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Memory Studies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.37
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 41  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1750-6980 - ISSN (Online) 1750-6999
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Finding place in Northeast and Southeast Asia: Collective memory
           construction of the marginalized, disenfranchised, and dislocated

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      Authors: Mary M McCarthy
      Pages: 3 - 7
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Volume 17, Issue 1, Page 3-7, February 2024.
      This introductory article presents the frame and impetus for our special issue on collective memory construction of the marginalized, disenfranchised, and dislocated in Northeast and Southeast Asia. The objective of this article is to showcase this collection as in dialogue and to draw out some of the common themes, including speaking from the margins, the gatekeepers of public memory, the geopolitics of commemoration, and the ongoing negotiation in domestic and international spaces for control of the historical narrative.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-22T10:19:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231215007
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Mnemonic splinterings and disciplinary convergences: Memory studies,
           Vietnamese studies, and diasporic Vietnamese studies

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      Authors: Quan Tue Tran
      Pages: 8 - 20
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Volume 17, Issue 1, Page 8-20, February 2024.
      This article considers memory studies in the context of the Vietnamese case study in order to test and revise previous assumptions on dimensions, levels, and modes of memory drawn mostly from European or Northern American frameworks. In particular, it examines the politics of modern Vietnamese memories about war and migration both in the Socialist Republic of Vietnam and in the Vietnamese refugee diaspora to consider the possibilities, limitations, and implications of such contested memory work. Highlighting the particularities of Vietnamese memory politics, the article illustrates what memory studies, Vietnamese studies, and diasporic Vietnamese studies can bring to each other and contribute to important disciplinary discussions ongoing in these fields.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-22T10:19:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231215008
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Gendering displacement: Nieh Hualing’s re-membering refugee students
           during the Second Sino-Japanese War

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      Authors: Linshan Jiang
      Pages: 21 - 38
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Volume 17, Issue 1, Page 21-38, February 2024.
      This article analyzes the representation of Nieh Hualing’s war memory as a refugee student during the Second Sino-Japanese War in her creative writings, especially Mulberry and Peach: Two Women of China, in intertextual conversation with her autobiography, Three Lives. By centering the intersectional experience of a female refugee student, the analysis enriches war narratives with a combination of diasporic and feminist perspectives on daily life distinguishing itself from male-dominated battlefields. While her war experience as a refugee student constitutes her “first life” in war-torn mainland China among her “three lives” in mainland China, Taiwan, and the United States, Nieh as a writer constantly negotiates with her Chineseness and inquires about her positionality in the world when moving across cultures. While Nieh as a writer embodies a “Chinese cosmopolitanism,” the female protagonist in Mulberry and Peach uses “hypersexuality” to reject patriarchal society and ethnocentric nationalism and go beyond Chinese cosmopolitanism.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-22T10:19:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231214637
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Incriminated writers and their wives: Gendered memory of a national
           campaign in Mao’s China

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      Authors: S Louisa Wei
      Pages: 39 - 55
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Volume 17, Issue 1, Page 39-55, February 2024.
      The primary source of this study is 76 video interviews concerning a political campaign by the Chinese Communist Party: the Anti-Hu Feng Counter-revolutionary Clique Movement (1955–1956). This campaign and the long incrimination of its central figures—Hu Feng (1902–1985), his wife Mei Zhi (1914–2004), and other associates—have had an impact on Chinese intellectuals for nearly seven decades and generated hundreds of (auto)biographies, memoirs, critical writings, and scholarly studies since the 1980s. Victimized writers managed to publish again, but the stories of their wives remained obscured and marginalized for years. This article presents three research findings: first, the wives provide different but equally essential testimonies as do the writers; second, methods used by feminist historians can benefit oral history collection from all, but from women and the marginalized in particular; and third, gendered memory helps to bridge the gap between those who have and have not personally experienced specific historical events.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-22T10:19:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231215009
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • (Un)rest in revolution: Beijing’s Eight Treasures Mountain (Babaoshan)
           Revolutionary Cemetery and the making of China’s national memory

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      Authors: Linh D Vu
      Pages: 56 - 70
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Volume 17, Issue 1, Page 56-70, February 2024.
      In 1950, the People’s Republic of China began transforming the Eight Treasures Mountain (Babaoshan) into a national cemetery for its highest-ranking cadres and most devoted supporters. This article advances our understanding of how the People’s Republic of China revolutionizes the way it uses the dead to legitimize its rule over the living. While the People’s Republic of China seeks to erase the Imperial and Republican past, it follows its predecessors in shaping national memory by creating a sacred site for the loyal dead. Furthermore, despite atheist self-proclamation, the People’s Republic of China relies on traditional beliefs and practices to memorialize its dead members. The state’s attempts to shape national memory through these means have not been without resistance from the bereaved families, particularly under controversial circumstances. Besides these unsettled conflicts, the People’s Republic of China faces the challenges posed by a growing number of the dead. The People’s Republic of China tries to manage its necro-constituents by turning to information technology and eco-burial.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-22T10:19:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231215010
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Homey foods: Domesticating memories of the martial-law era in
           Taiwan’s heritage tourism

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      Authors: Rui Kunze
      Pages: 71 - 85
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Volume 17, Issue 1, Page 71-85, February 2024.
      After the martial law period (1949–1987) ended, Taiwan embarked on democratization, which became interwoven with Taiwanization. Mainlander migrants, who came to Taiwan in the late 1940s with the Chinese Nationalist Party, and their offspring born in Taiwan, have come to be recognized or position themselves as the ethnic group of Mainlanders. Essential to this ongoing identity (trans)formation in Taiwanese society is how to remember the martial-law era. This article examines heritage tourism of two preserved sites built in early postwar Taiwan: the Shihlin Official Residence 士林官邸 of Chiang Kai-shek and the Forty-four South Village 四四南村, one of the earliest military dependents’ villages. More specifically, it investigates how tourist culinary programs and on-site exhibits de-militarize and de-sinicize the heritage sites to create a nostalgic prosthetic memory couched in a discourse of home-building and domesticity, which parallels the mainlanders’ changing foodways with their Taiwanization.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-22T10:19:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231214628
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Lens to difficult history: Museums of Hansen’s disease in Malaysia,
           South Korea, and Taiwan

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      Authors: Shu-yi Wang, Jaehyung Kim
      Pages: 86 - 102
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Volume 17, Issue 1, Page 86-102, February 2024.
      A recent revisit of the history of leprosy in East and Southeast Asia led to the establishment of museums of Hansen’s disease. Given that the history of leprosy has been a touchy subject due to its social stigma and complicated colonial past, these museums become spaces for the curious to comprehend memories of the forgotten past. In this article, we investigate contradictory purposes of reappraising the heritage value of the history of leprosy for present needs. Museum exhibitions in three colonial leprosaria in Malaysia, South Korea, and Taiwan are examined, specifically focusing on three areas of interpretation: the medical past in a post-colonial present, the difficult life of former patients, and the unsettled present. In contrast with the traditional museum as a place for the repository of glorious national identity, museums of Hansen’s disease offer diverse pathways to new museum culture created by activists, museum visitors, and officials.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-22T10:19:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231215011
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Memory, borders, and justice: The emerging morality competition over the
           wartime documentary heritage of Jewish refugees in East Asia

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      Authors: Shu-Mei Huang
      Pages: 103 - 120
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Volume 17, Issue 1, Page 103-120, February 2024.
      This article brings attention to the moral aspect of remembering by examining the emerging interest in wartime documentary heritage in East Asia, particularly epitomized in recent competitions and disputes over nomination processes of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization Memory of the World. It examines China and Japan’s attempts at pursuing MoW registers and leading the commemoration of Jewish passages in wartime East Asia, through which they wish to gain an international reputation for morality derived from the Holocaust. This study demonstrates that memory politics in East Asia, instead of only reinforcing the image of innocent victims of wars, has moved toward featuring the righteous figures who preserved humanity against violence. It also sheds light on the limits of MoW—an institutional practice that is not designed to accommodate entangled memory but to confine and govern memories.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-22T10:19:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231214627
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Book review: Regions of Memory: Transnational Formations Simon Lewis,
           Jeffrey Olick, Joanna Wawrzyniak and Malgorzata Pakier (eds)

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      Authors: Kieran JH Shackleton
      Pages: 121 - 123
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Volume 17, Issue 1, Page 121-123, February 2024.

      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-22T10:19:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231214613
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Book review: Fragments of Truth: Residential Schools and the Challenge of
           Reconciliation in Canada Naomi Angel

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      Authors: Audrey Rousseau
      Pages: 123 - 126
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Volume 17, Issue 1, Page 123-126, February 2024.

      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-22T10:19:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231214613a
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Book review: Human Rights Museums: Critical Tensions Between Memory and
           Justice Jennifer Carter

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      Authors: Robin Ostow
      Pages: 126 - 130
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Volume 17, Issue 1, Page 126-130, February 2024.

      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-22T10:19:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231214613b
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Book review: Dancing on Bones: History and Power in China, Russia and
           North Korea Katie Stallard

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      Authors: Marc Kosciejew
      Pages: 130 - 133
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Volume 17, Issue 1, Page 130-133, February 2024.

