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  Subjects -> ANTHROPOLOGY (Total: 398 journals)
Showing 1 - 90 of 90 Journals sorted by number of followers
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 370)
Global Change, Peace & Security: formerly Pacifica Review: Peace, Security & Global Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 305)
Cultural Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 200)
Annual Review of Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 193)
Current Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 190)
American Anthropologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 167)
Ethnography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 95)
Ethnos: Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
American Ethnologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Journal of Anthropological Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Anthropology Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Anthropological Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53)
History and Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Social Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Contemporary Ethnography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Human Development: A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Memory Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Critique of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
American Journal of Physical Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Discourse Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Social Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of World Prehistory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Qualitative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Medical Anthropology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Ethnology : An International Journal of Cultural and Social Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of African History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Anthropology & Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Anthropological Review     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Medical Anthropology: Cross-Cultural Studies in Health and Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Archaeology, Ethnology and Anthropology of Eurasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Anthropological Forum: A journal of social anthropology and comparative sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Ethnohistory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Anthropology & Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
African Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Museum Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Human Evolution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
City & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
African and Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Anthropology of the Middle East     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Material Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Australian Historical Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
French Politics, Culture & Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
American Journal of Primatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Anthropology & Archeology of Eurasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Evolutionary Anthropology Issues News and Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Anthropological Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Pragmatics & Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Ethos     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Field Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Anthropology of Work Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Visual Anthropology: Published in cooperation with the Commission on Visual Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Culture & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Anthropology & Humanism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Latin American & Caribbean Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Mental Health, Religion & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Archeological Papers of The American Anthropological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Buildings & Landscapes: Journal of the Vernacular Architecture Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Anthropology Now     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Cultural Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Linguistic Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Reviews in Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Visual Anthropology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Anthropology in Action : Journal for Applied Anthropology in Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Food and Foodways: Explorations in the History and Culture of     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Dialectical Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Museum Anthropology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Asian and African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Geografiska Annaler, Series B : Human Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Ethnomusicology Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Tourism Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Cultural History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Anthropology News     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Anthropological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
E&G Quaternary Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Anthropology of Consciousness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
L'Homme     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cahiers d’études africaines     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
African American Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
East Central Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
POLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Osteoarchaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Anthropologie et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Progress in Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asian Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
L'Anthropologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Antiquaries Journal, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Historical Biology: An International Journal of Paleobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Transforming Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Myth & Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Chinese Sociology & Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Collaborative Anthropologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Transcultural Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Ateliers d'anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Focaal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Cultural Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Levant     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Anthropologie et santé     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anthropological Journal of European Cultures     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Turcica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Human Organization     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Primates     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Australian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Histories of Anthropology Annual     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Modern Greek Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Gradhiva     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Civilisations     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Oceania     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Arctic Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Polynesian Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal des anthropologues     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Canadian Studies/Revue d'études canadiennes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Quotidian : Dutch Journal for the Study of Everyday Life     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cuadernos de Antropologia Social     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
The Australian Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Acta Ethnographica Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Listening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Terrain     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Exchange     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
General Anthropology Bulletin of The General Anthropology Division     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Gesture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Social Science Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Burma Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Revista de Antropologia     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Alteridades     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Anatomical Science International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Socio-anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
South Asian Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Quaternaire     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Behemoth     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
South Asian Diaspora     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Images re-vues : histoire, anthropologie et théorie de l'art     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Antipoda : Revista de Antropología y Arqueología     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Recherches sociologiques et anthropologiques     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Durkheimian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
HOMO - Journal of Comparative Human Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bulletin de l’APAD     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Estudios Atacameños     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
L'Atelier du CRH     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Transnational American Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Structure and Dynamics: eJournal of Anthropological and Related Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Zoosystematics and Evolution - Mitteilungen Aus Dem Museum Fur Naturkunde Zu Berlin     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cadernos de Estudos Africanos     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. Ciências Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuicuilco     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Desacatos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Andes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Boletin de Antropologia Universidad de Antioquia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indiana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Antropologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tabula Rasa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal for the Anthropology of North America (JANA)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Southwest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cahiers de l'Urmis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Totem : The University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tipití : Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethnographic Praxis in Industry Conference     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intersecciones en Antropologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chungara (Arica) - Revista de Antropologia Chilena     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Apparence(s)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Terrae Incognitae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Nuevo mundo mundos nuevos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Scripta Ethnologica     Open Access  
Revista de Antropología Social     Open Access  
Mitologicas     Open Access  
Liminar. Estudios Sociales y Humanisticos     Open Access  
Avá. Revista de Antropologia     Open Access  
Treballs de Sociolingüística Catalana     Open Access  
Anthropologischer Anzeiger     Full-text available via subscription  
Mélanges de la Casa de Velázquez     Partially Free  
Recherches amérindiennes au Québec     Full-text available via subscription  
Runa : Archivo para las Ciencias del Hombre     Open Access  
Papeles de Trabajo. Centro de Estudios Interdisciplinarios en Etnolingüística y Antropología Socio-Cultural     Open Access  
Trace     Open Access  
Interações (Campo Grande)     Open Access  
Journeys     Full-text available via subscription  
human_ontogenetics     Hybrid Journal  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Myth & Symbol
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1022-3827 - ISSN (Online) 1753-5972
Published by Taylor and Francis Homepage  [2651 journals]
  • Fathering: New perspectives, paradigms, and possibilities.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Research on fathering and father–child relationships has been conducted for more than 40 years but fathers are still missing in many studies focused on parenting and parent–child relationships. In this special issue, our goal was to compile a group of papers that would provide a catalyst to move fathering scholarship forward into emerging areas with renewed focus, awareness, and attention to the social and cultural ecology of fathers, children, and family life. The work in this issue exemplifies the new theoretical perspectives and research questions driving contemporary fathering research and acknowledges men’s varied roles as fathers and their contributions to family life. Different methodological approaches are showcased, including secondary data analyses with large national data sets, longitudinal studies with observational assessments, and intensive qualitative studies. We discuss the various themes emerging from this collection, including the centrality of the father role to men’s identity, the role of men as coparents, a focus on nontraditional family forms, and a recognition of inclusion, diversity and equity. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 05 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Testing the father–child activation relationship theory: A replication
           study with low-income unmarried parents.

