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Culture & Psychology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.529
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1354-067X - ISSN (Online) 1461-7056
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • Conceptual questions about meaning: Divergence or complementarity between
           cultural-Historical positions'

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      Authors: Ramiro Rodrigues Coni Santana, Marilena Ristum
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Meaning was a core concept in the development of Lev Vygotsky’s cultural-historical approach. Considering the incompleteness of his work, other authors have adopted different directions in the seminal discussion on meaning as a unit of thought and language. Based on Rychlak’s ideas, this paper proposes dialogues between three culturally based authors—González Rey, Jaan Valsiner, and Jerome Bruner—reviewing relations of complementarity and synthesis to understand the concept of meaning. We call attention to the uniqueness of each theoretical approach, avoiding the simplification of their assumptions or the intention of reducing them as if they only dealt with the same concept with different words. The comparison between authors brings about a notion of cultural, historical, narrative meaning grounded on the singular-collective dialectic, endowed with an affective dimension, and the access to which implies the adoption of a qualitative and idiographic methodology. Based on common grounds, we coordinated different understandings, and attempted to devise a concept comprising inter-focus features, while meeting the criteria for a satisfactory theoretical formulation, such as its capacity of description, explanation, and prediction, its logical consistency, its perspective or possibility of generalization, its innovation, inventiveness or fruitful heuristic and, ultimately, its simplicity or parsimony.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-12-01T11:09:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221143412
       
  • “Flying over the crisis”: A study on interdisciplinary
           metaphors of resilience

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      Authors: Lisa Milena Kriegsmann-Rabe, Nina Hiebel, Katja Maus, Franziska Geiser
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Background/Aim: Metaphors on theoretical concepts may be congruent or divergent from their explicit definitions. We carried out a secondary qualitative analysis on metaphors of members of an interdisciplinary research group on resilience and investigated: (A) Which metaphors do experts in different disciplines use to describe people showing resilience' (B) Do these (implicit) metaphors support the (explicit) theses of the research group on resilience' (C) Do we find differences between experts from different disciplines in the use of metaphors on resilience' Method: Nine guideline-based interviews with experts from medicine, psychology, philosophy, and theology were studied using a systematic metaphor analysis, basing on inductive and deductive categorizations. Results: Eight metaphor sources were identified, for example, battle, path. Experts used similar metaphors to describe resilience that often overarched the concepts of resilience as a trait, process, and outcome. Moments of vulnerability within the resilience trajectory were found. Conclusions: The analysis revealed high concordance of metaphors across different disciplines, reflecting both the ideas of the group as well as the mainstream view of resilience. This supports that implicit concepts may be more difficult to reframe than explicit theories. Few differences between disciplines may point to the impact of an overarching Western concept of individual resilience.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-11-15T09:46:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221111438
       
  • Cultivation of Humanity: How we can stagnate within the eternal flow

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      Authors: Marc Antoine Campill
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      By introducing Taoism—the understanding of flow—and the meaning of cultivation as a basic human ability, an essential challenge in our current understanding of science can be discovered. Human interaction with nature is a meaningful process, which can reveal a better understanding of the inner cultivation processes and with it a multidimensional field of endless inputs triggering an ongoing process of growth. For this purpose, MyCu-cultivation (My cultural cultivation) is introduced as new terminology. A construct that allows to separately elaborate the social concepts of culture and the process of metaphysical reality perception—generated in our mind. At the same time, the layers of physical experienced reality and imagination are reintroduced in an alternative interrelation, leading to new insights in the layers of metaphysical understandings. Therefore, the central manifestation of meaning-making will be elaborated through the metaphorical use of bookshelves, allowing to perceive new insights in the raw information processing of individuals—underlining the human limitations, in processing the overwhelming meaning flow. This theoretical knowledge leads us further to a new possibility of understanding the constructive externalization of the imagination, highlighting the diversity of phenomenological insights in our everyday life, resulting in a complex theoretical repositioning between semiotics, cultural psychology, and Naturwissenschaften.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-11-08T11:00:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221138912
       
  • Understanding Postmodern Identity Among US Young Adults Through an
           Investigation of Globalized Interest

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      Authors: Ann Y. Kim
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The 21st century and internet technology has brought about many changes that includes exposure to new cultures. This creates opportunities for new identities to develop. In this study, the researcher examines identity integration through discussions on engagement in a globalized interest in connection with postmodernism. Twelve college students who were interested in a culture not connected to their own ethnic background were interviewed. The majority of the participants were interested in Japanese anime and Korean pop music while not being ethnically Japanese or Korean. Using Erikson’s theorizing of three levels of identity and Hidi and Renninger’s four phases of interest development, the researcher discusses the integration of participants’ interest into their ego identity, personal identity, and social identity as well as the utilization of the internet for interest development. The researcher ends with suggestions for future identity research that includes considerations around how identity integration might be considered (i.e., identity synthesis) and further investigations around internet content.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-10-25T10:07:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221135643
       
  • On the problem of generalization in cultural psychology: Aesthetics,
           generalizability, and dialogical research