      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-22T10:19:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231214613c
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Russian LGBT activism and the memory politics of sexual citizenship

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      Authors: Pauline Stoltz, Anna Khlusova
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article discusses barriers to the citizen practices of Russian lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender activists in the memory politics of Russian sexual citizenship. Based on memories of activism, as told in interviews with Russian lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender activists, we focus on how these memories play a role in their national and transnational struggles for sexual rights and recognition, and how intersectional inequalities may create barriers to their queer and memory space-making practices. The interviews were conducted in 2021 (before the war between Russia and Ukraine, which started in 2022) and focus on the period between 2010 and 2020. Our findings highlight how intersectional inequalities of power influence Russian sexual citizenship and queer (memory) space-making, both at home and abroad. Theoretically, the results reveal the need to situate Russian lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender activism in time, place and space in research on narratives of progress and social change in studies of queer global politics and transnational solidarities.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-23T11:14:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980241233136
       
  • Book reviews: The Right to Memory: History, Media, Law, and Ethics

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      Authors: Anne Whitehead
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T12:43:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231224564
       
  • The Battle of Thakhek, 21 March 1946: Traces of a colonial massacre on the
           Lao–Thai border

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      Authors: Vatthana Pholsena
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the life of an event—a massacre during the First Indochina War on 21 March 1946 in Thakhek, Laos—in the border town of Nakhon Phanom in northeastern Thailand, to where most of the survivors fled. Ignored by Thai authorities and not memorialized in social practices, this event nevertheless continues to have significant impacts on local communities. This article draws on two key concepts: Paul Ricoeur’s “mnemonic act” and Avery Gordon’s notion of “haunting.” Ricoeur’s “small miracle” of memory and Gordon’s haunting as a way of awakening consciousness to past violence help to elucidate the meanings of events for the present, namely, the traces that they leave. Following Valentina Napolitano’s definition of “trace,” this article shows how the memory of the event of 21 March 1946 has become anchored in different sites in Nakhon Phanom and how the event has acquired different meanings, its life prolonged through divergent processes of (re)interpretation and narrativization in each of these sites.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T09:30:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231224764
       
  • Remembering for the future: Feminicide literary narratives and the
           formation of feminist collective subjects

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      Authors: Sofía Forchieri
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Over the past three decades, transnational feminist activist movements in Latin America have been struggling to construct collective subject positions from where to remember, bear witness to, and rally against feminicide. This article explores literature’s contribution to this broader process of feminist collective subjectivity formation. It does so by means of a reading of two recent yet already emblematic feminicide narratives in literature: Selva Almada’s Dead Girls and Cristina Rivera Garza’s Liliana’s Invincible Summer. The article starts by making a case for the importance of attending to the rhetorical dimensions of contemporary literary engagements with feminicide to better understand how they mobilize memory with a view to enabling political change. Subsequently, the analysis shows how, in the process of commemorating gender violence, Almada and Rivera Garza tactically interpellate readers into communities of feminicide remembrance with the aim of bolstering ongoing feminist struggles against gender violence.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T09:28:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231224755
       
  • Entrepreneurs of memory: Selling history in the GDR Museum shop in Berlin

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      Authors: Magdalena Saryusz-Wolska, Hanno Hochmuth, Sabine Stach
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The field of memory studies rarely deals with commercial enterprises, which, as we argue in this article, play just as prominent a role in shaping collective memories as state actors or nongovernmental organizations. The aim of our study is therefore to discuss the role of private entrepreneurs and their businesses in the context of GDR memory. We focus on the privately run GDR Museum in Berlin and its best-selling products. Through the lens of the museum store, we analyze the exhibition, an iconic eggcup, and a book on the history of the GDR that has enjoyed sustained sales over a lengthy period. By tracing the intertwined distribution chains of these memory goods, we emphasize the importance of private entrepreneurs and their networks in the current German memory culture. We argue that economic interests and developments are just as important as political decisions and public institutions regarding the memory of the communist past. Thus memory studies should also focus on enterprises of memory by analyzing business data. This poses an empirical challenge that is worth tackling, since it broadens our understanding of current memory culture.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T09:27:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231224697
       
  • Shape of storage memory: A digital analysis of the museums’ storage
           of Northeast Europe

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      Authors: Maija Spurina
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Objects in museums’ storage constitute “storage memory” that sets the limits to our knowledge and interpretation of the past. Spread out across thousands of institutions, it has been inaccessible for empirical inquiry until recently. Theoretically, the digitization of museum catalogs allows the uniting of dispersed containers of institutional data into a vast connected digital archive, turning “storage memory” from a theoretical concept into an empirically explorable phenomenon. The study examines national digitized museum catalogs of three countries—Latvia, Estonia, and Finland—with a two-fold purpose: first, to explore if and how they can be used to produce a structural overview of the storage memories of each of the three included countries, both separately and in combination; second, by documenting the process of exploration, to examine critically how these new digital data collections are structured and formatted and to what extent they allow to transgress institutional and national boundaries.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T05:58:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231224763
       
  • Libyan deportees on the Italian island of Ustica: Remembering colonial
           deportations in the (peripheral) metropole

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      Authors: Galadriel Ravelli
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In 1911, the Italian liberal government launched the colonial occupation of what is now known as Libya, which was met with unexpected local resistance. The government resorted to mass deportations to the metropole to sedate the resistance, which continued for more than two decades under both the liberal and Fascist regimes. This chapter of Europe’s and Italy’s colonial history has been almost entirely removed from collective memory. The article explores the extent to which colonial deportations are remembered on the Sicilian Island of Ustica, which witnessed the deportation from Libya of more than 2000 people. Currently, the island is home to the only cemetery in Italy that is entirely dedicated to Libyan deportees. I argue that the visits of Libyan delegations, which took place from the late 1980s to 2010, succeeded in challenging colonial aphasia at the local level. Yet, as a result of Ustica’s peripheral position within the national space, the memory work developed through the encounter between local and Libyan actors remained marginal, despite its potential to redefine the Mediterranean as a symbolic space where colonial histories are articulated and remembered. Italy’s outsourcing of the memory work in relation to colonial deportations implies a missed opportunity to interrogate the postcolonial present and thus question persistent dynamics of power in Europe that exclude the constructed Other.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T05:51:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231224759
       
  • Memories in between: Daughters from the Chilean diaspora in Sweden speak
           about their mothers

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      Authors: Paulina de los Reyes, Diana Mulinari
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      While literature on memory and dictatorship in Latin America is extensive and narratives departing from the memories of children are evolving, the (gendered) intergenerational processes at the core of the experience of military terror, from the specific location of the diaspora, have so far been marginal in both research and in public debates. What is the language through which collective experiences of violence and political persecution are told to the next generation in diaspora contexts' What does it mean to articulate narratives from the dictatorship in Chile with memories emerging from the diaspora located in Sweden' This understanding is a vital point of departure in our study of young female adults whose parents came to Sweden after the Pinochet military takeover, a group that we here refer to as the daughters of the Chilean diaspora in Sweden.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-20T06:27:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231219594
       
  • Redrawing the lesbian: The memory of lesbian feminism in Kate
           Charlesworth’s Sensible Footwear: A Girl’s Guide

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      Authors: Vasiliki Belia
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Kate Charlesworth’s graphic narrative Sensible Footwear: A Girl’s Guide (2019), part memoir and part documentary of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and intersex life and activism in the United Kingdom from 1950 to 2019, remembers the time when the LGBTQI+ and feminist movements met and influenced each other deeply, namely in lesbian feminism of the 1970s and 1980s. Drawing on feminist historiography and memory studies, this article discusses the role the figure of the lesbian has played in the collective memory of lesbian feminism. With a focus on the expressive capacities of comics, it examines how the work revisits this figure at a time when women’s and LGBTQI+ rights face a backlash led by anti-gender campaigners, some of whom draw on discourses associated with lesbian feminism. It concludes that the work challenges dominant narratives about the relationship between lesbian, queer, and trans feminism and enables a reconsideration of these movements as parts of a common political project.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T12:16:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231219592
       
  • Gibsland, Louisiana’s memoryscape of Bonnie and Clyde: Putting the
           past in the present

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      Authors: William N Holden
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      A memoryscape is a place where memories are anchored in space. One cannot travel back in time to when an event occurred, but one can travel in space to where an event occurred. On 23 May 1934, Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were ambushed and killed near Gibsland, Louisiana, by a posse of law enforcement officers. There is a monument at the ambush’s location, and since 1993, there has been the Authentic Bonnie and Clyde Festival commemorating the ambush and culminating with its re-enactment. The re-enactment demonstrates putting the past into the present, and while watching it, one feels being taken back in time to when the ambush occurred and experiences living history. The ambush’s re-enactment commemorates not only the end of Bonnie and Clyde’s crime wave but also the beginning of the end of the Public Enemy Era.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-29T11:12:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231219596
       
  • Migrants, transcultural memory and World War I commemoration in
           post-conflict Northern Ireland

