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Journal of Material Culture
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.466
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 19  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1359-1835 - ISSN (Online) 1460-3586
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • Memorial ambiguity: A typology of rhetorical effects in Oklahoma and the
           wider US context

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      Authors: Nathan A Shank
      Abstract: Journal of Material Culture, Ahead of Print.
      Memorials and monuments often shape the narratives of public memory surrounding key events and figures, even as they help process and represent the trauma and remembered emotions that those subjects evoke. This essay develops a schema of four types of memorial ambiguity in order to provide more precise analytic tools for understanding memorials. Ambiguous physical representation, ambiguous messages, ambiguous emotions, and ambiguous political responses interrelate as parts of the rhetorical interpretation of memorials. Examples draw from national memorials such as the Iwo Jima Memorial in Washington, DC, and the USS Arizona Memorial in Hawai’i as well as regional examples like Oklahoma’s Yellow Ribbon Memorial commemorating a 1986 postal mass shooting and The Guardian atop Oklahoma’s state capitol. This typology matters to memorial scholars and memorial designers alike: those who seek to theorize memorials ought to have a more developed sense of the rhetorical nature of ambiguity, and those who seek to construct memorials ought to consider the possibly ambiguous effects of their design. Failure to understand memorial ambiguity can lead to forgotten or ineffective memorials.
      Citation: Journal of Material Culture
      PubDate: 2022-11-24T10:23:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591835221139675
       
  • Invasive materialities: War bunkers as disturbing nodes of collaboration

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      Authors: Mads Daugbjerg
      Abstract: Journal of Material Culture, Ahead of Print.
      This article discusses the qualities and affordances of the remaining World War II bunkers still found along Europe's Western coastline. Drawing on ethnographic and historical material from a Danish section of the line, and on my involvement in establishing an alternative film festival among these ruins, I explore the bunkers as ‘invasive’ materialities, that is, externally imposed structures, still conceived in various ways as foreign, intrusive or out of place. The bunkers continue to disturb the status quo, prompting different kinds of responses – of opposition and consternation but also certain kinds of allure and fascination. With the film festival as the main case, I trace the bunkers as products of various kinds of collaboration and as natural-cultural amalgams around which questions of protection, ownership, and rights come to matter, socially and materially. I argue that an ‘invasive’ analytics may further our understanding of the different relationships and agencies involved in these dynamics.
      Citation: Journal of Material Culture
      PubDate: 2022-11-17T06:30:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591835221136807
       
  • The absence that will not go away

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      Authors: Julie de Vos
      Abstract: Journal of Material Culture, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, I will explore the concepts of absence and presence in the context of the Francoist repression during the Spanish Civil War (1936–1939) and the following dictatorship (1939–1975) ruled by General Francisco Franco. My aim is to explore how this tension between absence and presence has been deliberately used as a repressive means in the construction of a new social order and how this has been materially maintained until the present day. To accomplish this, I will focus on Domanska's concept of non-absence (2006) and Kristeva's concept of abjection (1982). I intend to use observations of the material phenomenon from the field – in the context of mass graves and monuments – to discuss the concepts of absence and presence in the archaeological record and on a broader level. The Spanish case thereby serves as a ground for the emergence of a conceptual frame that serves as a tool for working on the ideas of absence and presence. Absence is undeniably an inherent part of archaeology and indeed, as so, and in the midst of the material turn, the role of absence should be paid as much attention as the presence of things. Even more so in specific archaeological contexts where certain presences are dominating the landscape deliberately excluding others.
      Citation: Journal of Material Culture
      PubDate: 2022-11-17T06:29:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591835221136806
       
  • Care in the air' Atmospheres of care in Swedish pharmacies

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      Authors: Rui Liu
      Abstract: Journal of Material Culture, Ahead of Print.
      This article builds upon literature on materialities of care and departs from a relational view of care and place. Using the concept of atmosphere, it investigates how care practices are situated spatially and temporally in pharmacies. In many countries, pharmacies are viewed as an important sector in formal healthcare systems. Rarely discussed in pharmacy literature is the affective and embodied aspect of care and care services. Drawing on an ethnographic study of Swedish pharmacies, I demonstrate that pharmaceutical care services are more than filling prescriptions and giving medical advice. Senses of care are partly accomplished through pharmacy staff's routinized and embodied engagement with the material environment. They also are performed through staff's tacit reading of customers. This article argues for an alternative understanding of care than an institutionally scripted one.
      Citation: Journal of Material Culture
      PubDate: 2022-10-18T07:02:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591835221133289
       
