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  Subjects -> ANTHROPOLOGY (Total: 398 journals)
Showing 1 - 90 of 90 Journals sorted by number of followers
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 370)
Global Change, Peace & Security: formerly Pacifica Review: Peace, Security & Global Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 304)
Cultural Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 200)
Annual Review of Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 192)
Current Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 190)
American Anthropologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 167)
Ethnography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 95)
Ethnos: Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
American Ethnologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Journal of Anthropological Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Anthropology Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Anthropological Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53)
History and Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Social Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Contemporary Ethnography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Human Development: A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Memory Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Critique of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
American Journal of Physical Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Discourse Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Social Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of World Prehistory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Qualitative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Medical Anthropology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Ethnology : An International Journal of Cultural and Social Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of African History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Anthropology & Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Anthropological Review     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Medical Anthropology: Cross-Cultural Studies in Health and Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Archaeology, Ethnology and Anthropology of Eurasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Anthropological Forum: A journal of social anthropology and comparative sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Ethnohistory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Anthropology & Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
African Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Museum Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Human Evolution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
City & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
African and Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Anthropology of the Middle East     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Material Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Australian Historical Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
French Politics, Culture & Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
American Journal of Primatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Anthropology & Archeology of Eurasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Evolutionary Anthropology Issues News and Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Anthropological Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Pragmatics & Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Ethos     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Field Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Anthropology of Work Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Visual Anthropology: Published in cooperation with the Commission on Visual Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Culture & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Anthropology & Humanism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Latin American & Caribbean Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Mental Health, Religion & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Archeological Papers of The American Anthropological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Buildings & Landscapes: Journal of the Vernacular Architecture Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Anthropology Now     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Cultural Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Linguistic Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Reviews in Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Visual Anthropology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Anthropology in Action : Journal for Applied Anthropology in Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Food and Foodways: Explorations in the History and Culture of     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Dialectical Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Museum Anthropology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Asian and African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Geografiska Annaler, Series B : Human Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Ethnomusicology Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Tourism Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Cultural History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Anthropology News     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Anthropological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
E&G Quaternary Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Anthropology of Consciousness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
L'Homme     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cahiers d’études africaines     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
African American Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
East Central Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
POLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Osteoarchaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Anthropologie et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Progress in Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asian Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
L'Anthropologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Antiquaries Journal, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Historical Biology: An International Journal of Paleobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Transforming Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Myth & Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Chinese Sociology & Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Collaborative Anthropologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Transcultural Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Ateliers d'anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Focaal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Cultural Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Levant     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Anthropologie et santé     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anthropological Journal of European Cultures     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Turcica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Human Organization     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Primates     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Australian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Histories of Anthropology Annual     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Modern Greek Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Gradhiva     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Civilisations     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Oceania     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Arctic Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Polynesian Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal des anthropologues     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Canadian Studies/Revue d'études canadiennes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Quotidian : Dutch Journal for the Study of Everyday Life     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cuadernos de Antropologia Social     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
The Australian Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Acta Ethnographica Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Listening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Terrain     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Exchange     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
General Anthropology Bulletin of The General Anthropology Division     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Gesture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Social Science Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Burma Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Revista de Antropologia     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Alteridades     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Anatomical Science International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Socio-anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
South Asian Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Quaternaire     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Behemoth     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
South Asian Diaspora     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Images re-vues : histoire, anthropologie et théorie de l'art     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Antipoda : Revista de Antropología y Arqueología     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Recherches sociologiques et anthropologiques     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Durkheimian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
HOMO - Journal of Comparative Human Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bulletin de l’APAD     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Estudios Atacameños     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
L'Atelier du CRH     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Transnational American Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Structure and Dynamics: eJournal of Anthropological and Related Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Zoosystematics and Evolution - Mitteilungen Aus Dem Museum Fur Naturkunde Zu Berlin     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cadernos de Estudos Africanos     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. Ciências Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuicuilco     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Desacatos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Andes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Boletin de Antropologia Universidad de Antioquia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indiana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Antropologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tabula Rasa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal for the Anthropology of North America (JANA)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Southwest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cahiers de l'Urmis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Totem : The University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tipití : Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethnographic Praxis in Industry Conference     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intersecciones en Antropologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chungara (Arica) - Revista de Antropologia Chilena     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Apparence(s)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Terrae Incognitae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Nuevo mundo mundos nuevos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Scripta Ethnologica     Open Access  
Revista de Antropología Social     Open Access  
Mitologicas     Open Access  
Liminar. Estudios Sociales y Humanisticos     Open Access  
Avá. Revista de Antropologia     Open Access  
Treballs de Sociolingüística Catalana     Open Access  
Anthropologischer Anzeiger     Full-text available via subscription  
Mélanges de la Casa de Velázquez     Partially Free  
Recherches amérindiennes au Québec     Full-text available via subscription  
Runa : Archivo para las Ciencias del Hombre     Open Access  
Papeles de Trabajo. Centro de Estudios Interdisciplinarios en Etnolingüística y Antropología Socio-Cultural     Open Access  
Trace     Open Access  
Interações (Campo Grande)     Open Access  
Journeys     Full-text available via subscription  
human_ontogenetics     Hybrid Journal  