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      Authors: Philip McDermott
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores a community memory project on World War I led by first-generation migrants living in Northern Ireland. As a location recovering from 30 years of political violence, debates on commemoration are frequently reduced to the bi-partisan lens of Irish nationalism or British unionism. World War I is one episode often interpreted through this exclusivist framework. Recent immigration, however, raises questions as to how those who are neither nationalist nor unionist can partake in public memory debates. Drawing on the project’s experiences, I argue that incorporating migrants’ worldviews on the past can elucidate important transcultural analysis and positively aid in reframing simplistic ethno-national interpretations. Transcultural methods can illuminate cross-cultural themes and explicate differences and similarities across multiple groups rather than just two historically divided communities. Thus, transcultural approaches offer a novel means of generating holistic dialogue on memory which has transformative potential for a society transitioning from conflict to peace.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-29T10:57:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231219588
       
  • Pro-dictatorship memorialization in democratic Chile (1990–2020):
           How is it maintained'

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      Authors: Valentina Infante Batiste
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The article examines the combinations of conditions that explain the maintenance of pro-dictatorship memorialization in democratic Chile, where various pro-dictatorship memory sites, memorials, squares, and street names still positively commemorate the military dictatorship or associated elements (1973–1990). The study used four main explanatory factors and subjected them to a Qualitative Comparative Analysis. The procedure revealed that, in Chile, pro-dictatorship memory sites are maintained through two main paths. On one hand, “Walls” (veto players) block elimination demands and guarantee the pro-dictatorship sites’ maintenance. On the other hand, it is the combination of “Silence” (absence of human rights organizations denouncing the site) and “Local and/or Institutional Support” (protection granted by local communities or state agencies) that explain the maintenance of pro-dictatorship memorialization. These results reflect a unique sociological attempt to understand the phenomenon of pro-dictatorship legacies and their permanence in democracy.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-29T10:47:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231219586
       
  • Colonial imagery of ‘Arctic hysteria’ and its resignification in Pia
           Arke’s work of counter-memory

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      Authors: Magdalena Zolkos
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The figure of the ‘Arctic hysteric’ emerged in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in the discourses of polar explorations and Arctic colonisation as part of photographic and narrative archive of Westerners’ encounter with Greenlandic populations. This racialised and gendered trope made a mark on the European collective memory of Arctic explorations, solidifying an image of native Greenlanders as infantile, frail and in need of protection from the deleterious effects of civilisation. As such, post-colonial scholars have suggested that ‘Arctic hysteria’ cannot be regarded as a solely psychological diagnostic, but needs to be historicised in the context of colonisation and the social disruptions and hardship it brought about for the Inuit. This article, first, undertakes an analysis of the photographic figurations of ‘Arctic hysteria’ to investigate their place in the collective memories of polar explorations, including erasing the role of Indigenous people in these explorations, and, more broadly, construing imaginary geography of the Arctic as an uninhabited and empty place, a canvas for colonial projections, rather than a native homeland. Next, it focuses on artistic resignifications of ‘Arctic hysteria’ in the work of Greenlandic-Danish artist, Pia Arke, and argues that these resignifications are an example of a decolonial project of counter-memory of the Arctic, which is based on a refusal of regarding colonisation as past. Tracing coloniality and its effects in the domains of the body, affect and intimacy, Arke explores the possibilities of creating a shared and relational Arctic memory.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-28T06:34:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231219585
       
  • Memories of a fishing landscape: Making sense of flow and decline

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      Authors: Maria Abranches
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on life history interviews conducted with former fishers and other older residents in Great Yarmouth – one of the 20% most deprived districts in England – this article explores how memories of a once flourishing fishing industry are used to make sense of the decline that followed the end of the industry in the 1960s. Focusing on the material and affective constituents of people’s memories, embodied in three categories of fishing-related objects (boats and quay, nets and fish) through which their stories are told, I explore how those formerly involved in fishing-related activities understand and experience the past and their world in the present. Using biographical and historical memories to reclaim their role in the making of a town that they consider to ‘have missed the boat’, they are able to make sense of the transformations that occurred and to reclaim their role as place makers.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-10-11T12:30:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231197120
       
  • Digital methods in memory studies: A beginner’s guide to scalable
           reading of Twitter data

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      Authors: Helle Strandgaard Jensen, Josephine Møller Jensen, Alexander Ulrich Thygesen, Max Odsbjerg Pedersen
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article makes a methodological contribution to the growing subfield of digital memory studies. It demonstrates a possible way forward for memory studies scholars who want to try out digital methods but also remain in conversation with the kinds of research traditionally produced within the field. The article revolves around a showcase of an analytical workflow for conducting a scalable reading of large quantities of tweets through access to the Twitter API. The article argues that using only basic computational approaches to social media data in combination with API access can drastically improve data collection practices and enrich analytical practices, producing results recognizable and compatible with existing research in memory studies. As a case study, the article uses a dataset of nearly 200,000 tweets collected around two events that prompted Twitter users to discuss the history of the American children’s television program Sesame Street. It does so to demonstrate: first, how a visualization focusing on chronology can help underpin arguments about heightened activity around certain events. Second, a close reading of selected tweets from these events can support claims of shared activity, even if no hashtags were used. And third, how using simple tools for distant reading makes it possible to converse with questions and issues about gatekeepers and connectivity already central within memory studies. Furthermore, the article demonstrates how the Twitter API supports a more systematical, large-scale collection of tweets than usually seen in memory studies, making researchers less dependent on the algorithmic bias that rules the search in the platform’s regular interface.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-09-23T11:36:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231197126
       
  • Memory discourses in visitor books of travelling exhibits in Southern
           Chile

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      Authors: Sol Rojas-Lizana
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The Museum of Memory and Human Rights in Chile hosts regular travelling exhibits about the country’s recent traumatic past of 1973–1990. In this article, I study the visitor books (VBs) that accompanied travelling exhibits to the cities of Valdivia and Puerto Montt to examine their effect on the audience. The entries reflected a variety of writers, from younger generations to survivors and witnesses. The analysis shows that the VBs are used to exercise the right to memory, to confirm their ‘duty to remember’ manifested in the presence of transitional justice discourses, and to express emotions that seem to reflect a positive and healing effect. Moreover, it was proven that the nature of the visitor’s memory (direct or postmemory) would showcase different reactions to the exhibit experience.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-09-08T05:33:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231195570
       
  • Memorial reparation: Women’s work of remembrance, repair and
           restoration in rural Colombia

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      Authors: Maddalena Tacchetti, Alexandra Chocontá-Piraquive, Natalia Quiceno Toro, Dimitris Papadopoulos
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The article discusses the reparative textile-making practices of three women’s sewing collectives in Colombia. Textile making and crafting is also a memory work which intersects and negotiates with different geographies, temporalities and scales of human subjectivity, social interaction and ecological belonging. We approach textile memory work as a practice embedded in a complex net of other everyday practices, spaces, and human and non-human beings, enabling the production of collective memories, while facilitating transformational processes by which women materially resignify and recover their communities affected by war. Textile memory work is a socially and ecologically situated practice of repair and reparation from below.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-08-28T12:15:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231188482
       
  • Corrigendum to “The Archival Riot. Travesti/Trans* Audiovisual Memory
           Politics in Twenty-First Century Argentina”

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      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-08-23T11:00:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231190463
       
  • Heritage, memory and identity of Harbin: A confluence of Russian and
           Japanese colonial effects

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      Authors: Wenzhuo Zhang
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Harbin is the capital of Heilongjiang Province and China’s northernmost metropolis. The modern city of Harbin was founded by the Russians in 1898 and colonised by Russia and Japan during the first half of its 120-year history. After the Second World War, the post-colonial Harbin had to deal with its Russian and Japanese colonial pasts and their architectural remains. While the city initially tried to forget its colonial pasts by demolishing the colonial-era buildings, in recent decades, Harbin is re-remembering those pasts through the presentation and (re)interpretation of its colonial built heritage. It is noteworthy that the local government has approached Harbin’s Russian and Japanese colonial heritages in very different ways, and public opinion has polarised on the issue of colonisation regarding the city’s Russian and Japanese colonial pasts. Using archival analysis, observation and semi-structured interviews, this paper investigates the evolution of Harbin’s urban memory of the colonial pasts from both official and popular perspectives. It is argued that the different approaches to Russian and Japanese colonial heritages have historical reasons in cultural, economic and political terms and serve to achieve a common goal in the present, that is to construct a distinct and consistent identity for the city’s future. Further, post-colonial identity constructed in this way is questioned as it still does not overcome the self–other dichotomy that features in colonisation.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-08-22T11:56:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231188483
       
  • Erratum to Introduction: Sites of reckoning special issue

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      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-08-18T12:57:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231191256
       
  • Thanatographical fiction: Death, mourning and ritual in contemporary
           literature and film