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      Abstract: The current study aims to replicate and extend previous research on father–child activation relationship theory, which suggests that fathers engage in stimulating, challenging, and directive parenting behaviors that are likely to benefit children’s development. A large and racially diverse sample of low-income, unmarried couples with young children (n = 672) was used to examine whether fathers and mothers exhibited an activation parenting profile (high sensitivity, positive regard, and stimulation of cognitive development, moderate levels of intrusive/directive behavior, and low detachment and negative regard). Observations of mother–child and father–child parenting behaviors during the two-bags task with preschool children were included in latent profile analysis to reveal 3 distinct parenting profiles for both fathers and mothers (i.e., supportive, activation, and intrusive), with the activation profile showing a pattern of moderate intrusiveness combined with sensitivity, positive regard, and cognitive stimulation. Four family configurations were created: (a) supportive mother/supportive father (23.74%), (b) supportive mother/activation father (9.24%), (c) activation mother/activation father (27.31%), and (d) activation mother/supportive father (39.71%). Children with supportive mothers and fathers had higher receptive language scores compared with those from other family groups, and had higher prosocial scores compared with children with activation mothers and activation fathers, but not other family groups (i.e., activation father/supportive mother or supportive father/activation mother). Results support activation relationship theory by noting a pattern of parenting behaviors used by fathers (and mothers) in which parents are moderately intrusive, challenging, or directive with their children, yet still sensitive and positive in their interactions. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 05 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • The interaction of child–father attachment and child–mother attachment
           in the prediction of observed coparenting. Correction to Bureau et al.
           (2020).