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      Authors: James Cresswell, Jocelyn Melnyk, Rita Diaz
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      A recent special issue of Culture & Psychology focused on dialogic research and the problem of generalizing research from one context to another. A challenge is that the special issue bypassed a crucial discussion of aesthetics, which is a core feature of dialogical research that is important in the discussion about generalization. Using a dialogical approach influenced by Bakhtin, we discuss aesthetics and how it inspires dialogic research. Two features of dialogical research are discussed herein to show where we align with the authors of the special issue: expressed realities (socio-communally constituted realties lived as if given) and ethics. Expressed realities and ethics are foundational for aesthetics and so we seek to add the discussion of aesthetics to the conversation initiated in the special issue. In our efforts to discuss these ideas, we draw upon illustrative examples from interviews about the role of the church in poverty reduction.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-10-21T04:32:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221135048
       
  • Diverse transnational backgrounds, same master narrative'
           Constructions of a national past among middle-school students

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      Authors: Floor van Alphen, Cesar Lopez
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we aimed to explore the various ways in which the past is constructed, using or tinkering with a national master narrative, by students surrounded by and immersed in contemporary transnational plurality. Specifically, we studied the permanence of or variations on the Spanish ‘reconquest’ narrative among 14 to 15-year-old students of a public school in Madrid. Semi-structured individual interviews were carried out with 30 students whose families came from Madrid, other regions in Spain and other countries around the world. We carried out a detailed narrative analysis of their constructions of the medieval past on the Iberian Peninsula and found that the ‘reconquest’ narrative still predominates. Few variations in their narratives were found that hint at counternarratives, the ‘travelling’ of narrative schema across national borders, or the transnational trajectories in their families feeding into their constructions. Given these findings, we discuss the role of alternative narrative schema and dynamic concepts of nation and national identity in challenging national master narratives.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-10-20T09:59:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221135041
       
  • Cultural psychological implications of Hermann Hesse’s
           Glasperlenspiel (glass bead game)

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      Authors: Enno von Fircks
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      In the present article, I dissect key elements of Hermann Hesse’s famous novel, the Glass Bead Game (Glasperlenspiel) in order to make them fertile for Cultural Psychology. I originate from the idea that the Glass Bead Game can be understood as a universal language that relies on open ideographs, thus signs that can be combined and structured for multiple purposes. Yet, this universal language is not solely a play; it has an educational drive to educate the mind and to help the individual reaching inner harmony. This play comes into being only when listening to the play of other people interacting with me and me meditating upon the multiple meaning making opportunities of it. I argue that such a perspective is in close accordance with the actual task of Cultural Psychology helping to unravel how people do relate to their environments and the impact that results from this ecological interaction. However, I appeal interested readers in trying to better institutionalize such a cultural psychological purpose of serving the individual in order for Cultural Psychology to be a sustainable and long-lasting science unlike the Glass Bead Game that became an end in itself.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-10-07T12:52:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221132000
       
  • Cultural and economic attributes of guitar-making vis-à-vis the crafting
           of a contextualized gitara teaching model

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      Authors: Reynaldo Inocian, Eldren Joseph Luzano
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This study unveiled the economic and cultural attributes of guitar-making that serve as basis in the creation of a contextualized teaching model. The study employed a grounded theory design with interviews among 12 key research participants in Abuno, Pajac, and Lapu-Lapu City, selected through convenience sampling. The economic and cultural attributes of making gitara reflect clear Filipino economic and cultural values of resiliency and contentment of luthiers in their working conditions. Guitar-making has transformed to being a source of income with minimal changes in the process as brought by changes in perspectives, economic competition, and technology; however, the commitment, knowledge, and practice of producing handmade guitars are still intact and evident that serve as bases for recommendation for government to support Filipino luthiers and guitar factory owners to design and implement programs to uplift their working conditions and its opportunities for preservation, promotion, and development. Lastly, these serve as the context in the formulation and dissemination of the Gitara Teaching Model as a contextualized teaching model that provides meaningful learning process for quality learner-centered pedagogy in the field of culture-based education, which can also be used in training the youth to become professional luthiers so that this guitar-making culture will flourish.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-10-06T11:39:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221132001
       
  • Cultural constructions of the mentally ill in South Africa: A discourse
           analysis, part one

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      Authors: Ashleigh L Daniels, Dean Isaacs
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyses Zulu constructions of mental illness, as according to Zulu Psychology Masters Students from universities in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, by means of Foucauldian Discourse analysis. Analysis of qualitative interviews highlighted the complexity surrounding mental illness and psychology within the Zulu culture in South Africa, and revealed various cultural constructions of the mentally ill and psychopathology that have not previously been researched. Elucidated cultural constructions of the mentally ill included constructions of the ill as a contagious diseased state; a threat to peace; a deviant; a vagrant; and a non-social being and non-functional. These constructions placed the mentally ill at the lowest strata level within society. Historically rooted discourses of the black South African’s fight to be resilient, and the philosophical idea of ‘Ubuntu’, intersect with these constructions of the mentally ill. Furthermore, the constructions of the mentally ill are impacted by rural and urban geographic location. Also explored is the discourse of the Zulu mentally ill’s oppressed subject position as the ‘mad’ and black. These elicited constructions and discourses of the mentally ill within Zulu communities, in South Africa, provide a basis for vital future research into the cultural relativity and nosologies of mental illness within the South African context, and wider African context.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-10-06T11:36:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221131998
       
