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  Subjects -> ANTHROPOLOGY (Total: 398 journals)
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Journal of Social Archaeology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.936
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 43  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1469-6053 - ISSN (Online) 1741-2951
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • Archaeology, Indigenous erasure, and the creation of white public space at
           the California missions

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      Authors: Lee M Panich
      First page: 149
      Abstract: Journal of Social Archaeology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores how the materiality of the past has been mobilized to simultaneously erase Indigenous presence and create white public space at Spanish mission sites in California. As the site of present-day Santa Clara University, Mission Santa Clara de Asís presents an important case study. The documentary record associated with more than a century of archaeology at the mission reveals its intersections with heritage-making, particularly the maintenance of public memory that privileges and valorizes whiteness. These same records further detail how the university and local residents effectively erased the heritage of the thousands of Ohlone people and members of neighboring Indigenous groups who lived, worked, and died at Mission Santa Clara. Recognizing how archaeology has contributed to the current heritage landscape at Santa Clara and other California mission sites is a necessary first step in the creation of new archaeological and heritage practices that center the experiences and persistence of Native Californian communities.
      Citation: Journal of Social Archaeology
      PubDate: 2022-01-08T03:24:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14696053211061675
       
  • Reconstructing narratives: The politics of heritage in contemporary Syria

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      Authors: Nour A. Munawar
      First page: 172
      Abstract: Journal of Social Archaeology, Ahead of Print.
      It is predominantly known that history is written by winners. However, this statement is true when a conflict has a symmetric tendency. In the case of Syria, where the conflict has been widely considered asymmetric, history is being written by a regime/government that won the war by not losing it. This article investigates the interconnection between heritage and politics in Syria by scrutinizing heritage practices, uses, and abuses since the colonial period. First, this article examines regime/government-led post-conflict reconstruction projects in the aftermath of Syria’s current conflict. Then the article moves on and explores the creation of war narratives and the selective memorialization of Syria’s recent conflict by looking at the portrayal of contested war memories in the media and the production of oral history. I argue that heritage practices, uses, presentation, and promotion in Syria since the colonial period have produced a politicized, one-sided (hi)story influenced by political agendas. This history includes highly politicized, ongoing tangible and intangible heritage reconstruction works, freighted with cultural meaning and primarily intended to bolster the power and authority of the ruling regime.
      Citation: Journal of Social Archaeology
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T11:47:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14696053221073992
       
  • Narrating from landscape in Andean archaeology: The problem with the suni
           natural region

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      Authors: Gabriel Ramón, Martha G Bell
      First page: 191
      Abstract: Journal of Social Archaeology, Ahead of Print.
      Archaeologists use the landscape to explain the past, often referring to traditional or indigenous knowledge to better understand that landscape. But how is this analogical process performed, and how is indigenous knowledge understood and recorded' This article examines Peruvian geographer Javier Pulgar Vidal’s concept of suni—a term with several definitions in Aymara and Quechua, but which was transformed by Pulgar Vidal into a “Natural Region,” in other words a meaningful portion of the landscape—as an entry point into this broader issue. Suni is important because it is a poorly defined part of a wider Andean landscape model supposedly based on indigenous knowledge and because it is commonly used by archaeologists to explain precolonial land use and landscapes. Through analysis of the creation and application of suni, we define major challenges faced by archaeologists when interpreting sites and materials in landscape perspective and present suggestions for moving forward.
      Citation: Journal of Social Archaeology
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T05:12:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14696053221094319
       
  • Sketchbook archaeology: Bodies multiple and the archives they create

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      Authors: Shannon A Novak
      First page: 212
      Abstract: Journal of Social Archaeology, Ahead of Print.
      Archaeological bodies and their afflictions have multiplied in recent years, along with the specialists who study them. The result is a cascade of data, much of it difficult to reconcile. I argue that variable enactments of disease, rather than reflecting an epistemological disconnect or difference in scale, engender ontological gaps. To pursue these malleable matters, I trace the proliferation of “cancer” from the Spring Street Presbyterian Church burial vaults (1820–1850) in Manhattan. To explore the struggles involved in making many things one, I consider emergent multiplicities of this “disease” within specialists’ laboratories, archival records, and the writing process. Rather than force these different cancers to cohere, or make one “win” based on disciplinary domain (science/humanities) or hierarchy of substance (bone/paper), I rely on Stengers’s (2018) ecology of partial connects. The outcome is not a rubric of knowledge gained, but a sketchbook of lessons learned with bodies multiple along the way.
      Citation: Journal of Social Archaeology
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T04:17:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14696053221102235
       