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Reports an error in "The interaction of child–father attachment and child–mother attachment in the prediction of observed coparenting" by Jean-François Bureau, Audrey-Ann Deneault, Kim Yurkowski, Jodi Martin, Jeffry Quan, Sage Sezlik and Camille Guérin-Marion (Psychology of Men & Masculinities, Advanced Online Publication, Jul 30, 2020, np). In the article “The Interaction of Child–Father Attachment and Child–Mother Attachment in the Prediction of Observed Coparenting” by Jean-François Bureau, Audrey-Ann Deneault, Kim Yurkowski, Jodi Martin, Jeffry Quan, Sage Sezlik, and Camille Guérin-Marion (Psychology of Men & Masculinities, Advance online publication. July 30, 2020. https://doi.org/10.1037/men0000309), the visual representation of interaction effects was erroneously the same in both Figure 2 and Figure 3. Figure 3 depicted the right values of simple slopes, but the wrong visual representation of them. All versions of this article have been corrected. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2020-55281-001.) A number of studies have examined the role of coparenting relationships on the development of children’s attachment to their mothers and fathers. However, previous research tends to interpret this link as unidirectional, thereby ignoring the possibility that, in reverse, child–parent attachment relationships could also predict the quality of the coparenting relationship. Furthermore, there is limited work examining how the child–father and the child–mother attachment relationships may interact to predict coparenting. In response to these limitations, the current study drew from an integrative family systems framework and observational measures to examine these possible relations in biparental heterosexual families. To assess child–parent attachment security, 144 preschool-aged children (83 girls; M = 46.89 months, SD = 8.77) completed independent separation–reunion procedures with their mother and father during counterbalanced laboratory visits. During a subsequent home visit, parents engaged in triadic play with their child, from which coparenting cooperation and competition were evaluated. Results showed that child–mother and child–father attachment security were not independent predictors of coparenting; rather, their interaction significantly predicted the quality of the coparenting relationship. In line with theoretical models calling for a family systems approach, study findings highlight the importance of considering the interactive effects of child–father and child–mother attachment relationships when examining family dynamics. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 19 Apr 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/men0000309) the visual representation of interaction effects was erroneously the same in bot
       
  • Fathers’ parenting and coparenting behavior in dual-earner families:
           Contributions of traditional masculinity, father nurturing role beliefs,
           and maternal gate closing.

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      Abstract: We investigated whether dual-earner fathers’ adherence to traditional masculine norms, father nurturing role beliefs, and maternal gate closing behavior predicted the quality of new fathers’ observed parenting and coparenting behavior. Data were drawn from a longitudinal study of the transition to parenthood among 182 dual-earner different-sex couples. Expectant fathers reported their masculine agency, hostile sexism, gendered provider beliefs, and father nurturing role beliefs in the third trimester of pregnancy. Maternal gate closing behavior was coded from observations of mother–father–infant interaction at 3 months postpartum. At 9 months postpartum, the quality of fathers’ parenting behavior was coded from observations of father–infant interaction, and the quality of fathers’ coparenting behavior was coded from observations of mother–father–infant interaction. Structural equation modeling (SEM) analyses indicated that fathers who held stronger father nurturing role beliefs showed more positive parenting behavior and less undermining coparenting behavior. Fathers higher in masculine agency also showed more positive parenting behavior. Mothers’ greater gate closing behavior was linked to less positive parenting and less supportive coparenting behavior by fathers. More positive couple behavior observed prenatally was also associated with better parenting and coparenting by fathers. These results highlight the complexity of relations of traditional masculinity, father role beliefs, and maternal gate closing with the quality of new fathers’ behaviors with children and partners in dual-earner families. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 08 Apr 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Stereotype awareness and Black fathers’ paternal engagement: At the
           nexus of racial and fathering identities.

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      Abstract: Social experiences and interactions can influence fathering role identities and motivate parenting behaviors. The current investigation seeks to better understand how awareness of societal and media stereotypes shape identity beliefs about Black fathers and paternal engagement, with an emphasis on multidimensional components of Black fathering identity (e.g., personally held beliefs about Black fathers; assessments of societal views about Black fathers). Also, we examine whether these associations vary by child gender, fathers’ residential, and partner status. A sample of 467 Black fathers (Mage = 38.39; SD = 9.86) with children between the ages of 8 and 17 years of age (M = 12.01; SD = 2.84) completed a survey via a Qualtrics Panel study. Approximately 58% of the sample was currently married. Forty-one percent of fathers reported non-residential status. Structural equation model analyses indicated that, while stereotype awareness about Black fathers was unrelated to paternal engagement, there was a significant indirect effect via Black fathers’ identity beliefs. Additionally, analyses provided some support that the examined associations varied by partner status and child gender. Findings suggest that Black fathers’ awareness of stereotypes may have direct and indirect implications for paternal engagement and that demographic context may shape the direction and strength of these associations. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 25 Mar 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Social contact, time alone, and parental subjective well-being: A focus on
           stay-at-home fathers using the American Time Use Survey.