  • Walking for well-being. Exploring the phenomenology of modern pilgrimage

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      Authors: Anna Sørensen, Henrik Høgh-Olesen
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Modern pilgrimages are gaining popularity in Western culture despite increased secularization. Historically, pilgrimages were a religious ritual with the goal of personal transformation. This study explores the phenomenology of modern pilgrimage: the motivations to go on a pilgrimage, the experience and the subsequent changes. An explorative study was conducted on 142 pilgrims. The results indicate that 74% of the participants were motivated by psycho-existential motives to go on the Camino to Santiago. In addition, 75% of the participants experienced changes in life after walking the Camino. The findings indicate that modern pilgrimage still has transformative potential. Furthermore, six major themes regarding the phenomenology of the Camino emerge from the data: (1) authentic experience, (2) walking in nature, (3) self-transformation, (4) community, (5) simplicity and (6) spirituality, indicating that modern pilgrimage is a multidimensional psycho-existential phenomenon.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-09-30T10:45:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221131354
       
  • Nurturing patriotism and national pride: An ethnographic exploration into
           the everyday worlds of Yekolo temari in Washera Qenie School

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      Authors: Taglo Kassa
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Anchored in an ethnographic fieldwork in rural Ethiopia, involving 66 children (12–18 years old) and 17 church scholars, this article looks at how a traditional school of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church nurtures sentiments of patriotism and national pride in Yekolo temari (children in the school). The findings revealed a multitude of pedagogical approaches that the church school employed. The school system also provided the students with ample cultural resources that enhance their national pride and patriotic feeling. This research has practical implications and contributes to the literature on national identity (re)construction, specifically on ways of cultivating patriotism and national pride among schoolchildren.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-09-28T04:50:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221129213
       
  • The significance of dynamic mind-body cultivation of Li—based on
           archetypal mind-body mutual shaping development theory

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      Authors: Wei Xie, Yancui Zhang, Yue Wu, Benyu Guo
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Li (礼) in Chinese culture is an integrated concept of mind and body. Based on C. G. Jung’s idea of mind-body unity, post-Jungians’ archetypal image schema and Chinese self-cultivation view, the study attempts to construct an archetypal mind-body mutual shaping development model in the hope of providing wisdom and theoretical support for the dynamic mind-body cultivation process through Li and its significance for psychological healing, so as to make Li more contemporary and inherited.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-08-13T01:33:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221120051
       
  • Deaf Identity Salience: Tracing Daphne’s Deaf Identity Salience
           Through Switched at Birth

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      Authors: Ryan DeCarsky, Penny Harvey, Sally W Johnston
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Mainstream television scarcely features Deaf persons. When they do, they are usually cameo, secondary, and rarely multidimensional characters. This paper examines Deaf identity of a main character, Daphne Vasquez, on the popular show Switched at Birth. We analyze moments where Daphne’s identity, a constructed Deaf identity, is showcased. We map how her identity is salient across seasons and then examine key moments of identity formation as Daphne negotiates her Deafness. We find a strong display of Deaf identity salience and impactful moments in the show that resulted in more positive, holistic representations of Deafness. In recent years, the media has come under increased scrutiny for limited representations of minority identities; this case study seeks to contribute to that conversation by studying a show explicitly focused on increased representation. This work is important as it not only examines a show which successfully features a character with a traditionally stigmatized identity but simultaneously quantifies how that identity is invoked as a message to viewers. This paper bridges cultural sociology with social psychology to gain a deeper understanding of the importance of identity representation in entertainment media and comments directly on the social impact of Daphne’s character on Deaf presence in 21st century media.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-08-12T12:15:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221117178
       
  • Grief and mourning in Covid-19 pandemic and delayed business as a new
           concept

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      Authors: Eyüp Sabır Erbiçer, Ahmet Metin, Türkan Doğan
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The measures, restrictions, and death-related rituals in the COVID-19 pandemic have affected the mourning-related routines of individuals. Moreover, mourning processes have been affected by the restriction of death-related cultural rituals, funeral ceremonies performed only by the officials, and the prohibition of visiting graves. This study aims to investigate the experiences of individuals who lost their loved ones in Turkey during the COVID-19 pandemic. For that purpose, the phenomenological method is employed in the design of the study. Individual interviews were conducted with nine participants who lost their relatives during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were collected through semi-structured interview forms prepared by the researchers. The study participants described the various factors contributing to the grief and mourning process in the COVID-19 pandemic. These factors were categorized into three following main categories: grief and mourning responses of the individuals lost loved ones, including cognitive, emotional, and behavioral responses; risk factors including the expectation of harm, unfinished business, and restriction of death-related religious-cultural rituals; and protective factors including relative support (i.e., family, spouse, friend, partner), tele-support (i.e., mobile phone, internet, social media), positive coping strategies (cognitive, behavioral, and religious-spiritual), and delayed business. The “delayed business” concept was also addressed within protective factors and explained in general terms. Finally, the findings were discussed considering the literature and presented some theoretical and practical implications.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-08-12T11:42:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221118921
       
  • ‘Exploring strategies of semiotic mediation – Making sense of
           COVID-19’

