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Memory Studies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.37
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 36  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1750-6980 - ISSN (Online) 1750-6999
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Book Review: Memories Before the State: Postwar Peru and the Place of
           Memory, Tolerance, and Social Inclusion

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      Authors: Daniel Willis
      Pages: 937 - 941
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Volume 15, Issue 4, Page 937-941, August 2022.

      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T11:44:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221096794a
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Book Review: Tourism and Memory: Visitor Experiences of the Nazi and GDR
           Past

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      Authors: Kieran J. H. Shackleton
      Pages: 941 - 944
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Volume 15, Issue 4, Page 941-944, August 2022.

      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T11:46:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221096794b
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Agonistic memory as a relational concept: Remembering socialism in
           Lithuania

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      Authors: Barbara Christophe
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Based on a biographical narrative interview, this article analyzes the policies of discursive positioning enacted by Adele, a history teacher born in the Lithuanian countryside in 1951, while telling her life story. Showing how she consistently disrupts two rival narratives, the misalignments between which inform public debate in Lithuania’s divided memory culture, I interpret her account as a bottom-up example of agonistic memory. To date, this mode of remembering the past has usually been described as the project of creative intellectuals. In order to prepare the ground to include the memory practices of the rank and file, I suggest (1) reconceptualizing agonistic memory as a relational concept and (2) using agonistic memory as a sensitizing concept in an analysis of oral history accounts focused on the positions articulated by interviewees in response to public memory discourses.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T10:35:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221114083
       
  • Marielle restored' Mortuary graphisms, memory and ritual in
           intersectional and anti-racist responses to necropolitical violence in Rio
           de Janeiro

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      Authors: Julio Bizarria, Edlaine de Campos Gomes
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article discusses mortuary memory and ritual among subalternised populations, in their struggle against necropolitical violence, in the city of Rio de Janeiro, as of the late 2010s. The case study analyses the conception, vandalisation and restoration of two graffiti works, made by Brazilian artists Panmela Castro and Simone Siss, with a decisive contribution from Malala Yousafzai. These works, made in honour of the late Councillor Marielle Franco, are often celebrated as material memories of the intersectional and anti-racist resistance against the mounting authoritarianism of the Brazilian socio-political regime. Yet, they are also confronted by discourses that seek to delegitimise Black and intersectional bodies as effective members of Brazilian society, deeming them disposable and unworthy of mourning. The analysis highlights the importance and the agency of mortuary graphisms as factors of mobilisation and memorial (in)justice, which question and destabilise hegemonic narratives concerning the racialised character of Brazilian society.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T10:34:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221114081
       
  • ‘Nothing is lost’: Mourning and memory at the National
           Memorial for Peace and Justice

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      Authors: Jenny Woodley
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The National Memorial for Peace and Justice is the first national memorial to Black victims of lynching. Its purpose is to provoke a confrontation with the United States’ racial past, in the hope that truth will lead to racial justice. This article argues that in remembering the dead, the Lynching Memorial also allows and encourages visitors to mourn. During the peak of racial lynchings in the early twentieth century, it could be difficult or even dangerous for the bereaved to publicly mourn Black victims. The National Memorial for Peace and Justice, therefore, provides a delayed opportunity for the Black community to mourn those losses. But it also encourages visitors of other races to mourn too. The memorial facilitates mourning through the visitors’ relationship to the monuments, and the echoing of Black mourning traditions. In publicly mourning for these victims, visitors acknowledge and insist on the grievability of Black lives, something which white supremacy has long sought to deny. This article, therefore, argues for the radical potential for mourning at sites of commemoration as a step towards justice.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T10:32:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221114080
       
  • Book review: Remember Me: Memory and Forgetting in the Digital Age

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      Authors: Katarzyna Nowaczyk-Basińska
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-08-01T10:20:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221114223
       
  • Dialita: Collective memories of former women political prisoners during
           the New Order era in Java, 2000–2011

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      Authors: Amurwani Dwi Lestariningsih, Linda Sunarti
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article studies how the experiences of former women political prisoners in the New Order era of Indonesia have been recollected to reproduce identity. In 1979, these women were returned to their community after a rehabilitation period of nearly 10 years. The public, which could not accept their past, attached a lingering stigma to them and continually rejected them. This article attempts to uncover the process of memory articulation and the context in which these women sought to reproduce their identity through Dialita (Di Atas Lima Puluh Tahun, Above 50 Years Old), a choir group consisting of former women political prisoners and their relatives. Dialita positioned itself as a medium for cultural reconciliation that aimed to alter public perception of the women’s identity and reposition them in the country’s collective memory. This is how the politics of memory work in Indonesian society, where the government has the power to decide which memories should be remembered and which should be forgotten. Dialita brought almost forgotten songs back to life because its members were not allowed to write songs while being imprisoned at correctional facilities in Bukit Duri, Plantungan, Salemba and Ambarawa. Interviews and textual interpretation have allowed us to delve deeper into the lives of these former women political prisoners, who were positioned as the main actors of a past historical event and encouraged to articulate their memories by reproducing songs as a part of their identity reproduction. The articulation process and the re-interpretation of the past helped the women shape their sense of self and, more importantly, to alter the way the public remembers the events of 1965.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-08-01T10:17:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221114075
       