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      Abstract: Stay-at-home fathers (SAHFs) face negative stereotypes and social stigma, which may be linked to negative feelings during social contact. In this study, we compare SAHFs’ social contact and time alone to that of stay-at-home mothers and parents of other work/caregiving statuses. In addition, we analyze SAHFs’ subjective well-being when with their children, spouse, nonspouse adults, and when alone to more accurately capture the positive and negative valences of their experiences. Using individual-level time-use diaries from the American Time Use Survey (N = 35,959), a nationally representative sample, we find that compared to fathers working full time, SAHFs spent more time alone, more time with only their children, and less time with adults. SAHFs reported that this alone time was meaningful, not negative. They reported more happiness when interacting exclusively with children. These findings refute some stereotypes that primary caregiving fathers only stay home with their children as a last resort and further support the new fatherhood ideal that contemporary fathers desire to be more actively involved in child rearing. Unfortunately, SAHFs reported significantly more sadness, more stress, and less happiness while interacting in a variety of contexts with adults. Connecting our work with previous research, we believe these findings are best explained by either exclusion of SAHFs or increased salience of social stigmas felt by SAHFs in social situations with adults. These indicators of emotional well-being during social contact have important implications for parent physical and mental health. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Nov 2020 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Determinants of fathers’ and mothers’ involvement in a
           parenting intervention.

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      Abstract: Parental involvement in interventions is key to their success. Drawing on data from an ongoing book-based parenting intervention aimed at increasing knowledge of child development among fathers and mothers of infants, we examined parents’ participation and quality of their engagement in the first 2 waves of the intervention, when children were 9 to 12 months old. We also examined the factors that predicted parents’ level of participation in the intervention. We report 2 sets of findings. First, parents participated an average of 2.6 times per week, and mothers participated more frequently than fathers. Almost all parents reported that they enjoyed reading the books regardless of their level of participation, though mothers reported slightly more enjoyment than fathers. Second, results of regression tree analyses showed that the most important predictor of mothers’ and fathers’ participation in the intervention was whether or not their partner was also participating. The other important set of predictors was the level of resources, hours worked, education, and household income for fathers and employment status and income for mothers. Our findings have important implications for improving fathers’ and mothers’ participation in interventions. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Nov 2020 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Latino resident fathers’ early involvement with infants.

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      Abstract: Despite the growing number of Latino families in the United States (Passel et al., 2011), Latino fathers are an understudied segment of the population. We examined a subsample of Latino residential fathers (n = 859) from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. Measures of fathers’ generational status and fathering beliefs, including adherence to traditional gender roles and fathering identity salience, were collected at child’s birth; father involvement was collected at infant age 1 year. We tested longitudinal mediations between fathers’ generational status, fathering beliefs, and involvement using structural equation modeling. Fathers’ generational status impacted the amount of time fathers spend with their children in tasks relating to direct caregiving, but not necessarily cognitive engagement. Findings highlight the importance of considering cultural context in early Latino father involvement. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 02 Nov 2020 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • The importance of father involvement for adolescent internalizing and
           externalizing symptoms.

