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  Subjects -> ANTHROPOLOGY (Total: 398 journals)
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Totem : The University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology
Number of Followers: 1  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1203-8830 - ISSN (Online) 1925-8542
Published by Western University Homepage  [18 journals]
  • The Truth About Deer, Turtles, and Dogs: An Examination of the Ancient
           Maya Human-Faunal Interaction

    • Authors: Lindsay Foreman
      Abstract: This paper examines how Mayan individuals, families, and communities living in Mesoamerica from approximately 1200 B.C. to A.D. 1550 interacted with deer, turtles, and dogs. Data collated from archaeological, ethnohistoric, ethnographic, and written/artistic records is reviewed, and summarizes the symbolic, ritual, and ceremonial significance of these animals in the Preclassic to Postclassic Maya world. Deer, turtles, and dogs played important roles in the subsistence economy of Mayan individuals and family groups. Chi-square statistical analyses of the Number of Identified Specimens (NISP) and Minimum Number of Individuals (MNI) of deer, turtles, and dogs recovered from 10 Mayan archaeological sites (6 inland and 4 coastal) indicates that the availability of these animals differed at inland versus coastal locations and over time. These differences can be attributed to a combination of factors including, but not limited to, local ecosystems, changes in humidity, precipitation, and sunlight conditions, and variations in human exploitation patterns over time.
      PubDate: 2023-03-30
      DOI: 10.5206/uwoja.v25i1.16029
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • UWOJA Volume 25 Issue 1

    • Authors: UWOJA
      Pages: 1 - 208
      Abstract: UWOJA Volume 25 Issue 1
      PubDate: 2023-03-30
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Frankenstein’s Journal: Introducing the Reanimated University of Western
           Ontario Journal of Anthropology

    • Authors: Isabelle Rutherford, Naomi Nakahodo Moromizato, Sydney Holland, Ashley Ward, Zsofia Agoston, Javier Alvarez
      Pages: 1 - 9
      Abstract: This special issue of The University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology (UWOJA) serves to relaunch the journal after a prolonged hiatus. UWOJA (formerly TOTEM) published its first volume in 1994 and in its life, has endeavored to publish exceptional pieces of creative and original research by undergraduate and graduate students in all four subfields of anthropology. Despite UWOJA’s interruption in publication (2016-2023), the journal has had a considerable impact, especially for a student-led journal, receiving nearly 600 citations across 151 articles and becoming one of the most-consulted resources on Scholarship@Western. As of January 2023, articles from UWOJA have received over 35 thousand downloads. In addition to its contributions to anthropological knowledge, UWOJA has provided opportunities for many undergraduate and graduate students to participate in the peer-review and journal publication processes. In this issue, UWOJA’s new Editorial Committee intends to highlight the collective effort of previous authors, reviewers, editors, and organizational committees by republishing a selection of the most highly cited, or currently relevant, articles from the journal’s nearly 30-year history and discussing the impact these opportunities have had on the authors’ careers. Just as Frankenstein’s creature was brought to life using a collection of repurposed parts, this issue reanimates UWOJA by compiling highlights from its past.
      PubDate: 2023-03-30
      DOI: 10.5206/uwoja.v25i1.16315
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Multiple Histories: The Archaeology, Ethnohistory, Oral History, and
           National History of Iximche', Guatemala

    • Authors: Jessica Metcalfe
      Pages: 47 - 71
      Abstract: This article calls for the use of multiple histories to reconstruct the past. More specifically, it argues that Indigenous histories should figure prominently in archaeological discourse. Although the word ‘decolonization’ and its derivatives are never used in the article, it argues for what would today be recognized as a decolonizing approach: foregrounding Indigenous voices, conducting research with benefits for Indigenous communities, changing language that legitimizes Eurocentric views, and ‘braiding’ different ways of knowing about the past. Drawing on ethnohistoric sources, Maya oral histories, archaeological reports, and national histories told by Ladino authorities, this paper examines several historical themes in relation to the Maya site of Iximche’: its origins, conflict and ethnic relations, politics, religion, and identity. This case study shows that combining multiple historical perspectives has the potential to highlight the dynamic, changing, and sometimes contradictory histories of Iximche’s people, and to assert the relevance of Iximche’ and the Maya to Guatemala’s past, present, and future. More generally, bringing together ‘multiple histories’ is a way for archaeologists to build respectful partnerships with Indigenous peoples and act as allies in revitalizing Indigenous identities and cultures.    
      PubDate: 2023-03-30
      DOI: 10.5206/uwoja.v25i1.16033
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Museums Narrating the Nation: Case Studies from Greece and
           Bosnia-Herzegovina

    • Authors: Evan Taylor
      Pages: 72 - 93
      Abstract: A museum that represents a community’s history and culture has the ability to influence visitors’ perceptions of that community in the present. In this paper, museums in Greece and Bosnia-Herzegovina are examined as case studies to better understand how museums narrate national identity to visitors, both domestic and international. Critical analysis of exhibits reveals that museum narratives often project the image of singular national identities. Meanwhile, they may deny the history of place of other contemporary or historic communities. In Greece, museums project a ‘Greek’ identity based on Classical, Byzantine, and post-Ottoman history. Museums in Bosnia-Herzegovina emphasize a unifying, shared history of the state’s three main ethnic communities without recognizing the profound differences felt between these communities today. These institutions encourage visitors to imagine the nation in a singular manner, without recognizing contemporary or historic diversity. Through these case studies, I interrogate the role of national museums in contemporary society, and consider the implications of transforming representational practices.
      PubDate: 2023-03-30
      DOI: 10.5206/uwoja.v25i1.16030
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Transformation of Coca to Cocaine: An Overview of Traditional Drug Use and
           Modern Drug Abuse