  • Left-wing melancholia and activist memories of the Colombian conflict in
           Fabiola Calvo Ocampo’s Hablarán de mí

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      Authors: Cherilyn Elston
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Dialoguing with recent memory studies scholarship that has questioned the field’s predominant focus on violence, victimhood and trauma, this article explores the emergence of forms of memory in Colombia that alongside commemorating the armed conflict also incorporate positive memories of the past and memories of left activism. To do so, it analyses Colombian journalist and academic, Fabiola Calvo Ocampo’s testimonial text Hablarán de mí as a key example of recent transitional justice and memory discourses emerging out of a new peacebuilding context in the country. Although detailing a history of trauma and a melancholic vision of the catastrophic destruction of the left in Colombia, the article reads Calvo Ocampo’s testimony through Enzo Traverso’s reading of left-wing melancholia to suggest that the text recovers a memory of the vanquished as part of an attempt to restore a left-activist memory of past historical struggles, which can be mobilised for the current peacebuilding scenario.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-08-01T10:16:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221114068
       
  • Collective memory of environmental change and connectedness with nature:
           Survey evidence from Aotearoa New Zealand

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      Authors: Olli Hellmann
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The field of memory studies has, in recent years, experienced a ‘nonhuman turn’ that extends the analytical focus beyond anthropocentric functions of collective remembering. However, while this growing literature has considerably enhanced our understanding of how memories of environmental change may promote a stronger sense of connectedness with nature, the different arguments – developed mainly through critical readings of cultural texts – have yet to be investigated empirically. By means of an original survey of 1,100+ adults in Aotearoa New Zealand, the paper here provides a first step towards addressing the empirical gap in the ‘nonhuman turn’ literature. Two main findings emerge from this analysis. First, knowing about historical environmental change and overestimating the extent of environmental change make it more likely that individuals see themselves as part of nature. Second, the survey demonstrates that the relationship between memories of environmental change and closeness to nature interacts with wider political conflicts over how to remember the colonial past. In particular, the question of who to blame for historical environmental change shapes the effect of ecological memories in different ways, depending on whether respondents identify as European New Zealanders or Indigenous Māori.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-07-29T06:49:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221114077
       
  • Intergenerational transmission of historical memory of volcanic risk in
           Mexico

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      Authors: Dayra Elizabeth Ojeda-Rosero, Esperanza López-Vázquez
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Collective memory is built on concepts and meanings that a population shares and builds over time. These contents are perpetuated through oral transmission from generation to generation. In the case of populations exposed to volcanic risk, coexistence with the volcano is part of their history and daily life. The present study focuses on understanding the meanings, perceptions, and responses facing (before and after) volcanic crises. All these are taken from the collective memory that has been transmitted intergenerationally after the new stage of activity of the Popocatepetl volcano in 1994. It was carried out with qualitative methodology, based on symbolic interactionism, integrating elements of ethnography and grounded theory. People of different age groups from a Mexican community near the Popocatepetl volcano participated. The techniques used were in-depth interviews, focus groups, and participant observation. The historical memory of the volcano’s activity before and after the last reactivation was reconstructed, thus evidencing the generational processes.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-07-29T06:47:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221114066
       
  • Selfies in Auschwitz: Popular and contested representations in a digital
           generation

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      Authors: Jackie Feldman, Norma Musih
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Selfies at Auschwitz have become increasingly popular, and have generated agitated public debate. While some see them as an engaged form of witnessing, others denounce them as a narcissistic desecration of the dead. We analyze the taking, composition, and circulation of several of the most popular selfies of Auschwitz and the online reactions to them. The practice of selfies marks a shift from witness to witnessee and from onsite to online presence. Yet it also builds on previous practices: photography, postcards and souvenirs, the affordances of the architecture of the memorial site, the bodily presence of the survivor-witness as mediator of the Holocaust, and the redemptive value assigned to the physical presence of the visitor as “witness of the witness.” We suggest that the combination of continuities with the past alongside the radical break with previous witnessing practices empowers selfie-takers, while arousing the indignation of gatekeepers of Holocaust memory.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-07-13T10:11:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221101111
       
  • The (de)tours of memory: Strategies and tactics of memory at
           Argentina’s Parque de la Memoria

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      Authors: Daniel James
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In recent years, political leaders from around the world have been provided with a tour of Argentina’s Parque de la Memoria. What explains their detour from the affairs of state to a park that commemorates the victims of Argentina’s military dictatorship' How do these visits sit alongside other, everyday uses of the space' Borrowing from de Certeau, I interpret these practices as practices of memory. I analyse the ‘pedestrian speech acts’ through which key stakeholders attempt to divert these practices towards a particular construction of the memory space. The invitation to a global political elite can be read as a strategy to protect the symbolic order of the memory of the desaparecidos by performatively enacting a transnational community of memory in mourning. This leaves the park vulnerable to those who would mobilise these mourning rituals as a tactic to dismantle any politics that might take place at the park.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-07-13T07:16:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221108480
       