  • Local fashion, global imagination: Agency, identity, and aspiration in the
           diasporic Hmong community

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      Authors: Tian Shi
      Abstract: Journal of Material Culture, Ahead of Print.
      Dress has been used as a visual avowal of social status, personality, personal taste, identity, and philosophy throughout history. This article aims to assess the changing dress practices and understand the meaning of ethnic dress in the diasporic community in a super-connected era. This article examines the cultural–historical contexts that contribute to dress practices at the macro level and individuals’ perceptions at the micro level. This article demonstrates how the Hmong experience can contribute to the knowledge of dress as a vehicle of agency, identity, and aspiration in fashion and material culture studies. In doing so, this article provides new insights into a growing area of research by exploring the emotionality of materials in terms of how imagination and aspiration of ethnicity are inscribed in and ascribed to dress and clothing in diasporic groups.
      Citation: Journal of Material Culture
      PubDate: 2022-09-23T06:27:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591835221125113
       
  • Anthropological face casts: Towards an ethical processing of their
           histories and difficult legacies of intimacy and ambiguity

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      Authors: Gwyneira Isaac, Sadie Colebank
      Abstract: Journal of Material Culture, Ahead of Print.
      Anthropologically informed plaster face casts were created and collected in the 19th and 20th centuries as part of an effort to develop human typologies, and to acquire data on what were perceived to be the morphological attributes of race. Their subsequent affective, politically sensitive, promiscuously mobile, and precarious qualities have resulted in them occupying highly charged territories within collections, as well as between museums and descendant communities. They are objects with inherent ambiguities due to how they exist at the intersections of art and science, merging individual, cultural, political, and colonialized bodies. Casts also provide tangible traces of unwanted physical intimacy resulting from how colonized peoples often had no choice in being cast or handled by strangers. In recent years, however, they have also been used by descendent communities as memorials of family members. This article explores this potent intersection of ambiguity and intimacy that these casts occupy, arguing for ethical protocol for their treatment that acknowledges their history, colonial contexts, and the processes behind their creation, as well as their current re-socialization through renewed relationships with descendant communities.
      Citation: Journal of Material Culture
      PubDate: 2022-09-15T06:17:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591835221123995
       
  • Learning from the secondary: Rethinking architectural conservation through
           ‘barn architecture’

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      Authors: Iida Kalakoski, Sigrun Thorgrimsdottir
      Abstract: Journal of Material Culture, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores material culture and peoples’ engagement with built environments from the perspective of vernacular architecture, adaptive reuse and more specifically barn-inspired architecture. Departing from actual cases of conversions that involve material reuse and initiate a correspondence between various more-than-human actors and temporal dimensions, we join the debate around sustainable architecture. We understand sustainability rather as transmission than as arresting change, and we have taken into consideration a broad scope of heritage, including masses of unlisted and abandoned buildings. Adaptive reuse and other comparable forms of using and caring for the outworn existing building stock are practices intended to prolong the lifespan of material resources through reinterpretation. Through barn architecture, we suggest alternative approaches and concepts, such as mending and care, to both fields of architecture and architectural conservation.
      Citation: Journal of Material Culture
      PubDate: 2022-09-13T02:50:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591835221123953
       
  • From demon to deity: Forging a new iconography for Mahishasur

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      Authors: Moumita Sen
      Abstract: Journal of Material Culture, Ahead of Print.
      This article focuses on the forging of a new iconography for Mahishasur, a ‘demon’ in Hindu mythology who was reclaimed by indigenous communities both as a ‘god’ and as a champion of their political autonomy. The public political ritual of venerating Mahishasur was deemed blasphemous by the Hindu nationalist party in power. Among clay-modellers of Bengal, the dominant ‘demon’ image of Mahishasur embodies the highly-valued skill of Naturalistic sculpture; but the movement needed a new benevolent image. Through interviews with image-makers and organisers of this political ritual in several villages of West Bengal, I will show how local aesthetic ideals of masculinity, virtue, and political ideology are expressed in the new aesthetic form(s) and iconographies of this emerging hero of Indian politics.
      Citation: Journal of Material Culture
      PubDate: 2022-08-18T03:22:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591835221116708
       