    • Authors: Marla Toyne
      Pages: 94 - 115
      Abstract: This research paper briefly reviews the complex relationship between traditional use of coca and the consumption of the recreational drug, cocaine. A review of the history of coca production and utilization in the Andean region of South American illustrates the bio-social evolution of this plant. Coca leaves also have long played a significant role in the local economy and ritual practice. Alternatively, cocaine’s history and modern position as an illegal narcotic has a different impact on individuals, society, and the global economy. This paper reviews the role that both “drugs” play in terms of the health and lifestyle effects on the respective consumers. 
      PubDate: 2023-03-30
      DOI: 10.5206/uwoja.v25i1.16031
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • De Profundis: Unmasking the clinical pathological and sociocultural
           aspects of leprosy

    • Authors: Mark Dolson
      Pages: 116 - 134
      PubDate: 2023-03-30
      DOI: 10.5206/uwoja.v25i1.16116
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • The Evolutionary History of the Modern Birth Mechanism: Looking at
           Skeletal and Cultural Adaptations

    • Authors: Sharon Sadvari (née Buck)
      Pages: 135 - 151
      Abstract: The development of bipedalism changed the course of hominin evolutionary history. One of the most significant impacts it had, outside of locomotion, was on birth. The advent of bipedalism, combined with later encephalization, has placed many evolutionary constraints on the birth process. As a result of evolutionary pressures, a series of skeletal and cultural adaptations occurred making the modern birth process unique. This paper reviews the literature and fossil evidence and will outline the differences between three forms of birth mechanisms: modern, ancient and non- human primate. A look at the variability within these processes will lead to a more complete understanding of evolutionary history and a more critical analysis of the fossil record. This review of research on the evolution of human birth mechanisms is essential, not only to understand our history but also to apply these insights in a modern context. Knowledge of human and non- human primate birth mechanisms is useful for the biomedical community, primate conservationists and socio-cultural anthropologists trying to understand birthing practices throughout different cultures.
      PubDate: 2023-03-30
      DOI: 10.5206/uwoja.v25i1.16118
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Spatial Metaphors as Linguistic Primitives: A Comparison of UP-DOWN
           Metaphors in Three Languages

    • Authors: Mark Tovey
      Pages: 152 - 159
      Abstract: This paper examines the mapping of such ideas as happy and sad, control and subjugation, and past and future upon the spatial metaphors of UP and DOWN. Hitherto, such mapping had only been considered for English but this paper extends this to two other languages.
      PubDate: 2023-03-30
      DOI: 10.5206/uwoja.v25i1.16121
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • A Proto-Human Language: Fact or Fiction

    • Authors: Christine Schreyer
      Pages: 160 - 173
      Abstract: This paper investigates whether or not linguistics can be used to uncover the origins of human language for anatomically modern humans through an examination of proto-language studies. Specifically, this paper examines whether it is possible to determine a proto-language for all modern human languages. A review of comparative linguistics, including the challenges with this mode of study in deep-time, as well as genetic evidence is included to determine how far these kinds of studies are viable into the past. The paper concludes that it is highly unlikely that use of comparative linguistics can be used as a method as far back as the origins of human language.
      PubDate: 2023-03-30
      DOI: 10.5206/uwoja.v25i1.16032
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Culture in Social Theory

    • Authors: Greg Beckett
      Pages: 174 - 189
      Abstract: This article explores the place of an anthropological concept of culture in contemporary social theory more broadly. The concept of culture in Marxist social theory is explored with an emphasis on the questions of determination, social reproduction, and the problem of social action and agency. Drawing on works from cultural Marxists such as Raymond Williams and Stuart Hall, this article argues for a theory of cultural mediation as key to social reproduction over time.
      PubDate: 2023-03-30
      DOI: 10.5206/uwoja.v25i1.16027
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • The Nêhiyawak Nation through Âcimowina: Experiencing Plains Cree
           Knowledge through Oral Narratives

    • Authors: Paulina Johnson
      Pages: 190 - 208
      Abstract: This paper connects you to the Nehiyawak Nation of Western Canada by sharing key elements of our intellectual traditions and knowledge systems that have been shared through countless generations. The basis of this paper extends through the Indigenisation and decolonisation initiatives of preceding Indigenous scholars who have begun sharing their knowledge in a means to rewrite and challenge the dominant systems and methodological approaches that we ourselves find ourselves in. Since it does, I want you as the reader to understand that the concepts found in this paper are not the typical knowledge you are taught, and I ask you to come with an open mind as you read it since our Western society has been removed from metaphysical elements of our environment. The stories and insights of the Nehiyawak culture found in this paper delivers an emphasis on the deep-rooted understanding of the universe linked within our language, understanding of the world, and ancestral knowledge. It is shared with you for the purpose of enlightenment, and not for academic debate. I do not own this knowledge, but these are the stories of the Nehiyawak Nation, of which I am a part. You may not understand this paper now, but the information presented and given to you will keep with traditional customs and will make sense to you maybe not this year but maybe couple years down the road, as this is the lifelong effect of storytelling found in the Nehiyawak Nation.
      PubDate: 2023-03-30
      DOI: 10.5206/uwoja.v25i1.16028
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2023)
       
 
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  Subjects -> ANTHROPOLOGY (Total: 398 journals)
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