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      Authors: Cornelia Ruhe
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In recent years, many authors around the world have taken on the difficult task of commemorating the unmourned dead caused by wars, terrorism or structural violence, or of giving them a literary burial. Their fictions, which I will call thanatographical fiction in the following, play a central role for the collective imaginary in that they provide an archive of knowledge on how violent death and grief are processed. The study of a comparative corpus shows that there is a transcultural and transmedial poetics of grief that serves to frame and channel emotions, to give them a form that allows access to them without sparking further excess. What I aim to demonstrate is that the common grounds of fictions from such diverse places as France, Québec, Senegal and Ukraine are that they can illustrate processes of the economy of emotions: in order to address the subject of violent death, they have to resort to different strategies of emotion control. By modulating emotions, texts and films influence both the regulation of grief and commemoration on one hand, and on the other, the reinforcement of collective identities. They can thus provide an instrument for reflecting on the interaction of grief and violence to gain a better understanding of it. I will thus analyse Wajdi Mouawad’s tetralogy of plays Le sang des promesses, Mohamed Mbougar Sarr’s novel De purs hommes, Valentyn Vasyanovych’s film Atlantis and Julie Ruocco’s novel Furies to elaborate a first draft of a thanatographical poetics of grief.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-08-03T10:46:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231188480
       
  • Memory and kinship across the Indo–Myanmar border: A study of the lived
           experiences of displaced Kuki families

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      Authors: Seilienmang Haokip
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The crisis of India’s north-east is intertwined with the contestation of its history and memory. Its colonial spatial strategy and administrative policies – inherent in a series of ethnographic works – continue to have repercussions in the post-independence era. Therefore, memory as a border device is an important means of understanding the experiences and manoeuvres of the borderland communities. This article seeks to understand the challenges of violence and displacement faced by the Kuki community, which lives along the Indo–Myanmar border, in a conflict that has separated many families living in the north-eastern region. Following the independence of India, the dispute over territories in this region took a violent turn, leading to forced displacement and aggravating the problems of the borderland community. Based on a qualitative study among different generations of displaced Kuki families, this article argues that the intergenerational transmission of memories can be creatively used to generate responsibility and adjustment to the challenges of poverty and separation caused by the international border. It was also found that embodied memories of violence and displacement are transmitted across generations and that these memories can be creatively fashioned in the families’ everyday lives. Despite the challenges of mobility, elders continue to sustain a familial relationship across the border as the narratives they transmit to younger generations are often saturated with affective meaning, which foregrounds a mode of habitation and understanding of spatial imagination that is different from the present-day, hardened border.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-08-03T10:37:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231188484
       
  • Race against time: “9/11: One Day in America” and the amnesia
           of America’s archive

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      Authors: Liz Hallgren
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      I engage in a discourse analysis of National Geographic’s docuseries “9/11: One Day in America” to argue that the series’ multi-layered effort at commemoration, geared as a long-awaited “full” telling of the 9/11 story, but committed to honoring a specific group of victims and survivors, is enabled by a disorienting temporality that raises questions about the role of national memorials and archives at this moment. Temporality is essential to the development of narrative, and with narrative a central element in the making of memory worlds, temporality cannot be underestimated as a key factor in how memories take shape. “One Day” depends on structural instantiations of time to develop its narrative as authentic memory, reflecting a paradoxical linear yet circular pattern that simultaneously authenticates and undermines the veracity of the story it tells. “One Day” transports viewers into lower Manhattan and through the events of 9/11 via a vividly illustrated timeline. But while a linear version of time in “One Day” supports the telling of survivor stories and the memorialization of the dead, the overarching effect of the timeline for viewers is circular, transporting viewers back in time to 2001 and a state of fear and confusion, forcing collective memory to exist in a repetitive temporality that excuses a turn away from history and consequences. The resulting circular mechanism for commemoration allows cultural institutions, like the ones represented in “One Day,” to emphasize the past at the expense of more critical understandings of both history and the future.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-07-29T10:08:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231188481
       
  • ‘I can’t remember how many I killed’. . .: Child soldiers and memory
           work in YouTube

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      Authors: Birgit Bräuchler
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The way conflicts are remembered is crucial for the prevention of future violence, and digital technologies play increasing roles in processes of remembering. This article looks at memory work conducted in a YouTube video featuring two former child soldiers in Maluku, Eastern Indonesia, and their story from mutual hatred and war to friendship and peace. Analysing and comparing the video and the related English and Indonesian video commentaries, this article asks how the Moluccan violence is remembered, how that memory travels and how it is translated and received among different audiences. It investigates how connectivity and creativity open up new memory spaces and how, within these digital spaces, transcultural memory tropes and political and cultural contexts of social media users can both solidify hegemonic memory narratives and transform traumatic memories into hope and peace.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-07-29T10:06:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231188478
       
  • Contesting public forgetting: Memory and policy learning in the era of
           Covid-19

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      Authors: Sydney Goggins
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines scholarship on public forgetting and its implications for post-disaster recovery and policy learning to theorize how tendencies toward structural amnesia risk limit policy learning as the Covid-19 pandemic continues to unfold and as the climate crisis exacerbates the risk of new global health crises. This article will contribute to memory studies by advancing a theory of how public forgetting leads to a cascade of impacts on policy and social well-being. Building on Beiner’s work on social memory, scholarship on the politics of memory, and research on post-disaster policy learning, I show that institutional forgetting implicitly places individual and collective memories outside the public sphere in which policymaking occurs. This discourages commemorative practices that constitute the traumatic past and present of the pandemic as creating responsibilities on the part of policymakers and governments for increased protections in the present and policy learning in the future. Constituting the Covid-19 pandemic as a necessary subject of public memory, in contrast, allows individuals and communities to assert rights to restitution and accountability for the policy failures that led to profound racial and socioeconomic disparities in risks of infection, severe illness, and death. Through engaging with the memory advocacy by the nonprofit groups the We Must Count Coalition, Marked by Covid, and the Covid-19 Longhauler Advocacy Project, I illustrate how commemorative practices by social movements illuminate the policy implications of contesting how collective traumas will be remembered.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-07-26T09:10:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231184563
       
  • Memory and time in early Quakerism

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      Authors: Hilary Hinds
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the ambiguous place of memory – its absences and presences, its strategic mobilisation and theological redundancy – in the practices and writings of the early Quaker movement. Quakers’ commitment to unprogrammed, largely silent, worship and to spontaneous speech meant that memory had no place in their Meetings for Worship. Nevertheless, the movement was actively intent on conserving the memory of its early years, ensuring that its writings, published and unpublished, were preserved, by developing systems of copying and archiving key documents. Memory is thus central to the ambitions and practices of the early movement and yet also rendered redundant by aspects of its theology. The article investigates traces of memory in the composition of the Journal of George Fox, the movement’s first leader, and finds its strategic rhetorical mobilisation of memory to be rooted in Quakers’ distinctive understandings of human and divine time.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-07-26T06:13:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231184580
       
  • Remembering the anti-Soviet partisan war in Lithuania, 1944–1953: The
           effects of heroization at different levels of remembrance

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      Authors: Liucija Vervečkienė
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The collective-level heroisation of the armed resistance (1944–1953) against the Soviet occupation in Lithuania faces various challenges, which initially address the threat posed by foreign propaganda or the legacy of Soviet period narratives. However, in this article, I argue that the difficulties in constructing a hero-freedom fighter from the partisan past lie in the exaltation of the ‘right’ type of behaviour at the ‘wrong’ time of occupation. As collective (political)-level memory portrays heroic resistance, the ‘memory consumers’ within families of different generational experiences mediate meanings and react to them with certain strategies. This reveals rather painful aspects of remembering collaboration and being on the ‘wrong side’, although the heroic image of the partisan aims to foster pride in the conflictual past. The Lithuanian case illustrates more general challenges in the intersection of individual, communicative and structural (political) memory in a country that experienced transformational regime change and commemorates the difficult past.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-07-05T06:00:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231184577
       
  • The invented myth behind the Taiwanese ‘national’ holiday: The
           collective memory of Peace Memorial Day

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      Authors: Ming-li Yao
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to discuss how the state of the Republic of China, which is Chinese-oriented, created the discourse of the national holiday of Peace Memorial Day to reinforce Taiwanese nationalism. Peace Memorial Day was proclaimed to commemorate the tragedy of the state’s massacre of Taiwanese locals on 28 February 1947, usually known as the ‘228 Incident’. Based on resources collected from the two officially sponsored museums, this study explored how the Republic of China government has ‘selectively’ presented the sources of the 228 Incident, reshaping the contested text as part of a mnemonic past shared by itself and society, and on which basis it has developed the cultural discourse embodying Taiwanese nationhood. The research results also suggest that the officially constructed memory underscores the core value of democratisation not only to reinforce the notion regarding the Republic of China as a ‘Taiwanese’ government, but also to mark the distinction between the Republic of China and the People’s Republic of China as two ‘national’ unities.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-07-05T05:57:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231184558
       
