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  Subjects -> ANTHROPOLOGY (Total: 398 journals)
Showing 1 - 90 of 90 Journals sorted by number of followers
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 371)
Global Change, Peace & Security: formerly Pacifica Review: Peace, Security & Global Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 305)
Cultural Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 201)
Annual Review of Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 192)
Current Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 192)
American Anthropologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 167)
Ethnography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 95)
Ethnos: Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
American Ethnologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Journal of Anthropological Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Anthropology Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Anthropological Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53)
History and Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Social Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Contemporary Ethnography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Human Development: A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Memory Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Critique of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
American Journal of Physical Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Discourse Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Social Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of World Prehistory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Qualitative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Medical Anthropology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Ethnology : An International Journal of Cultural and Social Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of African History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Anthropology & Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Anthropological Review     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Medical Anthropology: Cross-Cultural Studies in Health and Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Archaeology, Ethnology and Anthropology of Eurasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Anthropological Forum: A journal of social anthropology and comparative sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Ethnohistory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Anthropology & Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
African Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Museum Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Human Evolution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
City & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
African and Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Anthropology of the Middle East     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Material Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Australian Historical Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
French Politics, Culture & Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
American Journal of Primatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Anthropology & Archeology of Eurasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Evolutionary Anthropology Issues News and Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Anthropological Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Pragmatics & Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Ethos     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Field Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Anthropology of Work Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Visual Anthropology: Published in cooperation with the Commission on Visual Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Culture & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Anthropology & Humanism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Latin American & Caribbean Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Mental Health, Religion & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Archeological Papers of The American Anthropological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Buildings & Landscapes: Journal of the Vernacular Architecture Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Anthropology Now     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Cultural Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Linguistic Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Reviews in Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Visual Anthropology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Anthropology in Action : Journal for Applied Anthropology in Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Food and Foodways: Explorations in the History and Culture of     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Dialectical Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Museum Anthropology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Asian and African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Geografiska Annaler, Series B : Human Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Ethnomusicology Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Tourism Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Cultural History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Anthropology News     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Anthropological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
E&G Quaternary Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Anthropology of Consciousness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
L'Homme     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cahiers d’études africaines     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
African American Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
East Central Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
POLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Osteoarchaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Anthropologie et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Progress in Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asian Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
L'Anthropologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Antiquaries Journal, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Historical Biology: An International Journal of Paleobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Transforming Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Myth & Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Chinese Sociology & Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Collaborative Anthropologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Transcultural Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Ateliers d'anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Focaal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Cultural Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Levant     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Anthropologie et santé     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anthropological Journal of European Cultures     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Turcica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Human Organization     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Primates     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Australian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Histories of Anthropology Annual     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Modern Greek Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Gradhiva     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Civilisations     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Oceania     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Arctic Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Polynesian Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal des anthropologues     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Canadian Studies/Revue d'études canadiennes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Quotidian : Dutch Journal for the Study of Everyday Life     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cuadernos de Antropologia Social     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
The Australian Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Acta Ethnographica Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Listening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Terrain     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Exchange     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
General Anthropology Bulletin of The General Anthropology Division     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Gesture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Social Science Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Burma Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Revista de Antropologia     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Alteridades     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Anatomical Science International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Socio-anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
South Asian Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Quaternaire     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Behemoth     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
South Asian Diaspora     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Images re-vues : histoire, anthropologie et théorie de l'art     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Antipoda : Revista de Antropología y Arqueología     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Recherches sociologiques et anthropologiques     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Durkheimian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
HOMO - Journal of Comparative Human Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bulletin de l’APAD     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Estudios Atacameños     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
L'Atelier du CRH     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Transnational American Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Structure and Dynamics: eJournal of Anthropological and Related Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Zoosystematics and Evolution - Mitteilungen Aus Dem Museum Fur Naturkunde Zu Berlin     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cadernos de Estudos Africanos     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. Ciências Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuicuilco     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Desacatos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Andes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Boletin de Antropologia Universidad de Antioquia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indiana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Antropologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tabula Rasa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal for the Anthropology of North America (JANA)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Southwest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cahiers de l'Urmis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Totem : The University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tipití : Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethnographic Praxis in Industry Conference     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intersecciones en Antropologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chungara (Arica) - Revista de Antropologia Chilena     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Apparence(s)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Terrae Incognitae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Nuevo mundo mundos nuevos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Scripta Ethnologica     Open Access  
Revista de Antropología Social     Open Access  
Mitologicas     Open Access  
Liminar. Estudios Sociales y Humanisticos     Open Access  
Avá. Revista de Antropologia     Open Access  
Treballs de Sociolingüística Catalana     Open Access  
Anthropologischer Anzeiger     Full-text available via subscription  
Mélanges de la Casa de Velázquez     Partially Free  
Recherches amérindiennes au Québec     Full-text available via subscription  
Runa : Archivo para las Ciencias del Hombre     Open Access  
Papeles de Trabajo. Centro de Estudios Interdisciplinarios en Etnolingüística y Antropología Socio-Cultural     Open Access  
Trace     Open Access  
Interações (Campo Grande)     Open Access  
Journeys     Full-text available via subscription  
human_ontogenetics     Hybrid Journal  