  • Repeating beats: The return of rave, memories of joy and nostalgia between
           the afterglow and the hangover

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      Authors: Joe PL Davidson
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The British rave scene of the late 1980s and early 1990s is widely remembered as a moment of elation and bliss. Contemporary cultural representations position the Second Summer of Love of 1989 – when thousands of young people attended illegal parties, experienced the hypnotic beats of house music and had their first brush with the drug ecstasy – as an object of nostalgia. I argue that rave nostalgia is suspended between two dispositions: the afterglow and the hangover. Whereas the former involves happiness, reversibility and continuity, the latter is defined by melancholia, irreversibility and discontinuity. On this basis, I consider two texts that creatively combine these dispositions in their evocation of rave: the music video for The Streets’s ‘Weak Become Heroes’ and Jeremy Deller’s documentary Everybody in the Place. Finally, I assess how the euphoria associated with rave nostalgia helps to augment and advance the recent turn to joy in memory studies.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-07-13T07:14:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221101115
       
  • Changing the story: Intergenerational dialogue, participatory video and
           perpetrator memories in Cambodia

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      Authors: Paul Cooke, Katie Hodgkinson, Peter Manning
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Questions of reconciliation and memory after genocide and conflict in Cambodia remain finely poised. Young people often do not believe the stories of hardship and loss of the older generation, and cleavages remain between divided and stigmatised former factions. This article reflects on a series of participatory video projects led by young Cambodians that sought to engage and explore complex ‘perpetrator’ memories with the aim of building dialogue across communities and generations. Working in partnership with the Documentation Centre of Cambodia through 2018, our participatory-video project sought to document the experiences and accounts of former lower level Khmer Rouge community members. Through a discussion of the 11 films produced, and young filmmakers’ reflections on their involvement in the project, we show how participatory video allows and produces interventions on memory that can renegotiate, augment and contest dominant narratives of past violence. Crucially, we argue, that when read together, the films outline the contours, ambiguities and contestation of claims for ‘complex victimhood’ in Cambodia, and the problems of stabilising singular stories of past violence. We argue that this has implications for transitional justice more broadly, which is a field that tends to rely on neat distinctions of victim and perpetrator and shared accounts and meanings of past harm in the ways it intervenes on memory.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-07-07T12:28:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221108474
       
  • Perceived societal anomie and the implicit trajectory of national decline:
           Replicating and extending Yamashiro and Roediger (2019) within a French
           sample

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      Authors: Octavia Ionescu, Julie Collange, Jean Louis Tavani
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      To date, most research has investigated people’s representations of the national past and future separately and the few that examined the relationships between the two overlooked the role of the group’s present. The present study aimed to replicate previous results showing an implicit trajectory of national decline among Americans within a French sample and additionally examined whether perceived societal anomie— that is, perceiving that present society is disintegrated and disregulated—would accentuate this trajectory of decline. Results first showed a positivity bias for the French past and a negativity bias for the French future; thus, replicating previous results showing an implicit trajectory of national decline in another national context. Moreover, the trajectory of decline was steeper for participants who perceived present French society as highly anomic; but only because they projected more negative national futures. Explanations for the conflicting results in the literature regarding valence biases in collective memory are discussed.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-07-07T11:26:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221108479
       
  • Affective future and non-existent history: The issue of future past in
           memory research

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      Authors: Justyna Tabaszewska
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores one of the possible approaches to the question of future in memory research. It aims to show that both the currently anticipated future as well as future past and the affective facts construed on its basis (B. Massumi) are a part of collective memory. Polish memory of the Second World War is the main analytical focus in the article and it is considered as a particularly clear example of the influence held by that which did not occur, but merely might have, over contemporary politics of memory. It is argued that the analysis of the visions of the future, which are expressed, for example, in alternative histories, can be beneficial for research on the functioning of at least some European politics of memory, and in particular for those focused on contemporary Polish memory, which is entangled in the need for a constant rewriting and restructuring of the memory of the past.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-07-06T10:00:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221108481
       
  • Spain’s democratic anxieties through the lens of Franco’s
           reburial

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      Authors: Rachelle Wildeboer Schut, Zoltán Dujisin
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Through a qualitative content analysis of an ideologically representative sample of influential media outlets in Spain, this article identifies three principal discursive frameworks surrounding Franco’s exhumation. These frameworks expressed not only deep disagreements over the direction of Spain’s regime of remembrance, but reflected deeper anxieties over the state of a democracy in crisis. More broadly, this analysis responds to calls to engage with journalistic sources in the memory studies literature, while illustrating the role of collective memory in collapsing past, present, and future in the articulation of political identities.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-07-06T09:56:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221108477
       
  • Living in history and by the cultural life script: What events modulate
           autobiographical memory organization in a sample of older adults from
           Romania'

