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  Subjects -> ANTHROPOLOGY (Total: 398 journals)
Showing 1 - 90 of 90 Journals sorted by number of followers
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 371)
Global Change, Peace & Security: formerly Pacifica Review: Peace, Security & Global Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 305)
Cultural Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 204)
Current Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 194)
Annual Review of Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 194)
American Anthropologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 170)
Ethnography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 96)
Ethnos: Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 90)
American Ethnologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Journal of Anthropological Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
Anthropology Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Anthropological Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54)
History and Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Journal of Social Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Journal of Contemporary Ethnography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Human Development: A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Memory Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Critique of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
American Journal of Physical Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Social Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Journal of World Prehistory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Discourse Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Qualitative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Medical Anthropology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Ethnology : An International Journal of Cultural and Social Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of African History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Anthropological Review     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Anthropology & Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Archaeology, Ethnology and Anthropology of Eurasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Anthropological Forum: A journal of social anthropology and comparative sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Medical Anthropology: Cross-Cultural Studies in Health and Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
African Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Ethnohistory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Anthropology & Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Museum Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Human Evolution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
City & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Anthropology of the Middle East     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Material Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Australian Historical Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
African and Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Ethos     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
French Politics, Culture & Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Visual Anthropology: Published in cooperation with the Commission on Visual Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Primatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Pragmatics & Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Evolutionary Anthropology Issues News and Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Anthropology & Archeology of Eurasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Anthropological Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Anthropology of Work Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Field Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Anthropology & Humanism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Latin American & Caribbean Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Culture & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Archeological Papers of The American Anthropological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Buildings & Landscapes: Journal of the Vernacular Architecture Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Mental Health, Religion & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Anthropology Now     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Cultural Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Linguistic Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Reviews in Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Dialectical Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Food and Foodways: Explorations in the History and Culture of     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Visual Anthropology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Anthropology in Action : Journal for Applied Anthropology in Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Tourism Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Ethnomusicology Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Geografiska Annaler, Series B : Human Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Anthropology News     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Asian and African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Museum Anthropology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Australian Cultural History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Anthropological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Anthropology of Consciousness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
East Central Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
E&G Quaternary Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
L'Homme     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
African American Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Cahiers d’études africaines     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
POLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Osteoarchaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
L'Anthropologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Progress in Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Anthropologie et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Antiquaries Journal, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Historical Biology: An International Journal of Paleobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asian Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Myth & Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Chinese Sociology & Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Transforming Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Focaal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Transcultural Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Anthropological Journal of European Cultures     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Collaborative Anthropologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ateliers d'anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Turcica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Gradhiva     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anthropologie et santé     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Levant     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Primates     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Human Organization     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Cultural Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal des anthropologues     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Polynesian Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Arctic Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Modern Greek Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Histories of Anthropology Annual     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Acta Ethnographica Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Oceania     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Australian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Civilisations     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cuadernos de Antropologia Social     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Terrain     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Canadian Studies/Revue d'études canadiennes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Gesture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Listening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Quotidian : Dutch Journal for the Study of Everyday Life     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Exchange     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
The Australian Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
General Anthropology Bulletin of The General Anthropology Division     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
South Asian Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Burma Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
South Asian Diaspora     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Images re-vues : histoire, anthropologie et théorie de l'art     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Anatomical Science International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revista de Antropologia     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Antipoda : Revista de Antropología y Arqueología     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Social Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Alteridades     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Social Science Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Socio-anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Quaternaire     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Behemoth     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Structure and Dynamics: eJournal of Anthropological and Related Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Transnational American Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Recherches sociologiques et anthropologiques     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Durkheimian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Zoosystematics and Evolution - Mitteilungen Aus Dem Museum Fur Naturkunde Zu Berlin     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
HOMO - Journal of Comparative Human Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cadernos de Estudos Africanos     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bulletin de l’APAD     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
L'Atelier du CRH     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Estudios Atacameños     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cahiers de l'Urmis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tabula Rasa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Antropologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indiana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Boletin de Antropologia Universidad de Antioquia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Andes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Apparence(s)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Desacatos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuicuilco     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. Ciências Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chungara (Arica) - Revista de Antropologia Chilena     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethnographic Praxis in Industry Conference     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Totem : The University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tipití : Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nuevo mundo mundos nuevos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intersecciones en Antropologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Terrae Incognitae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal for the Anthropology of North America (JANA)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Southwest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Scripta Ethnologica     Open Access  
Revista de Antropología Social     Open Access  
Mitologicas     Open Access  
Liminar. Estudios Sociales y Humanisticos     Open Access  
Avá. Revista de Antropologia     Open Access  
Treballs de Sociolingüística Catalana     Open Access  
Anthropologischer Anzeiger     Full-text available via subscription  
Mélanges de la Casa de Velázquez     Partially Free  
Recherches amérindiennes au Québec     Full-text available via subscription  
Runa : Archivo para las Ciencias del Hombre     Open Access  
Papeles de Trabajo. Centro de Estudios Interdisciplinarios en Etnolingüística y Antropología Socio-Cultural     Open Access  
Trace     Open Access  
Interações (Campo Grande)     Open Access  
Journeys     Full-text available via subscription  
human_ontogenetics     Hybrid Journal  

