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  Subjects -> ANTHROPOLOGY (Total: 398 journals)
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Journal of Organizational Ethnography
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.204
Number of Followers: 7  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 3 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 2046-6749 - ISSN (Online) 2046-6757
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • What comes around, goes around: how neo/normative control accidently
           enables its own resistance

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      Authors: Maria Krysfeldt, Jannick Friis Christensen, Thomas Burø
      Abstract: The paper discusses how the management of a sports and fashion company, which we refer to as NULMA, successfully applied the neo/normative control technology “karma organisation” and gained employee engagement. Whereas other studies have documented employee resistance to organisational cultures when used for managerial control, our case demonstrates resistance to management practices that employees find inconsistent with the dominant karma culture. The study is based on a six-year longitudinal organisational at-home ethnography conducted by one of the authors using methods of both participant and non-participant observation, semi-structured interviews and collaborative production of secondary data in the case organisation. While our research shows that management can successfully apply neo/normative control which employees accept and support, we further show that employees mobilise the same values to resist management when it fails to deliver on the commitments and promises of the organisational culture. The study contributes to the literature on organisational culture and, in particular, neo/normative control by theorising employee resistance as being by “accident”, by which we mean an inherent negative potentiality co-invented and released by managers establishing a “karma organisation”. Our theorising culminates in a discussion of the study’s implications for research and practice.
      Citation: Journal of Organizational Ethnography
      PubDate: 2024-04-05
      DOI: 10.1108/JOE-04-2023-0011
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Ethnography beyond the tribe: from immersion to “committed localism”
           in the study of relational work

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      Authors: Irene Skovgaard-Smith
      Abstract: The purpose of the paper is to propose a shift from the ideal of immersion to a practice of “committed localism” in the ethnographic study of relational work in the post-bureaucratic and service-based economy. The paper is based on ethnographic fieldwork following management consultancy projects in a hospital and a manufacturing company in Denmark. The approach was predicated on committed attention to the everyday of consultancy work activities and associated relational dynamics. This involved being present at the client sites, observing and listening in concrete situations of interaction and engaging in conversations with the multiple actors involved, both external consultants and members of client organisations. The paper shows how “committed localism” was practiced in the ethnographic study of management consultancy as it is relationally accomplished in and through concrete situations of interaction between consultants and different actors in client organizations and the associated meaning production of the involved actors. The paper develops the notion of “committed localism”, originally introduced by George Marcus, into a methodological concept to challenge the conventional ideal of immersion as the hallmark of “proper” ethnography. Such a shift is particularly pertinent for the ethnographic study of relational processes involving multiple actors occupying different positions in the temporary social spaces of contemporary workplaces.
      Citation: Journal of Organizational Ethnography
      PubDate: 2024-02-23
      DOI: 10.1108/JOE-05-2023-0025
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Autoethnographic reflections on creating inclusive and collaborative
           virtual places for academic research

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Cristina-Alexandra Trifan, Roxane de Waegh, Yunzi Zhang, Can-Seng Ooi
      Abstract: This paper explores the collaborative dynamics and dimensions within a virtual multi-cultural and interdisciplinary workplace. The study focusses on the use of online communication technologies to enhance social inclusion and networking within academia. This study uses an autoethnographic approach to draw on the personal experiences of a team of four scholars, including three early-career researchers and a senior scholar. Their reflections on their academic positionality and the institutional constraints reveal both the strengths and vulnerabilities of collaborating in a virtual workplace. The findings offer insights into the complexities of navigating social dynamics, such as delegating responsibilities, organising meetings across various time zones and encouraging continuous collaboration, inclusivity and effective communication during an extensive timeline. As a result, their experiences revealed that a virtual workplace culture with similar and different attributes to a “normal” workplace emerged. The paper demonstrates how to create an effective and inclusive virtual workplace by exemplifying best practices in academia and providing practical guidance for individuals and institutions based on honest, co-produced autoethnographic reflections of the authors’ lived experiences.
      Citation: Journal of Organizational Ethnography
      PubDate: 2024-02-19
      DOI: 10.1108/JOE-06-2023-0037
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Political sensitivity and autoethnography: a case on negotiating the
           personal political front