  • Making “Senses”: The qualia of Pu’er tea and sensorial encounters
           between tea producers and traders in southwest China

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      Authors: Zhen Ma
      Abstract: Journal of Material Culture, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyses how Han buyers’ perception of and desire for the qualia—sensuous qualities—of Pu’er tea affects how ethnic minority producers perceive and make the tea. As a defining aspect of the consumers' experiences with ancient Pu’er tea, these qualia were invented and emphasised as part of the elite Chinese tea culture by Han traders and consumers. While the Bulang people's traditional way of making and using Pu’er tea related more to its economic and symbolic values than to its perceived effects on the body, in response to China's rapid marketisation they had to learn to sense the qualia rooted in a Han lexicon and philosophy and then acquire new skills to produce them. The paper argues that sensorial experience as a cultural dimension of tea has created new layers within Bulang people's encounters with the modern market.
      Citation: Journal of Material Culture
      PubDate: 2022-08-01T07:53:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591835211066811
       
  • Making a home in the world: Clothes as mnemonic devices through which
           refugees experience home in flight and resettlement

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      Authors: Charlot Schneider
      Abstract: Journal of Material Culture, Ahead of Print.
      How do refugees experience home not just in the country of settlement but also along their journeys of flight' Departing from theories that see home as something which is left behind in displacement, this paper explores how clothes act as important mnemonic devices, storing and archiving memories from different times and places, whilst connecting people to new places en route. Through the in-depth analysis of two refugees’ stories, this paper highlights that home is not a onetime accomplishment but a lived experience that people are continuously involved in, especially in times of upheaval and transformation as they search for a safer place to be in the world. Clothes, as one of the few materials that refugees carry, become central to this lived experience not only as semiotic devices, carrying different narratives of home, but also as sensual materials through which different sensations of home are carried, transformed, and negotiated.
      Citation: Journal of Material Culture
      PubDate: 2022-03-25T05:27:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591835221088512
       
  • Creels and catenary wires: Creating community through winter lights
           displays

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      Authors: Julia Bennett
      Abstract: Journal of Material Culture, Ahead of Print.
      Lighting up darkness is a material practice shared across many cultures. Lighting up winter darkness is a particular concern in urban areas in order to make urban spaces feel safer and more welcoming. Temporary lights, often characterised as ‘Christmas’ or ‘Winter’ lights, are installed over the darkest period of the year (December in the northern hemisphere) in town and city centres to attract shoppers and tourists. This paper examines the lights displays installed over the Christmas/ New Year period in two British towns. In each case the lights are installed by volunteers, who also arrange a ‘switch on’ community celebration. The research argues that the architecture of the lights signifies and reinforces the identities of the communities involved. In particular, the paper examines: the importance of infrastructure for the ongoing creation of community; the creative potential of these temporary structures for community identity; and the essential materiality of community.
      Citation: Journal of Material Culture
      PubDate: 2022-03-22T07:03:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591835221089547
       
  • Under one roof: Material changes and familial estrangement in Puno, Peru

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      Authors: Sandhya Krittika Narayanan
      Abstract: Journal of Material Culture, Ahead of Print.
      Traditional, Indigenous houses in Puno, Peru, were built using adobe bricks, stone, and wood. Today, young Indigenous couples are building houses that utilize modern materials such as concrete, brick, and steel. In this paper, I analyze the effects that changing materialities of house construction practices have on the durability and breadth of kin-relationships in Puno. I argue that these changes are possible due to the kind of personhood that houses occupy within kin networks in the Puno and the Andes. Furthermore, I show how access to new materials allows younger families to build houses more quickly than their parents did, shortening the time to develop stronger kin relationships that were once afforded by building with traditional materials. These new materials affect the house's ability to make and maintain kinship in the future where the quality of kin relationships is directly influenced by the material qualia of the house.
      Citation: Journal of Material Culture
      PubDate: 2022-03-21T08:36:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591835221088515
       
