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  Subjects -> ANTHROPOLOGY (Total: 398 journals)
Showing 1 - 90 of 90 Journals sorted by number of followers
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 370)
Global Change, Peace & Security: formerly Pacifica Review: Peace, Security & Global Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 305)
Cultural Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 200)
Annual Review of Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 193)
Current Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 190)
American Anthropologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 167)
Ethnography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 95)
Ethnos: Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
American Ethnologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Journal of Anthropological Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Anthropology Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Anthropological Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53)
History and Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Social Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Contemporary Ethnography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Human Development: A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Memory Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Critique of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
American Journal of Physical Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Discourse Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Social Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of World Prehistory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Qualitative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Medical Anthropology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Ethnology : An International Journal of Cultural and Social Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of African History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Anthropology & Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Anthropological Review     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Medical Anthropology: Cross-Cultural Studies in Health and Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Archaeology, Ethnology and Anthropology of Eurasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Anthropological Forum: A journal of social anthropology and comparative sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Ethnohistory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Anthropology & Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
African Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Museum Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Human Evolution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
City & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
African and Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Anthropology of the Middle East     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Material Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Australian Historical Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
French Politics, Culture & Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
American Journal of Primatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Anthropology & Archeology of Eurasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Evolutionary Anthropology Issues News and Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Anthropological Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Pragmatics & Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Ethos     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Field Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Anthropology of Work Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Visual Anthropology: Published in cooperation with the Commission on Visual Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Culture & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Anthropology & Humanism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Latin American & Caribbean Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Mental Health, Religion & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Archeological Papers of The American Anthropological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Buildings & Landscapes: Journal of the Vernacular Architecture Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Anthropology Now     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Cultural Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Linguistic Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Reviews in Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Visual Anthropology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Anthropology in Action : Journal for Applied Anthropology in Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Food and Foodways: Explorations in the History and Culture of     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Dialectical Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Museum Anthropology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Asian and African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Geografiska Annaler, Series B : Human Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Ethnomusicology Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Tourism Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Cultural History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Anthropology News     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Anthropological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
E&G Quaternary Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Anthropology of Consciousness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
L'Homme     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cahiers d’études africaines     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
African American Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
East Central Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
POLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Osteoarchaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Anthropologie et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Progress in Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asian Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
L'Anthropologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Antiquaries Journal, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Historical Biology: An International Journal of Paleobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Transforming Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Myth & Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Chinese Sociology & Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Collaborative Anthropologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Transcultural Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Ateliers d'anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Focaal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Cultural Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Levant     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Anthropologie et santé     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anthropological Journal of European Cultures     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Turcica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Human Organization     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Primates     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Australian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Histories of Anthropology Annual     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Modern Greek Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Gradhiva     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Civilisations     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Oceania     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Arctic Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Polynesian Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal des anthropologues     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Canadian Studies/Revue d'études canadiennes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Quotidian : Dutch Journal for the Study of Everyday Life     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cuadernos de Antropologia Social     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
The Australian Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Acta Ethnographica Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Listening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Terrain     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Exchange     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
General Anthropology Bulletin of The General Anthropology Division     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Gesture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Social Science Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Burma Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Revista de Antropologia     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Alteridades     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Anatomical Science International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Socio-anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
South Asian Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Quaternaire     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Behemoth     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
South Asian Diaspora     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Images re-vues : histoire, anthropologie et théorie de l'art     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Antipoda : Revista de Antropología y Arqueología     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Recherches sociologiques et anthropologiques     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Durkheimian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
HOMO - Journal of Comparative Human Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bulletin de l’APAD     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Estudios Atacameños     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
L'Atelier du CRH     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Transnational American Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Structure and Dynamics: eJournal of Anthropological and Related Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Zoosystematics and Evolution - Mitteilungen Aus Dem Museum Fur Naturkunde Zu Berlin     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cadernos de Estudos Africanos     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. Ciências Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuicuilco     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Desacatos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Andes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Boletin de Antropologia Universidad de Antioquia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indiana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Antropologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tabula Rasa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal for the Anthropology of North America (JANA)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Southwest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cahiers de l'Urmis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Totem : The University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tipití : Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethnographic Praxis in Industry Conference     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intersecciones en Antropologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chungara (Arica) - Revista de Antropologia Chilena     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Apparence(s)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Terrae Incognitae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Nuevo mundo mundos nuevos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Scripta Ethnologica     Open Access  
Revista de Antropología Social     Open Access  
Mitologicas     Open Access  
Liminar. Estudios Sociales y Humanisticos     Open Access  
Avá. Revista de Antropologia     Open Access  
Treballs de Sociolingüística Catalana     Open Access  
Anthropologischer Anzeiger     Full-text available via subscription  
Mélanges de la Casa de Velázquez     Partially Free  
Recherches amérindiennes au Québec     Full-text available via subscription  
Runa : Archivo para las Ciencias del Hombre     Open Access  
Papeles de Trabajo. Centro de Estudios Interdisciplinarios en Etnolingüística y Antropología Socio-Cultural     Open Access  
Trace     Open Access  
Interações (Campo Grande)     Open Access  
Journeys     Full-text available via subscription  
human_ontogenetics     Hybrid Journal  