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Anthropological Theory
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.739
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 42  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1463-4996 - ISSN (Online) 1741-2641
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • Semiotic vista

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Carter E. Timon
      Abstract: Anthropological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Throughout life, one may witness grand views, scenes accompanied by intense affect and a sense of awe or wonder. The awe-inspiring things in these experiences vary considerably from suns in sunsets to glowing visages in holy visions to juices in simple tangerines. For different people, different views along the broad spectrum of these affectively intensive grand-view experiences can produce meaning in life, the influential facet of wellbeing identified by positive psychologists but poorly differentiated from meaning-making in other senses. This paper lays out a theory of semiotic vista to organize such disparate signification events and their use of both linguistic and non-linguistic signs. Using the examples of accounts of mountain hiking experiences, mindfulness meditation experiences, and supernatural encounters, I describe semiotic vista as a transitional mode of semiotic viewing in which agents re-interpret multiple signifiers of ordinary phenomena (objects) as valorized components of novel contexts, typically in association with intense affective experience. The vista mode is heavily facilitated by the (re)generation of at least two primary types of first-order indexical interpretants which occur in these contexts and of their attendant second-order indexicality which (semi)permanently re-contextualizes the objects originally referenced in the same view. I also briefly touch on how this process relates to storytelling and audience reactions. This analysis has implications for wellbeing, positive affect generation, and ideological enregisterment.
      Citation: Anthropological Theory
      PubDate: 2022-11-21T05:21:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14634996221130555
       
  • Imagination theory: Anthropological perspectives

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      Authors: Ingo Rohrer, Michelle Thompson
      Abstract: Anthropological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      The term imagination and its derivatives often serve as points of departures, yet a concise understanding of imagination in anthropology is lacking. In this paper, we argue for a contextualized anthropological approach to imagination; a complex notion which has been used to describe the human capacity to mentally (re)create that what is not materially present; the creative process of imagining; and the individual and social products of such a process. We address terminological particularities, conceptual differences, and related concepts in addition to discussing the importance of methods and the poetic imagination. In doing so, we consolidate and elaborate on previous analytical and conceptual works to provide a more explicit middle-range theory of imagination from an anthropological perspective. While we propose understanding imagination as a guiding action in situations of uncertainty or ignorance and emphasize focusing on everyday processes and practices, our discussions provide a framework to discuss and compare empirically grounded findings regarding imagination.
      Citation: Anthropological Theory
      PubDate: 2022-11-14T06:17:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14634996221129117
       
