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  Subjects -> ANTHROPOLOGY (Total: 398 journals)
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Dialectical Anthropology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.321
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-0786 - ISSN (Online) 0304-4092
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Uneven “genocide” memorialisation: a hindrance to achieving
           post-colonial equality'

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      Abstract: Abstract  Diverse memorials of the Nazi-engendered Holocaust are legion in today’s world. They sustain a sense of painful heritage for that genocide’s survivors and their descendants while also providing ethical and political lessons and reminders for present and future generations. While the historical record provides evidence of many other massacres, some of them genocides, those committed by European colonialism in particular have been only minimally memorialised or monumentalised; and scant literature exists about the pain they have caused or the consequent, often unspoken, legacy of their victims’ and their descendants’ long-term suffering and marginalisation. This often results in little substantive, “formal” memorialisation available for mobilisation in efforts to effect recognition for those who have so suffered and, ultimately, to effect restitution for them and their descendants. The article uses present-day South African examples to illustrate the consequences, in an already profoundly divided society rife with identitarian thinking, of how such unequal memorialisation reproduces persisting senses of colonial suppression and exacerbates structural impediments to achieving social justice and equality.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
       
  • Bones and injustices: provenance research, restitutions and identity
           politics

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      Abstract: Abstract The last decade has witnessed increasing numbers of “provenance research” projects investigating the histories of human remains in academic collections and leading to their restitution. Such projects explicitly and implicitly address the historical injustices and their continuities of amassing people’s mortal remains and their subsequent use by those who have appropriated them. This article considers which historical wrongdoings provenance research and restitutions attempt to address and how effective they are in doing so. Firstly, the article points towards the relatively effective recognition of spiritual and emotional injustice. Secondly, it discusses the limited recognition of “race science’s” history and legacies and of its logic’s persistence in a social essentialism that inheres in contemporary handling of such human remains. Thirdly, it discusses how recognition of past oppression, dispossession and exploitation ties to broader political goals and attempts at redistribution.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
       
  • Why is identity politics not conducive to achieving sustained social
           justice'

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      Abstract: Abstract  Oppression of racialized and ethnic minorities and women needs to be adequately understood and effectively fought against. Identity politics (IP) appears to take oppression seriously. As an intellectual and political struggle for justice, IP has two inter-related components: recognition/respect and economic distribution for identity-groups, with the first being the predominant component. IP has highlighted the importance of oppression and is right to emphasize recognition as an aspect of social justice. Yet, IP cannot be a good tool for the fight for sustained social justice because of its theoretical and political deficiency. IP’s biggest theoretical problem is its inherent neglect of the causal primacy of objective class relations. As a result, it over-emphasizes special oppression as a cause of humanity’s major problems. It lacks a rigorous conception of oppression itself as a condition that is common to many different oppressed groups, nor does it have an objective explanation of oppression. IP’s theoretical deficiency leads to its political deficiency. The latter is manifested in its neglect of class politics, its overemphasis on linguistic resistance, and its fight for representational politics whereby small groups of people defined on the basis of identity receive some limited material benefits. Based on an empiricist, idealist, individualist, and reformist approach, IP has no strategy to unite all the different oppressed groups based on their objective interests. Just as trade union politics is a bourgeois politics of workers, IP is a bourgeois politics of oppressed groups. A class theory of society recognizing oppression, and a class-based political strategy aiming to eliminate exploitation and oppression constitute the only alternative to IP.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
       
  • Russia’s nationalities policy and the country’s Central Asian
           residents’ identity-based activities

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      Abstract: Abstract As applied to the Russian case, identity politics means first and foremost a state strategy that regulates the public expressions of ethnicity-based solidarity in a way that prevents them from being motivated by a sense of injustice. With regard to Russia’s Central Asian residents, injustice lies in tacit racist treatment by officials, police officers, employers and landlords. The peculiarity of officially recognised Central Asian organisations operating on the basis of state nationalities policy institutions is that they contribute to maintaining the status quo. They do so through orchestrating cultural activities that reproduce stereotypical images of harmonious ethnic diversity in Russia, as well as by supervising labour migrants. However, there are members in these organisations who do manage to use the resources of Russia’s rather idiosyncratic nationalities policy to fulfil their own aspirations, i.e. to practice identity politics for which the policy is not intended.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
       