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Similar Journals
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Dialectical Anthropology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.321
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-0786 - ISSN (Online) 0304-4092
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • “Youth speaking truth to power”: intersectional decolonial
           activism in Namibia

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      Abstract: This article portrays a recent movement towards intersectional activism in urban Namibia. Since 2020, young Namibian activists have come together in campaigns to decolonize public space through removing colonial monuments and renaming streets. These have been linked to enduring structural violence and issues of gender and sexuality, especially queer and women’s reproductive rights politics, which have been expressly framed as perpetuated by coloniality. I argue that the Namibian protests amount to new political forms of intersectional decoloniality that challenge the notion of decolonial activism as identity politics. The Namibian case demonstrates that decolonial movements may not only emphatically not be steeped in essentialist politics but also that activists may oppose an identity-based politics which postcolonial ruling elites have promoted. I show that, for the Namibian movements’ ideology and practice, a fully intersectional approach has become central. They consciously juxtapose colonial memory with a living vision for the future to confront and situate colonial and apartheid history. Young Namibian activists challenge the intersectional inequalities and injustices, which, they argue, postcolonial Namibia inherited from its colonial–apartheid past: class inequality, racism, sexism, homophobia, and gender-based violence.
      PubDate: 2022-12-02
       
  • Rural schools and agribusiness in Argentina. Senses and practices of rural
           teachers around agrochemical spraying in school contexts

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      Abstract: This article ethnographically analyses the phenomenon of agrochemical spraying in rural school contexts of the Argentine Humid Pampas. The analysis is guided by a Gramscian approach and is based on fieldwork carried out in the southeastern region of the province of Córdoba (Argentina). On analyzing the daily experiences of these teachers with pesticide spraying not only the conditions of the hegemonic landscape in which they work become evident but also their active positioning in relation to the problem. These positions are expressed through heterogeneous, disjointed, and even contradictory practices and senses, but in which it is possible to identify the plots of the broader social dispute around the problem of intensive agrochemical use.
      PubDate: 2022-11-22
       
  • Editorial

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      PubDate: 2022-11-21
       
  • Academia, Twitter wars, and suffocating social justice in Canada: the case
           of unrecognised Indigenous peoples

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      Abstract: The “woke movement” is now under fire globally. Seeking to right social injustice and battle racism, the woke movement has laudable intentions, but its implementation can exacerbate social inequalities. In the case of Canada, a social movement seeks to ferret out “Pretendians” or those White individuals deemed to be falsely assuming, and thus appropriating, Indigenous identity. Though this movement may seem righteous, the problem arises that individuals targeted are those who are Non-Status Indians and have yet to be recognised by the state, as well as Métis (or mixed-heritage people) whose historical communities have yet to be sanctioned by governments or courts, and who are also portrayed as being “Fétis” or fake Métis. Our challenge as researchers is to do the deep ethnographic, historical, and legal research to provide a nuanced understanding of indigeneity that does not constrain it solely to colonial models as the case studies provided will demonstrate.
      PubDate: 2022-11-21
       
  • From common sense to collective practices: a social-ontological commentary
           on Gramsci’s concept of common sense

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      Abstract: In my paper, I start by providing a brief taxonomy of three types of theories that conceptualize common sense. Thereby, I differentiate between positive, negativist, and dualistic/dialectical theories of common sense. By juxtaposing a “good” form of common sense that he calls buon senso and a “bad” form of common sense he calls senso comune Antonio Gramsci falls undoubtedly within the reach of the dualistic/dialectical theories of common sense. In order to scrutinize Gramsci’s idiosyncratic conceptualization of common sense, I turn to Kate Crehan’s interpretation of this concept and argue that Gramsci’s understanding of common sense is better understood as a social-ontological category that is historical, inclusive, relational, and intersectional. In this framework, collectivity is disclosed as the primary mode both of existence and of practice. Ultimately, and in order to demonstrate the current political ramifications of Gramsci’s understanding of common sense, I turn to his figure of the “modern prince.” As I conclude, it is the “bad” form of common sense as senso comune that is most capable of addressing the current demands of an inclusive and radical democracy.
      PubDate: 2022-11-11
       