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Similar Journals
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Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.58
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 41  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0891-2416 - ISSN (Online) 1552-5414
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • Addressing the Methodological Challenges that Cloaked Profiles Pose to
           Digital Observations

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Thea Rabe
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      Although digital ethnographic studies concerned with online misinformation have focused on analyzing the contents shared by “cloaked” profiles (concealed or fake identities), less attention has been given to the epistemological and ontological dilemmas that cloaked profiles pose to digital ethnography. This article deals with these issues by asking: how can digital ethnographers determine who and what we are observing' And how can we conduct online observations when confronted with cloaked profiles' Drawing on field research, this article argues that researchers would benefit from including more critical reflections on the presence of cloaked profiles and learning how to apply digital skills for how to unveil cloaked profiles. Such practices will challenge a commonly accepted ontology that online profiles represent human behavior and enhance researchers’ digital literacy and ability to recognize cloaked profiles. Finally, applying techniques to unveil cloaked profiles will arguably strengthen the hermeneutic process of knowledge production in digital observations.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T06:19:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221135498
       
  • Mujeres Guerreras: Negotiating Women’s Empowerment in Colombia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zareen Thomas
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      This research is based on nine months of ethnographic fieldwork with a formalized youth hip-hop organization in Colombia whose broad work with youth included a mission of women’s and girls’ empowerment. Throughout this article, I show how young women, through their affiliation with this professionalized organization, utilized city spaces to articulate opposition to gender-based inequalities and marginalization, within a larger context of protracted armed conflict and everyday violence. In these spaces, women configured themselves as hip-hop “guerreras” (warriors) and “luchadoras,” (fighters) to convey their fortitude while minimizing risk. I argue that they balanced “uncivic” modalities of hip-hop with a civic language of empowerment to garner support for their labor and causes. By examining women’s NGO affiliations and their creative performances, I show how women simultaneously reinforced sanctioned rhetoric of empowerment while strategically carving spaces to craft media intended to challenge dominant ideologies.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-10-22T06:13:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221126519
       
  • Tales from a Hospital Entrance Screener: An Autoethnography and
           Exploration of COVID-19, Risk, and Responsibility

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rachelle Miele
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      This autoethnography explores my experiences as a hospital entrance screener during the first wave of the pandemic in a hospital in Ontario, Canada. In April 2020, I was redeployed from my research role to a hospital entrance screener. Focused on my lived experiences, the purpose of this research is to provide a glimpse into what it was like to work in a hospital early in the pandemic, to understand these experiences in relation to sociocultural meanings, and to try to make sense of my experiences with COVID-19. Through reflections, I offer a critical account of my experiences working as a screener and analyze personal reflections about my thoughts, feelings, and experiences from a post-structural lens. My analysis reveals several themes: responsibilization, risk, emotional labor, policing and securitization, and the hero discourse. My experiences as a screener demonstrate the complexities of the COVID-19 society and experience.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-10-17T05:26:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221131512
       