  • Making masks: The women behind Ghana's nose covering mandate during the
           COVID-19 outbreak

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      Authors: Abena Dove Osseo-Asare
      Abstract: Journal of Material Culture, Ahead of Print.
      In 2020, Ghanaians adopted face masks, or “nose masks,” in public places to combat the spread of a novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2. Seamstresses and tailors quickly pivoted to manufacture nose masks by April, given the longstanding cottage sewing industry. While the country saw an influx of disposable face masks by the end of the year, cloth mask makers made a significant impact on public health at the start of the pandemic. This article considers how people were able to quickly popularize nose masks in 2020, noting the key role women seamstresses played alongside public leaders, the Ghana Standards Authority, and the police who used punitive punishments and coercive tactics to encourage sustained use as the pandemic continued. It marks one of the first studies on the history and cultural use of nose masks in an African country, comparing their use and adoption to other national mask responses, including those in the United States, Japan, and the Czech Republic.
      Citation: Journal of Material Culture
      PubDate: 2022-03-18T08:12:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591835221086870
       
  • Money, memory objects and material practices in the everyday conduct of
           inter-ethnic marriages in Indonesia

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      Authors: Jony Eko Yulianto, Darrin Hodgetts, Pita King, James H. Liu
      Abstract: Journal of Material Culture, Ahead of Print.
      In the context of historical and ongoing tensions between different ethnic groups, inter-ethnic marriages are increasingly prevalent in Indonesia today. This article explores the social materiality of memory objects (money and related household items) in the negotiation of shared lifeworlds within two inter-ethnic marriages between Javanese and Chinese Indonesians. The research is based on detailed fieldwork conducted face-to-face in East Java over a 10 week period, and supported with further online interactions with participating couples. We demonstrate how a focus on money and related material practices can offer new understandings of how couples respond agentively to inter-cultural tensions in their marriages and strive towards harmony. In doing so we demonstrate how values of cooperation and prudence are articulated through things and related practices, and in the process are harnessed to support couples efforts to build mutually supportive lives together. In the process we document how objects, including money, an onion peeling machine and food emerge in these relationships as both practical things and objects of care, cooperation and affection. This research demonstrates that whilst still of crucial importance, a focus on inter-cultural tensions and the conflicts these can cause can be complimented with a focus on couple's agentive efforts to manage and contain such tensions as they build culturally hybrid lives together.
      Citation: Journal of Material Culture
      PubDate: 2022-03-18T08:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591835221086862
       
  • Contemporary archaeology in conflict zones: The materiality of violence
           and the transformation of the urban space in Temuco, Chile during the
           social outburst

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      Authors: Henrik B. Lindskoug, Wladimir Martínez
      Abstract: Journal of Material Culture, Ahead of Print.
      We have, during the Latin American spring, studied the material traces of state oppression and social movements in Temuco, Chile, and the transformation of the urban landscape with archaeological surveys. Our results demonstrate alterations in the urban landscape related to both police presence and protesters. Large amounts of teargas-projectiles and rubber bullets indicate strong police presence and repression of different social movements. We have also identified protection and resistance modes in the form of shields, paint bombs, and protective masks, often associated with graffiti's, barricades, and other alterations of the public space. Material vestiges combined with interviews have shown how state institutions have tried to cover up the traces of violence. We argue that archaeology can play a central role in this process and in recording the materiality of these events with the aim to hand over the information to human right associations to prevent state oppression.
      Citation: Journal of Material Culture
      PubDate: 2022-02-04T10:49:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591835221074167
       
  • Reading clay: The temporal and transformative potential of clay in
           contemporary scientific practice

