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Qualitative Inquiry
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.691
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 33  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1077-8004 - ISSN (Online) 1552-7565
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Ways That Qualitative Researchers Engage in “Technological
           Reflexivity”: A Meta-Synthesis

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      Authors: Trena M. Paulus, Elizabeth M. Pope, Kyle L. Bower
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      While the use of digital qualitative methods has increased, we do not yet know to what extent researchers are engaging in intentional reflexivity around the consequences of this shift. In this systematic thematic synthesis, we analyzed journal articles that reported use of digital methods for data collection. We found four circumstances in which authors reported engaging in “technological reflexivity” and two rhetorical moves for doing so. These strategies for engaging in technological reflexivity are useful for making the consequences of adopting digital research workflows visible and open for further inquiry.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2024-02-20T09:20:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004241231927
       
  • A Transcultural Teacher’s Creative Ecologies: Poetry-ing the
           Entanglements of Institutional Privilege and Love’s Care in a Melbourne
           College

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      Authors: Jack Tan
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article is a transcultural teacher’s critical autoethnography of entangled privilege and care in a university residential college. Using prose poetry as poetic inquiry, I write the entanglements of institutional privilege and love’s care in a college. I write my pedagogical subjectivity evocatively, where I am interdependent with my creative ecologies of humans and environment. In this article, I first discuss transculturality, creative ecologies, and pedagogical lived experience that inform a poetic inquiry method. I then offer a series of critical autoethnographic prose poems as inquiry into transcultural pedagogy in the college, evoking interconnected privilege and care in the college.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2024-02-20T09:11:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004241229790
       
  • In Tribute to Norm

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      Authors: Cameron McCarthy
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2024-02-15T08:18:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231219731
       
  • Creative-Relational Inquiry: Institutional Threat, Fortitude, and Flying
           Like a Brick

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      Authors: Fiona Murray, Jonathan Wyatt
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Creative-relational inquiry has what is called a “center,” the Center for Creative-Relational Inquiry (CCRI, Sea~cry), at the University of Edinburgh. We are two of the center’s co-directors. Sea~cry is an institution within an institution. It had its 5-year university review in 2022. The experience and (successful) outcome of that review process has left us troubled. Our concern prompts us to write. We respond to sirens. We respond to sirens by turning again to writing, to writing together, with other, by turning again to “downlow lowdown maroon community” of creative-relational inquiry.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2024-02-15T08:15:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004241231922
       
  • Collaborative Creative Engagements as Drivers for Re-imagining Classrooms
           and Pedagogies

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      Authors: Natalie Tacuri, Mindy R. Carter, Layal Shuman, Daniel X. Harris, Christopher Blomkwist
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This paper presents a study examining how pre-service teachers understand and experience the limit(s) of classroom creativity in a Canadian higher education class. Participants first completed a modified version of the Harris Creativity Audit to assess their preliminary understandings of creativity policies and practices, as well as perceptions of the value and feasibility of incorporating creativity into their own teaching. The survey results informed the content of a two-part workshop where participants utilized participatory design and sketch modeling to further explore their understanding of classroom creativity. Data analysis resulted in three themes: (a) the impact of physical space; (b) assessing creativity and assessing in creative ways; (c) challenging the educational system. This study is part of a multisite Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council–funded project that aims to explore creativity in higher education to empower educators and students to develop creative agency through creative ecologies and collaborative assessment.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2024-02-14T05:52:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004241229063
       
  • Developing Methodologies for Co-Production of Knowledge: Data Production
           and Analysis in Community-Based Research Partnerships

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      Authors: Molly Victoria Shea
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article reports on the development of a local methodological innovation that supports the co-production of knowledge side-by-side with community-based research partners. In addition to conducting critical ethnography, Shea reports on how educators within an after-school community science program and a researcher developed practices to surface community educators’ values, demystify the data analysis process, conduct collective analysis, and produce critical layers of data through storytelling. The discussion offers scholars interested in co-producing knowledge an imagination for how to revise existing and taken-for-granted research practices to shift knowledge production.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2024-02-13T09:15:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004241227268
       
  • “I Wish I had the Confidence of a Mediocre White Man”

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      Authors: Graham Francis Badley
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this narrative, I trace several elements encased in a recent article entitled ¿Quien Soy Yo' These include issues connected with personal and collective identity, feelings of alienation, feminism, confidence, and assertion. There is also a deep implication that some higher education academies do not try hard enough to welcome new colleagues, especially from minorities, into their institutions.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T11:46:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004241229795
       
  • Quality (and Qualities) in Qualitative Inquiry'

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      Authors: Graham Francis Badley
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      I address some of the issues connected with the elusive concept of quality, especially in the process of qualitative inquiry. I do so by contrasting the relatively simple term “qualities” (or characteristics) with the more contentious idea of quality. I begin by considering aspects of psychogeography (assuming it to be one form of qualitative inquiry) and then by concentrating on the concept of quality itself in autoethnography, specifically as well as in higher education in general.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2024-02-09T10:57:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004241229793
       