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      Abstract: Although much research has highlighted the importance of parents for adolescent well-being, less work has focused on the relations between fathers’ positive involvement and adolescent well-being. Using Pleck’s model of father involvement, this study examined the associations between fathers’ and mothers’ positive involvement behaviors and adolescents’ internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Gender was examined as a potential moderator of these relations. Data came from 52 intact families where the father, mother, and adolescent child (ages 13–17) completed online surveys. Fathers and mothers each reported on their own parenting behaviors (positive engagement activities, warmth/responsiveness, control, indirect care, process responsibility), and adolescents reported their internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Multiple regression analyses indicated that higher levels of paternal positive engagement activities and lower levels of indirect care were related to lower levels of internalizing and externalizing symptoms, controlling for all other father involvement behaviors. Additionally, more maternal warmth/responsiveness was related to fewer adolescent internalizing and externalizing symptoms, controlling for all other mother involvement behaviors. Analyses focusing on each parenting behavior indicated that fathers’ involvement behaviors were not significantly related to either internalizing or externalizing symptoms when controlling for mothers’ corresponding behaviors, but higher levels of maternal warmth/responsiveness and control were associated with fewer adolescent internalizing symptoms when fathers’ corresponding behaviors were controlled. Finally, moderation analyses indicated that fathers play an important role in sons’ adjustment that was not found for daughters. These findings underscore the value of considering multidimensional models of fathers’ positive involvement behaviors and incorporating nontraditional dimensions of parental involvement. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 29 Oct 2020 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • How do Chinese fathers express love' Viewing paternal warmth through
           the eyes of Chinese fathers, mothers, and their children.

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      Abstract: Parental warmth is vital for child adjustment, but the expressive practices of parental warmth as gendered and cultural practices have remained understudied so far. The present study examines the expression of warmth among contemporary Chinese fathers who, based on inferences from traditional Chinese emotion philosophy and Confucian family ethics, have been typically portrayed as strict, stern, and inexpressive disciplinarians of their children. This study aims to understand the expression of paternal warmth in the backdrop of China’s drastically transformed sociocultural landscape. Interview data were collected from fathers, mothers, and children in 133 two-parent families in southeast China (girls = 51.9%; Mage = 9.54 years, SD = 0.77), who were asked individually about how the father in their family demonstrated love and affection, among a variety of fathering behaviors. Thematically coded interview transcripts suggested that today’s Chinese fathers are willing to display parental warmth toward their children, contrary to stereotypes. However, Chinese fathers prefer nonverbal expressions such as by providing instrumental support or showing physical intimacy, whereas verbal displays of love and affection were not preferred. The children noticed and valued their fathers’ coveted expression of love through instrumental support and the use of an authoritative parenting style. These findings shed light on the nuances in fathering behaviors and processes in contemporary Chinese families and call for culturally informed reflection and revision of the conceptualization and measurement of warmth in fathering and parenting scholarship. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 17 Sep 2020 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • The interaction of child–father attachment and child–mother attachment
           in the prediction of observed coparenting.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported online in Psychology of Men & Masculinities on Mar 18 2021 (see record 2021-36794-001). In the article “The Interaction of Child–Father Attachment and Child–Mother Attachment in the Prediction of Observed Coparenting” by Jean-François Bureau, Audrey-Ann Deneault, Kim Yurkowski, Jodi Martin, Jeffry Quan, Sage Sezlik, and Camille Guérin-Marion (Psychology of Men & Masculinities, Advance online publication. July 30, 2020. https://doi.org/10.1037/men0000309), the visual representation of interaction effects was erroneously the same in both Figure 2 and Figure 3. Figure 3 depicted the right values of simple slopes, but the wrong visual representation of them. All versions of this article have been corrected.] A number of studies have examined the role of coparenting relationships on the development of children’s attachment to their mothers and fathers. However, previous research tends to interpret this link as unidirectional, thereby ignoring the possibility that, in reverse, child–parent attachment relationships could also predict the quality of the coparenting relationship. Furthermore, there is limited work examining how the child–father and the child–mother attachment relationships may interact to predict coparenting. In response to these limitations, the current study drew from an integrative family systems framework and observational measures to examine these possible relations in biparental heterosexual families. To assess child–parent attachment security, 144 preschool-aged children (83 girls; M = 46.89 months, SD = 8.77) completed independent separation–reunion procedures with their mother and father during counterbalanced laboratory visits. During a subsequent home visit, parents engaged in triadic play with their child, from which coparenting cooperation and competition were evaluated. Results showed that child–mother and child–father attachment security were not independent predictors of coparenting; rather, their interaction significantly predicted the quality of the coparenting relationship. In line with theoretical models calling for a family systems approach, study findings highlight the importance of considering the interactive effects of child–father and child–mother attachment relationships when examining family dynamics. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Jul 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/men0000309) the visual representation of interaction effects was erroneously the same in bot
       
  • Associations between low-income nonresident fathers’ parenting identity
           and involvement with children.

