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  Subjects -> ANTHROPOLOGY (Total: 398 journals)
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African American Review
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.1
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1062-4783 - ISSN (Online) 1945-6182
Published by Johns Hopkins University Press Homepage  [22 journals]
  • Embracing the Incomplete: Speculative Reading in The Curse of Caste,
           Minnie’s Sacrifice, and the Christian Recorder

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      Abstract: As modern readers of the nineteenth-century Black press know, archival holdings of the Christian Recorder are incomplete—as are, therefore, the novels serialized within its pages. This essay takes up the examples of two incomplete, serialized novels—Julia C. Collins’s 1865 The Curse of Caste; or, The Slave Bride and Frances Ellen Watkins Harper’s 1869 Minnie’s Sacrifice—to develop a speculative methodology for reading incomplete texts that allows us to better understand the complexities and breadth of mixed-race heroine fiction. Although these novels are incomplete, scholars including William L. Andrews, Mitch Kachun, Frances Smith Foster, and others have shown that The Curse of Caste and Minnie’s Sacrifice are ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The New Era’s More Civil War: How Big a Tent'

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      Abstract: The single periodical that Frederick Douglass owned and edited after the Civil War debuted in January 1870 at an auspicious moment. Initially called the New Era and edited for the first six months by John Sella Martin, the weekly newspaper published in Washington, DC was poised to inaugurate a hard-won political epoch. The Emancipation Proclamation had been expanded to abolish slavery permanently as the Constitution’s Thirteenth Amendment, which was ratified by the states in December 1865. The Fourteenth Amendment guaranteeing federal protection of civil rights had been ratified in July 1868, and the Fifteenth Amendment securing voting rights for Black men had been passed by Congress in February 1869 and sent to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Aliened Americans: Pseudonymity and Gender Politics in Early Black Social
           Media

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      Abstract: In the middle of a heated debate with William Howard Day (1825–1900) about a proposed Industrial School in 1854, James McCune Smith (1813–65) published the following May 12, 1854 missive in Frederick Douglass’ Paper under his pseudonym, “Communipaw”:It is a pretty rural sight and sound to witness Brother Day gallanting Maria, and Becky, and Nancy, and Fanny, over his barn-yard, astonishing them with his bantam strut and squeaky crowing, while he boastfully cries “hens you are hens and I know it,”—now, Mr. Editor, could I have the heart to disturb that harmony' If tearful Fanny Homewood, sat and listened to wailing Lucy Stone until she thought her to be brother Day, who could be so hard-hearted as to ruffle a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Disalienating Realism of William Attaway’s Blood on the Forge:
           Rethinking Black Chicago Renaissance Aesthetics

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      Abstract: The concrete is concrete because it is the concentration of many determinations, hence unity of the diverse. It appears in the process of thinking, therefore, as a process of concentration, as a result, not as a point of departure, even though it is the point of departure in reality and hence also the point of departure for observation [Anschauung] and conception.Literary historian Robert Bone’s pathbreaking 1986 essay, “Richard Wright and the Chicago Renaissance,” prompted scholars to rethink the landscape of twentieth-century African American cultural history. In this essay, he argued the existence of a Black cultural movement in Chicago during the mid- to late 1930s and the 1940s, a movement no less distinctive ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • James Baldwin’s Readers: White Innocence and the Reception of “Letter
           from a Region in My Mind”

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      Abstract: The earliest readers of the November 17, 1962 issue of The New Yorker would have opened its pages with no warning of the piece stretching across its vast middle. That it would act like a hinge, a genuine pivot, in the life of the writer and the history of the magazine—selling out the issue’s run within weeks and participating “in a historic process of civil rupture and civil repair” (Forde 573)—was not to be foreseen. It would have taken a regular reader to spot the truncated Table of Contents, surrounded by the paragraph reviews of “Goings On About Town” and a less-than-enthusiastic notice of Edward Albee’s new play, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf' Those who did consult the Contents, moreover, would not find this ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Race and Vision in the Nineteenth-Century United States ed. by Shirley
           Samuels (review)

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      Abstract: To a large extent, race operates as a function of visual markers. In this broadly varied collection, Shirley Samuels challenges Stephen Best’s contention that the visual archive of slavery is empty by presenting twelve ways visibility shaped the democratic and antidemocratic cultural agendas of the nineteenth-century United States (1). Serving as a provocative assemblage of entry points to access the contestation of racial identity, visible elements emerge as sites for understanding the surveillance and reinforcement of the social order. While sights and sounds of nineteenth-century American life have often been dismissed as inaccessible to scholars of the twenty-first century, Samuels’s collection models the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Black Feminism Reimagined: After Intersectionality by Jennifer Nash
           (review)