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      Authors: Lia Bryant, Kimberly Jamie, Gary J. Sharples
      Abstract: Journal of Material Culture, Ahead of Print.
      Clay has a long history in the global south and has been extensively studied by ‘Western’ social scientists particularly anthropologists and archeologists in relation to histories of earlier civilisations and cultural practices. Clay in relation to contemporary ‘science’ has received less attention in social science despite the emergence of the sub-discipline of ‘clay science’ and its increasing focus on clay to transform wide ranging aspects of social life. In this paper we work towards an exploration of clay in science. We begin with the question of ‘what is clay'’ from the perspective of a multidisciplinary group of scientists, whilst being alert to culturally located and past knowledges of clay that shape current scientific knowledges and practices. Drawing on interviews with six clay scientists we explore the ontological and epistemological process for scientists in ‘reading’ clay to reveal how clay is ‘classified’, ‘worked upon’ and ‘partnered’. Our findings suggest that clay comes into being for scientists by being read as an informational and temporal medium and agentic matter with transformative promise to remedy specific threats to human and environmental health.
      Citation: Journal of Material Culture
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T02:02:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591835221074159
       
  • Introduction: Afterlives in objects

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      Authors: Jeremy F. Walton, Çiçek İlengiz
      First page: 347
      Abstract: Journal of Material Culture, Ahead of Print.
      In this introduction to our edited volume, Material Afterlives, we specify the interventions and arguments of our collection as a whole. To begin, we reflect on the recent proliferation of “afterlives” as a concept and metaphor within the social sciences and humanities, a development that we describe as the “new hauntology.” As we argue, this new hauntology favors the subjective rather than objective aspects of afterlives and consequently neglects questions of materiality. The overarching goal of Material Afterlives is to remedy this neglect. Following this, we examine the contributions and limitations of the concepts of ruin/ruination and waste to the investigation of material afterlives. While the concepts of ruin and waste presuppose a decrease in value in the face of time and change of function, material afterlives, by contrast, accentuate the proliferation of enhanced and unanticipated material values. We then enumerate the implications of our consideration of material afterlives for Memory Studies broadly, with particular emphasis on how material afterlives unsettle the orienting role of trauma in the discipline. Finally, we briefly outline the five specific contributions that constitute our volume.
      Citation: Journal of Material Culture
      PubDate: 2022-10-26T07:29:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591835221132197
       
  • Between past and future ruins: Post-Ottoman Niš in the album of Knez
           Milan Obrenović

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      Authors: Jelena Radovanović
      First page: 359
      Abstract: Journal of Material Culture, Ahead of Print.
      While historians of Southeast Europe have recently increasingly turned to photographs as primary sources, this article reads a late 19th century photographic album not as an (objective) representation of a city, but as a carefully constructed visual narrative with afterlives of its own. The album, created upon the annexation of the city of Niš from the Ottoman Empire, produces multiple temporalities: the “recurring” and “timeless” national authenticity of the village, shown through costumes and church ruins, is contrasted with the images of the city, which the album constitutes as “old” and photographs as “future ruins.” The latter serves to establish a temporal break between the Ottoman past and the pending Serbian modernization project. Today, the album embodies two distinct afterlives. First, the Ottoman city—and the Empire itself—which the album proclaims “dead,” continues to live only as an object of photography. Second, the album today represents an afterlife of the foundational ideologies and images of post-Ottoman nation-making in and beyond Serbia. The two afterlives are not without contradiction: even though it is used to proclaim the empire “dead,” the album represents an ambivalent material afterlife of the empire in the present (Walton, 2019), while the ambivalence of photography as a medium itself opens avenues for readings beyond the prescribed.
      Citation: Journal of Material Culture
      PubDate: 2022-10-26T06:53:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591835221132650
       
  • The dead wait: Material afterlives in sepulchral spaces

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      Authors: Jeremy F. Walton
      First page: 377
      Abstract: Journal of Material Culture, Ahead of Print.
      This essay examines the heterotopic and heterochronic material afterlives of cemeteries through a comparative focus on two cities of the dead: Zagreb's Mirogoj Cemetery, which was established during the late 19th century, and Thessaloniki's Zeitenlik World War I Military Cemetery, which entombs Allied victims from the Salonika Front. My principal aim is to highlight the contrasts and contradictions between nationalized collective memories and unsettling imperial legacies that define the material afterlives of each of these cemeteries. In Mirogoj, material afterlives take shape as a palimpsest of eras, only some of which are monumentalized as collective memories. In Zeitenlik, the material afterlife of a single event of death-dealing, the Great War, constitutes an archive of bygone imperial socialities that defy the homogenizing logics of national identity in the present.
      Citation: Journal of Material Culture
      PubDate: 2022-10-17T07:53:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591835221132378
       