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      Authors: Vladimer Lado Gamsakhurdia
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Human meaning-making becomes particularly dramatic at times of social or biological calamities. COVID-19 appeared in the winter of 2020 and had an immense catalytic influence on peoples' lives worldwide. New coronavirus was a new object for many people and they needed the challenge to make sense of it. The meaning of new coronavirus influenceed an individual’s self-positioning in relation to the new threat in the context of related developments. This manuscript reveals the diversity in mediating new coronavirus among discussants representing the same ethnocultural community. Taking the perspective of cultural psychology of semiotic dynamics, we assume that people would make sense of the new coronavirus sourcing semiotic resources from the socio-cultural context; however, simultaneously it is argued that there are no hegemonic ways of reacting to COVID-19. Individuals are considered not passive recipients of external guidance but rather proactive agents whose interpretants serve as regulators of internal and hetero dialogues. Through our exploration, we identified the variety of semiotic techniques which are used by individuals whilst making sense of new signs and developments through various ways of their schematisation and pleromatization. The online-ethnographic research approach was taken to explore various forms of COVID-19 mediation.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-08-12T03:48:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221117177
       
  • Conceptualising Bhāvana: How do contemplative Hindu traditions inform
           understanding emotions and well-being'

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      Authors: Shilpa Ashok Pandit
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      There are more than 150 (grand and micro) theories of emotion. Even as European phenomenological perspectives do mention self and agency, the mainstream discourse on emotion in psychology is quite limited in presenting a coherent theory of affective process. A key aspect of Euro-American theories of emotion is that, these theories are topographically flat, thus, unable to provide mechanisms of transformation of emotion relevant for well-being. In this paper, a theory-based framework for emotional transformation through understanding Indian concepts in āyurveda, yoga sutras and the nātya is discussed. Second, the paper proposes that it is Śānta (the Indian conceptualisation of peace) alone, that permits a substantive possibility to a radical re-emotion or experiencing and articulating well-being. The concept for a radical re-emotion is called Bhāvanā, indicating the possibility of conscious and radical re-creation and re-imagination of affective relationships with objects, concepts, processes and people in the world, re-orienting from the isolated ‘re-appraisal’, ‘self-regulation and control’ of emotion as discussed in the mainstream paradigm. The paper contends that these culturally relevant models educate and inform global psychology theory and applied practice.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-08-09T09:38:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221118919
       
  • Children’s death and bereavement in antiquity. A psychological and
           anthropological analysis of the attachment relationships and coping with
           loss

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      Authors: Elena Commodari, Valentina Lucia La Rosa
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Child death is a rare event, especially in industrialized countries. On the contrary, early deaths were frequent in ancient Rome, especially in the first years of life. For example, it was estimated that about 30–40 per cent of children died within the first year of life. For this reason, the low emotional involvement of the parents for their newborns and infants has been hypothesized. This commentary aims to discuss the psychological response to child death in antiquity, focusing on ancient Rome, by analyzing a marble epigraph conserved at the Louvre Museum: the epigraph of Iulia Florentina. Specifically, the idea of parents’ lack of emotional investment in children in antiquity is disproved by modern theories of psychology and psychoanalysis that highlight the universal nature of the attachment bond between child and caregiver. Further studies combining the historical–archaeological and psychological perspectives will help investigate this topic further.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-07-21T02:36:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221117173
       
  • Sociocultural positivism: Critical evaluation in three research vignettes

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      Authors: Eugene Matusov
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The paper develops a critical evaluation of sociocultural positivism by contrasting it with universal positivism, on the one hand, and with unique authorial dialogism, stemming from Bakhtin’s dialogical framework, on the other hand. I will bring three research vignettes to make my analysis more grounded: on universal positivism, on sociocultural positivism, and on authorial ethical dialogism. Sociocultural positivism is not rebuked or rejected, but rather it must be limited in search for the boundary of its legitimate use and existence. A complementary framework based on Bakhtin’s philosophical framework of dialogism that would deepen sociocultural positivism is proposed.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-07-11T07:37:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221114131
       
  • Philosophy of friendship with a place as interpretive support for cultural
           psychology

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      Authors: Aleksandra Kunce
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Why is it important for cultural psychology to look attentively and inspirationally into the depths of the problem of friendship' Focussing on the cultural empowerment of a man, the search for meaning in life, but also in the art of life which binds ars bene vivendi with ars bene moriendi, cultural psychology should not lose sight of the art of friendship, but also of its connection with mobile practices of the contemporary world, for in this space of encounters friendship constitutes a philosophical recommendation and a cultural challenge. I propose therefore turn to the philosophical and cultural space in order to analyse the experience of friendship with a place, interpretively extracting those elements of experience that are crucial for in-depth and contextual thinking about man. Here cultural psychology can find inspiration. I deliberately refer to the transcultural space to indicate the possibilities of experiencing the problem of being in a place. Philosophy of friendship anchored in a transcultural context helps to bring out the multi-dimensionality of the experience of self and the Other, which complements psychological research.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T01:14:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221111803
       
  • Moving up the stream beyond resistance to counter move

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      Authors: Marc Antoine Campill, Teppei Tsuchimoto
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      In the following paper, we aim for an extended understanding of the most crucial phenomena itself, the generation of meaning in the interaction with—what we describe as reality. The cultural psychological core principles are re-introduced and connected to a new more holistic construction, elaborating the generation of new meaning. In the same context, new terminology will be introduced, crucial for the understanding of the from phenomenology generated perspective toward cognitive processes and their interrelation with the everyday life. Borders not only as separator but also as deep connector of meaning are for this purpose explored and reintroduced. A procedure that led to central understandings that go far beyond the simple definitions accessible in dictionaries. As significant organic metaphor the river and the meadow (Towards a wholistic model of identity: Why not a meadow' Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science, 55(1), 112–127. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12124-020-09588-3) will be used and extended by the rabbit hole, a triggered process extending the imagination of individuals by the central counter movement against streams and Gegenstände.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T02:19:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221111452
       