  • Minding the gap: Attempts at community archaeology and local
           counter-narratives at an archaeological site in Turkey

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      Authors: Sevil Baltalı Tırpan
      First page: 235
      Abstract: Journal of Social Archaeology, Ahead of Print.
      Community archaeologies should emerge from an awareness of the ways in which archaeological praxis is embedded with multiple pasts, subjectivities, materialities, and national and transnational histories. This longitudinal archaeological ethnography explores the lived experiences, perceptions of the past, and relationship to archaeology and archaeologists amongst villagers residing near the Kerkenes site in Turkey after attempts by the project to develop heritage awareness, a sustainable local economy, and collaborative management of the site within the community. However well-intentioned, considerable challenges to closing the gap in understanding between archaeologists and locals can arise when the efforts of archaeologists become entangled in larger socio-political frameworks beyond their control. Villagers have experienced being dehumanized as Muslim migrant workers in Europe and were Islamic-based nationalist supporters of the conservative Erdoğan regime. The archaeologists’ heritage-making practices inadvertently triggered symbolic associations of the project with the colonial endeavor. Locals produced counter-narratives about the site as a decolonizing response.
      Citation: Journal of Social Archaeology
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T09:49:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14696053221102911
       
  • Archaeology, land tenure, and Indigenous dispossession in Mexico

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      Authors: Sam Holley-Kline
      First page: 255
      Abstract: Journal of Social Archaeology, Ahead of Print.
      In this paper, I examine a case of dispossession that made land belonging to Indigenous Totonac residents of San Antonio Ojital part of the archaeological site of El Tajín. To do so, I examine the failure of a 2016 claim made to Mexico’s Comisión Nacional de Derechos Humanos. Rather than this being a case of purpose-driven dispossession or an unintended consequence of well-meaning policies, I trace the ultimate causes to multicultural recognition, 19th-century land reforms, and the expansion of archaeological research in El Tajín. Liberal land reforms brought a private property regime into being through enrollment and inscription, and Totonac landowners around El Tajín used the regime to their benefit. As El Tajín expanded though excavation, archaeologists and landowners used the private property regime’s conception of space to address conflicts in El Tajín. The resulting pragmatic accommodations would ultimately fail landowners when an archaeological megaproject came in. Ultimately, I argue for an historical and contextual understanding of archaeology and land tenure to understand the discipline’s diverse relationships with dispossession.
      Citation: Journal of Social Archaeology
      PubDate: 2022-07-08T06:25:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14696053221112608
       
  • Roman provincial sexualities: Constructing the body, sexuality, and gender
           through erotic lamp art

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      Authors: Sanja Vucetic
      First page: 277
      Abstract: Journal of Social Archaeology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores how replicated erotic art decorating terracotta lamps constructed sexual ideology in Roman provinces. Lamp imagery, through semantic combination of elements, generated sexual discourse in which certain bodies and actions visually articulated boundaries of ideal and non-ideal sexualities and associated practices. Mould-made replication helped sexual disc-reliefs communicate consistent ideas about sexuality, aiding cultural cohesion throughout the globalising empire. Lamp portability helped these ideas reach large audiences across vast geographies. Provincial communities, through selection of these objects, however, redefined Roman sexual discourse locally. The greatest difference is discernible between the Latin and Greek locales. In the Latin sites disc-reliefs generate meaning through idealised and dwarf symplegmata, whereas in the Greek East they do so through portrayals of idealised symplegma, mythological rapes, and bestiality. The paper demonstrates the plurality of provincial sexualities, the regional bases for their formation, and their implication in broader Roman colonial discourses.
      Citation: Journal of Social Archaeology
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T12:56:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14696053221109955
       