  • Uneven “genocide” memorialisation: a hindrance to achieving
           post-colonial equality'

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      Abstract:   Diverse memorials of the Nazi-engendered Holocaust are legion in today’s world. They sustain a sense of painful heritage for that genocide’s survivors and their descendants while also providing ethical and political lessons and reminders for present and future generations. While the historical record provides evidence of many other massacres, some of them genocides, those committed by European colonialism in particular have been only minimally memorialised or monumentalised; and scant literature exists about the pain they have caused or the consequent, often unspoken, legacy of their victims’ and their descendants’ long-term suffering and marginalisation. This often results in little substantive, “formal” memorialisation available for mobilisation in efforts to effect recognition for those who have so suffered and, ultimately, to effect restitution for them and their descendants. The article uses present-day South African examples to illustrate the consequences, in an already profoundly divided society rife with identitarian thinking, of how such unequal memorialisation reproduces persisting senses of colonial suppression and exacerbates structural impediments to achieving social justice and equality.
      PubDate: 2022-10-27
       
  • Why is identity politics not conducive to achieving sustained social
           justice'

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      Abstract:   Oppression of racialized and ethnic minorities and women needs to be adequately understood and effectively fought against. Identity politics (IP) appears to take oppression seriously. As an intellectual and political struggle for justice, IP has two inter-related components: recognition/respect and economic distribution for identity-groups, with the first being the predominant component. IP has highlighted the importance of oppression and is right to emphasize recognition as an aspect of social justice. Yet, IP cannot be a good tool for the fight for sustained social justice because of its theoretical and political deficiency. IP’s biggest theoretical problem is its inherent neglect of the causal primacy of objective class relations. As a result, it over-emphasizes special oppression as a cause of humanity’s major problems. It lacks a rigorous conception of oppression itself as a condition that is common to many different oppressed groups, nor does it have an objective explanation of oppression. IP’s theoretical deficiency leads to its political deficiency. The latter is manifested in its neglect of class politics, its overemphasis on linguistic resistance, and its fight for representational politics whereby small groups of people defined on the basis of identity receive some limited material benefits. Based on an empiricist, idealist, individualist, and reformist approach, IP has no strategy to unite all the different oppressed groups based on their objective interests. Just as trade union politics is a bourgeois politics of workers, IP is a bourgeois politics of oppressed groups. A class theory of society recognizing oppression, and a class-based political strategy aiming to eliminate exploitation and oppression constitute the only alternative to IP.
      PubDate: 2022-10-26
       
  • Bones and injustices: provenance research, restitutions and identity
           politics

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      Abstract: The last decade has witnessed increasing numbers of “provenance research” projects investigating the histories of human remains in academic collections and leading to their restitution. Such projects explicitly and implicitly address the historical injustices and their continuities of amassing people’s mortal remains and their subsequent use by those who have appropriated them. This article considers which historical wrongdoings provenance research and restitutions attempt to address and how effective they are in doing so. Firstly, the article points towards the relatively effective recognition of spiritual and emotional injustice. Secondly, it discusses the limited recognition of “race science’s” history and legacies and of its logic’s persistence in a social essentialism that inheres in contemporary handling of such human remains. Thirdly, it discusses how recognition of past oppression, dispossession and exploitation ties to broader political goals and attempts at redistribution.
      PubDate: 2022-10-25
       
  • Correction to: The common sense of expert activists: practitioners,
           scholars, and the problem of statelessness in Europe

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      PubDate: 2022-10-15
       
  • On the common sense of social reproduction: social assistance and
           ideologies of care in austerity Europe

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      Abstract: In this article, we examine the mobilization, justification, and enactment of ideologies of care and social reproduction in the field of religious charity-based social assistance in Italy and Portugal under austerity. Our framework combines the feminist critique of the naturalization of gendered inequalities with Gramsci’s notion of common sense. Drawing on ethnographic research in two mid-size cities in Italy (Brindisi) and Portugal (Setúbal), we address, from a comparative perspective, changes in the model of welfare redistribution enhanced by implementing austerity policies. We aim to illuminate how the gendered domestic sphere and the expansion of religious charities under austerity are tight together through ideologies of care and social reproduction, becoming operative in the concrete management of welfare redistribution and integral to the implementation and legitimation of emerging austerity welfare regimes. Focusing on the everyday and mundane tasks of charity work, we show the existence of a relational continuum between the gendered domestic sphere and charity voluntary work. We provide evidence of how naturalized visions and patterns of care inherent in family ideologies are transferred into the sphere of social assistance, hence recasting as moral and practical regulatory principles of welfare distribution. Finally, we show how the common sense of social reproduction ultimately becomes instrumental in the regressive naturalization of poverty at the core of the exclusionary and discriminatory patterns of welfare distribution.
      PubDate: 2022-10-15
       