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      Authors: Yunzi Zhang
      Abstract: The paper introduces the autoethnography as a healing and everyday resistance strategy for marginalized voices. The focus is to deliver the author’s own reflections on some key moments and experiences to stimulate the discussion on autoethnography as a critical instrument channeling one’s reflexivity in the higher education context. The paper draws on a case study of Chinese academic professionals to inspire the discussion on the research and practical values of autoethnography. It also provides conceptual reflections on the political meaning and functions of autoethnography. The paper highlights two key aspects of autoethnography in the higher education context. Firstly, it emphasizes the importance of autoethnography in navigating the personal political front. Secondly, it promotes the integration of autoethnography into the ordinary lives of overseas Chinese academic professionals for daily healing and resistance. The paper explores political sensitivity as an important dimension of workplace ethnography. Recognizing political sensitivity avows autoethnography a political act and a research framework, through which the (auto)ethnographer examines his or her own principles for negotiating justice and interpreting the ownership of personal identity against the influx of politically-charged opinions from the surrounding.
      Citation: Journal of Organizational Ethnography
      PubDate: 2024-02-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JOE-07-2023-0040
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • The politics of smiling: the interplay of emotion, power and discourse
           in sensegiving and sensemaking

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      Authors: Yi Zhu
      Abstract: This research investigates the politics of smiling as a central driver for employees to navigate power dynamics within the prevailing discourse at a Japanese retailer in Hong Kong. Existing critical management studies emphasize power in organizational language, often neglecting the role of employees’ emotions in sustaining discourse. This paper examines employees’ smiles as tools for legitimizing (sensegiving) and interpreting (sensemaking) discourse. It explores how the use of their emotional display influenced the outcome of the company’s attempt to legitimize discourse. This research divides the discourse process into five phases: formation, codification, implementation, monitoring and adaptation. Using the critical sensegiving and sensemaking approach, this paper discusses how employees’ interpretations of corporate policies shape the perpetuation of dominant discourse and outcomes. Data were collected through the author’s long-term participant observation in the Hong Kong branches of Japanese retailers. The formation phase discusses the emergence of a dominant discourse favoring Japanese practices in the company’s Hong Kong operations. Codification involves the conceptualization of standard smiles in customer service policies. In practice (implementation, monitoring and adjustment), employee smiles serve as tools for negotiating power—shaping careers, earnings and shift preferences. This paper argues that this discourse shapes organizational norms while employees’ sensemaking influences the discourse implementation. Furthermore, this paper highlights the transnational impact of Japanese culture in Hong Kong, which has shaped the way Japanese top management and local employees interpret the dominant discourse. This study demonstrates the importance of discussing the display of emotions and employees’ intentions to understand their impact on the outcome of discourse implementation. This study also reiterates the significance of discussing the influence of one culture on another to understand the broader social context that affects the perpetuation of discourse.
      Citation: Journal of Organizational Ethnography
      PubDate: 2024-01-30
      DOI: 10.1108/JOE-05-2023-0028
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Learning under lockdown: sensing, feeling and learning to work from home

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      Authors: Julian Waters-Lynch, Cameron Duff
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to reflect on and analyse the sensory experiences related to the transition to remote work during the COVID-19 pandemic. The research seeks to understand how these experiences have influenced the integration of work practices into home and family life and the subsequent adaptations and embodied learning that arise in response. The authors' research approach incorporates autoethnographic methods to explore the sensory, affective and emotional experiences of transitioning to remote work. The authors draw on principles of embodied learning, as influenced by Gilles Deleuze, and utilise a range of ethnographic tools including note-taking, audio memos, photography, shared conversations and written reflections to gather their data. The study illuminates the ways bodies learn to accommodate the new organisational contexts that arise when the spaces, affects and forces of home and work intersect. It demonstrates how the integration of work into the private domain resulted in new affective and material arrangements, involving novel sensory experiences and substantial embodied learning. This study provides a distinct, sensory-oriented perspective on the challenges and transformations of remote work practices amid the pandemic. By focussing on the affective resonances and embodied learning that emerge in this context, it contributes to the emerging discourse around post-lockdown work practices and remote work in general.
      Citation: Journal of Organizational Ethnography
      PubDate: 2024-01-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JOE-07-2023-0043
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Beyond methodology: unveiling multisited entrepreneurship
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Bas Becker, Carel Roessingh
      Abstract: Multisited ethnography has primarily been portrayed as a challenge for the following field-worker, with the researcher taking the central role and neglecting research participants also experiencing a multisited nature of their work. The authors argue that literature on multisited ethnography merely discusses multisitedness as a methodological theme. In correspondence, the authors propose to think of multisitedness not just as a methodological theme but also as an empirical theme. The authors contend etic and emic perspectives to address multisitedness empirically, which enables researchers to compare and contrast the multisited topic of inquiry in academic “outsider” terms with the etic analysis and considering the perspective of the research participants' multisited experiences using the emic perspective. To show the fruitfulness of discussing multisitedness using the complementary etic and emic analysis, the authors present the example of Mennonite entrepreneurial activities in Belize, a heterogeneous group of migrants that established themselves as successful traders and entrepreneurs. Through an etic multisited ethnographic perspective, the authors compare and contrast four communities of Mennonites in terms of their entrepreneurial activities, technology and energy use. Through an emic perspective, the authors demonstrate how Mennonites, while preferring an in-group focus, navigate their multisited entrepreneurial activities, which require interaction with the outside world. The authors highlight the value of combining etic–emic reflections to acknowledge and include the multisited nature of many social phenomena as experienced by the research participants.
      Citation: Journal of Organizational Ethnography
      PubDate: 2024-01-01
      DOI: 10.1108/JOE-05-2023-0022
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • “That's not a proper ethnography”: a hybrid “propportune”
           ethnography to study nurses' perceptions of organisational culture in a
           British hospital