  • The homeless mind in a mobile world: An autoethnographic approach on
           cognitive immobility in international migration

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      Authors: Ezenwa E Olumba
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The migration phenomenon, in which the mind travels ahead of the body, especially among would-be travellers, has received scholarly attention within migration studies. Research in this area has not unpacked the cognitive migration experiences of those who have already moved. This autoethnographic article explores the feelings, thoughts and experiences of an individual living abroad in the United Kingdom but cognitively imprisoned at his ancestral home in Igbo land. It draws on the concept of cognitive migration and the author’s own experiences and feelings to introduce and explain the phenomenon of cognitive immobility, which exemplifies the dialectical conflict between the aspirations of longing for and emotions of belonging to a place against a simultaneous desire to remain distant from it. This article advocates the recognition of this cognitive experience of being trapped in place while mobilised in-person elsewhere in migration studies, providing a lens to view such experiences that have erstwhile received inadequate attention. This article contributes to the growing body of knowledge in relation to cognitive migration processes and experiences of those contemplating or participating in human mobility.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-06-27T09:35:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221111456
       
  • I’ll never forget: Remembering of past events within the Silent
           Generation as a challenge to the political mobilisation of nostalgia

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      Authors: Sue Nieland, Kesi Mahendran, Sarah Crafter
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The political mobilisation of nostalgia is increasingly preoccupying social and political psychologists. A key concern is with rising populism and the use of an imagined golden past to foster threat through anti-EU and anti-immigrant sentiment. This article introduces two key concepts, anemoia – imagining a past not experienced – and prolepsis – how the past influences actions in the present aligned to future goals – to argue that actual recall of past biographical events potentially counters the influence of nostalgic rhetoric designed to influence political decision-making. The focus of this article is a single Scottish case study, Rachel, a member of the Silent Generation of citizens aged over 75 years, who have a living memory of World War II and its aftermath. A dialogical analysis was carried out identifying key I-positions and chronotopic analysis of the dialogical self, relating to experienced extreme childhood poverty and deprivation, anti-Semitism and limited mobility. This demonstrated how living through a historic event and its repercussions, rather than imagining a past not experienced, mitigates against nostalgia. This raises the question of how much mobilisation of the events of a glorious past and anxieties about the future rely upon the unexamined silence of those who recall those same events.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-06-13T02:38:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X211066815
       
  • The role of the Ifá in the construction of the person in relation to
           death: Psychology’s interface with ideas from the Adjatado of Dogbo, in
           Benin

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      Authors: Kwami Fleury Serge Kiki, Danilo Silva Guimarães
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      According to the Adjatado systems of knowledge, the Ifá is a mediator between the world of the living and of the dead and this mediation depends on the funerary rites. Ifá is a word used to refer to the science of divination, the son of God, among other names. It is present from a person’s birth to death. The paper discusses the Ifá’s relation with the cultural processes of the construction of the Adjatado person, assuming its significant role in the lives of the Adjatado people in sustaining personal experience. After discussing selected cultural perspectives, about the meaning of Ifá for the Adjatado people, we propose a dialogue on the construction of the person in relation to death in the framework of Semiotic-Cultural Constructivism in psychology, in which death can be discussed from a philosophical perspective, articulated to the phenomenology of temporality, tradition, and alterity (cf. Simão, 2005; 2010; Simão, Guimarães & Valsiner, 2015), nevertheless, the subject of death has not yet been much explored. We argue that the dialogue here proposed enables an understanding of how the meanings that the Adjatado confer to the experience of death is related to processes that involve the cultivation of the person in the culture, addressing further developments concerning dialogues between diverse cultural understandings on psychological processes.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-06-04T03:52:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221097611
       
  • Muslim minorities’ experiences of Islamophobia in the West: A
           systematic review

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      Authors: Ishba Rehman, Terry Hanley
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Islamophobia across the western world appears to be on the rise yet very little is known about it. This review systematically examines qualitative literature to gain an in-depth understanding of Muslim minorities’ experiences of ‘Islamophobia’, and how it may impact upon their psychosocial wellbeing. 180 initial studies were identified across six databases; PsycINFO, ASSIA, Humanities Abstracts (EBSCO), IBSS, CINAHL and MEDLINE, 9 of which met the inclusion and quality criteria. The studies included were analysed using Thematic Synthesis and four key themes were identified; ‘Construction of The Other’, ‘Stigmatisation of Appearance and Attire’, ‘Homogeneity of Identity and Experience’ and ‘Concealing and Normalising Behaviour’. The findings of this review are consistent with previous literature and highlight the difficulties Muslims experience as victims of ‘Islamophobia’. In conclusion, the implications for psychological research and practice are discussed.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-05-28T04:20:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221103996
       
  • Once Upon a Time, Materiality: A Possible Scenario for Psychology in the
           Nature/culture Divide