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Similar Journals
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Field Methods
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.568
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 15  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1525-822X - ISSN (Online) 1552-3969
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • Daily and Momentary Variability in Sleep, Stress, and Well-being Data in
           Two Samples of Health Care Workers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Soomi Lee, Christina X. Mu, Rhitik Joshi, Arooj Khan
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) can capture how sleep, stress, and well-being are related within individuals. However, the use of EMA involves participant burden, which may be a major barrier when studying at-risk populations like frontline workers. To guide future research interested in using EMA, this study examined variance components in sleep, stress, and well-being variables collected from health care workers. Two samples of hospital nurses (60 inpatient, 84 outpatient) responded to 2-week smartphone-based EMA. Adherence to the EMA protocol was good in both samples. Results from intraclass correlations showed more momentary variability in stressors and uplifts, more daily variability in sleep, fatigue, and physical symptoms, and more between-person variability in affect, rumination, and work quality. Across the variables, however, there was substantial within-person variability. Variance components were relatively consistent between workdays and non-workdays and between week 1 and week 2. Some nuanced between-sample differences were noted.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-10-27T11:14:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X221132425
       
  • Effects of Prepaid Postage Stamps and Postcard Incentives in a Web Survey
           Experiment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Georg-Christoph Haas, Marieke Volkert, Monika Senghaas
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      Even small monetary incentives, e.g., a one-dollar bill in a postal invitation letter, can increase the response rate in a web survey. However, in the euro currency area, the smallest amount of monetary incentive for a postal invitation is a five-euro bill, which is costly. As such, we conducted a random experiment with prepaid stamp and postcard incentives as affordable alternatives. We compare the effect of our experimental groups with a control group in terms of response rates, response rates in a subsequent wave, data linkage consent, and data collection costs. Compared with the control group, the postcard incentive has no effect on our outcomes except overall costs. Using a prepaid stamp incentive increases the response rate overall but with different effect sizes for subgroups. We find no effect of stamp incentives on response rates in a subsequent wave or data linkage consent.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-10-27T02:25:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X221132401
       
  • What about the Less IT Literate' A Comparison of Different Postal
           Recruitment Strategies to an Online Panel of the General Population

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Barbara Felderer, Jessica M. E. Herzing
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      Even though the proportion of individuals who are not equipped to participate in online surveys is constantly decreasing, many surveys face an under-representation of individuals who do not feel IT literate enough to participate. Using experimental data from a probability-based online panel, we study which recruitment survey mode strategy performs best in recruiting less IT-literate persons for an online panel. The sampled individuals received postal invitations to conduct the recruitment survey in a self-completion mode. We experimentally vary four recruitment survey mode strategies: one online mode strategy, two sequential mixed-mode strategies, and one concurrent mode strategy. We find the recruitment survey mode strategies to have a major effect on the sample composition of the recruitment survey, but the differences between the strategies vanish once respondents are asked to proceed with the panel online.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-10-26T05:20:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X221132940
       
  • Are Voter Rolls Suitable Sampling Frames for Household Surveys'
           Evidence from India

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ruchika Joshi, Jeffery McManus, Karan Nagpal, Andrew Fraker
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      We examine the use of publicly available voter rolls for household survey sampling as an alternative to household listings or field-based sampling methods. Using voter rolls for sampling can save most of the cost of constructing a sampling frame relative to a household listing, but there is limited evidence about their accuracy and completeness. We conducted a household listing in 13 polling stations in India comprising 2,416 households across four states and compared the listing to voter rolls for the same polling stations. We show that voter rolls include 91% of the households found in the household listing. We conduct simulations to show that sampling from voter rolls produces estimates of household-level economic variables with minimal bias. These results suggest that voter rolls may be suitable for constructing household sampling frames, particularly in rural India.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-10-25T09:28:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X221135369
       