  • The spatial dimension of shifting commonsensical understandings

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      Abstract: In this article, I engage with the spatial dimensions of Gramsci’s work and look at common sense through a primarily spatial lens. I discuss how changing commonsensical understandings concerning migration do more than redefine persons as “migrants” or “non-migrants.” As such, I underline how socio-spatial relations are also renegotiated symbolically, in practice, and on multiple scales. Thereby, I take the role of common sense in Lefebvre’s idea of spatial production as an entry point for the analysis. I then link this perspective to migration scholarship that discusses how the relational positioning of localities at specific historic conjunctures influences the differentiation between “migrants” and “non-migrants.” The empirical material was gathered in two fieldwork periods in 2011 and 2018 in the Monte Laa neighborhood of Vienna, Austria. I describe the repositioning of the neighborhood in everyday practices and commonsensical imaginaries both in an urban context and the transnational context of Central and Southeast European space. Comparing commonsensical imaginaries from 2018 with those from 2011, the so-called 2015 “refugee crisis” emerges as a moment of conjunctural rupture.
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
       
  • Russia’s nationalities policy and the country’s central Asian
           residents’ identity-based activities

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      Abstract: As applied to the Russian case, identity politics means first and foremost a state strategy that regulates the public expressions of ethnicity-based solidarity in a way that prevents them from being motivated by a sense of injustice. With regard to Russia’s Central Asian residents, injustice lies in tacit racist treatment by officials, police officers, employers and landlords. The peculiarity of officially recognised Central Asian organisations operating on the basis of state nationalities policy institutions is that they contribute to maintaining the status quo. They do so through orchestrating cultural activities that reproduce stereotypical images of harmonious ethnic diversity in Russia, as well as by supervising labour migrants. However, there are members in these organisations who do manage to use the resources of Russia’s rather idiosyncratic nationalities policy to fulfil their own aspirations, i.e. to practice identity politics for which the policy is not intended.
      PubDate: 2022-10-06
       
  • Ben Fallaw and David Nugent, eds. State formation in the liberal era:
           capitalism and claims of citizenship in Mexico and Peru. Tucson, AZ:
           University of Arizona Press

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2022-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10624-022-09648-7
       
  • Tranquebar—the tsunami, heritage tourism, power, and memory in a
           South Indian fisher village

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      Abstract: Place-making strategies in the neoliberal era center on exploiting the relative advantages of particular sites in terms of investment, production of value, consumption, and accumulation. In the aftermath of disaster events, this can take the form of “disaster capitalism” as states and powerful assemblages of domestic and global capitalist interests seek to transform space in the name of reconstruction and recovery, taking advantage of the fact that constraints that may have tempered such goals before the disaster are temporarily put on hold due to the urgency of demands imposed by the disaster event. In this paper, I critically examine the development of heritage tourism as an economic development strategy designed to help a place “recover” while enforcing the relocation of most of its residents. In the aftermath of the devastating tsunami of 2004 in India’s Tamil Nadu state, the fisher village of Tharangambadi became the site of a reconstruction project involving on the one hand the relocation of artisanal fishers to new houses built inland by NGOs, and on the other, the rapid promotion of heritage tourism in parts that had been previously occupied by fisher households. Called Tranquebar by Europeans, Tharangambadi was once the key colonial outpost of the Danish East India Company, and in recent years began drawing the attention of Danish heritage enthusiasts. The tsunami and the reconstruction projects that emerged in its aftermath provided a powerful impetus to the goal of transforming portions of the village into a site for heritage tourism. I focus on two facets of this rebuilding process, one devoted to producing a specific set of spatial arrangements designed for what scholars of tourism refer to as the regulated consumption of difference, and two, the more complex and less visible though vital set of aligned processes involved in the production of this difference. If the former manifested in the remaking of physical space, the latter informed the rationale behind how that remaking was an unequal and elitist project linking the exclusion of fishers from the present to their systemic erasure from the past.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10624-021-09641-6
       
  • The common sense of expert activists: practitioners, scholars, and the
           problem of statelessness in Europe