  • Climate change in the courtroom: An anthropology of neighborly relations

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      Authors: Noah Walker-Crawford
      Abstract: Anthropological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      This article follows a groundbreaking climate justice lawsuit between a Peruvian farmer and major energy company in a German court, a strategic political intervention addressing the inequities of global warming. The claim posits that the two are neighbors, meaning the company should take responsibility for contributing to climate change impacts in the Andes. Using this legal conception as a starting point to engage with academic discussions about sociality and moral responsibility, I establish neighborliness as an analytical framework for examining the moral stakes of social relations. Addressing the methodological and theoretical challenges of studying a phenomenon that draws connections across the planet, this approach allows for an ethnographically grounded understanding of global warming. Climate change expands the scope of social relations and raises the question of how we should live together on our planet. A focus on neighborliness foregrounds the normative claims through which people make sense of globalizing phenomena.
      Citation: Anthropological Theory
      PubDate: 2022-11-11T04:05:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14634996221138338
       
  • Over the ruins of subjects: A critique of subjectivism in anthropological
           discourse

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      Authors: Ricardo Santos Alexandre
      Abstract: Anthropological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      The present article develops a theoretical and philosophical critique of the subjectivist paradigm that grounds a good part of present-day anthropological discourse. The main thesis is that by placing the individual and its subjective experiences at the beginning and end of the anthropological discourse, one never thoroughly acknowledges and accepts our non-subjective and finite modes of being, thereby replicating a distorted and shallow picture of what we are as humans. The article explores, first, how that subjectivist paradigm came about, as well as some of its problems; secondly, it considers ethics and morality as the domain where one can better grasp the limits of subjectivist orientations; and concludes by turning to Heidegger's perspective on the ontological finitude of Dasein in order to emphasize the need for contemporary anthropology to build its reflections from within human finitude, that is, the frailties and the practical, analytic and moral limits of human existence.
      Citation: Anthropological Theory
      PubDate: 2022-10-18T06:36:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14634996221128079
       
  • The smell of bare death: Encountering life at the graveyard of Lampedusa

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      Authors: Alessandro Corso
      Abstract: Anthropological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      What smell does border death leave to the inhabitants of borderlands' Is the encounter with the dead bodies of the migrants who perished in the Mediterranean Sea telling in how we articulate discussions around (necro)politics at the external borders of Europe' Based on one-year of fieldwork on the island of Lampedusa (Southern Italy), Door to Europe, and frontier for irregular border crossing, I argue that border death has consequences for both the migrants and the inhabitants of borderlands. The paper will trace such consequences through the testimony of Vincenzo, the old cemetery gatekeeper of Lampedusa, the witness and bearer of knowledge around the nameless bodies buried in Lampedusa's cemetery since 1996. This approach will help considering the extent to which the encounter with migrants’ dead bodies – bare life in death – allows ethnographers to speak of the inherently violent system that scholars referred to as necropolitics or thanatopolitics, and the otherwise irreducible force of life, which manifests itself beyond any possible attempt to reduce it or silence it.
      Citation: Anthropological Theory
      PubDate: 2022-10-07T05:44:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14634996221128104
       
  • Calibrating home, hospitality and reciprocity in migration

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      Authors: Nicholas DeMaria Harney, Paolo Boccagni
      Abstract: Anthropological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Hospitality, as an analytic and a lived experience, is central to the day-to-day workings of home, and to managing the tensions and contradictions inherent in place attachment and appropriation on any scale – from the domestic to the national one. This emerges as a contentious and yet under-researched social question whenever newcomers such as immigrants and refugees lay some claim for guesthood. Following this premise, and based also on our fieldwork, this article outlines a conceptual argument for a joint understanding of home and hospitality in time and space. This leads us to conceptualize ‘calibrated hospitality’ to appreciate the ongoing dialectic between the spatial, temporal, and relational dimensions of the host–guest encounter in immigrant- and refugee-receiving societies. Looking at immigrant and refugee inclusion in terms of hospitality being claimed, negotiated, and possibly denied, relative to the theories and practices of ‘home’, opens an extensive conceptual terrain for social research that is more connected to foundational lived cultural idioms, and contextually more sensitive, than approaches based only on policy frames such as integration, or on formal entitlements such as access or residence rights.
      Citation: Anthropological Theory
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:09:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14634996221118140
       