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      Abstract: When Jennifer Nash returns to the state at the conclusion of her potent Black Feminism Reimagined: After Intersectionality, it feels, as she notes: “risky” (117). “Against the grain of the moment,” writes Nash, hailing the state’s diurnal renewal of anti-Black violence, “I suggest that the juridical might be precisely where black feminists need to root our loving practice” (115). Beyond mere redress, Nash advocates an orientation to radical politics that dispenses with a presumptive antistate imperative. “What if the disavowed deathly archive of law is reimagined as a home for black feminism’s loving practice'” (113).Nash’s project throughout the book is to excavate the “largely forgotten connections” of law to the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Brick City Vanguard: Amiri Baraka, Black Music, Black Modernity by James
           Smethurst (review)

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      Abstract: Amiri Baraka’s development as an artist and thinker has raised vexing questions about race, nation, and class as forms of social identification and mobilization. In 1965, Baraka left the racially and ethnically mixed bohemian arts milieu of lower Manhattan for a life in Black nationalist cultural and political work. He decamped to Harlem, and within the same year, he returned to his hometown of Newark, New Jersey. A decade later, in the mid-1970s, he renounced Black nationalism for a Marxist politics that envisioned leading roles for African Americans and other peoples who had been subject to colonial domination and exploitation. For some observers, these changes were ruptures. But in Being & Race: Black Writing ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Radical Black Theatre in the New Deal by Kate Dossett (review)

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      Abstract: In a scene from the play Liberty Deferred, written in 1937 by Abram Hill and John Silvera, ghostly victims of lynching are admitted into the afterworld Lynchtopia, where they vie for a prize for having the most horrific murder. The winner, Claude Neal, who in real life was tortured and mutilated publicly in Alabama in 1934, then leads a march of lynch victims to the US Senate as a version of the song from Disney’s Snow White—which had been released in theaters that same year—plays “Hi Ho, Hi Ho, off to Washington we go.” There, the ghosts raucously heckle Southern senators who are in the process of trying to filibuster an antilynching bill.In the context of 1930s racial realities and politics, this is a courageous ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Navigating the Fiction of Ernest J. Gaines: A Roadmap for Readers by Keith
           Clark (review)

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      Abstract: Keith Clark has written an excellent study of a writer that Americans need to be reading now. This beautifully written book could not be more timely; like Gaines’s fiction, however, it is not bound entirely by the moment in which it appears. Students, teachers, and fellow scholars will be using this text for years to come as they plumb the depths of Gaines’s often underappreciated corpus, gleaning from it lessons about who Americans have been and who we are becoming as we struggle with the entirely vexed and vexing questions of systemic racism and Black freedom.Gaines’s enduring national reputation rests primarily on the publication of two novels, The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman (1971) and A Lesson Before ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Afrofuturism Rising: The Literary Prehistory of a Movement by Isiah
           Lavender III (review)

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      Abstract: Afrofuturism has always been as much concerned with the past as it is with the future. Whether they are being forcibly transported back to experience the enslavement of their ancestors, like Dana, the protagonist of Octavia Butler’s 1979 novel Kindred; or whether they are upcycling ancient Egyptian imagery into their costume design like performers from Sun Ra to Solange, Afrofuturists keeps a sankofa’s gaze on the past. Isiah Lavender’s Afrofuturism Rising seizes on this historical slippage to advance the idea that Black people in the Americas have always been Afrofuturists. Mirroring the technologizing language of science fiction, Lavender devises three critical terms to describe the transhistorical nature of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Blackademic Life: Academic Fiction, Higher Education, and the Black
           Intellectual by Lavelle Porter (review)

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      Abstract: Lavelle Porter’s The Blackademic Life is an especially timely contribution to our understanding of the intersections among African American history, literature, and the practice of American higher education. Porter’s work appeared at the end of 2019, months before the protests of 2020 began to convulse the nation, demanding that Americans confront the persistence of structural racism. All institutions, including—and perhaps especially—those of higher learning, found themselves grappling with overwhelming evidence of the pernicious effects of a system built on often unacknowledged inequities. On campuses across the country, statues were toppled; buildings were renamed; chief diversity officers were hired. Yet in the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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