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      Authors: Alexandra M Opriș, Laura Visu-Petra, Norman R Brown
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In the current study, we investigated the organization of autobiographical memory in view of the Living-in-History effect, which is visible when personal memory and historical memory become intertwined. We investigated how often participants dated their own personal recollections with reference to important historical events (such as the Fall of Communism). Furthermore, we also examined whether cultural life script events served as a prominent strategy to date personal memories in our sample of 35 participants (Mage = 69.76 years, SD = 8.26). This study failed to document the Living-in-History effect, as participants mentioned only few historical events of interest to this study when dating their personal memories. In addition, supporting the Cultural Life Script theory, participants employed culturally transmitted knowledge to navigate through their autobiographical memories. We conclude that for our sample, historically defined autobiographical memories mainly develop when the specific public events affect in a dramatic manner the individuals’ lives.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-07-06T09:53:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221108476
       
  • Enacting memories through and with things: Remembering as material
           engagement

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      Authors: Emanuele Prezioso, Nicolás Alessandroni
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      For mainstream theories, memory is a skull-bound activity consisting of encoding, storing and retrieving representations. Conversely, unorthodox perspectives proposed that memory is an extended process that includes material resources. This article explains why neither representationalist nor classical extended stances do justice to the active and constitutive role of material culture for cognition. From Material Engagement Theory, we propose an alternative enactive, ecological, extended and semiotic viewpoint for which remembering is a way of materially engaging with and through things. Specifically, we suggest that one remembers when one updates their interactions with the world, a form of engagement previously acquired through sociomaterial practices. Moreover, we argue that things are full-fledged memories, since they accumulate and bring forth how we have materially engaged with them over different timescales. Last, we highlight the need for studies considering the cognitive ecologies where remembering takes place in its full complexity.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-07-06T09:49:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221108475
       
  • Memories, piety and formation of civil religions: Do revolutionary youth
           sing along with the memory machine in Iran'

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      Authors: Younes Saramifar
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Memories of wars and constantly living with them become the measure of citizenhood, revolutionary commitments and piety remembering, where an incessant state-sponsored memory machine frames memory as a civil religion. This article argues that memories, remembering and mnemonic acts become the forces that hold a civil religion together, and then explains how mnemonic subjects/remembering individuals contribute to a civil religion through consumption of memories. I ground my argument in anthropological explorations of how the Iranian state choreographs a memory machine that collects, publishes and circulates memories of the Iran–Iraq War (1980–1988). The memory machine tries to inspire postwar generations with an Islamic model of piety, invent a militarized civil religion and inculcate the revolutionary youth into it. However, the Iranian revolutionary youth use memories of the war as ‘wiggle rooms’ to reshape the state-choreographed civil religion without expressing either dissent or absolute compliance. Ethnographically, I highlight that the revolutionary youth’s compliance may seem blind obedience but on the contrary, their compliance is an agentive attempt to resist subtly, find individuated sovereignty and craft mnemonic subjectivities under authoritarian conditions.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-06-13T10:08:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221101110
       
  • Witnessing migrant memories through literature: The case of
           Nagorno-Karabakh in transnational perspective

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      Authors: Natalia Dudnik
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This comparative essay explores the relationship between memory and migration/integration through the example of two recent literary texts—the German-language novel All Russians Love Birch Trees by Olga Grjasnowa and a story from the Russian-language “novel in voices” Secondhand Time by Svetlana Alexievich—that portray personal memory of ethnic violence in Baku, Azerbaijan in 1990. In Grjasnowa’s novel, the protagonist’s traumatic memories cannot be integrated into German memory culture, despite the fact that she, as a legal immigrant, enjoys the status of political subject. In reversed dynamics, Alexievich’s protagonist, who remains vulnerable on the political and social level, has been able to articulate her trauma in the presence of the empathetic listener—the implied author. Analyzing narrative devices that aim to engage the reader as a respondent to the characters’ suffering during the conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan in the 1990s and after their arrival in Germany and Russia, this essay identifies a call for a holistic integration of migrants on both the civic level and the level of memory through the medium of secondary witnessing.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T11:01:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221101108
       
  • The living past in the lives of victims-/survivors of conflict-related
           sexual violence: Temporal implications for transitional justice

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      Authors: Janine Natalya Clark
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Issues of time and temporality are highly relevant to the field of transitional justice. The very concept of ‘transition’ and transitional justice processes more broadly reflect a linear and teleological understanding of time that moves in a particular direction. While building on existing temporal critiques of transitional justice, this interdisciplinary article makes two original contributions to this corpus of scholarship – empirical and conceptual. First, emphasizing what it refers to as ‘the living past’, it draws on qualitative interviews with victims-/survivors of conflict-related sexual violence in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Colombia and Uganda to explore empirically some of the various ways that the past experientially intruded into the interviewees’ present. Second, it utilizes the analogy of the coagulation cascade, a biological blood-clotting process, to reflect on how transitional justice processes might move beyond linear temporal conceptualizations to recognize lived experiences of time and the multiple ways that individuals – as well as communities and societies – continue to coexist and transition with the living past.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T04:59:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221101143
       