  • The gift of waste: The diversity of gift practices among dumpster divers

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      Authors: Olli Pyyhtinen, Turo-Kimmo Lehtonen
      Abstract: Anthropological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      While the circular economy invites us to realize the potential of the so-called ‘waste-based commodity frontiers’, reintegration into capitalist value chains is not the only way for discards to be resurrected. In this article, we examine the ways in which the collective of dumpster divers is organized in relation to giving, receiving and reciprocating of various waste-gifts. Our intention is not only to expand existing theorizations of the gift to new domains but also to critically interrogate them, identify their limitations and explore what dumpster diving can teach us about the gift. In particular, the analysis foregrounds the heterogeneity of gift practices. Arguing against universal notions of the gift, the article proposes that waste assumes four main forms of gifts and relations among dumpster divers: givenness (parasitic relation); solidarity-based giving (relation of reciprocity); free giving (asymmetrical relation); and non-giving, as a withdrawal from returning the discards to nature conceived as an Other (the relation of non-relation).
      Citation: Anthropological Theory
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:09:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14634996221117318
       
  • On the surprising queerness of norms: Anthropology with Canguilhem,
           Foucault, and Butler

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      Authors: Thomas Hendriks
      Abstract: Anthropological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      “Norms” seem like a handy concept in the anthropological toolkit for describing, analyzing, and understanding ethnographic data. But contemporary anthropology rarely investigates the concept of the norm itself. This article critically examines norms as analytical constructs and argues for a more precise vocabulary that differentiates between related terms, such as “normality,” “normativity,” or “normalization,” that circulate loosely in anthropological discourse. To do so, it draws from Georges Canguilhem, Michel Foucault, and Judith Butler to show the affordances and pitfalls of their analytics for anthropologists. It particularly reveals the value of Canguilhemian understandings of normativity to keep us alive to the surprising queerness of norms in action.
      Citation: Anthropological Theory
      PubDate: 2022-08-12T06:12:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14634996221117755
       
  • The irony of development: Critique, complicity, cynicism

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      Authors: Benedikt Korf
      Abstract: Anthropological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Has development critique run out of steam' While a certain impasse can be noted between post-development theorists and development ethnographers, this article suggests to re-start the steam engine of development critique by attending to the “irony of development”, i.e. ironic predicaments that explain the sustenance of the development industry despite its persistent failures to live up to its aspirations. How one reads this “irony of successful failure” amounts to a question of how to practise critique, what position the critic takes and what ironic stances the critic intones. While post-development operates an external critique, development ethnographers practise an internal one. I propose to transform the latter into an immanent critique, which identifies “moral excess” as the constitutive function of the ironic predicaments inside the global development apparatus.
      Citation: Anthropological Theory
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T07:06:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14634996221115225
       
  • Future perfect: From the pandemic to the Paris climate agreement

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      Authors: Stuart Kirsch
      Abstract: Anthropological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Fifteen years ago, Jane Guyer (2007) argued that the near future had largely disappeared from collective imaginaries, replaced by longer-term horizons associated with evangelical Christianity and free market capitalism. While not seeking to repudiate Guyer, this article argues that recent developments have radically altered relationships to the future. It points to a previously unrecognized connection between two of the most significant challenges facing humanity today: the experience of living through a global pandemic and international efforts to limit the harmful consequences of climate change. Responses to both phenomena invoke the grammatical structure of the future perfect tense. During the pandemic, people began to imagine themselves living at a future moment in time when they have already resumed participating in those activities they have been prevented from undertaking, an example of the future perfect. The Paris Climate Agreement, which encourages states and other parties to take action in the present so that in the future they will already have saved the planet, also relies on the future perfect. In reaction to the pandemic and climate change, the near future has reemerged as a focal point of temporal attention. This article examines how the future appears in the present and the contribution of the future perfect tense to the creation of alternative futures.
      Citation: Anthropological Theory
      PubDate: 2022-06-27T06:40:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14634996221107961
       
  • The bewitchment of our intelligence: Scepticism about other minds in
           anthropology