  • “Are You …”: An Examination of Incomplete Question Stems in
           Self-administered Surveys

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nestor Hernandez, Kristen Olson, Jolene D. Smyth
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      Questionnaire designers are encouraged to write questions as complete sentences. In self-administered surveys, incomplete question stems may reduce visual clutter but may also increase burden when respondents need to scan the response options to fully complete the question. We experimentally examine the effects of three categories of incomplete question stems (incomplete conversational, incomplete ordinal, and incomplete nominal questions) versus complete question stems on 53 items in a probability web-mail survey. We examine item nonresponse, response time, selection of the first and last response options, and response distributions. We find that incomplete question stems take slightly longer to answer and slightly reduce the selection of the last response option but have no effect on item nonresponse rates or selection of the first response option. We conclude that questionnaire designers should follow current best practices to write complete questions, but deviations from complete questions will likely have limited effects.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-10-18T09:43:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X221134756
       
  • Comparing Readability Measures and Computer‐assisted Question Evaluation
           Tools for Self‐administered Survey Questions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rachel Stenger, Kristen Olson, Jolene D. Smyth
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      Questionnaire designers use readability measures to ensure that questions can be understood by the target population. The most common measure is the Flesch-Kincaid Grade level, but other formulas exist. This article compares six different readability measures across 150 questions in a self-administered questionnaire, finding notable variation in calculated readability across measures. Some question formats, including those that are part of a battery, require important decisions that have large effects on the estimated readability of survey items. Other question evaluation tools, such as the Question Understanding Aid (QUAID) and the Survey Quality Predictor (SQP), may identify similar problems in questions, making readability measures less useful. We find little overlap between QUAID, SQP, and the readability measures, and little differentiation in the tools’ prediction of item nonresponse rates. Questionnaire designers are encouraged to use multiple question evaluation tools and develop readability measures specifically for survey questions.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-10-14T04:09:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X221124469
       
  • A Critical Approach to Interviewing Academic Elites: Access, Trust, and
           Power

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yali Liu, Louisa Buckingham
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      To date, research on elite interviews has primarily focused on political or business settings in European and Anglo-American contexts. In this study, we examine the procedures involved in conducting elite interviews in academic settings, drawing on fieldwork with 53 senior scholars at 10 universities across five regions of northern China. We provide a detailed, critically reflective account of strategies to gain access, develop trust, and manage the power imbalance. Our account reveals the importance of the researcher’s professional identity in gaining participants’ trust and determining adequate forms of reciprocity.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-09-27T09:28:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X221114226
       
  • The Devil Is in the Details: A Randomized Experiment Assessing the Effect
           of Providing Examples in a Survey Question across Countries

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Eva Aizpurua, Gianmaria Bottoni, Rory Fitzgerald
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the widespread use of examples in survey questions, very few studies have examined their impact on survey responses, and the evidence is mainly based on data collected in the United States using questionnaires in English. This study builds on previous research by examining the effects of providing examples using data from a cross-national probability-based web panel implemented in Estonia (n = 730), Great Britain (n = 685), and Slovenia (n = 529) during Round 8 of the European Social Survey (2017/18). Respondents were randomly assigned a survey question measuring confidence in social media using Facebook and Twitter as examples, or another condition in which no examples were offered. The results show that confidence in social media was significantly lower in the example condition, although the effect size was small. Confidence in social media varied across countries, and the effect of providing examples was heterogeneous across countries and education levels. The implications of these findings are discussed.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-09-16T01:23:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X221115506
       
  • Improving Sampling Probability Definitions with Predictive Algorithms

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Matthew Jannetti, Amy Carroll-Scott, Erikka Gilliam, Irene Headen, Maggie Beverly, Félice Lê-Scherban
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      Place-based initiatives often use resident surveys to inform and evaluate interventions. Sampling based on well-defined sampling frames is important but challenging for initiatives that target subpopulations. Databases that enumerate total population counts can produce overinclusive sampling frames, resulting in costly outreach to ineligible participants. Quantifying eligibility before sampling using machine learning algorithms can improve efficiency and reduce costs. We developed a model to improve sampling for the West Philly Promise Neighborhood’s biennial population-representative survey of households with children within a geographic footprint. This study proposes a method to estimate probability of study eligibility by building a well-calibrated predictive model using existing administrative data sources. Six machine-learning models were evaluated; logistic regression provided the best balance of accuracy and understandable probabilities. This approach can be a blueprint for other population-based studies whose sampling frames cannot be well defined using traditional sources.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-09-15T03:22:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X221113181
       
