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  Subjects -> ANTHROPOLOGY (Total: 398 journals)
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Dialectical Anthropology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.321
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-0786 - ISSN (Online) 0304-4092
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Correction to: Labour, control, and value: Marx meets Negri in Bitcoin
           mining

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      PubDate: 2022-03-01
       
  • Correction to: The road to Atil: Shlomo Sand, post-Zionism, and the
           dialectic of Khazaria

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      PubDate: 2022-03-01
       
  • The road to Atil: Shlomo Sand, post-Zionism, and the dialectic of Khazaria

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      PubDate: 2022-03-01
       
  • Oliver C. Cox and the political economy of racial capitalism

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      Abstract: Abstract Oliver C. Cox was one of the most important and accomplished US-based sociologists, labor historians, and socialist thinkers of the twentieth century. He produced a series of classic works on racial prejudice and race relations and the foundations and development of capitalism. Despite some recent interest in his work, likely due to the renewed interest in the concept of racial capitalism, in-depth analysis of Cox’s work remains underdeveloped. The aim of this paper is twofold. First, the paper shows that the development of racial prejudice was, for Cox, not only an invention of capitalism as a particular moment in history, but it was also always undergirded by the requirements of capitalist political economy. Second, I show the dynamics that Cox believed were required to establish the conditions for racially prejudiced working-class subjects. Part of capital’s ideological alibi was, for Cox, the development and sedimentation of working-class racial antagonism. Yet, Cox showed that racial antagonism among the working class was inherently contradictory and counter to working-class interests and was traceable to the social, political, and economic apparatus of the elite class. Because the elite class necessarily relies upon the exploitation of the labor supply, it likewise relies upon racial antagonism to maintain labor quiescence. The work of the social scientist, then, is to explain such asocial phenomena in materialist terms, thereby redirecting working-class energy toward solidarity and the horizon of socialist revolution.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
       
  • The child everyone has inside: anthropology and the labor theory of value

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper revisits the debate on the relevance of the labor theory of value for the anthropological task. It argues that the labor theory of value can creatively inform and reformulate in critical ways a variety of social issues addressed through anthropological lenses. The argument is sustained by two main exercises: first, a critical overview of the foundations of the labor theory of value outlines the reasons why it opened new grounds for anthropological and, more generally, for social-scientific enquiries. Second, a discussion of the key points of friction between scholarship that attempts to develop an “anthropological” theory of value as an end in itself and anthropological scholarship that resorts to the (labor) theory of value to critically inform research.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
       
  • Commentary on the special issue: anthropology and the labour theory of
           value

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      PubDate: 2022-03-01
       
  • Labour, control, and value: Marx meets Negri in Bitcoin mining

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      Abstract: This article analyses the production of Bitcoin through two contradictory approaches to value: the labour theory of value as formulated by Karl Marx and value as an effect of political control proposed by Antonio Negri. Bitcoin mining is used as an exemplary case of a decentralized network that utilizes abstract labour as a regulatory mechanism. The process of Bitcoin mining is described in detail, and its consequences for the organization of labour are discussed. I argue that Bitcoin mining is a form of socialized work where abstract labour becomes a mechanism of control and thus also a source of Bitcoin’s value. I further demonstrate the controlling aspects of abstract labour on three interdependent dimensions: control of Bitcoin’s integrity, control of access to the network, and control of the class positions within the network. Consequentially, Negri’s and Marx’s views on value serve as complementary approaches to value creation in decentralized networks.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
       
  • Big Data won’t feed the world: global agribusiness, digital imperialism,
           and the contested promises of a new Green Revolution

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      Abstract: Abstract In the face of looming environmental crises and a swelling global population, Big Data’s acolytes envision a “digital revolution” as a solution for global hunger. Interrogating this promise, we argue that Big Data’s imagined futures articulate the realms of international development and smallholder agriculture in the Global South with an ongoing digital reorganisation of global capitalism—integrating farmers into new informational modes of production, and reshaping the nature of labour and human–environment relations in the process. This reorganisation must be located within a long history of crises and spatio-technical fixes for capital accumulation. More specifically, we situate the prefigurations of Big Data along a trajectory of capitalist technical innovations implicated in the propagation of colonial logics, particularly through the apparatuses of international development—for example, through the technical regimes of the “Green Revolution”. The rhetoric of Big Data and its applications within global food systems both reproduce earlier logics of primitive accumulation and colonial biopolitics, and extend them into new forms of digital imperialism that, we suggest, express incipient mutations in the nature of surplus value itself as it is retooled for the Anthropocene era. Big Data therefore portends novel forms of expropriation that are at once material and immaterial.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
       
  • Cultural labor and the defetishization of environments: connecting
           ethnographies of tourism in Venezuela and Chile

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper compares the development of the tourism industry in two different Latin American locations: a municipality of Chile’s Araucanía and Venezuela’s Gran Sabana. In both locations, part of the indigenous population shows interest in the development of this industry, which presents potential as a source of locally generated income. This comparison focuses on examining how property rights and relations shape and are reshaped by the expansion of tourist activities in these locations, shedding light on two additional questions: first, the socioeconomic conditions that help explain the increasing participation of the indigenous population in the expansion of tourism in these regions; second, a cultural phenomenon that this expansion stimulates: the circulation of discursive representations of local environments as permanently inscribed with a particular form of collective labor. This paper will conceptualize this labor as “cultural labor” and, drawing from theorizations of the fetishism of commodities, will argue that the widespread appeals to this labor constitute a (paradoxical) form of discursive defetishization that is fostered by the logic of the tourist industry. This form of defetishization discursively subverts the principle of concealment that pervades commodity fetishism as theorized by Marx, but it is nonetheless a functional part of a social process that reinscribes and rearticulates capital as a social relation among the populations of these regions.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
       
