examines whether the presence of wild animals in the Early Holocene ‘green’ Sahara could have represented a ‘disease challenge’ to the spread of domestic livestock, as proposed for sub-Saharan Africa. Analysis of the zooarchaeological record and Saharan rock art highlights this potential threat also in North Africa, where it has hitherto been disregarded. Old and new data from the study area in SW Libya, with a focus on Takarkori rock shelter, highlight the presence of herding activity at a very early stage. Direct dating on bones of sheep/goat and cattle secures this chronology, providing evidence of a rapid ingression of small groups of herders who crossed Africa’s north-eastern quadrant around ~ 8300 years cal BP. This rapidity defies the ‘disease challenge’ hypothesis and suggests alternative scenarios. In the central Sahara, the cultural complexity of local Early Holocene hunter-gatherers and their delayed return system of resource exploitation could have facilitated the incorporation of new practices, including the herding of small numbers of domestic animals. The societal implications of the transition from hunting and gathering to herding are archaeologically better visible in the funerary record and in rock art. By contrast, both material culture and the subsistence basis seem to demonstrate continuity with the former foraging groups’ phase. Taken together, the Saharan evidence suggests a punctuated process of acculturation for the inception of food production in North Africa.
      PubDate: 2022-01-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s10963-021-09162-8
       
  • Complex Pathways Towards Emergent Pastoral Settlements: New Research on
           the Bronze Age Xindian Culture of Northwest China

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      Abstract: Abstract The Xindian culture of northwest China has been seen as a prototypical example of a transition toward pastoralism, resulting in part from environmental changes that started around 4000 years ago. To date, there has been little available residential data to document how and whether subsistence strategies and community organization in northwest China changed following or in association with documented environmental changes. The Tao River Archaeology Project is a collaborative effort aimed at gathering robust archaeological information to solidify our baseline understanding of economic, technological, and social practices in the third through early first millennia BC. Here we present data from two Xindian culture residential sites, and propose that rather than a total transition to nomadic pastoralism—as it is often reconstructed—the Xindian culture reflects a prolonged period of complex transition in cultural traditions and subsistence practices. In fact, communities maintained elements of earlier cultivation and animal-foddering systems, selectively incorporating new plants and animals into their repertoire. These locally-specific strategies were employed to negotiate ever-changing environmental and social conditions in the region of developing ‘proto-Silk Road’ interregional interactions.
      PubDate: 2022-01-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10963-021-09160-w
       
  • Resilient Social Actors in the Transition from the Late Bronze to the
           Early Iron Age on Cyprus

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      Abstract: Abstract Our understanding of the earliest Iron Age on Cyprus has long remained somewhat obscure. This is the result of both a relative lack of material evidence and the fact that scholarly attention has focused more on the preceding Late Bronze Age and on the subsequent Cypro-Archaic period. As more, and more varied, data have accumulated, there have been calls for a more theoretically informed approach to considering the social changes involved, and even for prehistorians to extend their work into the Cypriot Iron Age. As a response to this, the present study considers a broad range of material and documentary evidence, attempts to reconstruct the political economy, and offers an interpretative framework based on social understandings of Complex Adaptive Systems theory. Using this approach, the authors conclude that, while the enduring realities of Cyprus—its geography, copper resources and long tradition of agropastoralism—continued to shape Cypriot culture, the Iron Age is not simply a continuation of its Bronze Age sociopolitical forms. We argue instead that the earliest Iron Age involved social actors negotiating new politico-economic agendas in response to changing conditions in the Iron Age eastern Mediterranean.
      PubDate: 2021-12-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s10963-021-09163-7
       
  • Seeking Horses: Allies, Clients and Exchanges in the Zhou Period
           (1045–221 BC)

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      Abstract: Abstract Horses and chariots—and the associated technology and expertise—derived from the steppe contributed to the success of the Zhou conquest of the Shang in c. 1045 BC and remained important throughout Zhou rule in ancient China. On the basis of material cultural patterns, including the style and material used in bridle cheek-pieces found in tombs of the late second and early first millennium BC, this paper points to a northern origin for Zhou horses. Important intermediaries, providing these horses, were the clans whose cemeteries have been identified on the northern edges of the Central Plains. The necessity for repeated exchanges bringing south horses from the north was a consequence of key environmental differences between the steppe and the Central Plains, including climate, geomorphology, essential soil nutrients, and land use. These created significant difficulties in sustainably breeding and pasturing horses of quality. As a result, the people of the Central Plains were bound, over millennia, to seek horses from the northwest, along a cultural corridor that also moved northern materials and technologies, such as gold-, iron- and some bronze-working, into the Central Plains from the steppes.
      PubDate: 2021-12-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s10963-021-09161-9
       
