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  Subjects -> ANTHROPOLOGY (Total: 398 journals)
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Arctic Anthropology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.161
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0066-6939 - ISSN (Online) 1933-8139
Published by U of Wisconsin Press Homepage  [10 journals]
  • Alutiiq Ancestors' Use of Birds During the Ocean Bay Period at Rice Ridge
           (49-KOD-363), Kodiak Island, Alaska

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      Abstract: In Archaeo-Ornithology (Kost and Hussain 2019) and Ethno-Ornithology (Funk 2018), zooarchaeologists recognize that human relationships with birds can encompass use as food, as materials to be made into tools and clothing, as indicators of ecological conditions, or as supernatural forces to be respected and petitioned. The Rice Ridge avifaunal assemblage is a culturally mediated collection (sensu Funk 2018:145–146) based on the social relationships between Alutiiq ancestors and birds. We cannot know how Ocean Bay tradition people perceived birds, how they assessed their characteristics, or how they classified them. However, archaeological study of the Rice Ridge bird bones does allow us to evaluate which birds ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Interpreting Prehistoric Labor North and South of the Forager-Agricultural
           Frontier in Central Fennoscandia, Northern Europe

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      Abstract: One cannot understand Scandinavia without being aware of the division between the north and the south, defined by the limits of cultivation. … In the south, cultures change more rapidly, and these changes are more pronounced and far-reaching, created and fostered in large part by agricultural surpluses and the rise of more complex societies. … The basic way of life involving hunting, fishing, and collecting did not change significantly in the interior of northern Scandinavia until the Industrial Revolution remains i a few places today (Price 2015:378).This quote by T. Douglas Price relates to Fennoscandia as a whole. Unlike most of Europe, where cultivation has been seen as gradually replacing foraging as the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • More-Than-Human Intimacies and Traditional Knowledge among Hunting
           Families in Northwest Greenland

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      Abstract: Inuit relationships with arctic environments have inspired ecological frameworks of analysis and the development of the discipline of anthropology itself (Boas 1888; Muller-Witte 1998, 2014). Today, the deleterious effects of climate change on arctic humans and their surroundings are well-documented, accompanied by narratives of ecological ruin that influence the representation of arctic lifeways. The term "Anthropocene" was first used by ecologists to reference growing evidence for the transformative effects of human activities on the earth, denoting the epoch in which human disturbances outrank other geological forces (Haraway 2016; Tsing 2015; Waters et al. 2016). Documenting, evaluating, and proposing solutions ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Subjective Well-Being and the Importance of Nature in Greenland

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      Abstract: Polar bears, icebergs, snowy mountains, or whales diving into the ocean are probably among the most common visual associations with nature in Greenland. The country takes up about one-fifth of the Arctic land area, with a population of approximately 56,000 scattered over an area of around 2.2 million km2. The majority of this sparse population is Greenlandic Inuit, whose traditional lifeway prior to colonization was one that coexisted with, by, and from nature. Today, although most Inuit have adapted to the modern globalized world, they are still living in close contact with nature and are highly dependent on it. Almost the entire national export consists of natural resources (fish, prawns, and shellfish), as well ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Tales and Traditions of the Nganasans

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      Abstract: In this article, the transliteration of names, titles, and place names is based on the system recommended by the United States Board on Geographic Names, except that the Russian "soft sign" or "hard sign" are not rendered as an apostrophe. Also, when appropriate, the letter "y" is inserted between a vowel and a consonant, for example, Baykal or Taymyr. All text in brackets ([ ]in the body, footnotes, and references) are those of the translator or editors. Any text in parentheses is that of the author. The transliteration of the Russian words Enets and Nenets are singular, and Entsy and Nentsy are plural. The following abbreviations are used for archival references in this book: F.—fond, folio (collection); Op.—opis ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • On the Kenai in Extreme Northwest America

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      Abstract: This brief anonymous article titled only "Über die Kenai im äußersten Nordwesten Amerikas" was possibly written by the editor of Globus, an illustrated German journal devoted to geography and anthropology created by Karl Andree (1808–1875). The journal was published from 1862 to 1910, a period when Europeans, and to some extent Americans, were ravenous consumers of literature dealing with travel and with foreign peoples (Belgum 2013). It is possible that Andree himself wrote this article based on information he had received from travelers.One individual who capitalized on the rush for knowledge of things foreign was the Hamburg animal collector/trainer Carl Hagenbeck (1844–1913). In the 1870s, when the animal trade ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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