  • Digital dialectics: culture, labor, and power in informational capitalism

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      Abstract: Abstract Based on extant literature on call centers and my own research in digitization in Mexico and Brazil, in this paper I address the relations between culture, labor, and digital technology in informational capitalism. Drawing on media theory and the anthropological work of Ana Tsing and Sidney Mintz, among others, I propose a conceptual framework on labor’s digital dialectics, within which the contradictions between algorithmic logic and the cultural layer occur. I argue that current technological subordination is based on a set of frictions and tensions that intensificate the contradiction between technology and culture as subordinated digitization while at the same time extensificate capitalistic informatization as digital subordination.
      PubDate: 2023-02-25
       
  • The unstable capitalist hegemony: dispossession, proletarianization, and
           conservatism in Turkey

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      Abstract: Abstract The present study seeks to examine the position of conservative workers between relations of production and daily political practices in the context of hegemony. The study will first touch upon the economic-political character of the mode of capital accumulation in Turkey. In the context of core-periphery dualism, relations in the base forced social classes in Turkey to become a part of the global network of production and neoliberal hegemony of the new world order. Under conditions of dependent semi-peripheral capitalism, the working class is situated in the public sphere, in the habitus of a politically excluded social status in line with efforts for conservatizing daily life. Political tendencies of conservative workers manifest themselves through criticisms targeting modernism rather than the capitalist mode of production. While turning out as a hegemonic ideology bringing along practices of submissiveness on the part of individuals in the process where capitalism reproduces itself, the conservative thought also socializes an epic and pastoral culture sphere that bars the development of class consciousness in wage workers. Hence, while proletarianization in production relations and depreciation of labor expands, there emerges control over daily life in civil society. The subject of this control is the typology of conservative workers conceptualized as the paid believer in the light of a field survey conducted in Ankara, the capital city of Turkey. The significant findings of the research confirm that the category of paid believer adapts to practices of control at the workplace under the influence of hegemonic ideologies. Consequently, in daily life, the category of the paid believer has a pragmatist essence that combines with submissiveness and fatalism.
      PubDate: 2023-02-22
       
  • The shortcomings of identity: Champeta, culture, and inequality in
           Cartagena, Colombia

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper explores the connections between the culture and living conditions of Afro-descendants in Colombian society. The specific object of study is Champeta, a Black urban music associated with social resistance. The text analyzes Champeta’s evolution in Colombia’s multicultural frame. It concludes with an analysis of these multicultural premises’ shortcomings, especially regarding the material improvement of Black Colombians’ living conditions. This text contributes to current debates on cultural diversity in Latin America.
      PubDate: 2023-02-16
       
  • Identity politics and social justice

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      PubDate: 2023-02-14
       
  • Dialectical anthropology after neoliberalism

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      PubDate: 2023-02-11
       
  • In memory – memory still very much living – of Jeremy Beckett

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      PubDate: 2023-02-10
       
  • The “pervasive” state: entrepreneurial identities,
           frustration, and gratitude

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      Abstract: Abstract The state has taken center stage during the COVID-19 pandemic in unanticipated ways. Rescuing private companies with public money exemplifies this, highlighting substantial state interventionism amidst a fairly dominant discourse of our times: that of the “neoliberal state.” In this article, we focus on how owners of micro-businesses in Croatia constructed state practices during the COVID-19 pandemic and how interactions with the state prior to the pandemic contributed to these constructions. We reflect on the state as a historically embedded social relation that is understood, experienced, and felt. Drawing on interviews, we develop three themes that illustrate the layered and wrought relationship between business owners and the state, as they understand it to “exist”—state-mediated constructions of business owners: tycoons and heroes; frustrating state practices; contradictory images—the benevolent state. The pervasiveness of the state is reflected in how the post-socialist state has shaped professional identities in the business sector, in the overwhelmingly negative emotional landscape state practices seem to propel, but also in hints of state benevolence during the COVID-19 pandemic. The identified nexus of emotions in relation to state practices—exasperation, disappointment, indignation, gratitude—and their historical embeddedness are a strong indication of how present-day constructions of the state are an expression of “accumulated history.” Based on their experiences with state practices, our interlocutors construct the state as corrupt, incompetent, inefficient, uncaring, coercive, only on occasion benevolent, and in a highly affective register as “unnecessary,” while also expressing a desire for a state that “cares,” particularly in disaster settings.
      PubDate: 2023-02-02
       