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      Authors: Rosa Traversa
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The present essay draws on the book “What if Culture was Nature All Along'” (Eds. Vicki Kirby, 2017) and on Karen Barad’s influence to discuss some main concepts of the so-called new materialism in social sciences and humanities over the last decade. It will bring the reader to come across the nature/culture divide as something inherently incorrect from an ontological point of view. Moreover, through different case-studies ranging from allergy, race, paternal post-natal depression, etc. I intend to give some insights into the most controversial and the most insightful attempts to see culture as nothing outside biology in social sciences, and psychology as well. I will then argue how Kirby’s and Barad’s perspective can be a good starting point to re-think critical theory and power-relations as always enmeshed in tangibility, and I will suggest some more empirical patterns for a new material psychological knowledge.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-05-21T08:12:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221103979
       
  • Alfred Schutz’s ‘Stranger’, the theory of sociocultural models, and
           mechanisms of acculturation

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      Authors: Valery Chirkov
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, the author addresses the mechanisms of the acculturation of people who move across different cultural communities (immigrants, refugees, sojourners, international students, etc.). It starts by analyzing Alfred Schutz’s essay ‘Stranger’ and then connects it to the theory of sociocultural models (TSCM) (Chirkov, 2020a). Schutz’s treatise provides background and a conceptual map for articulating the mechanisms of acculturation. The TSCM elaborates on these concepts and hypotheses and justifies the proposed understanding of the psychological and sociocultural basis of acculturation. The primary idea of this approach to acculturation is that migrants experience a clash and tension between two sets of sociocultural models: from their home communities and from their host communities. Newcomers must understand the sources of this tension; in turn, they must reflect on it and then develop strategies for reconciling these two sets of models. During this process, their selves, rationality, reflective capacities, agency and intellectual autonomy become the primary means for their acculturation success.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T05:39:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221103991
       
  • The Teaching-Learning Process or the Teaching Process and the Learning
           Process

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      Authors: Walfredo González Hernández
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Education in school is conceived from the teaching-learning process where the teacher, student, and group intervene as personal components. In the first part of the article, evidence is shown that this process is not a dialectical interrelation. Later it is demonstrated that this process exists under certain conditions that are explained from the theory of subjectivity. In this explanation, the role of the personal components that teaching and learning are integrated into a process is revealed.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T03:07:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221097610
       
  • The respect pyramid: A model of respect based on lay knowledge in two
           cultures

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      Authors: Meytal Nasie
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Respect is a common social concept, yet how lay people define it has not been thoroughly investigated. This study used a grounded theory approach, using in-depth interviews, to conceptualize respect according to lay knowledge. 40 participants from two cultures in the Middle East—20 Jewish Israelis and 20 Palestinians—reported how they define respect (Kavod in Hebrew and Ihtiram in Arabic). The findings define respect as a complex, multidimensional concept. Based on the findings, a respect pyramid model was developed, which includes four dimensions: avoiding disrespect, deserved/normative respect, conditional respect, and considerate respect. Each dimension indicates an increase in aspects that make the respect less conditional and more intrinsic, while requiring higher sensitivity and greater effort. The implications of the respect pyramid for relationships and the cultural differences regarding definitions of respect are discussed.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T02:09:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X211066819
       
  • “Music is…”'! Significations attributed by middle school
           students to the notion of music

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      Authors: Leandro Augusto dos Reis, Francismara Neves de Oliveira
      First page: 435
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This article presents the data of the significations attributed by students from the eighth year of Middle School to the notion of Music. Anchored in the Piagetian clinical–critical method and in the contribution of Genetic Epistemology, the research was carried out in a public school in the city of Londrina, Paraná, with the participation of 12 students. The results indicate that the notions of music are linked to the understanding of the social reality constructed by the participants. For this reason, by considering such constructive processes, through which social reality can be constantly signified by students, we aim to create opportunities for musical-pedagogical actions that favor the expansion of the idea of music and its domains.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-05-09T09:27:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221074341
       
  • Attention operation and language in the learning process in a music lesson

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      Authors: Bianca Viana Monteiro da Silva, Eliana C Maggioni Guglielmetti Sulpicio, Joana de Jesus de Andrade
      First page: 452
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper presents an interactive episode analysis which was resulted from a music lesson for children. The idea was to point out the attentional process, in a perspective of Vygotsky and Luria. The study involved a group of three children who weekly had participated in Group Piano lessons at a social project developed in São Paulo State, Brazil. The data were documented by means of a field diary and the transcription of a video recording, and the analyzes were based on studies of historical-cultural approach. It is emphasized that the attention process happens depending on the apparently individual volitional acts but notoriously established during social relationship. Social genesis and perceptions which are expressed in gestures, looks, and speeches point to a complex construction perception of oneself, of the other and of the music in teaching relationships.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-09-16T04:53:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221097612
       
  • Culture in the Seminar Room of Poetry: Poetic Insights for Cultural
           Psychology

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      Authors: Enno Freiherr von Fircks
      First page: 475
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Some relations between poetry and Cultural Psychology have been investigated in the past. Yet, the very nature of poetry and its fundamental links to Cultural Psychology remain uninvestigated. By outlining the essence of poetry – its rhythmic-melodic, linguistically pictorial character – I show how poetry is in deep accordance with Cultural Psychology of Semiotic Dynamics. Poetry is all about experiences and emotions; these emotive experiences explain the basic relatedness of a person towards an object and shed light onto the complex processes of sign construction. It is only while taking into account the genetic Gestalt, previous and subsequent elements within a specific rhythmic and pictorial form that we are able to unravel this specific relatedness. Different poetic texts might then treat the same object but the relatedness towards it might diverge drastically. Based on these poetic elements, I define culture as a poetic field. Referring to a fictitious example, I explain that researchers and practitioners need to take into account a person’s complex rhythmic actions, that are divided genetically into different forms to understand his/her complex experiences of the environment. Then this illuminative power of relatedness sheds light onto the dynamically complex structuring and re-structuring of culture.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T11:53:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221097609
       