  • Affective Infrastructures of Immobility: Staying While Neighbors Are
           Leaving Rural Eastern Siberia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Vasilina Orlova
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      Framing “immobility” as already containing mobility, this research asks why people stay in conditions of economic disadvantages and social abandonment even when they have tangible opportunities to leave. Based on ethnography conducted in Eastern Siberia, this research investigates how people throughout the region maintain connections to one place: the village of Anosovo. I argue that the notion of “affective infrastructure” can encapsulate a multiplicity of ties connecting people to places. Affective infrastructure refers to the capacity of “hard” infrastructural agglomerations—such as pipes, wires, and buildings—to evoke feeling, and to the “social” infrastructure such as kinship ties, memories, attachments, and human–nonhuman relationships. Seeing people as always already included in the agglomerations of affective infrastructures opens the space to see them pinned down to the place even as their neighbors leave while the hopes for improvements of conditions are bleak.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T05:47:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221130940
       
  • The Moral Discourse of Free Speech: A Virtual Ethnographic Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Julia Goldman-Hasbun
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      Freedom of speech has long been considered an essential value in democracies. However, its boundaries concerning hate speech continue to be contested across many social and political spheres, including governments, social media websites, and university campuses. Despite the recent growth of so-called free speech communities online and offline, little empirical research has examined how individuals embedded in these communities make moral sense of free speech and its limits. Examining these perspectives is important for understanding the growing involvement and polarization around this issue. Using a digital ethnographic approach, I address this gap by analyzing discussions in a rapidly growing online forum dedicated to free speech (r/FreeSpeech subreddit). I find that most users on the forum understand free speech in an absolutist sense (i.e., it should be free from legal, institutional, material, and even social censorship or consequences), but that users differ in their arguments and justifications concerning hate speech. Some downplay the harms of hate speech, while others acknowledge its harms but either focus on its epistemic subjectivity or on the moral threats of censorship and authoritarianism. Further, the forum appears to have become more polarized and right-wing-dominated over time, rife with ideological tensions between members and between moderators and members. Overall, this study highlights the variation in free speech discourse within online spaces and calls for further research on free speech that focuses on first-hand perspectives.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T05:43:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221129880
       
  • An Autoethnography of “Making It” in Academia: Writing an ECR
           “Journey” of Facebook, Assemblage, Affect, and the Outdoors

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Phiona Stanley
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      While much has been written to guide early career researchers (ECRs) and those charged with socializing them into academic ontologies, much less is known about ECRs’ own experiences of becoming academic. This article presents a narrative, new-materialist account—drawing on Facebook updates and personal diaries—of one ECR’s experience. Interdisciplinary theorizing is proposed, using work-types and zones-of-development models. Individualism is problematized within three contexts: autoethnography as method, the materiality of affect within ECR assemblages, and the limited capacity of any individual ECR to effect systemic change. As ECRs are driven to produce ever more, and thus to “succeed,” they are their own nexus of accountability, making overwork and burnout endemic. So, although ECRs may progress from adaptive to technical work and from proximal to actual zones of development, their workload has no ceiling. Issues of “balance” are therefore retheorized within the assemblage, with extant models critiqued as problematically dependent on neoliberal framings of individual responsibility.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-09-15T06:40:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221120819
       
  • Memory Politics on a Neighborhood Scale: Uses of the Past in the Historic
           Center and the Periphery of Valencia (Spain)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hernán Fioravanti, Albert Moncusí-Ferré
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyzes the production of memory on a neighborhood scale, comparing the different logics that shape narratives about the past in the historic center and a peripheral area of the city of Valencia (Spain). We analyze the uses of the past developed by three kinds of actors: local institutions, social movements, and residents. This line of research shows that administrators boost aestheticized memories oriented towards commodification and tourist promotion in the historic center and towards an unconflicted representation of interculturality in the periphery. These hegemonic narratives are being reproduced, appropriated, and negotiated by social movements and local residents, who replicate some elements of the official narratives while, at the same time, resignifying other parts and claiming neglected and erased memories. Urban memories function, therefore, as a political arena for the imposition and negotiation of different dynamics and transformations experienced at the local level.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-09-02T11:06:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221121341
       