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      Abstract: Low-income nonresident fathers face many challenges to staying involved in their children’s lives. The literature on these fathers suggests that men who value their status as fathers are more likely to be involved with children even when faced with barriers. Previous quantitative studies have tended to focus on one aspect of these fathers’ parenting identity when in fact there is more than one way to conceptualize identity. The current study examined fathers’ status centrality and interactional commitment using a sample of 300 low-income nonresident fathers. A unique aspect of this study was the focus on fathers’ identity in relation to their perception of how close they feel to their children as well as measures of engagement, contact, and responsibility. The findings indicated that status centrality and interactional commitment (encouragement from network members and maternal gatekeeping) are important components of these fathers’ identity. The associations between identity and father involvement were not moderated by child age. Suggestions for future research and implications for programs are discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Jul 2020 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Color him father: Generative parenting among low-income, urban-residing,
           coresidential Black fathers.

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      Abstract: In social science and popular parlance, Black low-income fathers continue to be represented as largely absent, disengaged, and negligent. These negative representations belie emerging qualitative and quantitative empirical data that demonstrate Black fathers, across lines of class, are constructively and responsibly involved in the lives of their children. The present study used qualitative data from 2 focus groups (n = 6 and n = 5) and 9 individual interviews with low-income, urban-residing Black men who are coresiding caregivers to young children (Mchild age = 47.9 months, SD = 11.4) to clarify how these men conceive of and pursue positive parenting. Caregivers were recruited from 11 Head Start programs in New York City. Interviews lasted 90–120 min and were transcribed verbatim. Content and thematic analysis of verbatim transcripts yielded 23 thematic codes related to men’s views of positive parenting. Themes revealed that fathers constructed positive parenting as a “generative” enterprise. However, generativity for these fathers reflected different concerns from generative parenting as conceived in extant literatures. In particular, our findings suggest the need to expand existing understandings of generative parenting by attending to challenges of emotional honesty, authenticity, dignity, and community. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Jul 2020 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Sensitivity and rough-and-tumble play in gay and heterosexual
           single-father families through surrogacy: The role of microaggressions and
           fathers’ rumination.

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      Abstract: Gay and heterosexual single fathers through surrogacy may be targets of microaggressions (i.e., subtle and implicit stigma-related stressors), as they present highly contested aspects of family formation: single parenthood, surrogacy conception, and, in the case of gay single fathers, nonheterosexual orientation. However, to date, no research has addressed whether experiences of microaggression impact the quality of the father–child relationship and the factors that mediate this process. The present study investigated the indirect effect of family-related microaggressions on observed sensitivity and rough-and-tumble play (RTP) via rumination in 35 gay and 30 heterosexual single-father families (n = 65), with children (3–10 years of age) born through surrogacy. Both groups of fathers showed high sensitivity and RTP quality during parent–child interactions. However, regardless of their sexual orientation, single fathers who perceived more frequent microaggressions also reported a higher tendency to “brood” in response to stress, and this was, in turn, linked to lower sensitivity—but not RTP quality—with their child. The findings provide a unique contribution to the fathering literature, as these underscore—for the first time—that although explicit and overt forms of stigmatization may differ in form and content, subtle and ambiguous forms of prejudice are equally detrimental to the parent–child relationship. Accordingly, the findings emphasize the need to raise awareness in practitioners and the broader society about the ways in which values and ideological assumptions about parenting, families, and conception may affect the lives of gay and heterosexual single fathers and their children. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Apr 2020 00:00:00 GMT
       
 
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