  • Ethnographic Methods for Identifying Cultural Concepts of Distress:
           Developing Reliable and Valid Measures

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jeffrey G. Snodgrass, Alexandra Brewis, H. J. François Dengah, William W. Dressler, Bonnie N. Kaiser, Brandon A. Kohrt, Emily Mendenhall, Seth Sagstetter, Lesley J. Weaver, Katya X. Zhao
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      We review ethnographic methods that allow researchers to assess distress in a culturally sensitive manner. We begin with an overview of standardized biomedical and psychological approaches to assessing distress cross-culturally. We then focus on literature describing the development of reliable and valid culturally sensitive assessment tools that can serve as complements or alternatives to biomedical categories and diagnostic frameworks. The methods we describe are useful in identifying forms of suffering—expressed in culturally salient idioms of distress—that might be misidentified by biomedical classifications. We highlight the utility of a cognitive anthropological theoretical approach for developing measures that attend to local cultural categories of knowledge and experience. Attending to cultural insider perspectives is necessary because expressions of distress, thresholds of tolerance for distress, expectations about stress inherent in life, conceptions of the good life, symptom expression, and modes of help-seeking vary across cultures.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-08-04T12:58:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X221113178
       
  • Challenges and Opportunities to Recruiting and Engaging with Gay Male
           Latino Sexual Assault Survivors

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Daniel Jacobson López, Antonio García, Rafael Engel, John L. Jackson
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      There is a paucity of empirical literature examining the experiences of gay Latino sexual assault survivors in the United States, due in part because there is little research focused on how to effectively recruit and engage Latino sexual assault survivors as participants in the research process. While researchers have utilized various recruitment methods to engage with gay Latino men, they have not focused specifically on sexual assault survivors. To address this gap, this study examined effective strategies for recruiting and engaging with gay Latino sexual assault survivors. Various recruitment methods were used, and social media-based recruitment methods proved to be the most effective. Researchers need to develop rapport and trust during the screening interview and avoid the risk of re-traumatization.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T05:32:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X221103736
       
  • Using Attributes of Survey Items to Predict Response Times May Benefit
           Survey Research

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stefan Schneider, Haomiao Jin, Bart Orriens, Doerte U. Junghaenel, Arie Kapteyn, Erik Meijer, Arthur A. Stone
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      Researchers have become increasingly interested in response times to survey items as a measure of cognitive effort. We used machine learning to develop a prediction model of response times based on 41 attributes of survey items (e.g., question length, response format, linguistic features) collected in a large, general population sample. The developed algorithm can be used to derive reference values for expected response times for most commonly used survey items.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T04:50:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X221100904
       
  • Using Systematic Social Observations to Measure Crime Prevention through
           Environmental Design and Disorder: In-situ Observations, Photographs, and
           Google Street View Imagery

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Marlies Sas, Thom Snaphaan, Lieven J.R. Pauwels, Koen Ponnet, Wim Hardyns
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      This study focuses on the use of systematic social observations (SSO) to measure crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) and disorder. To improve knowledge about measurement issues in small area research, SSO is conducted by means of three different methods: in-situ, photographs, and Google Street View (GSV) imagery. By evaluating the methodological quality of the observation methods, the results of our study suggest that virtual SSO approaches have considerable promise for the reliable assessment of physical properties of small areas. We discuss challenges and provide avenues for future research to encourage the evolution of a more reliable approach to measure the physical environment.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-03-02T12:33:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X221074768
       