  • Reclaiming disabled creativity: How cultural models make legible the
           creativity of people with disabilities

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      Authors: David R. Jones
      First page: 491
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The field of creativity studies underrepresents—even excludes—creators who have disabilities. The underrepresentation partly reflects an approach that pathologizes disability. Disability as a pathology or marker of ineligibility makes the contributions of people with disabilities invisible or illegible to creativity research. However, disability operates as a marker of membership in a larger disability culture. Considering disability and creativity as cultural phenomena locates a means for including disabled creators in creativity studies. Cultural models describe creativity in terms of groups sharing values, experiences, and resources. People with disabilities participate in subcultures (e.g., deaf communities) and/or larger cultures (i.e., disability culture). Disability cultures encapsulate shared experiences and values as well as resources. In the following article, I pair three propositions from cultural creativity models with evidence from creators with disabilities to demonstrate that (a) members of disability culture experience the world in ways that generate creative expression, (b) encountering a world designed for abled bodies incites the creativity of disabled people, and (c) disabled and abled people collaboratively create. However, not all methodological approaches effectively include creators with disabilities. Qualitative approaches suit best when the researcher practices reflexivity and allows creators with disabilities the right to manage their own representation within the project.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-01-15T10:13:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X211066816
       
  • Manifestations of wisdom in ancient China: An analysis of the Zhinang
           Quanji

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      Authors: Mimi Xiong, Fengyan Wang
      First page: 506
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to use summarizing content analysis and descriptive analysis to examine features related to wisdom in Zhinang Quanji, a collection of classical Chinese wisdom stories by 17th-century writer Feng Menglong, so as to investigate the real-life manifestations of wisdom of ancient Chinese. The results are as follows: (1) the wisdom of ancient Chinese is mainly manifested in 20 different kinds of events. Among these, the following are the five instances of wisdom that appear most frequently: (a) act resourcefully and calmly as the situation demands to deal with emergencies; (b) assist those in a higher position (especially through admonishment or remonstration); (c) take note of even the finest detail and wisely settle disputes; (d) when in bureaucratic circles, clearly analyze the situation and plan far ahead; and (e) on the battlefield, ascertain the mentality of the enemy force, take them by surprise, and overcome them. (2) A total of 932 wise characters are included in Zhinang Quanji. Here, several characteristics are commonly found, including dominant maleness, numerical minority of persons aged under 18 and above 60, and predominance of characters who possess human wisdom. The current findings can provide a useful framework for understanding the manifestation of wisdom in concrete life contexts, thus helping us to better understand and grasp the meaning and nature of wisdom.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-01-20T06:06:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X211066818
       
  • A Psychological Analysis of the Imagery of Chinese Menshen

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      Authors: Jingyu Liang, Ruitong Guo, Yiqing He
      First page: 527
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The prominent imagery of Menshen (门神door gods) within traditional Chinese culture has led to the development of a variety of cultural symbols, including military door gods, civil door gods, praying door gods, and other related ones, such as stone lions and Shigandang (stone tablets). This article studies the impact of the belief in Door Gods and their worship on Chinese psychology and behaviour on both a conscious and unconscious level. At the conscious level, from its first articulation to its development into a cultural image and related myths and legends, the belief in Door Gods can be said to have gone through four stages: a primitive worship of reproduction in ancient times, animal worship during the Zhou Dynasty, the worship of anthropomorphic gods during the Han Dynasty and the worship of hero gods worship during the Tang Dynasty. This process corresponds to the four specific symbols of ‘peach branch’, ‘tiger/chicken’, ‘Shēn Shū(神荼)’ and ‘Yù Lǜ(郁垒)’ (‘鬼’: the two spirits guarding the entrance of the house), and ‘hero’. On an unconscious level, the psychological symbolism of the belief in Door Gods belief is interpreted through the Door Gods sacrifice and the Fu(复)” hexagram. Closing the door is related to Kun (坤, the receptive, earth), while opening the door is related to Qian (乾, the creative, heaven). Together, Kun and Qian were held to be in a state of continual transition, one changing into the other, which reflects Chinese philosophy’s emphasis on movement. Traditionally, Chinese people held more than 10 kinds of door-related sacrificial activities every year. Although some of these activities have gradually fallen out of use, the traditional custom of pasting door couplets and images of Door Gods to doorways has been preserved. By repeating the ritual every year, the Chinese gain the strength to protect themselves and their family members. Clinical studies of sandplay therapy have found that the image of Door Gods constitutes a ‘patron saint’ on an unconscious level. Door gods guard the boundary between consciousness and unconsciousness (the inner and outer worlds), thereby protecting the spiritual strength of those who supplicate them. This suggests that using their images in a therapeutic context could help individuals to maintain boundaries and protect themselves. The emergence of the Door Gods image can transform the guardian energy hidden at the border between unconsciousness and consciousness, help the clients keep the boundary and protect themselves.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T11:43:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221097607
       