  • Four Distinct Cultures of Oilfield Masculinity, but Absent Hegemonic
           Masculinity: Some Multiple Masculinities Perspectives from a Remote UK
           Offshore Drilling Platform

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nicholas Norman Adams
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores the multiple and distinct cultures of oilfield masculinity uncovered during an embedded ethnographic study of masculinities onboard a remote UK offshore drilling platform. Oilmen revealed shifting interpretations for how risky and dangerous oil work “should be done.” Changes led to the construction of three distinct masculine cultures intertwined with positive safety behaviors and one culture intertwined with negative risky behaviors. Tracing the trajectory of Connell’s hegemonic masculinity theory, no singular “hegemonic” or dominant masculinity existed in the oilfield. Also, unlike some existing oilfield research, masculine reformations and subsequent divisions and associations between local cultures were triggered by factors independent from shifts in workplace policies. Rather, and linking with emerging research exploring “manhood acts”; oilmen consciously reformulated their masculine identities, embodying self-awareness and self-reflection for reimagining processes, and themselves recognized each industrial identity as unique and capable of cultural support or resistance. Perspectives of growth for “hegemonic” masculinities theory are presented, alongside suggestions for further examination of masculinities in understudied male-dominated workplaces, to further expand the “manhood acts” research perspective.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-08-06T04:31:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221116658
       
  • Interaction Rituals at Content Trade Fairs: A Microfoundation of Cultural
           Markets

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Andreas Gebesmair, Christoph Musik
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we show how ritualized periodic encounters of business partners help to reproduce business relations and a shared understanding of doing business based on ethnographic fieldwork at six international trade fairs in three different cultural industries. We draw on Randall Collins’ theory of interaction rituals (IRs), which highlights the relevance of emotional contacts in social life. Although Collins’ theory and his conceptional instruments help to shed light on a neglected aspect in the sociology of markets, our results go beyond his ethological interpretation of interactions. First, we conclude that Collins underestimates the direct impact of the uneven distribution of economic resources on IRs. Second, we observed not only emotional entrainment in IRs but also the strategic production of emotions.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-08-04T05:06:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221113370
       
  • “The Glorious Pain”: Attaining Pleasure and Gratification in Times of
           Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) among Gym Goers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Assaf Lev
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a widely known phenomenon among gym goers. For many of them, experiencing DOMS the day after working out in the gym is often perceived as rewarding and something of which to brag and be proud. Although existing work within the biomedical field has undoubtedly shed light on coping with and managing DOMS, there remains little in-depth qualitative research on the gym goer’s lived experience regarding this phenomenon. Following Becker’s conceptual framework of using marihuana for pleasure, the article will examine the way gym goers learn to attain pleasure and gratification in times of DOMS through a process of reframing and socialization. Ethnographic research was conducted for two years in two gyms, using a combination of participant observation and semi-structured interviews. Findings illustrate three coherent stages a novice gym goer experiences while becoming an experienced gym goer and enjoying DOMS: (1) learning the proper “working-out” technique required to experience positive effects; (2) recognizing the effects of DOMS and their connection with the workout; and (3) enjoying the effects of DOMS caused by working out. Moreover, once gym goers manage to change the definition of negative sensations and interpret them as enjoyable, DOMS often becomes an indispensable experience that has to be religiously pursued. In this context, the audience in front of which the gym goers perform their DOMS serves as a “front region of behavior” for gaining social recognition by instrumentalizing their pain to strengthen and solidify their gym goer identity.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-07-22T05:26:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221113369
       