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      Authors: Sally Sambrook, Charlotte Hillier, Clair Doloriert
      Abstract: This paper revolves around the central question: is it possible to do “proper ethnography” without complete participant observation' The authors draw upon a student's experiences of negotiating National Health Service (NHS) ethical approval requirements and access into the student's research field, a British NHS hospital and having to adapt data collection methods for the student's doctoral research. The authors examine some of the positional (insider/outsider, native gone academic), methodological (long-term/interrupted, overt/covert) and contextual challenges that threatened the student's ethnographic study. The paper draws on reflexive vignettes written during the student's doctorate, capturing significant moments and issues within the student's research. The authors highlight the temporal, practical, ethical and emotional challenges faced in attempting an ethnography of nursing culture within a highly regulated research environment. Having revealed the student's experience of researching this specific culture and finding ways to overcome these challenges, the authors conclude that the contemporary ethnographer needs to be increasingly flexible, opportunistic and somewhat covert. The authors argue that it is possible to do “proper” and “good” ethnography without complete participant observation – it is not the method, the observation, that is the essence of ethnography, but whether the researcher achieves real understanding through thick descriptions of the culture that explain “what is really going on here”. The authors hope to assist doctoral students engage in “good” ethnographic research within (potentially) risk-averse host organisations, such as the NHS, whilst being located in neo-liberal performative academic organisations (Foster, 2017; McCann et al., 2020). The authors wish to contribute to the journal to ensure good ethnography is accessible and achievable to (particularly) doctoral researchers who have to navigate complex challenges exacerbated by pressures in both the host and home cultures. The authors wish to see doctoral researchers survive and thrive in producing good organisational ethnographies to ensure such research is published (Watson 2012), cognisant of the pressures and targets to publish in top-ranked journals (Jones et al. 2020). Having identified key challenges, the authors demonstrate how these can be addressed to ensure ethnography remains accessible to and achievable for, doctoral researchers, particularly in healthcare organisations. The authors conclude that understanding can be attained in what they propose as a hybrid form of “propportune” ethnography that blends the aim of the essence of “proper” anthropological approaches with the “opportunism” of contemporary data collection solutions.
      Citation: Journal of Organizational Ethnography
      PubDate: 2023-12-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JOE-05-2023-0021
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Memories that last: evaluating the impact of eco-tourism
           on children's future behaviour