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      Authors: Marco Motta
      Abstract: Anthropological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      This article aims at characterizing how the problem of scepticism about other minds appears in anthropology. To do so, I offer a close reading of Nils Bubandt's book, The Empty Seashell (2014), a study of witchcraft and doubt on the North Maluku Island of Halmahera. Through its deep engagement with issues revolving around scepticism, I take the book to be an example of the tendency to consider the problem of sceptical doubt about others as a problem of access to the inner thoughts and feelings of other people. By looking closely at its attempts to respond to this problem, I endeavour to shed light on the ways in which, in working the problem of scepticism out, we may be doing exactly the reverse: giving into the sceptical impulse. How does a certain way of asking questions about scepticism nourish the drive to it' I am interested in the drift towards scepticism that precisely takes the form of a claim against it. In showing that such a drift is prompted by a certain use of language, I hope to elucidate some ways in which scepticism is lived and is thus not merely an intellectual conundrum, but an ordinary human condition.
      Citation: Anthropological Theory
      PubDate: 2022-02-17T01:25:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14634996221080578
       
  • La critique est aisée, mais l’art est difficile. A critical
           anthropology put to the test of decolonization: Lessons from New Caledonia
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Natacha Gagné, Marie Salaün
      First page: 365
      Abstract: Anthropological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      This article focuses on anthropologists’ analyses of decolonization struggles in relationship to past and present movements for self-determination. We begin by highlighting the relevance of Georges Balandier's model of the “colonial situation” for the understanding of these struggles. Next, we show that, as Pierre Bourdieu, following Balandier, suggested, the analysis of these struggles cannot forego an analysis of the position of the researchers themselves in the situation. This brings to light the difficulty of constructing one's “atopic position” as a researcher in decolonization processes. We aim to show that the theoretical precepts which anthropologists adopt (and the precepts’ moral underpinnings) lead them to minimize or overlook the political aspects of decolonization processes. This involves a certain blindness to the concrete conditions—economic, social, and political—that have led to the situation in question. We explore in detail the example of “critical” analyses of the “Kanak People's School System” (École populaire kanak, EPK)—a nationalist Kanak project, aimed at decolonizing the New Caledonia school system in the mid-1980s. We also briefly look at “critical” interpretations of a recent initiative undertaken by a segment of the Kanak population involving the establishment of a written “customary law” in civil (and potentially criminal) matters, which tends to distance itself from the nationalist strategy.
      Citation: Anthropological Theory
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T09:03:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14634996221086461
       
  • The misperception of the environment: A critical evaluation of the work of
           Tim Ingold and an alternative guide to the use of the senses in
           anthropological theory

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      Authors: David Howes
      First page: 443
      Abstract: Anthropological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      This article presents a critical evaluation of the work of Tim Ingold from the standpoint of social and sensory anthropology. It acknowledges the novelty of the emphasis on enskillment, movement, process, and growth in Ingold's work. However, it is critical of his abstraction of the senses, which are rendered ‘interchangeable’, and of persons, who are reduced to generic individuals. Ingold's anthropology is shown to be pre-cultural and post-social at once, with the result that it fails to address the sociality of sensation and cultural mediation of perception. Ingold's doctrine of ‘direct perception’ is exposed as particularly problematic. In place of his emphasis on ‘the life of lines’, this article foregrounds the life of the senses, and in lieu of his diminution of the social, it acknowledges the politics of perception that inform most every perceptual act. The article concludes with a series of reflections on how to go about sensualizing anthropological theory and practicing sensory ethnography (i.e. the methodology of participant sensation).
      Citation: Anthropological Theory
      PubDate: 2022-03-03T10:13:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14634996211067307
       