  • The religious component of uncertainty avoidance in the child-rearing
           practices in Kerala, India

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      Authors: Joanna James, Tissy Mariam Thomas, Arya Muraleedharan
      First page: 550
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The degree to which individuals of a society are uncomfortable with unpredictability and ambiguity is expressed by the Uncertainty Avoidance dimension of Geert Hofstede. Many studies have explored Uncertainty avoidance in terms of factors such as religion, law, and technology. The present study focuses on religion as it is the most explored research area while studying uncertainty avoidance of a culture. Based on this premise, we sought to understand the religious component of uncertainty avoidance in child-rearing practices in Kerala. A total of six participants were interviewed for this study from various districts in Kerala. Parents having children in the age group of 15 to 18 were chosen based on the nature of the study. Data collection was carried out through the interview method using a semi-structured interview schedule consisting of 21 questions developed based on the objectives of the present study. Because participants were not available due to the current Covid-19 circumstances, data were acquired and recorded over the phone. The collected data were transcribed, and thematic analysis was performed. The study’s major themes include a sense of belonging as a Keralite imprinted by Kerala’s rich culture, confidence in religion and overcoming uncertainty, and non-religious aspects of uncertainty. Thus the present study explored the nature and concept of uncertainty avoidance and how religion has been interwoven into child-rearing methods across Kerala.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-02-14T05:41:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X211073917
       
  • Spirit possession, mental suffering, and treatment by theurgic flight
           anthropological study of a culture-bound syndrome among the Turkmens of
           Iran

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      Authors: Fatemeh Saki, Abdoljavad Ahmadi
      First page: 567
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Although shamanism dates back to the prehistoric era, reminiscence of its beliefs and representation of them could still be seen in Central Asian communities and the Turkmens of Iran. Spirit possession, fairy possession and Porkhani are all terms used to describe a severe psychotic disorder; this mental disorder can be found in the Turkmen culture in Iran and Central Asia and is commonly explained as possession of the spirit by forces of evil. In this culture-bound syndrome, the patient experiences severe psychosis and shows resistance towards psychiatric treatments but finds relief through specific cultural rituals. This article, which is the outcome of 2 years of field research, aims to explain a phenomenon that is not yet considered a culture-bound syndrome through ethnography using observation techniques, interviewing patients and healers, attending healing rituals, and taking photos and filming. The author believes that without considering the patient’s cultural background, lifeworld, description of the symptoms, and cultural treatment methods, we cannot come to an accurate understanding of this phenomenon.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-03-03T01:06:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221074342
       
  • The Psycho-Anthropological Perspectives of Natural Hazards: Applicability
           of the ‘Protection Motivation Theory’ in Explaining Behavioral
           Responses Towards Tropical Cyclone Idai in the Chimanimani District of
           Zimbabwe

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      Authors: Denboy Kudejira, Maurice Kwembeya, Sifikile Songo, Innocent Sifelani, Memory Matsikure
      First page: 593
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper adopts a psycho-anthropological approach to explain individual behaviors in response to tropical cyclone Idai which made a landfall in the Chimanimani district of Zimbabwe in March 2019. Employing the Protection Motivation Theory (PMT) as a lever of diagnosis, the study sought to demonstrate how psychological concepts and anthropological approaches can be infused to improve disaster preparedness. The evidence presented in the paper is based on an intensive ethnographic study conducted in Chimanimani district between November 2020 and July 2021, and which benefited from a variety of data collection techniques. The research findings reveal that beyond its utility in predicting individual protective behaviors towards a disaster, the PMT framework can be adopted as a tool with which postmortems of past disasters can be conducted to identify gaps and inform future disaster administration. The findings suggest that to be useful as a policy making and planning tool, the PMT should remain flexible, allowing for modifications to suite different socio-cultural contexts, including the flexibility to incorporate salient factors that might influence individuals’ cognitive mediating processes.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T06:07:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221103990
       
  • Context matters: Sociocultural considerations in the design and
           implementation of community-based positive psychology interventions in
           sub-Saharan Africa

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      Authors: Richard Appiah
      First page: 613
      Abstract: Culture & Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Scholars conducting cross-cultural research in mental health often import intervention programs found to be efficacious in one social context (e.g., Western) and directly implement them in other contexts (e.g., African and Asian) without recourse to the sociocultural disparities between the target populations and the theoretical foundations of the constructs and principles underpinning the intervention programs. Such efforts mistakenly assume that positive psychology interventions (PPIs), most of which were developed from Western perspectives and assumed individualistic cultural orientation and value systems, operate equally across all contexts. Drawing on the extant literature and on insights from designing, implementing, and evaluating group-based (mental) health behavior change intervention programs across several communities in Ghana, we discuss some sociocultural, theoretical, and methodological issues that can significantly constrain the design, uptake, and effectiveness of PPIs in the rural, low literate, socioeconomically disadvantaged, highly collectivistic context of Ghana, and sub-Saharan Africa more generally. In all illustrations, we offer suggestions to guide the design and implementation processes to ensure culturally appropriate, highly acceptable, and potentially effective intervention programs. We argue that PPIs can be potentially fructuous in the sub-region when adapted to, or embedded in, the cultural values of the target population and tailored to the needs, capacities, and circumstances of participants.
      Citation: Culture & Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-08-13T06:25:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1354067X221118916
       
 
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