  • Staying local: Community formation and resilience in Archaic Southern
           Sicily

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      Authors: Matthias Hoernes
      First page: 296
      Abstract: Journal of Social Archaeology, Ahead of Print.
      In the 7th and 6th centuries BCE, Sicily saw migratory movements to and on the island, new power relations, and intercultural interconnections. In this environment, new communities emerged, existing communities were reconfigured and both were challenged to negotiate their lifeworlds. Drawing on concepts of community, locality and resilience, this paper examines how local communities in southern Sicily formed, consolidated their cohesion and demonstrated resilience, by taking a closer look at two sites and their burial grounds. Castiglione di Ragusa was located in a culturally diverse microregion, and yet the community maintained a steady consistency in burial practices and assemblages, while the community of Butera merged vessel depositions, cremations and differential body treatment in unique funerary conventions. The paper concludes that both communities mobilised social practices, material culture and cultural knowledge to create localised differences and built on these differences to forge and maintain a sense of belonging and boundedness.
      Citation: Journal of Social Archaeology
      PubDate: 2022-07-20T12:20:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14696053221114016
       
  • Symbolic kraals: Subterranean food stores, hidden wealth and ethnographic
           errors

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      Authors: Thembi Russell
      First page: 317
      Abstract: Journal of Social Archaeology, Ahead of Print.
      Iron Age studies in South Africa are dominated by Huffman’s (1982, 1986, 1993, 2001) ethnographically derived Central Cattle Pattern model, which identifies the cattle-based bridewealth institution of South Eastern Bantu-language speakers by the spatial distribution of specific archaeological features. The idea of the spatial expression ‘on the ground’ of a variety of symbolic codes was Adam Kuper’s (1980, 1982) interpretation of predominantly Swazi ethnography. Surprisingly, Kuper’s work has never been interrogated and consequently his misunderstanding of the ethnography was carried into the Central Cattle Pattern and interpretations of the last 1600 years of Iron Age, farmer archaeology in southern Africa. Two particular features, burials and subterranean grain storage pits, and their relationship to cattle-kraals are explored. Because cattle are central to the Central Cattle Pattern, much archaeological attention has been given to looking for evidence of cattle at archaeological sites, either by dung, bones or cattle-kraals. The paper presents the views of contemporary Swazi, Xhosa and Mfengu people that suggest the symbolic importance of cattle-kraals; in the extreme they may not reflect the presence of livestock at all, yet their persisting presence demonstrates the continuing importance of cattle, real or imagined.
      Citation: Journal of Social Archaeology
      PubDate: 2022-08-09T11:18:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14696053221117467
       
  • Domestication is not an ancient moment of selection for prosociality:
           Insights from dogs and modern humans

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      Authors: Robert J. Losey
      First page: 131
      Abstract: Journal of Social Archaeology, Ahead of Print.
      Domestication is often portrayed as a long-past event, at times even in archaeological literature. The term domestication is also now applied to other processes, including human evolution. In such contexts, domestication means selection for friendliness or prosociality and the bodily results of such selective choices. Both such perspectives are misleading. Using dogs and modern humans as entry points, this paper explores why conceiving of domestication as a threshold event consisting of selection for prosociality is both incomplete and inaccurate. Domestication is an ongoing process, not a moment or an achievement. Selection in breeding, including for prosociality, is a part of many domestication histories, but it alone does not sustain this process over multiple generations. Further, much selection in domestication has little to do with human intention. Care, taming, commensalism, material things, and places are critical in carrying domestic relationships forward.
      Citation: Journal of Social Archaeology
      PubDate: 2021-12-06T09:39:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14696053211055475
       
  • REMOVAL NOTICE: The Iron Age past in the archaeological present of
           southeastern Turkey

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      Abstract: Journal of Social Archaeology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Archaeology
      PubDate: 2019-07-07T12:28:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1469605319858449
       
 
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