  • Revisiting memoricide: The everyday killing of memory

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      Authors: Scott Webster
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Memoricide, it seems, is memory made rubble and ash. Its emblematic imagery is of scenes many would find familiar: burning ash-snow from Sarajevo’s Vijecnica; satellite images of Palmyra’s missing structures; the exploding Bamiyan Buddhas. Physically altering space is understandably a highly visible tactic. However, when explicitly built into definitions, the emphasis on physical destruction has been on specific forms targeted: archival institutions, monuments, memorials and heritage sites. This article revisits memoricide as a range of converging physical, social and discursive strategies. It introduces ‘everyday’ memoricide – the normalisation of memory erasure as mundane practices – which ordinarily masks its intelligibility as memoricide through ‘common sense’ or ‘greater good’ discursive frames. The sacred Djab Wurrung trees, threatened by the Victorian State Government’s Western Highway project, and a felled Directions Tree in particular, provide a still unfolding case study within the broader history of Australian memoricide.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-07-03T09:43:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231184564
       
  • A psalm is always a memory: Nostalgia and sacrality in contemporary
           ritual-musical appropriations of the psalms

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      Authors: Henk Vogel, Mirella Klomp, Marcel Barnard
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article discusses the role of biographical memory in three contemporary ritual-musical appropriations of the psalms in Dutch and Flemish contexts. We observe that, in performances of psalms, participants (intend to) either forget or recall different biographical memories. Nostalgic narratives of religious, cultural and individual change and continuity inform both the way that they interpret their experiences of these psalm performances, and their motivations for attempting to forget or recall particular memories related to the psalms. By using the notion of sacrality — that which is set apart, non-ordinary — we show that particular non-negotiable desires and non-ordinary experiences recur multiple times in these nostalgic narratives. Analysis of these desires and experiences leads us to conclude that contemplative experiences are desired by many, but experienced by only a few. We suggest the combination of Aleida Assmann’s theory of forgetting and remembering with the notions of nostalgia and sacrality as a way to successfully overcome the unproductive dichotomy between religious and cultural heritage.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-07-01T06:54:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231184567
       
  • A creativity-focused anniversary: Montreal’s 375th anniversary
           celebrations at the heart of a cultural economy of the past

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      Authors: Fannie Valois-Nadeau
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In 2017, the City of Montreal commemorated its 375th anniversary. Because it celebrated the city’s “creative” spirit more than its past, this 375th anniversary stands as an opportunity to explore reconfigurations of public anniversaries, which often take the shape of cultural mega-events. This article presents the different logics behind these celebrations, largely shaped by the communications and entertainment industries, and examines how they partake in developing of a cultural economy that benefits from the past. The purpose is thus not only to identify the presence of a commercial relationship but to explore how celebrations develop in light of the paradigm of creativity, which is currently a pillar of cities’ economic development policies. This article draws on interviews with people involved in the event organization, individuals sidelined by the process, and media and archives analysis.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-07-01T06:51:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231184560
       
  • Beyond multidirectional memory: Opening pathways to politics and
           solidarity

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      Authors: Zoltán Kékesi, Máté Zombory
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Our article responds to the ongoing crisis of memory politics that has brought the problem of de-politicization of memory studies scholarship to the forefront. This reflexivity is manifested in the demand for theories that explicitly address the problems of politics and solidarity. A representative theory in this regard is Michael Rothberg’s multidirectional memory that examines “the Holocaust in the age of decolonization” and offers a non-exclusive model of public remembering and reconciliation. While we acknowledge Rothberg’s attempt to overcome the “competition paradigm” of contemporary memory, we argue that the model of multidirectional memory as a politico-ethical framework of solidarity ultimately fails because of its underlying social ontology and presentist-ahistorical method of interpretation. We give a critical analysis of his model while applying the same historical and empirical focus. By doing so, we show that the direct theoretical link between memory and solidarity is the outcome of a de-politicization of the historical record. Ultimately, we make a case for Leftist-antifascist internationalism, a paradigm he misidentified as multidirectional Holocaust memory.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-06-05T09:59:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231176040
       
  • Narrating political participation: How do lifetime activists remember
           their political experiences'

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      Authors: Rodrigo Serrat, Feliciano Villar, Karima Chacur-Kiss
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Narrative approaches have gained popularity as a way to understand the construction and development of political identities over a person’s life span. However, little is known about how lifetime activists remember and make sense of different types of political experiences. To overcome this gap, this study aims to explore thematic and structural features of the narratives of lifetime activists about political experiences (O1), as well as examining differences in these features according to the type of experience described and the life stage at which the event narrated occurred (O2). Forty political activists aged 65 years or older were invited to explain a positive event, a negative event and a turning point in their political participation. The motivational themes, affective themes, themes of integrative meaning and structural elements of the narratives were analysed. Results show significant variations in these narrative features according to the type of political experience described and the life stage at which the event narrated occurred. Our study adds to the previous literature on political identities showing that, far from being monolithic, lifelong activists’ narratives about political experiences show significant variations according to these two features. Overall, the structural variations that we found in lifetime activists’ narratives about political experiences largely mirrored previous literature on general autobiographical narratives. This means that, regardless of whether life stories are general or domain-specific, their structural characteristics and the variations they show by life stage and type of narrated events are largely similar.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-06-02T10:53:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231176042
       
  • Mnemonic interventions: Memory and transitional justice at a Uruguayan
           prison-mall

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      Authors: Kristal Bivona
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In 1986, Uruguay’s maximum security Punta Carretas Prison closed following a riot in the context of Uruguay’s transition from authoritarian civic-military dictatorship (1973-1985) to constitutional democracy. In 1994, the building reopened as Punta Carretas Shopping, one of Uruguay’s most luxurious shopping malls. In this article, I show how two site-specific installations at the prison-mall—the temporary photography exhibition, Brava: Memoria fotográfica de Punta de las Carretas (2019) and the permanent memorial installation, Memorial Ex Penal de Punta Carretas (2020)—put forth distinct versions of the past to shape the memory of Punta Carretas. I call these mnemonic interventions because they interrupt the shopping trip and divert attention away from leisure and consumption toward remembrance, provoking the shopper to engage with the space of the former prison and its history. I demonstrate how different stakeholders struggle over memory in Uruguay in a context in which impunity undermines efforts toward truth and justice. Mnemonic interventions at Punta Carretas Shopping reveal the ongoing struggle over how the past should be remembered in Uruguay decades after the transition to democracy, showing the impact of recent transitional justice policies to demarcate sites of memory and resistance.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-06-02T09:44:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231176038
       
  • Vernacular de-commemoration: How collectives reckon with the past in the
           present

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      Authors: Tracy Adams
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This research develops a new framework through which to understand vernacular de-commemoration, as one aspect of bottom-up reckoning with the past through material commemoration. The productivity of breaking with the past distances us away from monumentality and toward action. Vernacular de-commemoration is part of a broad bottom-up process that goes beyond the mere withdrawal of uncomfortable reminders of the past from the public space, or even the recontextualization of public markers. Analyzing and comparing two case studies in the United States, and the United Kingdom, this research examines how vernacular de-commemoration is performed. In some instances, following the destruction of the now-contested memory site, new and alternative sites are installed (i.e. “re-memorialization”); other times, there may be a considerable delay, and sometimes nothing new is installed. Seen in this way, re-memorialization is always preceded by de-commemoration, and, in turn, de-commemoration is not always the final word in the constant negotiation about the meaning of the past in the present.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-05-25T10:58:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231176041
       
  • The ‘sites of oblivion’: How not to remember in a world of
           reminders

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      Authors: Veronika V Nourkova, Alena A Gofman
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      While it is commonly accepted that forgetting may serve to accomplish worthwhile goals, relevant social technologies require detailed analysis. We examined the literature on the social practices of the collective inhibition of unwanted memories. Complimenting the term ‘sites of memory’ introduced by Nora, we applied the term ‘sites of oblivion’ to the areas intentionally designed to protect visitors from specific unwanted memories associated with the disturbing affect. This study proposed a preliminary classification of the ‘sites of oblivion’. This analysis identified four qualitatively distinct social politics aimed at evoking the transformation of existing sites of memory into memory-inhibiting areas. Each of these politics employs a specific psychological mechanism of memory inhibition and varies with concrete strategies to achieve the goal of not remembering. These basic high-level forgetting politics include: exploiting the natural fragility of human activity traces or destroying memorial sites, including various forms of ignoring (the ‘no traces’ politic); retracting attention from memory triggers to other intense stimuli (the ‘switching memory to’ politic); recasting ‘sites of memory’ into ‘sites of oblivion’ through functional replacement or reconceptualisation, including renaming (the ‘recasting’ politic); and the politic of ‘hyper-evocation’, that is, decreasing the probability of recall outside of memorial sites by rising the threshold of mnemonic response to those reminders that are weaker than hyper-reminders. The psychological mechanisms underlying the inhibitory mnemonic effect of ‘sites of oblivion’ are as follows: Pavlovian extinction, attention deployment, Pavlovian re-conditioning and Pavlovian discrimination, respectively.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-05-25T10:55:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231176039
       