  • Contracting imaginations: on the political and hermeneutical monopoly of
           identity politics

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      Abstract: Abstract Identity politics has become a prevailing, almost monopolising, approach in many contemporary movements for social justice. Such prevalence calls for an urgent critical analysis of its proposal and outcomes. This paper seeks to contribute to this study by exploring two assumptions that underlie identity politics as a political and conceptual approach: first, that forms of subjection are always or predominantly articulated around identities; second, that there is a “we” constituted around such identities, which is homogenous and almost a self-evident given. Through an analysis of two examples from contemporary mainstream feminism (affirmative action and punitivism), it assesses the defence of identity as a sufficient and/or necessary hermeneutical tool to understand oppression and resistance, as well as the actual reach of the identity-based “we” affirmed by feminism. It concludes that countering the monopoly of identity politics by rescaling identity as one factor among others, and identity-based tactics as some among many, is a better approach to struggles for social justice.
      PubDate: 2023-01-31
       
  • Schools as Drivers of Capitalist Accumulation Conditional Socialized
           Reproduction in Shenzhen

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      Abstract: Abstract Based on fieldwork in an urbanized village of Shenzhen, this paper analyzes the place of schools in the reproduction of Chinese state capitalism. It retraces the circuit of socialized capital that allows for the social reproduction of the native elite and the exclusion of many migrant workers in the context of Shenzhen’s development as a special economic zone and its efforts to upgrade the economy. The native villagers, now forming an urban upper-class of rentiers, have capitalized on their overseas connections and capital accumulation to finance their school, allowing for their elite’s upward social mobility after, but also already under Mao. After China’s transition to capitalism, this school has served as an asset in generating value in the context of redevelopment and the real estate-driven upgrading of Shenzhen’s economy. Property ownership is now a major criterion in points-based systems for accessing school places. I make two interrelated arguments. First, there is a closer relationship between the secondary circuit of socialized capital and the larger circuit of capital than what the literature on social reproduction implies. Second, the conditionality of quality education upon value generation amounts to separating the population deemed worthy of socialized reproduction and the surplus population that is left out. The paper connects diverse strands of social reproduction theory, Althusser’s interpellation and ideological state apparatuses, feminist agentive social reproduction theories, and Bourdieu’s capital conversion recuperated within a Marxian framework, to provide an integrated approach to social reproduction within capitalism.
      PubDate: 2023-01-11
       
  • Why Gramsci'

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      PubDate: 2022-12-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s10624-022-09680-7
       
  • “Youth speaking truth to power”: intersectional decolonial
           activism in Namibia

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      Abstract: Abstract This article portrays a recent movement towards intersectional activism in urban Namibia. Since 2020, young Namibian activists have come together in campaigns to decolonize public space through removing colonial monuments and renaming streets. These have been linked to enduring structural violence and issues of gender and sexuality, especially queer and women’s reproductive rights politics, which have been expressly framed as perpetuated by coloniality. I argue that the Namibian protests amount to new political forms of intersectional decoloniality that challenge the notion of decolonial activism as identity politics. The Namibian case demonstrates that decolonial movements may not only emphatically not be steeped in essentialist politics but also that activists may oppose an identity-based politics which postcolonial ruling elites have promoted. I show that, for the Namibian movements’ ideology and practice, a fully intersectional approach has become central. They consciously juxtapose colonial memory with a living vision for the future to confront and situate colonial and apartheid history. Young Namibian activists challenge the intersectional inequalities and injustices, which, they argue, postcolonial Namibia inherited from its colonial–apartheid past: class inequality, racism, sexism, homophobia, and gender-based violence.
      PubDate: 2022-12-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s10624-022-09678-1
       