  • #LongLiveDaGuys: Online Grief, Solidarity, and Emotional Freedom for Black
           Teenage Boys after the Gun Deaths of Friends

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nora Gross
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      This ethnographic study follows a group of Black teenage boys in their Philadelphia high school and online in the years following the shooting death of their friend. Within their peer group, the boys generally focus their shared memorializations on upbeat and affirming reminiscences, protecting each other from sadness but constraining their own emotional displays. In contrast, in the boys’ private worlds, most spend years actively working through their grief in material and embodied ways, including through objects they keep or wear. On social media, these private and public worlds converge as the boys regularly share their private grief expressions with public audiences and define their digital identities by loss. Contrary to popular worries about adolescent social media use, this research finds that for grieving Black boys online worlds offer unusual space for emotional freedom, social support, and solidarity around loss and a counter to restrictive racialized and gendered feeling rules.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T05:57:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221105869
       
  • Terminating a Wanted Pregnancy: A Feminist, Analytic Autoethnographic
           Account

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Batsheva Guy
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      With screening for fetal anomaly becoming more common, more families are faced with making decisions based on receiving fetal anomaly diagnoses after the first trimester. After receiving a diagnosis of fetal anomaly, which is typically associated with shock and denial, pregnant people and couples immediately become faced with a difficult decision of either continuing or terminating the pregnancy. Once a pregnancy termination decision has been made, following abortion of a wanted pregnancy, feelings of grief and sadness are common. While research has been done on the impact of decision-making and mental health diagnoses pre- and post-terminating a wanted pregnancy, there has been little research detailing effective coping strategies for dealing with these unexpected and devastating circumstances. The current study is a feminist analytic autoethnography, which details the experience of my own abortion through a reflexive account. I aim to explore my own methods of coping that were successful as I overcame grief, guilt, and anxiety after terminating my wanted pregnancy due to a fetal anomaly.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-06-24T05:50:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221106467
       
  • Touch Me if You Can: Intimate Bodies at Cuddle Parties

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      Authors: Cornelia Mayr
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      This article is based on ethnographic fieldwork, focusing on the processes and practices of cuddle parties. Data was collected from a combination of participant-observation, interviews, and diaries aimed to understand and interpret this unique form of intimate interaction. By disentangling bodily disciplines and dramaturgical (self-)presentations, this study explores how and to what extent cuddle party participants embody safe and nonsexual touch experiences in forms of “playful” interaction rituals. Alongside the chance for participants to explore bodies, with permission, this study concludes that cuddle parties are experiential, bounded playgrounds where both intimacy and touch are (re)created in the context of loosened normative, relational, and sexual constraints.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T05:21:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221100581
       
  • Relying on the Kindness of Strangers: Welfare-Providers to Seafarers and
           the Symbolic Construction of Community

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      Authors: Nelson Nava Turgo, Wendy Cadge, Sophie Gilliat-Ray, Helen Sampson, Graeme Smith
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      Seafarers who call into ports usually hope for, or anticipate, a visit from people who provide them with welfare services—from SIM cards and mobile top-up vouchers to religious or nonreligious reading materials, and free transport to the nearest seafarers’ center or shopping mall. In seafarers’ centers, seafarers can normally use free internet facilities, enjoy drinks from the bar, avail themselves of remittance services, and if they wish, practice their faith in rooms/chapels dedicated to religious observance. While port chaplains are usually the people that seafarers associate with welfare services, port chaplains are not alone in providing these services—there are also paid staff and volunteers working in seafarers’ centers. This worldwide community of welfare providers displays the patina of a homogeneous bloc, sharing the same functions, activities, and end-goals in their everyday pursuits in ports and seafarers’ centers. However, this belies a more complex and sometimes fractured community of welfare providers in ports. While their services could be described with one coherent narrative of kindness to strangers, members of this community come from different backgrounds and are employed by different welfare organizations, and in the case of port chaplains, by different religious maritime charities with varying theologies. As a result of this, and the challenges to and changing contexts of maritime welfare services, in ports worldwide, this community is riven with contestation and everyday politics, which may be associated with a symbolically constructed community. This article expands on these issues. It is underpinned by research into welfare provision in two UK ports and in five other countries. It highlights narratives of unity and conflict, opening the doors to a community of people rarely noticed by social scientists.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T06:22:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221092001
       