  • Environmental commemoration: Guiding principles and real-world cases

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      Authors: Mihaela Mihai, Mathias Thaler
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Addressing the political implications of the ever-accumulating destruction of ecosystems and more-than-human life, this paper asks whether and in what ways environmental losses should be publicly commemorated. Our answer is two-pronged. First, we hold that a politics of environmental commemoration would enfranchise those who are already grieving, by lending legitimacy to their experiences. Moreover, commemorative practices might prompt much-needed norm change by nurturing a recognition of our species’ entanglement with the more-than-human world. Second, we programmatically introduce five principles that should guide environmental commemoration, ethically and pragmatically: multispecies justice, responsibility, pluralism, dynamism, and anticlosure. A critical examination of two real-world examples – the memorialization of the passenger pigeon’s extinction and the annual ritual of the Remembrance Day for Lost Species – substantiates our theoretical argument. Finally, the paper engages with several potential criticisms.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-05-25T10:34:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231176037
       
  • Viral Camus: Mapping cultural memory in the Covid era

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      Authors: Vanessa Brutsche
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article evaluates the place of The Plague in the emergent cultural memory of the COVID-19 pandemic, a time when the novel was said to have “gone viral” in popular culture. I ask what it means to reread The Plague in the current moment, a time characterized not just by a pandemic but by widespread unrest and social movements on both ends of the political spectrum. While rereadings of Camus in light of COVID-19 seem predicated on a turn away from the novel’s allegorical dimension, The Plague has taken on new metaphorical meanings in its Covid-era reception. Examining the proliferation of “readings” of the pandemic, in which the virus has been understood as a figure for collective social ills, this article highlights the place of Camus’s novel in the cultural memory of the crisis and proposes that it can illuminate some of the complex entanglements of our present.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-05-25T10:31:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231176036
       
  • Legacies of a martial race: Sikh investment and implication in the US
           police state

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      Authors: Harleen Kaur
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      British colonization in India had devastating social, psychological, and political consequences for Sikhs in nineteenth-century Punjab. Still, much of the diasporic community remains nostalgic for this era of the Sikh “martial race”—a British-crafted racial category through which Sikhs were constructed as biologically and culturally suited for imperial service and consequently received privileged status within the colonial hierarchy. Today, this nostalgia emerges as a commemorative mechanism in US Sikh advocacy projects to incorporate the Sikh turban and unshorn hair into US military and police uniform. Through an analysis of community narratives around publicized Sikh deaths, this article explores the impact of martial race commemoration on Sikh subjectivity formation. Delineating when and how private grief is transformed into public remembrance, I argue such commemorative frameworks in US Sikh advocacy projects inform which Sikh bodies are worthy of collective mourning by suturing Sikh bodies’ value to their service to US imperialism.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-05-19T10:18:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231170348
       
  • A non-existent cemetery: The memory of Germans in today’s Belgrade

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      Authors: Sabina Giergiel, Katarzyna Taczyńska
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article demonstrates the post-World War II conflict of memory in Serbia, as manifested in the transformation of urban space in the post-war decades. The authors focus foremost on Zemun, a district of Belgrade which, between the mid-nineteenth and mid-twentieth centuries, was home to a significant German population. The term ‘memoryscape’ (Sławomir Kapralski) is used to discuss changes in the urban fabric. Post-war manipulations of space, based on the ideological foundation of brotherhood and unity, and treating members of the German nation as collectively responsible for the war, resulted in the erasure of all traces of German presence in Zemun. The article describes the Zemun conflict of memory using the example of a German cemetery that was liquidated by the authorities after World War II. In the 1950s, a hospital was erected on the site of the former necropolis, and the area functions nowadays as a difficult-to-access ‘non-site of memory’ (Roma Sendyka). The tombstones from the destroyed cemetery were used to build the stairs leading to Kalwarija Park. For decades, this fact was treated as an urban legend, but its authenticity was confirmed when fragments of grave inscriptions were discovered on the slabs used in the stairs during renovation. Kalwarija Park itself constitutes a remnant of the German Catholic heritage of this area, now dominated by Orthodox residents.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-05-19T04:00:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231170349
       
  • From disenchantment to glory: Fluctuations in the memory of World War II
           in Japanese Cinema (1980–2020)

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      Authors: Esteban Córdoba-Arroyo
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In recent decades, the field of memory studies has shown increasing interest in the reconstruction of the past through the lens of cinema. The ongoing “war for memory” or “history problem,” as it is otherwise known, in East Asia vis-à-vis the memory of World War II provides plentiful opportunities for exploration of the role films play in shaping collective remembering. This study was designed to answer the question of how World War II has been remembered in Japanese cinema by detecting patterns and fluctuations of memory in a sample of 59 movies released between 1980 and 2020. The results suggest that World War II has most frequently been depicted as a natural disaster (beginning in 1942) that evolved into a conflict between Japan and the United States alone—other Asian countries having been cast as mere spectators. Finally, after a heroic fight to the death in which only the Japanese suffered, the disaster ended in 1945 as mysteriously as it began.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-05-09T07:20:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231170352
       
  • Social fields, journalism, and collective memory: Reporting on the
           Armenian genocide in legal, political, and commemorative field events

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      Authors: Miray Philips, Joachim J Savelsberg
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Conflictual processes unfolding in legal and political social fields as well as commemorative events differentially shape social memories, including memories about genocides, in line with their rules of the game and institutional logics. News media subsequently process mnemonic struggles—carried out in law, politics, and commemorations—submitting them to the rules and norms of journalism before their messages reach the public. This article explores these processes for struggles pertaining to memories of the Armenian genocide. It is based on a quantitative and qualitative analysis of 259 English language newspaper articles published in the United States that report about a court case, a legislative process, and commemorative events. Our analysis identifies distinct patterns of representations. Differences are in line with the institutional logics of the legal and political fields and the epistemic potential of commemorative rituals, even as they interact with the logic of the journalistic field that mediates those accounts.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-05-06T09:45:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231170354
       
  • Memory dialogics: Scholastique Mukasonga’s literary renegotiation of
           Rwandan Genocide narratives

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      Authors: Valerie Fryer-Davis
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Many scholars have recently observed how the Rwandan State, led by the Rwandan Patriotic Front, relies on public memory after the 1994 Rwandan Genocide to categorize individuals based on gender and ethnicity. But the scholarship predominately constructs individual narratives in opposition to the State narrative, either supporting or resisting it. This article approaches the political memorialization in Rwanda through literature in order to explore how individuals simultaneously support and renegotiate State narrative tropes by fictionalizing a diverse set of emotions. Through a case study of Scholastique Mukasonga’s novels and memoires, the article examines how literary form and language allow an individual writer to dialogically situate their own memories within prescriptive State and international narratives, allowing readers to simultaneously relate to a multitude of contradictory narratives through their attendant emotions. The article reveals that the degree to which a writer can nuance these narratives from above depends on the writer’s identity, their geographical location, the languages they write in, literary form, and which aspects of the State narrative they choose to critique. The study concludes that literature might be crucial to encourage deeper reconciliation in Rwanda.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-05-02T09:07:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231170355
       
  • The difficult, divisive and disruptive heritage of the Queensland Native
           Mounted Police

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      Authors: Heather Burke, Lynley A Wallis, Nicholas Hadnutt, Iain Davidson, Galiina Ellwood, Lance Sullivan
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The colonial history of nineteenth-century Queensland was arguably dominated by the actions of the Native Mounted Police, Australia’s most punitive native policing force. The centrality of the Native Mounted Police to the sustained economic success of Queensland for over half a century, and their widespread, devastating effects on Aboriginal societies across the colony, have left a complex legacy. For non-Indigenous Queenslanders, a process of obscuring the Native Mounted Police began perhaps as soon as a detachment was removed from an area, reflected today in the minimisation of the Native Mounted Police in official histories and their omission from non-Indigenous heritage lists. In contrast, the Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Database preserves several elements of frontier conflict and Native Mounted Police presence, giving rise to parallel state-level narratives, neither of which map directly onto local and regional memory. This highlights potential issues for formal processes of truth-telling relating to frontier conflict that have recently been initiated by the Queensland and Federal Governments. Of particular concern is the form that such a process might adopt. Drawing on a 4-year project to document the workings of the Queensland Native Mounted Police through archival, archaeological and oral historical sources, we suggest that this conflicted and conflictual heritage can best be bridged through empathetic truth-telling, using Rothberg’s notion of the implicated subject to consider contemporary contexts of responsibility and connect present-day Queenslanders with this difficult, divisive and disruptive past.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-05-02T09:05:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231170353
       
  • Public spaces and circumscribed spaces of the collective memory: A
           research on the location of commemorative monuments

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      Authors: Pascal Moliner, Inna Bovina
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This research presents three archival studies conducted on three different databases, on the location of memorials. Study 1 compares French monuments dedicated to the Wars of 1870–1871 (defeat) and 1914–1918 (victory). We note a proportionally greater presence in public spaces of monuments dedicated to the 1914–1918 War. Study 2 concerns the memorials to political repression in the Russian Federation, erected before and after 1991 (date of promulgation of a victim rehabilitation law). Results show an increase of presence of monuments in the public space starting from 1991. Study 3 concerns the location of monuments dedicated to the Second World War in the Russian Federation. No significant variation in the locations of these monuments is observed between 1951 and 2010. The results of these studies suggest that the location of monuments could be a relevant indicator to assess the way a society views a commemorated event at a given moment.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-05-02T09:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231170351
       