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      Abstract: In this article, I follow a group of professionals in their efforts to address the problem of statelessness in Europe. My interlocutors divide the members of their group into “practitioners,” on the one hand, and “scholars” on the other. Relating this emic dichotomization to Antonio Gramsci’s dialectical take on common sense, I argue against a theoretical reductionism that regards expertise and activism as two essentially different and mostly separate endeavors, and put forward the concept of the “expert activist.” Unpacking what I call the “practitioner–scholar dilemma,” I show that in their effort to end statelessness, “practitioners” take a reformist route that aims at realizing citizenship for the stateless, while “scholars” are open to a more revolutionary path that contemplates the denaturalization and even the eradication of the state. By drawing on Gramsci, I suggest that the impasse the group encounters in their work might relate more to the structural constraints imposed by the state within or against which they operate than to the problem of statelessness they are trying to solve. This article contributes to a body of emergent work in anthropology that explores the intersection of scholarly expertise and activism.
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s10624-022-09666-5
       
  • Whiteness in Question: the Anatomy of a Taxonomy Across Transnational
           Contexts

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      Abstract: The idea of whiteness has been used in the Anglo-American, middle-class, liberal settings to denote an essential group appurtenance on phenotypical and cultural terms and to code such appurtenance as a universal marker of privilege that cuts across any other differentiating axes that allocate societal advantages and disadvantages. The assumption that racialized skin colour and low social status are inferiorizing attributes of racialization, while white skin colour and high social class are privileged attributes of whiteness, has constructed the idea of whiteness as one that encompasses and supersedes the idea of class. Immigrants to Anglo-American multicultural societies have always been relegated to the margins of their host societies, and their economic exclusion, in particular, has been theorized as resulting from their racialization. This paper, however, compares and contrasts the marginalization of two migrant populations—namely, high-skilled immigrants to Canada, and Eastern European low-skilled immigrants to the UK—to problematize the assumption that whiteness has an essential sameness that universally cuts across other stratifying axes in society, and to show that an essentialist understanding of whiteness disregards class-based explanations for the economic exclusion of migrants, explanations which are often bound with the global circulation of capital and the dominant economic position of the rich nations from the Global North.
      PubDate: 2022-08-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s10624-022-09665-6
       
  • Food relief deliveries and urban topologies of pandemic risk in Toronto

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      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1007/s10624-022-09654-9
       
  • The counter-trafficking apparatus in action: who benefits from it'

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      Abstract: Based on long-term ethnographic research, including documentary research, qualitative interviews and observations made at a Portuguese shelter for “sex trafficked women,” this paper explores the counter-trafficking apparatus questioning who benefits from it. The discussion explores the contrasts between an institutional commitment to constructing this apparatus and the actuality of procedural efforts purporting to support “trafficking victims.” I argue that the higher goal of building a counter-trafficking apparatus — in itself a political objective — limits the rights of “victims,” making processes that claim to be part of their protection de facto neo-liberal anti-political exercises in reenforcing bureaucratic state power.
      PubDate: 2022-06-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s10624-022-09655-8
       
  • Class dynamics and development in the mining region of Eastern India

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      Abstract: This paper examines how intra- and inter-class relations mold the development process. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in the bauxite-rich, plateau of Gumla district in Jharkhand, a state in the eastern part of India, this paper uses an historical approach to trace the evolution of the relationship between a mining company and the local adivasi (indigenous) communities over the last three decades. It portrays how development in this mining region is operationalized through the use of compensation. This makes financial resources available to landowners, and in turn provides private capital an access to natural resources. Compensation, thus, unifies the opposing interests of capital and labor in their strife to maximize their share in the wealth generated by bauxite mining. Against the associational power of labor, private capital forges multiple alliances with power elites including the state. These alliances coalesce multiple power structures into what we term the architecture of control (AOC). Three main functions of the AOC are identified: erosion of labor’s collective bargaining power, suppression and delegitimization of anti-mining voices, and the replacement of primordial loyalties by the market rationality, which facilitate capital accumulation. This paper argues that the tension between capital accumulation and reproduction of household constantly reconfigures the development process which essentially increases dependency of the local population on the market. The paper warns that the benefit-sharing mechanism will justify and deepen the exploitation of labor in mining industries, unless the working class reinvents its politics to free development thinking from the concerns of capital.
      PubDate: 2022-06-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s10624-022-09657-6
       
  • The silk roads: a new history of the world

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      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s10624-022-09653-w
       
 
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