  • How Did We Develop a Photographic Guide of Biodiverse Food Plants to
           Support Food Consumption Studies'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ially D. O. Ribeiro, Natalia A. D. N. Batista, Severina Carla V. Cunha Lima, Michelle Cristine M. Jacob
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      This short take explains how we developed a photographic guide for assessing biodiversity in food consumption studies with taxonomy accuracy. To build the guide, we followed the “Guidelines on Assessing Biodiverse Foods in Dietary Intake Surveys” of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations. As far as we know, this is the first tool developed in Brazil to support dietary surveys that consider food biodiversity. As researchers, this guide may help us make local biodiverse food more visible in food studies, improving our capacity to evaluate their contribution to nutritional and cultural outcomes.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T03:54:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X221083424
       
  • Short Take: Do Postal Stamps (Still) Lead to a Higher Response Rate'
           An Empirical Test in Belgium

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      Authors: Marc Hooghe, Dieter Stiers
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      When conducting a postal survey, a traditional recommendation is to use paper postage stamps instead of an automated postage system, to make sure that invitations have a more personal and attractive appearance. In this research note, we investigate whether this traditional recommendation is still valid. In the autumn of 2020, a postal survey was conducted among high-school teachers in Belgium strictly adhering to the Dillman protocol. The overall response rate was 43.4%. Invitations with a real paper postage stamp had a three-percentage points higher response rate (44.9% versus 41.8%), but this difference proved not to be significant. There are no significant gender or age differences between the groups. In addition, the presence or absence of a paper stamp did not influence the respondents’ choice for answering the questionnaire online or on paper, as those who received a stamped envelope were equally likely to choose the online answering tool.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-02-25T05:48:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X211072350
       
  • Advance Translation—The Remedy to Improve Translatability of Source
           Questionnaires' Results of a Think-Aloud Study

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      Authors: Brita Dorer
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      Advance translation is a method of source questionnaire development for multilingual survey projects to enhance translatability and (inter)cultural portability. The aim is to minimize translation issues in the final translation stage. I empirically tested the results of a previously conducted advance translation in a think-aloud study and analyzed the utterances made in a mixed-method approach, calculating chi-square statistics and cross-checking these by observational notes of the think-aloud sessions. My study confirms the usefulness of advance translation in making source items better to translate, thus improving final translation quality. It appears to be particularly useful for comprehensibility issues of the source text, irrespective of the target language. I recommend that advance translations be carried out into all languages and cultures into which the final source questionnaire is to be translated. This will improve source questionnaire translatability and, thus, final translation and overall cross-cultural data quality.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T09:15:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X211072343
       
  • The Effects of Prompt Interventions on Web Survey Response Rate and Data
           Quality Measures

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      Authors: Hanyu Sun, Andrew Caporaso, David Cantor, Terisa Davis, Kelly Blake
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      Previous survey research has found that prompt interventions for speeding and straightlining were effective at reducing these undesirable response behaviors in web surveys. However, the effects of prompt interventions on data quality measures are mixed, and it is unclear how prompt interventions affect key survey estimates. We conducted an experiment on prompt interventions using the National Cancer Institute’s 2019 Health Information National Trends Survey Push-to-Web Pilot Study. We used two types of prompts, one targeted speeding and the other targeted straightlining. We found no significant differences between the prompt and no-prompt conditions in overall web response rates. Also, we found that web respondents assigned to the prompt condition spent more time on the survey, had a lower percent of straightlining, and a lower percent of speeding on grid questions. Regarding key survey estimates, there were significant differences on estimates for one out of 40 items tested.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-02-18T07:38:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X211072358
       
  • Participatory Modeling: A Methodology for Engaging Stakeholder Knowledge
           and Participation in Social Science Research

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      Authors: Barbara Quimby, Melissa Beresford
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      Participatory modeling (PM) is an engaged research methodology for creating analog or computer-based models of complex systems, such as socio–environmental systems. Used across a range of fields, PM centers stakeholder knowledge and participation to create more internally valid models that can inform policy and increase engagement and trust between communities and research teams. The PM process also presents opportunities for knowledge co-production and eliciting cross-sectional and longitudinal data on stakeholders’ worldviews and knowledge, risk assessment, decision-making, and social learning. We present an overview of the stages for PM and how it can be used for community-based, stakeholder-engaged social science research.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T06:14:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X221076986
       
  • A Community-Partnered Approach to Social Network Data Collection for a
           Large and Partial Network