  • Memory practices ‘from below’: Mnemonic solidarity, intimacy and
           counter-monuments in the practices of Zoscua, Colombia

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      Authors: Claire Taylor
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyses the memory practices of Corporación Zoscua, a small, grassroots activist group in Colombia representing victims of the armed conflict within the region of Boyacá. After an initial grounding within the broader context of transitional justice and historical memory debates within Colombia, the article focuses on how Zoscua’s practices constitute a form of tactical, vernacular memory-making from below that involves temporary alliances and negotiations in order to make interventions into the mnemonic spaces of the city. Based on a mixed-methods approach that includes semi-structured interviews with participants, as well as textual and paratextual analysis, the article provides an analysis of the conception and construction of their memory wall in the city of Tunja. It highlights first how the choice of location of the wall constitutes a tactical take-over of public space, with grassroots memory being inserted into a conventionally top-down locale that conveys official, state-sponsored national values. Second, the article considers the practices and negotiations involved in designing and building the wall, and, subsequently, focuses on the content of the wall, with particular attention to the collective and collaborative nature of the artwork that, through its imagery, composition and focus on emotions, and contests the high-art values normally associated with monumental practices. The article concludes by suggesting that the distinction between top-down and bottom-up memory initiatives is complicated when examining the mnemonic practices of grassroots memory actors, who make tactical use of alliances to further their aims. As the analysis in this article reveals, bottom-up strategies undertaken by community groups and top-down initiatives promoted by authorities often become entangled or coalesce, evidenced both in the practices and negotiations involved in creating grassroots memorials, and in the resulting materiality of the memorial wall under discussion.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-05-02T09:00:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231170350
       
  • Far-right digital memory activism: Transnational circulation of memes and
           memory of Yugoslav wars

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      Authors: Katarina Ristić
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The terrorist attacks in Norway in 2011 and New Zealand in 2019 have revealed that the far-right worldwide uses the memory of the Yugoslav wars for online mobilization. Scholars working on memory activism usually deal with the liberal, self-critical memory emerging from the bottom-up activism of human rights groups while neglecting the activism of the far-right. This article fills the gap by addressing the global circulation of two memes, Remove Kebab and Pepe the Frog, as examples of far-right memory activism. In order to address the transnational circulation of memes as memory activism, this article employs the concept of ‘traveling memory’ while relying on multimodal discourse analysis to unveil the processes of memetic transformation, imitation, iconization and narrativization. The analysis reveals an alternative memory of Yugoslav wars that depicts Serbia as the first case of ‘white genocide’ in Europe, reversing the roles of war criminals and victims while propagating violence and celebrating genocide. The article argues that memory studies can no longer ignore memory production of far-right communities and, at the same time, outlines the method for examining far-right digital memory activism, revealing a whole set of mnemonic practices developed among the anonymous fringe communities of the far-right.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-03-16T05:31:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231155596
       
  • Echoes of famine: Effects of the embodied memories of the Spanish Hunger
           Years (1939–1952) on survivors’ subsequent food practices and
           attitudes

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      Authors: Gloria Román Ruiz
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the echoes that resonate in the present of the embodied memories of the Spanish Hunger Years (1939–1952) during the post-war period of Franco’s dictatorship. More specifically, it analyses both the bodily and mental effects of those traumatic memories on the survivors’ subsequent dietary practices and their perceptions of the socio-political reality. For this purpose, the study relies on the first-hand personal memories of those who were children during the 1940s. It is argued that there are continuities between these embodied memories and the eating habits of the survivors and their attitudes towards subsequent periods of prosperity and crisis.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-03-08T06:16:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231155569
       
  • The counter-monument as mnemonic device: The case of the Statues of Peace
           in South Korea

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      Authors: Jieheerah Yun
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyzes the removal and restoration of the “Statues of Peace” in South Korea. Although the presence of the statues has generated political tensions, various attempts to take down the statues have been met with recalcitrance and restorations. This article argues that processes of demolishing, re-erecting, and making modifications to the monuments function as ways of provoking a public debate, in the process becoming themselves a mnemonic device. This article concludes that despite criticisms of the concept of counter-monument, first formulated by James E. Young, this concept can become a valuable design tool if it is understood as a continuum rather than a binary construct. This study contributes to the current academic debate regarding counter-monuments and urban memorials by illustrating how the tactics of the counter-monument may vary.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-03-01T06:55:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231155577
       
  • The shift in the regime of silence: Selective erasure of the 1965 massacre
           in post-New Order Indonesia’s official narrative

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      Authors: Suzanna Eddyono
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This study revisits the regime of silence surrounding the official representation of the Indonesian 1965 massacre after the collapse of Suharto’s New Order regime in 1998. Focusing on the educational arena, where textbooks convey knowledge as well as moral meaning of the past, I conceive textbook authors as memory agents and seek to highlight narrative strategies in their representation of the 1965 killing. I argue that the narrative strategy opted by post-New Order textbook writers underscore silence as a selective erasure, featuring a continuance as well as a shift in the regime of silence before and after 1998. This article suggests that while before 1998, Suharto’s New Order regime imposed an official narrative that emphasized the leading role of Suharto pertaining to the 1965 killing, after the collapse of Suharto’s New Order regime in 1998, the official narrative instead opts for the strategy of selective erasure, circumventing a direct link between Suharto and the 1965 massacre while maintaining the rest of the New Order’s account of the perpetrators, victims, as well as when, how, and why the killings took place. This study further contributes to the existing discussions of strategies opted for maintaining or breaking the cycle of silence pertaining to the past. Through the strategy of silence as selective erasure and by crafting double-layers of silence, not only do state-supported memory agents in this study perpetuate the cycle of silence, but they also pave the way to join contesting efforts to shape post-memory of the past despite more than two decades of regime change from an authoritarian to a more democratic political system.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-03-01T06:51:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231155565
       
  • Marginal(ized) plurality: An empirical conceptualization of Michael
           

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      Authors: Sina Arnold, Sebastian Bischoff
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we apply Michael Rothberg’s concept of “multidirectional memory” to an empirical setting, by analyzing qualitative interviews with 124 educators in the field of memory work, such as museum and memorial site employees, teachers, volunteers of non-governmental organizations, and civil society initiatives. We analyzed where they come across memory conflicts and commonality, and what the respective “enabling conditions” were, that is, the influencing factors that promoted or prevented developments toward multidirectionality in the sense of a “differentiated solidarity.” We found only a few examples of this kind of multidirectional memory in educational settings. It was fostered by four factors: personal autobiographical experiences, political positions, structural/institutional aspects, and certain pedagogical principles. By contrast, different forms of competitive memory were dominant: first, “Conflicting Memory” characterized by differing politics; second, “Divided Memory” characterized by a perception of resource competition; and third, “Fragmented Memory,” consisting of a form of sympathetic ignorance by which memories of other groups or events are tolerated, but not actively interlinked. Central topics that emerge within memory conflicts and entanglements are the history of National Socialism, World War II and the Shoah, the history of the state of Israel and the Israel-Palestinian conflict, the Armenian Genocide, the history of the Ottoman Empire and—to a lesser extent—the history of colonialism. We argue that much can be gained by applying Rothberg’s concept to contemporary empirical settings, both in order to understand its current implications but also to help flesh out its underlying theoretical notions. These are regarding possible “negative” forms of multidirectional memory, as well as the implications and ethics of historical comparisons.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-03-01T06:46:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231155562
       
  • Creating memory of COVID-19: The actions of museums and archives in Spain

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      Authors: Xavier Roigé, Alejandra Canals, Marta Rico
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic is an historic event that has affected the entire world, but since it has been experienced differently in each country, locality and family, it will also be remembered in different ways. This article provides an analysis of the ways in which museums and archives have sought to document the pandemic in Spain to create memory discourses for the future. This includes an account of the subjects that have been documented, the exhibitions held, the online and in situ initiatives undertaken, and the nature of physical and virtual items collected. The museums and archival institutions have collected many documents, images and physical objects that will play an important role in the creation of memories about COVID-19 in the future.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-03-01T06:43:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231155560
       
  • The construction of family memory through activist engagement: The case of
           relatives of the disappeared in Spain

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      Authors: Sélim Smaoui
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Since the early 2000s, Spain has been shaken by mobilizations of “victims of Francoism,” promoting the memory of past violence. In this article, instead of apprehending such mobilizations as a sudden public display of private accounts, as is often stated, I contend that the “memory of Franco’s repression” is rather produced and constructed by the dynamics of mobilization. In order to demonstrate this, I analyze the process that led Spanish citizens to engage in defending the memory of the victims of Francoism, with a particular focus on the commitment of the relatives of the “disappeared.” While one might assume that these actors were the bearers of pre-existing family memory, they were content to disseminate in the public space on the occasion of their commitment; I argue quite the contrary: it is the experiences lived during the specific time of mobilization (social interactions, expert socializations, memorial activities) that have forged their status as relatives of the disappeared while profoundly reconfiguring their family memory.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-02-17T12:38:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231155575
       