  • Towards a resonant theory of memory politics

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      Authors: Jamie Ranger, Will Ranger
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      It is argued that Hartmut Rosa’s theory of resonance provides memory activists (those actors engaged in memory politics) with both a normative justification and qualitative metric by which sites of memory may be compared and evaluated. Resonance is a plausible candidate for an assessing concept on the grounds that there is overlap between Rosa’s sociological approach and the implicit appeal to resonance in the memory studies literature.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T04:58:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221101112
       
  • A more perfect union' The place of Black lives in presidential
           plantation sites

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      Authors: Stephen P Hanna, Derek H Alderman, Amy Potter, Perry L Carter, Candace Forbes Bright
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      While Mount Vernon, Monticello, Montpelier, and Highland work to recover the lives of people enslaved by Washington, Jefferson, Madison, and Monroe, their institutional missions emphasize the importance of these four men within American history. The resulting impediments to honoring Black lives within these spaces can be best understood using the analytical framework of reputational politics and by recognizing the roles visitors have in reproducing the reputations of the presidents and the women and men they enslaved. We base our examination of visitors’ participation in these reputational politics on a systematic documentation of tours and exhibits combined with surveys of visitors. Our results suggest that there are significant differences among the four sites in how visitors balance the reputations of enslaved communities with those of the Founding Fathers. On the whole, the emphasis on the presidents’ important positions within American social memory continues to inhibit efforts to honor Black lives at presidential plantation museums.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T06:08:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221094515
       
  • Fascination, nostalgia, and knowledge desire in digital memory culture:
           Emotions and mood work in retrospective Facebook groups

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      Authors: Robin Ekelund
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores how emotions are practised within retrospective Facebook groups and how these practices are shaped by the logics of the interface. Theoretical inspiration is drawn from Ahmed’s discussions on emotions and mood work and the study is based on netnographic fieldwork involving six retrospective Facebook groups. Overall, a positive emotional relationship with the past is practised and the analysis illustrates that three interrelated mood works are found in the groups; fascination, nostalgia and knowledge desire. The analysis of these indicate that Facebook’s interface directs the members towards fragmented interactions which produces a memory culture that is more focused on brief and general, rather than elaborate and specific, accounts of the past. I conclude by discussing how the emotional practices within the retrospective Facebook groups creates a double-edged sword; at the same time as they offer a sense of positive emotional belonging for likeminded members, they also risk producing simplified notions of the past that feeds into retrotopian tendencies of the present.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T12:02:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221094517
       
  • Taking the soldier home: Sustaining the domestic presence of absent fallen
           soldiers in Israel

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      Authors: Osnat Shalev Nizri, Carol A Kidron
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This study presents the lived memory work of Israeli bereaved parents who preserve the bedrooms of their children—fallen soldiers—intact after their deaths. Ethnographic semi-structured interviews and participant observation in the rooms point to an assemblage of interwoven practices that sustain the presence of the dead in the family lifeworld. Enactment of past habitual embodied movement, person-object interaction, and familial roles within the domestic architecture that housed the deceased sustain virtual presence. Removal from view of military objects signifying death, and modulated incorporation of new life in the room forestall cracks in virtuality of presence and temporal absencing, ushering the dead into familial futures. Reconceptualizing livedmemory as the manipulation of temporal stasis and continuity to (re)generate presence rather than represent/commemorate absence and loss, raises questions regarding the dialectical relations between lived memory and public commemoration and the salutary potential of continuing bonds with loved ones.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T10:09:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221094511
       
  • Casa 1, a site of LGBTQ memory in São Paulo, Brazil

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      Authors: Artur de Souza Duarte, Renato Cymbalista
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The NGO Casa 1 was conceived as a housing project for runaway and homeless LGBTQ youths. Launched in 2017, it has expanded into a complex that includes housing, culture, education and health services. Together with this infrastructure of care, Casa 1 has created several strategies to promote LGBTQ memory that have made it a new site of memory in São Paulo. Through field research, interviews and analysis of institutional material, this article presents the NGO’s memory strategies in four directions: memorialisation as a symbolic mechanism of gratitude, exemplarity and denunciation, and the safeguarding of a LGBTQ memory collection. We argue that, through these dimensions, Casa 1 has consolidated itself as a site of memory even considering its short existence, showing that the establishment of a site of memory is not a passive consequence of time and historical events, but can be precipitated and induced, through intensity and intentionality.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-03-12T08:58:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980211073089
       
  • The alliance of victory: Russo-Serbian memory diplomacy

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      Authors: Jade McGlynn, Jelena Đureinović
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The politics of memory of World War II underlies the public and political discourses in contemporary Russia and Serbia, with political elites using the narrative of the victory against fascism as a unifying and legitimising tool. The heroic war memory is also outward-oriented and underpins the ever-closer relations between the two countries. This article explores how Russia exports and engages with the memory of World War II in Serbia, introducing the concept of memory diplomacy as a form of public diplomacy. Based on the travelling of memory, narratives and practices, memory diplomacy takes memory politics to the international level. The article theorises memory diplomacy as co-creation, rather than a one-way process, which involves benefits for all parties involved. Through historical and content discourse analysis of data from Russia and Serbia, the article illustrates how the theory of memory diplomacy works in practice.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-03-05T09:09:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980211073108
       