  • Radiocarbon Dated Trends and Central Mediterranean Prehistory

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper reviews the evidence for long term trends in anthropogenic activity and population dynamics across the Holocene in the central Mediterranean and the chronology of cultural events. The evidence for this has been constituted in a database of 4608 radiocarbon dates (of which 4515 were retained for analysis following initial screening) from 1195 archaeological sites in southern France, Italy and Malta, spanning the Mesolithic to Early Iron Age periods, c. 8000 to 500 BC. We provide an overview of the settlement record for central Mediterranean prehistory and add to this an assessment of the available archaeological radiocarbon evidence in order to review the traditional narratives on the prehistory of the region. This new chronology has enabled us to identify the most significant points in time where activity levels, population dynamics and cultural change have together caused strong temporal patterning in the archaeological record. Some of these episodes were localized to one region, whereas others were part of pan-regional trends and cultural trajectories that took many centuries to play out fully, revealing prehistoric societies subject to collapse, recovery, and continuing instability over the long-term. Using the radiocarbon evidence, we model growth rates in the various regions so that the tempo of change at certain points in space and time can be identified, compared, and discussed in the context of demographic change. Using other published databases of radiocarbon data, we have drawn comparisons across the central Mediterranean to wider prehistoric Europe, and northern Africa. Finally, we include a brief response to the synchronously published but independently developed paper (Palmisano et al. in J World Prehist 34(3), 2021). While there are differences in our respective approaches, we share the general conclusions that large-scale trends can been identified through meta-analyses of the archaeological record, and these offer new perspectives on how society functioned.
      PubDate: 2021-10-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s10963-021-09158-4
       
  • Long-Term Demographic Trends in Prehistoric Italy: Climate Impacts and
           Regionalised Socio-Ecological Trajectories

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      Abstract: Abstract The Italian peninsula offers an excellent case study within which to investigate long-term regional demographic trends and their response to climate fluctuations, especially given its diverse landscapes, latitudinal range and varied elevations. In the past two decades, summed probability distributions of calibrated radiocarbon dates have become an important method for inferring population dynamics in prehistory. Recent advances in this approach also allow for statistical assessment of spatio-temporal patterning in demographic trends. In this paper we reconstruct population change for the whole Italian peninsula from the Late Mesolithic to the Early Iron Age (10,000–2800 cal yr BP). How did population patterns vary across time and space' Were fluctuations in human population related to climate change' In order to answer these questions, we have collated a large list of published radiocarbon dates (n = 4010) and use this list firstly to infer the demographic trends for the Italian peninsula as a whole, before addressing each of five sub-regions in turn (northern, central, and southern Italy, Sicily, Sardinia). We also compare population fluctuations with local paleoclimate proxies (cave, lake, marine records). At a pan-regional scale, the results show a general rapid and substantial increase in population in the Early Neolithic with the introduction of farming at around 8000 cal yr BP and further dramatic increases during the Bronze and Iron Age (~ 3800–2800 cal yr BP). However, different regional demographic trajectories exist across different regions of Italy, suggesting a variety of localised human responses to climate shifts. Population and climate appear to have been more closely correlated during the early–mid Holocene (Mesolithic–Neolithic), while later in the Holocene (Bronze–Iron Ages) they decouple. Overall, across the Holocene the population dynamics varied by region and depended on the long-term socio-ecological dynamics prevailing in a given area. Finally, we include a brief response to the paper ‘Radiocarbon dated trends and central Mediterranean prehistory’ by Parkinson et al. (J Word Prehist 34(3), 2021)—synchronously published by Journal of World Prehistory but wholly independently developed—indicating how our conclusions accord with or differ from one another.
      PubDate: 2021-10-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s10963-021-09159-3
       
  • The Western Periphery of the Red Sea as a Hominin Habitat and Dispersal
           Corridor: Marginal or Central'

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      Abstract: Abstract The Western Periphery of the Red Sea (WPRS) is an important region for paleoanthropological discussions about the history of hominin dispersal out of Africa. This paper examines the existing Paleolithic evidence in the region and some key aspects of its environmental setting, with the goal of assessing its role in hominin survival and dispersals. The paper’s chronological focus is the span 1.8–0.05 million years ago (Ma). Although the majority of the Paleolithic (Stone Age) sites so far documented in the region lack precise chronological control, the available evidence comprises Acheulean, Middle and Later Stone Age technocomplexes that can be broadly linked to distinct hominin settlement episodes. Most of the documented sites appear to be related to terrestrial niche exploitation around channelized alluvial plains between the coastal zone and the eastern slopes of the Red Sea Hills, although wave erosion may have destroyed sites associated with coastal resource use. As an extension of the East African Rift system, the WPRS mirrors the landscape features of the fossil-rich Rift Valley region, with the addition of a coastal niche. Thus, it may have posed little survival risk for hominins coming from the inland habitats, and some of the inhabitant populations may have easily dispersed toward Eurasia from there.
      PubDate: 2021-08-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s10963-021-09157-5
       