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      Authors: Tamas Lestar, Jessica Clare Hancock
      Abstract: This paper analyses children's experiences of school or family visits to Hare Krishna eco-farms in Europe. The article evaluates the extent to which these encounters enable retention and recollection of memories and, consequently, trigger change towards more sustainable behaviour. Participatory research, qualitative observations and theories of childhood memory are used to explore the nature of children's environmental encounters on Hare Krishna eco-tours. Findings reveal that Krishna eco-tours offer a conducive environment for cerebral registering and future reminiscing through the following components: experiential learning of sustainable practices which are radically different to mainstream alternatives, sensory experiences, nature play and entertainment and freedom from everyday constraints. The emerging literature on children's eco-tourism has largely focussed on market-related aspects and farmers' needs. In contrast, the authors’ conceptual framework, based on contemporary research in childhood memories, offers a tool to evaluate the impacts of eco-tourism from a more holistic perspective.
      Citation: Journal of Organizational Ethnography
      PubDate: 2023-12-13
      DOI: 10.1108/JOE-07-2023-0041
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Autoethnography in the modern workplace: a reflexive journey
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Marko Orel
      Abstract: This conceptual paper seeks to critically evaluate and illuminate the diverse autoethnographic methodologies that are pivotal for understanding the dynamics of contemporary workspaces. The objective is to contribute to the ongoing scholarly debate on the value of autoethnography in workplace research and explore how it can shed light on complex organizational phenomena. The paper adopts a narrative literature review approach, focusing on four main forms of autoethnography: realist, impressionistic, expressionistic and conceptualistic autoethnographies. Each form is discussed and dissected, emphasizing their specific sub-forms and illustrating their application through representative examples. The paper engages in a critical debate on utilizing autoethnography in workplace research. The findings illuminate how autoethnographic methods can be used to gain nuanced and complex understandings of personal experiences situated in workplace culture, as well as how broader social and cultural contexts shape these experiences. The study also highlights the potential of these methods to explore marginalized and silenced stories within workplaces and contribute to the knowledge on power dynamics, inequalities and injustices embedded in the organizational culture. The following contribution discusses approaches for conducting autoethnographic explorations of selected work environments, offering researchers valuable insights into these methods' application. Through better comprehension and application of these methodologies, researchers can enhance their contribution toward cultivating more inclusive and equitable workplace environments. The paper stands out in its extensive review and critical discussion of the autoethnographic methods as applied in workplace research. It expands upon individual autoethnographic studies by providing a comprehensive, multifaceted perspective, delving into the merits and limitations of these approaches in particular context of researching contemporary places of work.
      Citation: Journal of Organizational Ethnography
      PubDate: 2023-12-04
      DOI: 10.1108/JOE-06-2023-0038
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • A system psychodynamic perspective on collaborative leadership in
           multiparty systems: learnings from a behavioral simulation

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      Authors: Sandra G.L. Schruijer, Petru Lucian Curseu
      Abstract: This paper aims to provide a deeper understanding of what collaborative leadership in interorganizational systems entails. The empirical basis consists of the dynamics observed during two behavioral simulations involving seven stakeholders with managers and professionals as participants, dealing with a complex regional development issue. The authors describe what functions collaborative leadership in multiparty collaboration serve by discussing relevant literature and introducing a system psychodynamic perspective on leadership that focuses on the emerging dynamics between a leading party and other stakeholders. The relational dynamics between the leading party on the one hand and the other stakeholders on the other, are described and interpreted, taking the larger systemic context into account. The authors discuss some important group dynamics aspects that emerge in a multiparty context that can be used by participants in and facilitators of such complex systems in order to foster effective collaboration. Multiparty systems are set up to deal with some important societal challenges that require the integration of insights, resources and interests across several organizations and societal actors, therefore this study provides important insights into the complexity of collaborative leadership emergent in such contexts in which position power is lacking. The study provides a qualitative, in depth analysis of the collaborative leadership as it emerges in a multiparty context simulated by an experiential learning context.
      Citation: Journal of Organizational Ethnography
      PubDate: 2023-11-17
      DOI: 10.1108/JOE-08-2023-0048
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • “I don't want a child”: an apolitical argument in climate
           change trials in Switzerland

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      Authors: Clémence Demay, Mathilde Krähenbühl
      Abstract: This paper aims to explore how the argument of “eco-reproductive” concerns was mobilized in climate change trials in Switzerland. Looking at social movements' advantages and constraints when having recourse to the law, the authors interrogate why the symbolism of reproduction and kinship represented a political opportunity to defend the activists in a judicial system where judging is seen as an apolitical act. This paper is grounded in legal research and research on social movements. While legal research focuses mainly on the study of legal and written sources, the authors used ethnography and conducted interviews to cross the perspectives of activists, their lawyers and judges. In a context where positivist legal tradition remains strong, the “eco-reproductive” argument represented the advantage of being “apolitical,” thus audible in court. Used as socio-political tools, “eco-reproductive” concerns translated the activists' political claims into the legal arena. However, judges' conservative beliefs on family reinforced the depoliticization of activists' claims. While research on “eco-reproductive” concerns has been significantly quantitative and exploratory, the authors look in depth at one case of application and highlight the limits of “eco-reproductive” concerns to appeal to decision-makers.
      Citation: Journal of Organizational Ethnography
      PubDate: 2023-11-13
      DOI: 10.1108/JOE-04-2023-0012
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Editorial: Negotiated order in organisations revisited and straightened
           out

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      Editorial: Negotiated order in organisations revisited and straightened out
      Juha Klemela
      Journal of Organizational Ethnography, Vol. 12, No. 3, pp.261-266Journal of Organizational Ethnography2023-12-06
      DOI: 10.1108/JOE-10-2023-096
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 3 (2023)
       
 
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