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      Authors: Maxwell Izenberg, Ryan Brown, Cora Siebert, Ron Heinz, Aida Rahmattalabi, Phebe Vayanos
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      In the small town of Sitka, Alaska, frequent and often catastrophic landslides threaten residents. One challenge associated with disaster preparedness is access to timely and reliable risk information. As with many small but diverse towns, who or what is a trustworthy source of information is often contested. To help improve landslide communication in Sitka, we used a community-partnered approach to social network analysis to identify (1) potential key actors for landslide risk communication and (2) structural holes that may inhibit efficient and equitable communication. This short take describes how we built trust and developed adaptive data collection methods to build an approach that was acceptable and actionable for Sitka, Alaska. This approach could be useful to other researchers for conducting social network analysis to improve risk communication, particularly in rural and remote contexts.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T03:56:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X221074769
       
  • Using the Census Planning Database to Generate Differential Expected Yield
           Rates to Self-administered Mail Surveys

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      Authors: Taylor Lewis, Joseph McMichael
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      Expected yield rates are essential to a survey’s data collection plan, as they inform requisite sample sizes to meet the survey’s objectives. Given an overall expected yield rate for a self-administered mail survey, this short take describes a simple method for using the Census Planning Database to assign differential yield rates to lower-level geographies within the study area.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-02-14T07:57:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X221074764
       
  • Infrequent Identity Signals, Multiple Correspondence, and Detection Risks
           in Audit Correspondence Studies

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      Authors: Catherine Balfe, Patrick Button, Mary Penn, David J. Schwegman
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      Audit correspondence studies are field experiments that test for discriminatory behavior in active markets. Researchers measure discrimination by comparing how responsive individuals (“audited units”) are to correspondences from different types of people. This article elaborates on the tradeoffs researchers face between sending audited units only one correspondence and sending them multiple correspondences, especially when including less common identity signals in the correspondences. We argue that when researchers use audit correspondence studies to measure discrimination against individuals that infrequently interact with audited units, they raise the risk that these audited units become aware they are being studied or otherwise act differently. We also argue that sending multiple pieces of correspondence can increase detection risk. We present the result of an audit correspondence study that demonstrates how detection can occur for these reasons, leading to significantly attenuated (biased toward zero) estimates of discrimination.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-01-13T07:38:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X211057623
       
  • Local and Transnational Identity, Positionality and Knowledge Production
           in Africa and the African Diaspora

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      Authors: Kudus Oluwatoyin Adebayo, Emeka T. Njoku
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      How does shared identity between researcher and the researched influence trust-building for data generation and knowledge production' We reflect on this question based on two separate studies conducted by African-based researchers in sociology and political science in Nigeria. We advanced two interrelated positions. The first underscores the limits of national belonging as shorthand for insiderness, while the second argues that when shared national/group identity is tensioned other intersecting positions and relations take prominence. We also show that the researched challenge and resist unequal power relations through interview refusal or by evading issues that the researcher considers important, but the participant perceives as intrusive. We shed light on the vagaries, overlaps, and similarities in the dynamics of belonging and positionality in researching Africans in and outside Africa as home-based researchers. Our contribution advances the understanding of field dynamics in the production of local and cross-border knowledge on Africa/Africans.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-01-05T04:00:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X211051574
       
  • A Machine Learning Model Helps Process Interviewer Comments in
           Computer-assisted Personal Interview Instruments: A Case Study

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      Authors: Catherine Billington, Gonzalo Rivero, Andrew Jannett, Jiating (Kristin) Chen
      First page: 275
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      During data collection, field interviewers often append notes or comments to a case in open text fields to request updates to case-level data. Processing these comments can improve data quality, but many are non-actionable, and processing remains a costly manual task. This article presents a case study using a novel application of machine learning tools to assist in the evaluation of these comments. Using over 5,000 comments from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, we built features that were fed to a machine learning model to predict a grouping category for each comment as previously assigned by data technicians to expedite processing. The model achieved high top-3 accuracy and was incorporated into a production tool for editing. A qualitative evaluation of the tool also provided encouraging results. This application of machine learning tools allowed a small but worthwhile increase in processing efficiency, while maintaining exacting standards for data quality.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T08:29:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X221107053
       
  • Can Recall Data Be Trusted' Evaluating Reliability of Interview Data
           on Traditional Multilingualism in Highland Daghestan