  • A microphone in a chandelier: How a secret recording sparks mnemonic
           imagination and affect

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      Authors: Martin Pogačar
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, I examine a recording of an old Slovenian choral song made in 1941 during the Fascist occupation. Recorded music, I argue, has the capacity to condense the past and to potentiate the affective mnemonic imagination of the past regardless of its mediated form. To make this argument, I investigate the recording as a temporal object that drives affective mnemohistories; modulates individual and collective experiences, expectations and interpretations; and induces mnemonic imagination. I discuss the song’s pre-recorded historical background and the technical history of the recording, and the song’s affective force in live performances as compared to the mediated experience in YouTube. The investigation of the song as a temporal object that engenders variegated, multilayered engagements with the past contributes to the debates on the study of music and memory, and the history of media technologies in the context of post-socialist memory.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-03-04T12:29:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980211073110
       
  • The archival riot: Travesti/Trans* audiovisual memory politics in
           twenty-first-century Argentina

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      Authors: Patricio Simonetto, Marce Butierrez
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyzes the making of travesti/trans* memory politics in Argentina. Focused on audiovisual initiatives, archives, catalogs, novels, and digital activism, it studies how these policies emerged in the wider context of the archival and digital turn. While placing the dialogues with Argentine centrality of memory in social conflict and Latin American archival grassroots politics, this text addresses the role of remembrance in the production of travesti/trans* identity. This article argues that trans* memory initiatives acted as politics of belonging that worked in two levels: defining the limits of a common identitarian past, and reaching a wider cisgender audience to highlight the social violence that defined travesti/trans’ precarious lives. This article shows how by placing travesti/trans* memories in tension with national retelling of the past, they are building politics of belonging to legitimate their claims of social reparation to make new trans* futures possible.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-02-09T04:43:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980211073099
       
  • Antifascist memory revisited: Hungarian historical exhibitions in
           Oświęcim and Paris, 1965

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      Authors: Zoltán Kékesi, Máté Zombory
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The article challenges the widely shared thesis in memory studies that the antifascist memory of the Second World War suppressed the Holocaust. Instead of exploring exceptions to this rule by looking for single cases of antifascist memory that represent some aspects of the Holocaust, we argue that antifascist memory presented a distinct cultural regime for remembering the past. Our claim is that antifascist memory, understood as a particular historical phenomenon on a transnational scale, opened up specific ways to commemorate the Jewish genocide. Our article relies on two pillars: first, on recent memory studies scholarship that challenged “the myth of silence” in relation to the postwar decades; second, on recent studies revisiting antifascism itself, demonstrating its transnational and ideologically diverse nature. We argue that a contested but at least until the 1970s still commonly held pan-European antifascist legacy fostered not only intra-Eastern bloc but also cross–Cold War mnemonic cooperation. We present an empirical comparative study that discusses the 1965 Hungarian exhibition at the State Museum Auschwitz-Birkenau and the Hungarian section at the permanent exhibition at the Museum of the Memorial of the Unknown Jewish Martyr in Paris that opened in the same year. Based on archival documents in Budapest, Auschwitz-Birkenau, and Paris, we prove that both exhibitions displayed a coherent, historically accurate, and comprehensive account of the genocide that articulated unambiguously the Jewish identity of those perished and persecuted. At the same time, they both operated under discursive conditions informed by antifascist legacies in Poland, Hungary, and France.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-02-09T04:41:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980211066582
       
  • Obstinate memory: Working-class politics and neoliberal forgetting in the
           United Kingdom and Chile

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      Authors: Heather Watkins, Maria Urbina-Montana
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In the 40 years since Chile and the United Kingdom became the crucibles of neoliberalization, working-class agency has been transformed, its institutions systematically dismantled and its politics, after the continuity neoliberalism of both the UK Blair government and the Chilean Concertación, in a crisis of legitimacy. In the process, memories of struggle have been captured within narratives of ‘capitalist realism’ (Fisher) – the present, past and future collapsed into Walter Benjamin’s ‘empty homogeneous time’. This article explores ways in which two traumatic moments of working-class struggle have been narrativized by the media in the service of this ‘presentism’: the 1973 coup in Chile and the 1984–1985 Miners’ Strike in the United Kingdom. We argue that the use of ‘living history’ or bottom-up approaches to memory provides an urgently needed recovery of disruptive narratives of class identity and offers a way of reclaiming alternative futures from the grip of reductive economic nationalism.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-02-08T12:15:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980211073111
       
  • Filmic memory texts: Seeing America’s archeological turn from salvage to
           conservation in Spadework for History