  • Ben Fallaw and David Nugent, eds. State formation in the liberal era:
           capitalism and claims of citizenship in Mexico and Peru. Tucson, AZ:
           University of Arizona Press

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      PubDate: 2022-02-14
       
  • Tranquebar—the tsunami, heritage tourism, power, and memory in a
           South Indian fisher village

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      Abstract: Abstract Place-making strategies in the neoliberal era center on exploiting the relative advantages of particular sites in terms of investment, production of value, consumption, and accumulation. In the aftermath of disaster events, this can take the form of “disaster capitalism” as states and powerful assemblages of domestic and global capitalist interests seek to transform space in the name of reconstruction and recovery, taking advantage of the fact that constraints that may have tempered such goals before the disaster are temporarily put on hold due to the urgency of demands imposed by the disaster event. In this paper, I critically examine the development of heritage tourism as an economic development strategy designed to help a place “recover” while enforcing the relocation of most of its residents. In the aftermath of the devastating tsunami of 2004 in India’s Tamil Nadu state, the fisher village of Tharangambadi became the site of a reconstruction project involving on the one hand the relocation of artisanal fishers to new houses built inland by NGOs, and on the other, the rapid promotion of heritage tourism in parts that had been previously occupied by fisher households. Called Tranquebar by Europeans, Tharangambadi was once the key colonial outpost of the Danish East India Company, and in recent years began drawing the attention of Danish heritage enthusiasts. The tsunami and the reconstruction projects that emerged in its aftermath provided a powerful impetus to the goal of transforming portions of the village into a site for heritage tourism. I focus on two facets of this rebuilding process, one devoted to producing a specific set of spatial arrangements designed for what scholars of tourism refer to as the regulated consumption of difference, and two, the more complex and less visible though vital set of aligned processes involved in the production of this difference. If the former manifested in the remaking of physical space, the latter informed the rationale behind how that remaking was an unequal and elitist project linking the exclusion of fishers from the present to their systemic erasure from the past.
      PubDate: 2022-01-10
       
  • Notes on COVID 19 and the Contradictions of Capital II

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      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Challenging cow dung COVID therapies and bullshit state policies in India
           in 2021

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      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • At the fabric of history: Peru’s political struggle under (and
           against) the pandemic

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      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • What is history' Reflections from the edge of empires, nation-states,
           and disciplines

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      Abstract: Abstract Using a comparative, hemispheric perspective on Wayúu history and historicity in the Guajira peninsula, the essay outlines the political aims, projects, and laws of the Wayúu in relation to memory, ritual, ceremony, and territory, as well as empires, nation-states, and disciplines. It questions the primacy of written sources and their interpretation within the discipline of history and asks us to consider what oral traditions teach us about the relation between history, myth, and landscape. It specifies what Wayúu historical narratives tell us concerning aspirations for the future, explains the contexts in which they are mobilized and made public, and discusses the ways that Wayúu historians and intellectuals authorize their representations of the past in relation to kinship and lineage and jurisdiction, as well as how they make use of new technologies in pursuit of political legitimation and cultural preservation.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • COVID-19 in Romania—the militarization of social life and the
           banality of death

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      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • The ambivalence of slum politics in reactionary times in Recife, Brazil

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      Abstract: Abstract In this paper, we draw on the distinction between a “politics of negotiation” and a “politics of refusal” in order to highlight the ambivalence of “slum politics” in Recife, Brazil. Slum politics can be a radical politics of collective solidarity as was the case during the military dictatorship when a popular movement rooted in land occupations initiated the institutionalization of an internationally lauded participatory slum governance system. However, as our case shows, slum politics also has an opportunistic and reactionary side when community leaders seek individual advantage from their position as brokers between fellow slum dwellers and political patrons. We conclude that for slum dwellers, a good way for dealing with the internal contradictions of slum politics is engaging in a “politics of refusal” based on memories of destitution, eviction, and struggle, as an alternative to the “politics of negotiation” proposed by reformist political forces and social movements.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • The “naming of things”: US labor in the time of Covid-19

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      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Millenarist vaccination and the mediascape of Mexican politics

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      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Paradoxes of indigeneity: identity, the state, and the economy in
           Indonesia

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      Abstract: Abstract Contributing to recent debates on indigeneity, this article investigates contradictions of indigeneity, especially the “indigenous paradox,” that is, the formation of indigeneity through claiming sovereignty and autonomy from the state by acknowledging the very state and its laws as the framework for those claims, in the context of Indonesia. After analyzing how indigeneity came into existence in the Indonesian context, this article sheds light on the process of indigenous recognition in the Duri highlands, South Sulawesi. It is argued that the contradictions of indigeneity concern not only indigenous—state relations, but also narratives on tradition and history, and most of all, economic contradictions. It is the recognition of the overall framework of capitalism and the state which makes possible the emergence of alternative local economies based upon solidarity. Drawing on Louis Althusser’s concept of overdetermination, this article suggests that indigeneity shapes the way how economic contradictions are expressed, and while it provides local spaces for alternative economies, indigeneity is also prone to being incorporated into the logics of capitalism.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
 
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