  • The common sense of expert activists: practitioners, scholars, and the
           problem of statelessness in Europe

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      Abstract: Abstract In this article, I follow a group of professionals in their efforts to address the problem of statelessness in Europe. My interlocutors divide the members of their group into “practitioners,” on the one hand, and “scholars” on the other. Relating this emic dichotomization to Antonio Gramsci’s dialectical take on common sense, I argue against a theoretical reductionism that regards expertise and activism as two essentially different and mostly separate endeavors, and put forward the concept of the “expert activist.” Unpacking what I call the “practitioner–scholar dilemma,” I show that in their effort to end statelessness, “practitioners” take a reformist route that aims at realizing citizenship for the stateless, while “scholars” are open to a more revolutionary path that contemplates the denaturalization and even the eradication of the state. By drawing on Gramsci, I suggest that the impasse the group encounters in their work might relate more to the structural constraints imposed by the state within or against which they operate than to the problem of statelessness they are trying to solve. This article contributes to a body of emergent work in anthropology that explores the intersection of scholarly expertise and activism.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Editorial

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      PubDate: 2022-11-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s10624-022-09676-3
       
  • Academia, Twitter wars, and suffocating social justice in Canada: the case
           of unrecognised Indigenous peoples

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      Abstract: Abstract The “woke movement” is now under fire globally. Seeking to right social injustice and battle racism, the woke movement has laudable intentions, but its implementation can exacerbate social inequalities. In the case of Canada, a social movement seeks to ferret out “Pretendians” or those White individuals deemed to be falsely assuming, and thus appropriating, Indigenous identity. Though this movement may seem righteous, the problem arises that individuals targeted are those who are Non-Status Indians and have yet to be recognised by the state, as well as Métis (or mixed-heritage people) whose historical communities have yet to be sanctioned by governments or courts, and who are also portrayed as being “Fétis” or fake Métis. Our challenge as researchers is to do the deep ethnographic, historical, and legal research to provide a nuanced understanding of indigeneity that does not constrain it solely to colonial models as the case studies provided will demonstrate.
      PubDate: 2022-11-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s10624-022-09677-2
       
  • Correction to: The common sense of expert activists: practitioners,
           scholars, and the problem of statelessness in Europe

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      PubDate: 2022-10-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s10624-022-09671-8
       
  • On the common sense of social reproduction: social assistance and
           ideologies of care in austerity Europe

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      Abstract: Abstract In this article, we examine the mobilization, justification, and enactment of ideologies of care and social reproduction in the field of religious charity-based social assistance in Italy and Portugal under austerity. Our framework combines the feminist critique of the naturalization of gendered inequalities with Gramsci’s notion of common sense. Drawing on ethnographic research in two mid-size cities in Italy (Brindisi) and Portugal (Setúbal), we address, from a comparative perspective, changes in the model of welfare redistribution enhanced by implementing austerity policies. We aim to illuminate how the gendered domestic sphere and the expansion of religious charities under austerity are tight together through ideologies of care and social reproduction, becoming operative in the concrete management of welfare redistribution and integral to the implementation and legitimation of emerging austerity welfare regimes. Focusing on the everyday and mundane tasks of charity work, we show the existence of a relational continuum between the gendered domestic sphere and charity voluntary work. We provide evidence of how naturalized visions and patterns of care inherent in family ideologies are transferred into the sphere of social assistance, hence recasting as moral and practical regulatory principles of welfare distribution. Finally, we show how the common sense of social reproduction ultimately becomes instrumental in the regressive naturalization of poverty at the core of the exclusionary and discriminatory patterns of welfare distribution.
      PubDate: 2022-10-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s10624-022-09668-3
       
 
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