  • “Mimicked Winks”: Criminalized Conduct and the Ethics of Thick
           Description

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      Authors: Liora O’Donnell Goldensher
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      Thick description has long been the standard for both credibility and quality in ethnographic, community action, and participatory observation research across the disciplines, but I argue that researchers have an ethical obligation to consider when to decline to describe thickly. When ethnographers write about actions their informants took that broke, skirted, or challenged laws and rules in service of meeting their own basic needs, anonymization is not enough. We risk drawing the attention of law enforcement or hostile regulators to whole communities employing those practices, rendering their future actions more highly policeable or criminalizable—even if we do not intend to do so, and even if we adequately conceal the identities of the particular individuals described. I suggest five principles for ethical description of criminalized or policeable conduct: justified disclosure, substituting thick description of evidence of a practice for description of the practice itself, balancing thickness with thinness, telling stories when the risks of criminalization are decreasing, and narrating affinities with less-surveilled practices.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T11:35:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221094653
       
  • Street Art Commodification and (An)aesthetic Policies on the Outskirts of
           Lisbon

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      Authors: Otávio Ribeiro Raposo
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, I discuss how street art has become an ally of urban policies molded by the creative city paradigm in marginalized neighborhoods of Lisbon (Portugal). Based on a dense ethnography of a peripheral neighborhood of this Southern European city, I follow the trail left by how public power uses the commodification of street art as an instrument for urban regeneration, touristification, and management of inequalities. The different meanings and interests around this policy are examined in street art festivals and tours, focused on the participation of young people as local guides. This urban policy has changed the negative public image of the neighborhood, with street art being combined with a multicultural experience commodified in guided tours for tourists. However, by ignoring the opinions of the residents on the interventions, this policy follows a top-down approach in which street art aesthetics operate as a device of subjugation and maintenance of the subaltern, beautifying processes of exclusion.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-04-23T11:36:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221079863
       
  • Families on the Streets: Placemaking in an Urban Heritage Site in Cebu
           City, the Philippines

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      Authors: Bonifacio M. Amper
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      Streets are public spaces where people pass through in going from one place to another. As such, streets are not supposed to be dwelling places. However, rapid urbanization has ushered in problems on housing, livelihood, and basic social facilities and services, giving rise to informal settlements and street living in cities. In Cebu City (a highly urbanized city in Central Philippines), displacement from urban slums as well as, lack of livelihood options have pushed some people to dwell on the streets and sidewalks in sites most visited by foreign and local tourists. Through street ethnography, this research uncovers how street dwellers in a heritage site in downtown Cebu City came to live and make a living here. The findings point to the fact that street dwellers have socially constructed and purposely transformed heritage spaces into places where they do their daily domestic routines as well as livelihood activities, in order to survive. This article posits that placemaking by these street dwellers in this heritage site is a process from entering and integrating into the place, appropriating specific spaces into places with meanings for them, building and maintaining social networks, contesting notions of the place, and developing a street culture over time.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T01:01:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221089925
       
  • The Mental Life of a Telephone Pole and Other Trifles: Affective Practices
           in the Context of Research Funding

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      Authors: Pia Olsson
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      This article uses ethnographic social media analysis to interpret affective practices concerning research funding. The analysis is based on Finnish Twitter discussions both within academia and between researchers and those outside academia. Different kinds of affective practices, both sharing and othering, are present in the discussions that guide the ways we make sense of the role of science in our individual lives, as well as in society more generally. We need to see these emotions at work as signals of negotiations of values in the context of neoliberal universities and freedom of science.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-04-06T12:50:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221085713
       