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      Authors: Michael Daniel, Alexey Koshevoy, Ilya Schurov, Nina Dobrushina
      First page: 288
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we address the issue of reliability of quantitative data on multilingualism of the past obtained as recall data. More specifically, we investigate whether the interviewees’ assessments of the language repertoires of their late relatives (indirect data) provide results that are quantitatively similar to those obtained from the people of the same age range themselves (direct data). The empirical data we use come from an ongoing field study of traditional multilingualism in Daghestan (Russia). We trained machine learning models to see whether they can detect differences in indirect and direct data. We conclude that our indirect quantitative data on L2 other than Russian are essentially similar to direct data, while there may be a small but systematic underestimation when reporting others’ knowledge of Russian.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-10-01T11:53:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X221115844
       
  • A Comparison of Three Designs for List-style Open-ended Questions in Web
           Surveys

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      Authors: Tanja Kunz, Katharina Meitinger
      First page: 303
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      Although list-style open-ended questions generally help us gain deeper insights into respondents’ thoughts, opinions, and behaviors, the quality of responses is often compromised. We tested a dynamic and a follow-up design to motivate respondents to give higher quality responses than with a static design, but without overburdening them. Our results showed that a follow-up design achieved longer responses with more themes and theme areas than a static design. In contrast, the dynamic design produced the shortest answers with the fewest themes and theme areas. No differences in item nonresponse and only minor differences in additional response burden were found among the three list-style designs. Our study shows that design features and timing are crucial to clarify the desired response format and motivate respondents to give high-quality answers to list-style open-ended questions.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-09-30T04:24:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X221115831
       
  • Effects of Question Characteristics on Item Nonresponse in Telephone and
           Web Survey Modes

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      Authors: Oliver Lipps, Gian-Andrea Monsch
      First page: 318
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      Telephone surveys face more and more criticism because of decreasing coverage and increasing costs, and the risk of producing socially desirable answers. Consequently, survey administrators consider switching their surveys to the web mode, although the web mode is more susceptible to item nonresponse. Still, we do not know whether this is true for all question types. In this article, we analyze to what extent item nonresponse depends on question characteristics such as their form or difficulty in the telephone and the web mode. We use data from an experiment in which individuals randomly sampled from a population register are experimentally assigned to these two modes. Distinguishing effects on the frequency of don’t know responses, item refusals, and mid-scale responding, we find more don’t know responses and item refusals for the web mode generally, but no differences for mid-scale responding. However, this relationship depends on the characteristics of the question.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-08-28T02:28:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X221115838
       
  • Conditional Pop-up Reminders Reduce Incidence of Rounding in Web Surveys

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      Authors: Rainer Schnell, Sarah Redlich, Anja S. Göritz
      First page: 334
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      Frequency of behaviors or amounts of variables of interest are essential topics in many surveys. The use of heuristics might cause rounded answers, resulting in the increased occurrence of end-digits (called heaping or digit-preference). For web surveys (or CASI), we propose using a conditional prompt as input validation if digits indicating heaping are entered. We report an experiment, where respondents in an online access panel (n = 2,590) were randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) no input validation; (2) conditional input validation if rounding was presumed; and (3) input validation every time a numerical value was entered. Conditional input validation reduces heaping for variables with high proportions of heaped values. Unconditional input validation seems to be less effective.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-09-29T10:14:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X221115829
       
  • The Issue of Noncompliance in Attention Check Questions: False Positives
           in Instructed Response Items

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      Authors: Henning Silber, Joss Roßmann, Tobias Gummer
      First page: 346
      Abstract: Field Methods, Ahead of Print.
      Attention checks detect inattentiveness by instructing respondents to perform a specific task. However, while respondents may correctly process the task, they may choose to not comply with the instructions. We investigated the issue of noncompliance in attention checks in two web surveys. In Study 1, we measured respondents’ attitudes toward attention checks and their self-reported compliance. In Study 2, we experimentally varied the reasons given to respondents for conducting the attention check. Our results showed that while most respondents understand why attention checks are conducted, a nonnegligible proportion of respondents evaluated them as controlling or annoying. Most respondents passed the attention check; however, among those who failed the test, 61% seem to have failed the task deliberately. These findings reinforce that noncompliance is a serious concern with attention check instruments. The results of our experiment showed that more respondents passed the attention check if a comprehensible reason was given.
      Citation: Field Methods
      PubDate: 2022-09-30T09:31:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525822X221115830
       
 
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