  • The aesthetics of open-ended mourning: The statue of a holy-madman in
           Dersim, Turkey

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      Authors: Çiçek İlengiz
      First page: 396
      Abstract: Journal of Material Culture, Ahead of Print.
      What happens to the notion of commemoration when its object is not fixed in time' Intervening in scholarly discussions on the contested nature of public remembering, this ethnographic research analyses how the afterlives of genocidal violence, of people and of mythical characters, are intermingled in divergent temporalities of public memorials. Through the case of the statue commemorating a locally known holy-madman, Şeywuşen (1930–1994), inaugurated in 1995 in Dersim (Tunceli), Turkey, it examines the possibilities and limitations of the statue's aesthetic form in representing madness and holiness both of which lie beyond the bounded character of rationality in its normative form. The article first juxtaposes the fluctuating temporality generated by the statue of Şeywuşen with that of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk (1881–1938), representing the official memory regime of nationalism. Secondly, it contrasts the temporal multiplicity enabled by the statue of Şeywuşen with the statue of Seyyid Rıza (1863–1937), which commemorates the officially denied Dersim Genocide (1937–1938) and represents collective trauma. By putting it into conversation with monumental and counter-monumental aesthetic representations, the article illustrates that the statue of Şeywuşen paradoxically memorializes what is uncontainable within the political order and temporality of the nation-state. It argues that this case presents the possibility of joining different communities of loss by generating space for open-ended mourning for multiple injuries resulting from state violence.
      Citation: Journal of Material Culture
      PubDate: 2022-10-26T07:30:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591835221132494
       
  • Trauma remains: The material afterlives of the 1989 Alton school bus crash

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      Authors: Robert Matej Bednar
      First page: 414
      Abstract: Journal of Material Culture, Ahead of Print.
      This is an essay about how the material remains of automobile crashes remain in place to give road trauma a performative dimension through material objects. The paper draws on two decades of fieldwork on multiple roadside shrines throughout the American Southwest, but focuses on the site of the 1989 Alton school bus crash, which claimed the lives of 21 junior high and high school students in Alton, Texas, a small town on the border between Texas and Mexico. My analysis focuses on the way the trauma of the crash lives on in the materiality of the site—how it is structured visually, materially, and spatially at the shrine, but also how it is situated in relation to the adjacent intersection, guardrails, and fence, as well as the quarry and city park below. I argue that the shrine ensures not only that lost bodies receive a material afterlife in the form of a commemorative memorial, but also that the trauma of losing those lost bodies takes on a material afterlife in the structure of the site as well. By integrating both of these sets of material afterlives, the shrine becomes capable of translating Alton's collective trauma to a much broader collective made up not only of subsequent generations of Alton residents, but also of anonymous non-residents, forming a vast trauma collective that is stretched across time but always anchored to the materiality of the site.
      Citation: Journal of Material Culture
      PubDate: 2022-10-18T07:02:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591835221132200
       
  • Time after death: Material afterlives in the work of estate administration

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      Authors: Sofia Pinedo-Padoch
      First page: 432
      Abstract: Journal of Material Culture, Ahead of Print.
      When someone dies without a will and with no close family willing to administer their estate in New York City and other large US cities, the Public Administrator (PA), a small state agency, steps in to take care of the deceased's estate. Because the subject of the PA's work—the deceased—is no longer present, the office relies on things—objects, homes, money, and documents—as legal markers of identity. The afterlife of a person, therefore, is a distinctly material afterlife. Though death may signify an end, it is in fact the beginning of a different kind of time that is orchestrated in stops and starts by the work of the law, people, and material objects. The ethnographic stories told in this essay demonstrate how two temporal categories—the legal and extralegal—come up against each other in tense and uncanny ways, and how this convergence of legal and extralegal temporalities produces the distinctive material afterlives of the dead.
      Citation: Journal of Material Culture
      PubDate: 2022-10-20T06:10:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591835221132187
       
 
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