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      Authors: Sarah A. Buchanan
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Over two decades in mid-century America, the professional approach to sites endangered by post-war construction and development projects was to excavate and “save the data” from certain loss. Archeologists led such salvage efforts from 1945 to 1970, first meeting the increased demand for their labor and skills. Then, in seeing the permanence of destruction, they shifted by extending their concept of safe preservation into the future: an early conservationist archeology. One broad impact of the River Basin Surveys was in memorializing tribal histories and relationships to the land environment by the recovery of large swaths of biological, ecological, palynological, and geological data from excavations coordinated from branch offices in Nebraska, Oregon, California, Washington, D.C., and Texas. With funding from the National Science Foundation, Texas professor E. Mott Davis created a meticulous record of such archeological practices through a film series which captures that shift from the perspective of one of its practitioners. Spadework for History (1964), subtitled “Salvaging American History,” seeks to document the country’s anthropological archeology through a pioneering academic collaboration between film and archeology. Weighing scholarship on the production of archives—including an awakening to power in their production of history—this article considers the power of film in creating a memory text. In retelling Davis’s contribution, evidence from the films’ reception and memory studies perspectives together expand the temporal framework available to support further audiovisual collection-based analyses of professional work.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-02-08T12:13:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980211073106
       
  • Cued recall: Using photo-elicitation to examine the distributed processes
           of remembering with photographs

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      Authors: Tim Fawns
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In studies of cued recall, responses to photographic stimuli have often been examined in isolation of related photography practices (e.g. taking, organising, or sharing images), and without considering how photographs are used. In contrast, photo-elicitation methods position photographs not simply as cues, but as meaningful artefacts around which accounts of the past are constructed. Drawing on photo-elicitation interviews, I examine cued recall from a distributed cognition perspective, proposing that it consists of varying combinations of several, potentially-distributed processes. First, looking at photographs can catalyse remembering by surfacing relevant ideas, followed by: stimulation (of feelings and emotions), simulation and narrative production, association, inference, and meaning-making. Using examples from my interviews, I consider how each process is socially and materially configured. I then discuss the role of diverse photographic practices in the convergence of these processes, and the implications for conceptions of cueing, recall, and autobiographical memory.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-02-08T12:08:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980211073093
       
  • Civilizational mnemonics and the longue durée: The Bulgarian case

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      Authors: Dafina Nedelcheva, Daniel Levy
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Constructivist assumptions have dominated the field of memory studies, producing an avalanche of case studies focusing on the instrumental and expedient factors shaping memory politics. However, this constructivist bias has also yielded new blind spots. For one, it tends to privilege “events” and “contingencies” over the longue durée of a particular memory configuration. Two, it remains caught in a binary juxtaposition with some states adopting globally circulating mnemonic scripts, signaling universal aspirations, while other states pursue nation-centric approaches. To overcome these blind spots (and binaries), we propose two interrelated conceptual moves: first, we are taking the importance of enduring memory figurations into consideration. Second, we expand the nation-state focus by introducing the notion of “civilizational mnemonics,” which does not replace national memories, but frequently underwrites them. Bulgarian memory politics, our test case, is part of a complex nexus of imperial legacies and post-colonial discourses. Bulgaria has been a middle ground, accommodating competing imperial projects—Ottoman, Russian, and Western. These intersections allow us to draw general inferences about mnemonic tropes and their enduring salience.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-01-16T05:54:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980211066580
       
  • Spectacular memory: Zombie pasts in the themed shopping malls of Dubai

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      Authors: Paul O’Connor
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Memory invariably involves sifting and sorting historical traces and reassembling them into societal representations of the past. Usually this has been done by social groups of different kinds or the cultural institutions associated with them, and has provided materials for the construction and maintenance of group identity. In what I term “spectacular memory,” however, the sifting and sorting of memory traces is performed by commercial and media institutions within a globalized cultural framework to create spectacles for mass consumption. Spectacular memory is enabled by the progressive breakdown of Halbwach’s “social frameworks of memory”—the association of memory with face-to-face relations within social groups. In late modern societies, “memory” as a coherent body of representations which is the property of more-or-less bounded social groups has largely devolved into a globalized store of representations curated and diffused through the media, advertising, tourism and entertainment industries. This article uses the example of the history-themed shopping malls of Dubai to characterize this form of memory.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-01-16T05:51:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980211066579
       
  • ‘We thought she was a witch’: Gender, class and whiteness in the
           familial ‘memory archive’

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      Authors: Clare Hemmings
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      ‘We thought she was a witch’ uses my own ‘memory archive’ to give texture to the complex inheritance of gender, class and race that characterises the present. Drawing on interviews, archival data and fictionalisation, the article explores the role of gendered labour in securing dominant understandings of class progress. Starting from stories, my mother and I weave together of the history of 64 Chepstow Road, Newport (where her maternal family lived), I highlight the cost of historiography that does not pay attention to what is written out of family memory. The article draws on existing feminist memory work to flesh out an intersectional approach to the ‘memory archive’ we inherit and introduces the importance of an imaginative approach to the past.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-01-16T05:48:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980211066578
       
  • Afro-Germans, multidirectional memory and French colonial aphasia: The
           legacy of the First World War in Galadio by Didier Daeninckx