  • Miles and Bars Between: The Tertiary Prisonization and Layered Liminality
           of Prison Visitation Transportation Services

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      Authors: Dylan Addison
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      Prison visitation transportation services perform an important yet understudied role in the process of prison visitation for many people with incarcerated loved ones. This article draws on the findings of an ethnographic study of the experiences of loved ones of incarcerated people using a small, Black-owned prison visitation transportation service. Prison visitation transportation services help to mitigate the carceral state’s inherent function to separate people from their incarcerated loved ones, but in turn these services are also subjected to intensive forms of carceral control themselves. As a result, prison visitation transportation services and their staff experience a form of tertiary prisonization. This ultimately results in the drivers of these services experiencing a heightened and enduring state of layered liminality, which becomes attached to them as individuals.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-03-31T08:21:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221085604
       
  • Weed Central: Cannabis Specialists and Polydrug Vendors in Mexico City

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      Authors: Piotr A. Chomczyński, Roger Guy, Rodrigo Cortina Cortés
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      Findings discussed in this article addressed a gap in the literature on cannabis markets in Mexico. This article primarily draws on interviews with (N = 64) street drug dealers including 24 incarcerated ones, and ethnographic work in 3 impoverished neighborhoods in Mexico City. We find that cannabis sellers enter the profession through early biographical experiences that are reinforced throughout adolescence. Dealing in the context of this cannabis culture is not only acceptable in the present but also viewed as inherently part of their future. Further analysis reveals a typology of dealers that tends to be marked by the transition from cannabis specialists to polydrug vendors. As dealers progress to more profitable sales of hard drugs, they tend to lose the trust and support of neighborhood residents who view their suppliers, clients, and associates as dangerous. We conclude with policy interventions uniquely derived from ethnographic research that are intended to minimize the risk of escalating to more serious drug distribution while preserving community stability and cohesion.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-03-31T08:20:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221085560
       
  • “He’s Agonal”: An Insider’s Look into the Impact of Moral Injury
           Suffered While Policing on the Westside of Chicago

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      Authors: Patrick J. Burke
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, I seek to contribute to the literature on self-change and moral injury by providing an autoethnographic account of the processes through which I incurred “moral injury” while giving first aid to gunshot victims as a police officer on the Westside of Chicago. In particular, I aim to address the causes and consequences of failing to find a new identity that would allow me to adjust to repeated trauma. The second aim focuses on illustrating why many police officers working in extremely violent neighborhoods tend to disassociate from victims and potential victims. The analysis of the narratives I present on providing first aid to shooting victims shows that my religiously based moral norms were particularly transgressed by several key mechanisms. In the conclusion, I discuss how future research on moral injury can benefit from incorporating the theory of self-change. I also encourage future research on moral injury to focus on police officers working in extremely violent neighborhoods and consider using autoethnographic methods to pursue such research.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-03-23T01:48:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221087362
       
  • Assemblage Thinking in Lockdown: An Autoethnographic Approach

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      Authors: Salman Khan
      First page: 751
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      Over the past year, COVID-19 and the restrictions imposed in its wake have meant that a range of research methodologies involving social contact could no longer be pursued. Whilst this time has been challenging, this article aims to showcase how it nonetheless presents opportunities for methodological innovation that can be carried forward into the future. Drawing upon an autoethnographic dissertation that sought to conceptualize the researcher’s lived experience in Scotland’s lockdown as an assemblage that was situated within, and intersected with, the wider “lockdown cultural assemblage,” it proceeds chronologically from how the research began to inductively drawn findings on shifts to lived experience produced by the lockdown across five interrelated dimensions to lived experience: embodiment, spatiality, temporality, a changing vocabulary of sociality, and narratological environment and broader context. In recounting this journey, it demonstrates how assemblage theory can both benefit from, as well as transform, autoethnography as its primary methodological strategy.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-01-18T05:00:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416211067563
       