  • Reconstructing the Turkish Jewish identity of Çanakkale between silence
           and speaking out: Nostalgia as an exit strategy

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      Authors: Önder Cetin
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyzes the discursive strategies of the Turkish Jewish community of Çanakkale to make sense of their troubled memories resulting in a mass emigration. Considering the emphasis on silence in the present literature on the memory practices of the Jewish community, I argue that they do not simply avoid facing the past but rather refer to nostalgia as a complementary, proactive strategy. My analysis is based on the memoirs and impressions of the individual members who took part in the annual visit to Çanakkale to highlight the role of nostalgia between silence and speaking out. The critical discourse analysis of the narratives published in the newsweekly Şalom reveals that nostalgia emerges as a silence-breaker. In addition to the constructive strategy of presenting the discourses of coexistence and good-neighborhood embodied in a distinctive local identity, they propose a strategy of dismantling the figures that challenge the former by de-ethnicizing them.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-02-17T12:33:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980231155559
       
  • Memory as a means of governmentality

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      Authors: Katrin Antweiler
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The article proposes to pursue Memory Studies as Studies of Governmentality. It aims to demonstrate how an analysis of memory, undertaken from the perspective of governmentality, can provide an important diagnostic of our time(s) and its political conditions, while furthermore illuminating how these are derived from narratives about the past. For this, I put into dialogue theoretical considerations of the Foucauldian concept with findings from a study of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights. With a special focus on public memories that are performed and produced at the juncture of Holocaust memory and advocacy for human rights, this article puts forward an innovative approach to public memory’s entanglements with contemporary politics and subsequently argues that any public memory can in the broader context of governmental rationalities be understood as a technique of government itself.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-02-14T12:37:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221150892
       
  • Travelling and multiscaler memory: Remembering East Timor’s Santa Cruz
           massacre from the transnational to the intimate

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      Authors: Lia Kent
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article tracks the memory of East Timor’s Santa Cruz massacre across time and space, attending to the multiple scales at which it is imbued with meaning. While footage of the massacre initially had a strong impact in the west, helping to mobilise new audiences and spark a new wave of international solidarity for East Timor’s independence, the memory of Santa Cruz has now come ‘home’, increasingly solidifying as a foundational narrative of the Timor-Leste state. Ethnographic attention to the intimate scale, including the home and the neighbourhood, reveals, however, that Santa Cruz exceeds its ‘national’ meanings. In these spaces the families and friends of the dead communicate with, and care for, them, and the spirits of those whose bodies have not been recovered activate a questioning of continuous losses and absences. The case study demonstrates that an analysis of ‘travelling’ memory through a multiscaler lens can provide a fuller picture of its social and political import. It also shows how ethnographic methods can generate rich insights into the intersections between the transnational, national and intimate and shed light on the affective power of lived, embodied memory.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-02-09T05:54:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221150902
       
  • An Instituting Archive for Memory Activism: The Archivo de la Memoria
           Trans de Argentina

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      Authors: Daniele Salerno
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article introduces the concept of the instituting force of activist archives. It does so by analyzing the epistemological and ontological implications of describing and arranging archival materials, and narrativizing them in curatorial work, in the case of the Archivo de la Memoria Trans de Argentina—Trans Memory Archive of Argentina. On the one hand, the archival arrangement provides trans people with a frame of recognition for trans lives and transforms individual memories into collectable and usable cultural memories for activism. On the other hand, the appropriation of the language of the family in curatorial works incorporates trans memories into the framework of Argentinian post-dictatorship transition. This allows activists to gain access to, and adapt, an entire repertoire for trans causes and activist kinship. The article supports the analytical work and the presented theoretical hypothesis by creating a dialogue between cultural memory studies and critical archival studies, for the exploration of memory activism.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-02-04T06:38:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221150900
       
  • The grounds of Gallipoli: Earthy memory and the collapse of space and time

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      Authors: Mads Daugbjerg, Christopher Whitehead
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article deals with the meanings and agencies of earth in the making of memory. We consider the role of the soil at the Gallipoli peninsula, in today’s Turkey, a key First World War battlefield and a nodal point of national memories, especially for Australia, New Zealand and Turkey. Informed by more-than-human approaches to heritage and memory and drawing on contemporary site visits as well as historical sources, we discuss the Gallipoli peninsula as a landscape freighted with earthy memory in multiple ways: with the bodies of the dead of 1915, the material deposits and earthworks of the conflict, the memory practices undertaken relationally between people and nation states, and the weight of international diplomacies in the making and remaking of geopolitical orders and claims. In all of this, the ground is both supremely tangible and extremely abstract, making it a most potent agent in memory practices. We are interested in how groups claim ownership of, and control over, the ground; the many ways in which the earth comes to matter, including why and how it moves, how far, and through what forms of transfer; and the scalar zoom of perception and imagination that allows memory to take different forms. We explore these interrelations through attention to processes of what we call ‘formation’ and ‘activation’ of the earth, arguing that they often work to set up mitigations or collapses of distance – geographically and temporally – through different memorial and museum practices and rituals. In our analysis, however, such attempts to create collapses, or ‘wormholes’, through which the faraway Gallipoli can somehow be felt and grasped, are ultimately doomed to fail, as spatial and temporal distances inevitably seem to re-assert themselves as brutal and unbrookable gulfs.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-02-02T10:39:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221150894
       
  • Mediating memories: Individual remembering of two mass protests in Hong
           Kong

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      Authors: Donna Chu
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article aims to discuss the roles of media in shaping and sustaining personal memories of social movements. Through 24 in-depth interviews with witnesses of and participants in two mass protests in Hong Kong, it examines how media might contribute to differences in individual remembering. First, it found that individual remembering was characterized by a strong embodiment of various senses, experiences, and emotions. Second, personal memory was articulated and embedded in layers of social relations. Finally, media were often remembered as tools of mobilization by activists in protests. It argued that two key conditions were crucial for the formation of lasting personal memory: the presence of embodied experiences, and meaningful social connections. It shed light on the roles of media in terms of technology and generations. It identified how changing media technologies facilitated information environments that emphasized on different senses and hence favoring certain experiences, emotions, interpretations, and participation in the memory-making process.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-01-31T09:28:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221150903
       
  • From hatred to hope: Emotions, memory and the German labour movement in
           the late-nineteenth century

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      Authors: Philipp Reick
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Over the past few years, scholars from a broad range of disciplines have started to explore the role that emotions play in the collective memory of social movements. Against this backdrop, they have proposed that activists do not necessarily commemorate failed struggles by drawing on negative emotions such as suffering and grief. As a case in point, the interdisciplinary literature has drawn attention to the fact that the historical labour movement commemorated even events that ended in bloodshed and defeat, such as the Paris Commune of 1871, through performances and writings that evoked feelings of hope and joy. Analysing commemorative practices by the German labour movement in the late-nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, this article shows that Commune memory differed considerably in Germany. In a first step, the article shows that during the two decades following the Commune’s bloody demise, German socialists remembered the Paris Commune by drawing on hatred, anger, and grief – not hope or joy. In a second step, the article demonstrates that while the 1890s did see the rise of memory practices that emphasized hope, this was a peculiar kind of hope largely detached from the historical event that was commemorated. By the turn of the century, the German labour movement had established a memory tradition that saw the Commune as a painful but necessary step in the forward march of the movement. In a short conclusion, the article explores some of the reasons why memory traditions by the German labour movement differed from the pattern detected elsewhere. In so doing, it shows that the change in the affective repertoire corresponded to a change in the political needs of the movement. The conclusion thus points to how the historical examples discussed here contributes to a better understanding of role of emotions in social movements more generally.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-01-27T07:31:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221150896
       
  • The exodus memory community: Leveraging oral history records to understand
           collected memories of violence

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      Authors: Allan A Martell
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Memories about historical episodes of violence are a window not only into experiences of people’s past struggles but also about their aspirations for the future. In this article, I focus on memories about the armed conflict in El Salvador (1980–1992) to better understand how sets of individual recollections reveal collected patterns in the narrative arcs of those who personally lived through the conflict. In so doing, I aim to expand prior works that have explored communities of memory in El Salvador. To accomplish this goal, I rely on an oral history archive. Using a grounded theory approach, I investigate how people in a rural community in northern El Salvador remember the armed conflict, how their collected memories compare with prior research about life stories of former members of the guerrilla movement and the armed forces, and finally, how oral histories contribute to a scholarly understanding of social memories of violence. I find that, within this archive, people’s recollections of the armed conflict can be organized around four themes: (1) community organizing, (2) repression, (3) exile, and (4) reconstruction. I suggest that the metaphor of the exodus serves to understand how individuals from this region remember the armed conflict. I argue that the exodus memory community reveals the importance of acts of everyday resistance to state repression, sheds light on how noncombatants remember the conflict, and suggests a larger and ongoing trajectory to community organizing in which the war is an important chapter, but not the only one.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2023-01-27T07:26:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221150893
       
 
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