  • Early Balkan Metallurgy: Origins, Evolution and Society, 6200–3700
           BC

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper analyses and re-evaluates current explanations and interpretations of the origins, development and societal context of metallurgy in the Balkans (c. 6200–3700 BC). The early metallurgy in this region encompasses the production, distribution and consumption of copper, gold, tin bronze, lead and silver. The paper draws upon a wide range of existing archaeometallurgical and archaeological data, the diversity and depth of which make the Balkans one of the most intensively investigated of all early metallurgical heartlands across the world. We focus specifically on the ongoing debates relating to (1) the independent invention and innovation of different metals and metal production techniques; (2) the analysis and interpretation of early metallurgical production cores and peripheries, and their collapses; and (3) the relationships between metals, metallurgy and society. We argue that metal production in the Balkans throughout this period reflects changes in the organisation of communities and their patterns of cooperation, rather than being the fundamental basis for the emergence of elites in an increasingly hierarchical society.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10963-021-09155-7
       
  • Bronze Age Globalisation and Eurasian Impacts on Later Jōmon Social
           Change

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      Abstract: Abstract From northern China, millet agriculture spread to Korea and the Maritime Russian Far East by 3500–2700 BC. While the expansion of agricultural societies across the Sea of Japan did not occur until around 900 BC, the intervening period saw major transformations in the Japanese archipelago. The cultural florescence of Middle Jōmon central Honshu underwent a collapse and reorganisation into more decentralised settlements. Mobility increased as Late Jōmon influences spread from eastern into western Japan, and populations expanded to offshore islands such as Okinawa and the Kurils. In Kyushu and other parts of western Japan, the eastern Jōmon expansion was associated with the cultivation of adzuki and soybeans but, contrary to earlier assessments, there is no evidence for the introduction of cereal crops at this time. Here, we analyse archaeological and historical linguistic evidence of connections between the Eurasian mainland and the Japanese Islands c. 3500 to 900 BC. A re-evaluation of archaeological material discussed since the 1920s concludes that the transformations in Jōmon society during this period were at least in part a response to contacts with Eurasian Bronze Age cultures. Evidence for linguistic contact between Koreanic and the Ainuic languages which are presumed to have been spoken by Jōmon populations is also consistent with new Bronze Age mobilities. Although prehistoric Japan was one of the most isolated regions of Eurasia, we conclude that the historical evolution of societies in the Japanese archipelago after the third millennium BC was linked with processes of Bronze Age globalisation.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10963-021-09156-6
       
  • The Origins of the Apple in Central Asia

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      Abstract: Abstract The study of agricultural origins has been revolutionized by genomic science. Whole genome sequencing of plant domesticates opens a door to multiple new approaches by which the timing, nature, and geography of human selective pressures on the evolution of domesticated species might be detected. These new scientific pathways greatly enhance understandings of domestication as an evolutionary process, but they also renew long-standing questions for archaeologists about whether and how to perceive human agency in the ancient past of human–plant interspecies relations. Due to its importance as a global commercial crop, the apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.) was the tenth plant genome to be successfully sequenced in 2010. The genomic record of the apple reveals a deep history of human–plant co-evolution by unconscious selection, domestication through hybridization, and a phylogeographic origin in Central Asia. The first two of these insights document a domesticate that has evolved from protracted and unconscious processes, but the third—the identification of the progenitor Malus sieversii (Ledeb.) M. Roem. in Central Asia, and the necessary corollary that its hybridization arose along the ‘Silk Road’—invites further discussion about the roles of human agency and intentionality in the initial stages of plant domestication. This paper presents a review of apple domestication studies in archaeology and genetics and considers the problematic of Central Asia and the Silk Road in the current paradigm shift of agricultural origins research.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10963-021-09154-8
       
  • Temporal trends in the Colonisation of the Pacific: Palaeodemographic
           Insights