  • Eleven Namibian rains: A phenomenological analysis of experience in time

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      Authors: Michael Schnegg
      Abstract: Anthropological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      The Damara pastoralists (ǂnūkhoen) in Namibia distinguish a diverse range of rains. Some rains kill livestock, others care for insects and still others wash away the footprints of the deceased, allowing the person to exist in the spirit realm. While anthropologists have documented cultural classifications like the Namibian rains for decades, we still lack a convincing theory to explain how they come to exist. To address this, I develop a phenomenological perspective and theorise how experience contributes to what rain becomes. I argue with Husserl that the present in which we experience the rain is not a discrete moment, but a unity across a succession of ‘nows’. In the process, perceptions, images, memories and expectations about past and future events blend. In other words, a web of meaningful relationships connects the rain we experience ‘now’ with multiple past and future entities, including people, plants, spirits and animals. I refer to this as network formation. Combining the analyses of the people's pastoral being-in-the-world and their historical–political context, including post-colonialism, allows an explanation as to why some of those combinations are singled out and become distinct ontological entities. I refer to this as node selection. Combining the two processes – network formation and node selection – allows for an explanation as to why precipitation becomes discernible and meaningful as eleven different Namibian rains.
      Citation: Anthropological Theory
      PubDate: 2021-08-09T01:22:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14634996211035365
       
  • Governing the future through scenaristic and simulative modalities of
           imagination

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      Authors: Limor Samimian-Darash
      First page: 393
      Abstract: Anthropological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, I examine several expressions of imaginative practices to unpack the umbrella term scenario. Drawing on my long-term fieldwork on Israel’s annual Turning Point exercises, I examine actual uses of scenarios and distinguish between two different logics of imaginative practices and the modalities in which the future is governed by them, which I refer to as the scenaristic and the simulative. As I demonstrate, these two modalities can be distinguished from each other in terms of their approaches to future uncertainty, their temporalities and the role of imagination within their enactment. To further conceptually develop the logics of imagination, I draw on Deleuze’s and Bergson’s discussions of the concept of fabulation, and I suggest that scenarios and simulations represent two different logics of future-governing that are based on practices of imagination.
      Citation: Anthropological Theory
      PubDate: 2021-05-21T12:51:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14634996211014116
       
  • Fabulous: Remarks on scenarism, simulations, and scenarios

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      Authors: James D Faubion
      First page: 417
      Abstract: Anthropological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      In “Governing the Future,” Limor Samimian-Darash does much to illuminate scenarism and the divergence between the simulations and the scenarios that constitute the chief apparatuses of anticipatory governance. She renders both of them fabulations, drawing the concept as well as the divergence between simulations and scenarios from the epistemological and ontological precedents that Henri Bergson and Gilles Deleuze have set. Her renderings are compelling, but leave many epistemological and ontological issues unresolved. I address three of these issues. First, it has to do with what sort of concept scenarism might be. Second, it has to do with the poetics of simulations and scenarios. Third, it has to do with the virtuality or actuality of simulations and scenarios, in their planning as in their enactments.
      Citation: Anthropological Theory
      PubDate: 2021-07-26T03:58:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14634996211033443
       
  • Corporate sovereignty: Negotiating permissive power for profit in Southern
           Africa

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      Authors: Tessa Diphoorn, Nikkie Wiegink
      First page: 422
      Abstract: Anthropological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      The growing engagement with sovereignty in anthropology has resulted in a range of concepts that encapsulate how various (non-state) actors execute power. In this paper, we further unpack the concept of ‘corporate sovereignty’ and outline its conceptual significance. Corporate sovereignty refers to performative claims to power undertaken by (individuals aligned to) corporate entities with profit-making objectives within a state-sanctioned space. This contrasts with claims made by other (non-state) actors who operate in a permissive space that (regularly) lacks this legally grounded relationship with the state. By unpacking this state-sanctioned permissive space and highlighting the role of the state as the arbiter, our approach to corporate sovereignty offers a new comparative analytical perspective to theorize how sovereignty is performed and opens ethnographic avenues to explore how sovereignty is negotiated and co-produced across diverse localities. To elucidate our argument, we draw from ethnographic fieldwork conducted on coal mining companies in Mozambique and private security companies in South Africa. By focusing on cases that differ, we want to show the multitude of ways in which corporate sovereignty is enacted and takes shape.
      Citation: Anthropological Theory
      PubDate: 2021-09-06T10:46:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14634996211037124
       
 
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