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      Authors: Anna Branach-Kallas
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article offers an analysis of mnemonic traces in Galadio, Didier Daeninckx’s 2010 novel. I demonstrate that by fictionalizing the history of the persecution of Afro-Germans under National Socialism, the novel exposes antiblackness as a neglected phenomenon of the Third Reich. Synchronously, applying Michael Rothberg’s theoretical framework, the article discusses the dialogue between Jewish and Afro-German legacies of violence in the novel, as well as the intricate relation between colony, camp and what Paul Gilroy defines as camp mentality. Furthermore, I argue that Daeninckx engages with French colonial aphasia: in my interpretation, his oblique approach to the French imperial past conveys its simultaneous presence and absence, which is key to disabled memory. Finally, I focus on the ethics of commemoration in Galadio, which claims space for black soldiers in French collective memory of the two world wars, yet at the same time challenges imperial loyalties and homogeneous approaches to French national identity.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-01-16T05:46:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980211066577
       
  • Theuth, Thamus, and digital civics: Plato’s formulation of memory and
           its lessons for civic life in the digital age

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      Authors: Estelle Clements
      First page: 767
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Plato’s story of Theuth and Thamus from the Phaedrus is explored as a means of seeking insight into digital age civic issues. Similar civic challenges in the digital age to those faced by Plato’s contemporaries are observed, including the role of memory in formulating context, its weaponisation, and the misuse of published information. Consideration is given to the potential lessons that can be observed from Plato’s story with the aim of providing understanding of, and approaches to, challenges in digital age civic life through law, technological intervention, and education.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T12:01:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221094516
       
  • Knotted memories of a betrayed sacrifice: Rethinking trauma and hope in
           South Africa

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      Authors: Kim Wale
      First page: 827
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Different groups within South African society express disillusionment with the present through a discourse of betrayal in relation to the liberation movement-cum-governing-party of the African National Congress. This article focuses on a particular articulation of this discourse within two memory communities in the Western Cape (Bonteheuwel and Crossroads) who were embroiled in violence and political struggle during apartheid and continue to suffer conditions of structural violence in the post-apartheid era. It analyses the shared memory narrative of a ‘betrayed sacrifice’ to demonstrate a proposed theoretical concept of ‘knotted memories’ which describes the way in which past and present memories of suffering knot together to produce a lived affective condition of despair. It further considers what these everyday experiences of ‘knotted memories’ mean for re-thinking the nature of trauma and hope in relation to post-apartheid despair.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-01-16T05:55:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980211066581
       
  • Concealment, coexistence, and citizenship: (Post-)conflict strategies of
           survival and inclusion in Sacsamarca, Peru

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      Authors: Eva Willems
      First page: 898
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      What happens when the memory duty—the idea that remembrance leads to prevention, redemption, and recognition—intersects with a contentious past of violence between “intimate enemies”' This article turns to the microhistory of a small highland town that became a scenery of both collaboration and resistance during the insurgency of the Maoist rebels of Shining Path in Peru (1980–2000) to answer this question. An analysis of the (post-)conflict strategies deployed by the villagers reveals processes of both appropriation and contestation of the memory duty. On the one hand, the heroic narrative of resistance against Shining Path that dominates public remembrance in Sacsamarca serves to demand recognition by the Peruvian state for the community’s role in opposing the Maoist revolutionaries. On the other, putting emphasis on resistance enables the villagers to downplay their initial support for Shining Path, a necessary precondition for claiming reparations and citizenship as well as for maintaining a tense coexistence between community members.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T05:52:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221094520
       
  • ‘Fiction keeps memory about the war alive’: Mnemonic migration and
           literary representations of the war in Bosnia

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      Authors: Jessica Ortner, Tea Sindbæk Andersen, Fedja Wierød Borčak
      First page: 918
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates how literary works of fiction depicting wartime memories from Bosnia were received by groups of lay readers in Copenhagen, Manchester and Berlin. We introduce the concept of mnemonic migration to include both the narrative strategies employed by migrant authors in order to represent such memories in new mnemonic contexts, and the reception of this type of literature in different social and cultural settings. By investigating readers’ reactions to literature by migrants who write about topics related to own or fictional experiences in wartime Bosnia, we explore literature as a medium that makes memories travel and has the potential to create prosthetic memories. Studying what happens in the encounter between the texts and recipients within the following three national communities of remembrance – Denmark, Germany and England – we ask if the texts are capable of representing Bosnian wartime memories in an emotionally appealing manner that urges the reader to incorporate them into their own stock of memories. Based on focus group interviews in the three cities, we argue that the agency of literature in transmitting memories into new frameworks is limited but definitely present. We found that the literary style of memory mediations was an important factor and many readers preferred texts with more clarity and factuality. Nevertheless, in spite of the frustration experienced by a significant group, most readers felt emotionally engaged by at least parts of the texts. We observed that there were considerable differences in how readers in the three social settings related to the events. However, in all three countries, differences between generational groups most obviously affected the readings. Often, the books made readers aware of the limited role of the Bosnian War in their respective public frameworks of memory and created a wish for a more thorough commemoration of that event.
      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T10:11:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221094514
       
  • Book review: Carnivalizing Reconciliation: Contemporary Australian and
           Canadian Literature and Film beyond the Victim Paradigm

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      Authors: Sakiru Adebayo
      First page: 935
      Abstract: Memory Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Memory Studies
      PubDate: 2022-06-13T02:00:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506980221096794
       
 
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