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      Abstract: Abstract The colonisation of eastern parts of the Pacific Islands was the last phase in the preindustrial expansion of the human species. Given the scale and challenges of the endeavour it is unsurprising that scholars have long been interested in understanding the conditions that drove and supported the exploration and settlement of this vast region. There has been speculation as to the influence of demographic factors, either as drivers or in some way regulating the rate and success of human expansion, but testing this has proven challenging. This study evaluates two hypotheses of population dynamics: the adaptation/resilience hypothesis, which proposes that populations respond to localised environmental conditions and changes in subsistence strategy, technology, differences in pathogen loads, and other events that occur at different times in different places; and the temporal hypothesis, which proposes that populations respond to major events such as climate change that occur in a region at an absolute point in, or over an absolute period of, time (noting that the two hypotheses are not mutually exclusive). Applying new methods for estimating the rate of natural population increase from human skeletal remains, this study utilised 23 samples to evaluate trends in population increase following the human expansion into the region. The results indicate a trend in population growth following colonisation, with initially high population growth, followed by a significant decrease and subsequently an increase in growth rates. The lack of a temporal trend may represent a high degree of heterogeneity in the impacts of climate change on individual archipelagos and islands.
      PubDate: 2021-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10963-021-09152-w
       
  • Dogs that Ate Plants: Changes in the Canine Diet During the Late Bronze
           Age and the First Iron Age in the Northeast Iberian Peninsula

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      Abstract: Abstract We studied 36 dogs (Canis familiaris) from the Can Roqueta site in the Catalan pre-littoral depression (Barcelona), dated between the Late Bronze Age and the First Iron Age (1300 and 550 cal BC). We used a sample of 27 specimens to analyse the evolution of the dogs’ diet based on the carbon δ13C and nitrogen δ15N isotope composition. The results show a marked human influence in that these natural carnivores display a highly plant-based diet. The offset between canids and herbivorous ungulates does not reach the minimum established for a trophic level, which implies an input of C3 and C4 (millet) cultivated plants. Moreover, the homogeneity in the values indicates that humans prepared their dogs’ food.
      PubDate: 2021-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10963-021-09153-9
       
  • Bronze Metallurgy in Southeast Asia with Particular Reference to Northeast
           Thailand

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      Abstract: Abstract The long-awaited definitive chronology for the period from the initial use of bronze metallurgy to the end of the Iron Age on the Khorat Plateau of Northeast Thailand has received near universal acceptance. In this review, we trace how bronze was deployed, and assess its social impact from the late Neolithic communities that first encountered metal to the civilization of Angkor. We identify eight phases that, for the prehistoric period, centred on the anchor site of Ban Non Wat, beginning in the eleventh century BC with imported copper axes and the opening of the first mines and associated smelting sites. This was followed in the second and third phases of the Bronze Age by a dramatic increase in mortuary wealth in the graves of social aggrandizers. After about eight generations, bronzes were locally cast in bivalve moulds. However, no further elite burials were found and bronze mortuary offerings were very rare. From about 400 BC, the opening of seaborne exchange networks, the establishment of dynastic China and climatic change then stimulated marked regionality. On the Khorat Plateau, many more bronzes were interred with the dead, but casting activity in the consumer sites declined. In the early centuries AD, increased aridity stimulated an agricultural revolution as sites were ringed by reservoirs and wet rice was grown in ploughed fields. This was accompanied by a surge in the range and number of bronzes with the new social elite that within a century led to the formation of early states. The new royalty now sponsored bronze statues, leading directly on to the dynastic foundries of Angkor, when massive bronzes reflected royal divinity.
      PubDate: 2021-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10963-020-09151-3
       
  • Beyond the Bounds of Western Europe: Paleolithic Art in the Balkan
           Peninsula

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      Abstract: Abstract Paleolithic art offers unique perspectives on prehistoric societies and cultures. It is also considered a key component of modern human behavior. Until recently, Paleolithic artworks were thought to be geographically restricted to a very few areas, especially southwestern Europe. Discoveries of art in other parts of Europe and other parts of the globe have challenged this vision, expanding the documented distribution of this important cultural phenomenon. As a consequence, there has been renewed interest in less well-known areas, with the goal of determining whether the current lack of art is a reflection of a past reality, the product of limited research, or a matter of preservation. One of these regions is the Balkan Peninsula, a key area for understanding Upper Paleolithic societies given its location at the crossroads of several migration routes into Europe. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the Paleolithic symbolic products, including both rock art and portable art from the Balkans. Recent research has led to new discoveries and insights into the symbolism of this long-neglected area. The present review, combining existing literature and new fieldwork, sheds new light on social and cultural interactions in this part of the continent and leads to a better understanding of its role within the European Upper Paleolithic cultural sphere.
      PubDate: 2020-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10963-020-09147-z
       
 
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