  • Autoethnography of Holy Death: Belief, Dividuality, and Family in the
           Study of Santa Muerte

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      Authors: Kate Kingsbury
      First page: 784
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      Through an autoethnographic account that interweaves academic observations, my story of how I came to study Santa Muerte in Mexico and the entangled, emotive tale of Abby, a Santa Muerte devotee whom I grew very close to, I discuss the topic of belief in the ethnography of the occult and the “politics of integration”, derisively referred to “as going native”. I reveal how being an ethnographer of the Mexican female folk saint of death has taught me the necessity of dividuality and embracing belief in both the epistemological worlds of academia and the occult. I argue that slipping fluidly between the realm of science and the cosmos of magic has given me access not only to arcane knowledge and networks of practitioners but also through shared experiences of participatory consciousness with devotees of death during our rituals, proffered unique experiences, and new insights through intersubjectivity and interexperience, allowing me to understand the mystical power of Death Herself.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-02-12T05:12:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221075374
       
  • Claiming and Reclaiming Settings, Objects, and Situations: A
           Microethnographic Study of the Sociomaterial Practices of Everyday Life at
           Swedish Youth Homes

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      Authors: Kajsa Nolbeck, Helle Wijk, Göran Lindahl, Sepideh Olausson
      First page: 816
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study is to explore social interactions in the spatial and material environment within everyday life at special youth homes in Sweden, where youths with psychosocial problems, or criminal behavior are cared for involuntary. A microethnographic approach was chosen, and data was collected through participant observation. A theory integrating analysis, using Burke’s (1969) dramatistic pentad as a tool for structuring the data and Goffman’s (1956; 1961) dramaturgical perspective was undertaken. The findings demonstrate that the staff’s control over settings and objects also means control over the definition of what kind of place the special youth home is, and what takes place there. This is shown through a decorous behavior of sociomaterial control practices, rather than care practices, by the staff. This study contributes to knowledge on spaces and objects as crucial parts of care practices highlighting the intentions inscribed in institutional design and objects.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-03-08T07:13:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221082701
       
  • From Nativeness to Strangeness and Back: Ascribed Ethnicity, Body Work,
           and Contextual Insiderness

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      Authors: Patrycja Trzeszczyńska
      First page: 845
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      This article offers a reflection on a certain variant of broadening the position of “being inside” with some “buts,” or through “within but.” Drawing on my field experience in the Ukrainian diaspora in Canada, I discuss the context-dependent, fluid and labile insiderness and the case of using a researcher’s embodied distinctions (senses, ethnicity, class) in the research site created by the fieldwork participants, and not the researcher him/herself. My considerations are embedded with the dialectics (not opposition) of the insider–outsider and point to the contextual “nativeness” and “strangeness” of the researcher. I also discuss the fluidity and contextuality of a researcher’s field familiarity, as well as when s/he conducts research in cooperation with “their own people,” as well as circumstances and factors that transform this familiarity into strangeness. I argue that the latter, instead of being an obstacle or barrier in the research, is a beneficial and mind-opening ethnographic tool.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-03-10T05:11:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221077676
       
  • The Price of Consent: Identity Wages in the Games Industry

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      Authors: Alison R. Buck
      First page: 868
      Abstract: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Ahead of Print.
      Sociologists have long known that wages are not all that attract highly skilled workers to jobs. Identity rewards in organizations of work are opportunities for workers to affirm valued identities. Past research has found that workers who value these rewards will protect them when they are threatened. Other scholars have shown that managers can use identity rewards to control and elicit cooperation from workers. Another body of scholarship has explored how gendered assumptions and expectations are built into organizations of work. Based on 2 years of field research and 18 interviews with games industry professionals, my research unites these lines of inquiry, by examining how gendered identity rewards entice game developers for game developers to forgo higher wages and more stable conditions in other areas of software development, reinforcing both exploitive class relations and a culture hostile to marginalized workers.
      Citation: Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
      PubDate: 2022-03-21T05:36:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08912416221085558
       
 
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