  • Sand in Sculpture: Creatively Rewilding Ecologies of Health

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      Authors: David Carless, Kitrina Douglas, Jamie Barnes, Elyse Pineau
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Through this creative-relational inquiry, we pursue a radically new way of conceptualizing, researching, communicating, and practicing health and health care in contemporary times. We write to reimagine what an alternative paradigm that is at once humane, democratic, accessible, inclusive, generative, and resolutely open to diversity in its many forms might look and feel like. We begin by presenting the script of an autoethnographic film that explores health, creativity, and physical activity through an arts-based approach that incorporates moving image, spoken word, soundscape, music, and song. Next, we offer two responses to the film, which embody emotional and empathetic engagement, relational commitment, moral and ethical sensibility, and careful scholarly reflection to extend and develop our inquiry in innovative interdisciplinary directions. Finally, we draw on recent developments in complexity theory and environmental activism to propose a new way to understand and practice health care within complex ecologies of health.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2024-02-09T10:55:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004241229786
       
  • Capacious Methodologies for an Unravelling World: Three Research Ecologies

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      Authors: Susan Germein, Prue Adams, Jen Dollin
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we take Dan Harris’ conceptualization of creative ecologies as a provocation to think individually and collectively across three very different research ecologies and the methodologies we use to navigate them. The three research ecologies originate with slippery eels and multispecies ethnography around the Hawkesbury River (New South Wales); affective filmmaking and experience of gender in Australian secondary schools: and the sociomaterialities of living and researching with/in a small girls school on a Himalayan mountainside. We articulate something of these diverse projects, asking what the concept of creative ecology does in our research practice. Together we ask: What work does inhabiting creative ecologies as concept do; and what does thinking with/in creative ecologies mean for our research work' Finally, we speculate how re-conceptualizing research as creative ecologies might offer more capacious ways to address issues of conceptual, cultural, and ecological justice in this unravelling world.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2024-02-08T07:10:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004241229791
       
  • The Crealectic Method: From Creativity to Compossibility

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      Authors: Luis de Miranda
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Can we fruitfully apply creative ecology practices in the world of industrial production' Enter the crealectic method for innovation and self-innovation, aiming at fostering creative long-term thinking and acting. The crealectic method proposes five steps: Step 1—Resetting (doing tabula rasa); Step 2—Crealing (reconnecting with the “Creal”); Step 3—Profusing (letting ideas pour out without censorship); Step 4—Compossibilizing (connecting compatible ideas); Step 5—Realizing (understanding and making real). I describe a pilot test of the method within the Research and Development unit of Vattenfall, a Swedish power company dedicated to fossil-free energy production.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T04:51:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004241229065
       
  • Hard Rain

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      Authors: Norman K. Denzin, Tami Spry
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Patti Smith’ performance of Bob Dylan’s “A Hard Day Rain’s a-Gonna Fall” at the 2016 Nobel Prize ceremony illustrates the complex relationship between bodies, selves, emotion, biographies, voices, performances, and written texts.1
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T07:18:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231206051
       
  • The Historical Methodological Foundation of Phenomenography

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      Authors: Lennart Svensson
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Phenomenography is a research tradition originating from research on students’ studying and learning. The research methods of phenomenography have been discussed and criticized by many authors. There is a need for a presentation of the historical methodological foundation of phenomenography. The phenomenographic research methods are best understood as placed within the general research methodology and research approach of contextual analysis. The following description is directed to all interested in phenomenography and its methodological foundation. It is also directed to all interested in research methodology, especially in the fields of empirical educational and social science research. After a brief introduction, the common background of contextual analysis and phenomenography, and the origin and development of contextual analysis and phenomenography, are briefly outlined. Then, the methodological reflections and orientations in phenomenography, and the foundation of contextual analysis and phenomenography are presented. The article ends with a conclusion.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T11:12:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004241227270
       
  • A Novel Methodology for Engaging Complex Therapeutic Landscapes and Health
           Care Performances: “Theatricality”

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      Authors: Sarah Croke, Dawn Freshwater
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Complex health care interventions often consist of specific and non-specific effects and can present a methodological and intellectual challenge to researchers. This is especially the case in Complementary and Integrative Medicines (CIM), where research may inadequately capture the holistic nature of therapies, affecting the quality of outcomes and evidence reported. This article introduces a novel approach that advances methodology and helps researchers to “step inside” the therapeutic drama, to improve the quality of evidence produced. The method, termed Theatricality, was trialed in five complementary health centers across four European countries and provides a fresh view of therapy, where the interventions, practitioners, and researchers appear bound by their context and space, creating, or limiting the potential for these acts. Delivered as an adjunct to Ethnography, this approach offers a new way of conceiving, capturing, and communicating whole health care performances that may help to improve the quality of evidence in complex health care interventions.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T11:09:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004241227269
       
  • Embodied Reflexivity Through the Arts: An Introduction

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      Authors: Ellyn Lyle, Jee Yeon Ryu, Celeste Nazeli Snowber
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Emerging from a global health crisis that shone the light on the effects of alienation, isolation, and physical and spiritual vulnerability, we wondered what we might offer to re/center humanness and remind us of individual and collective possibilities to create positive change. With this call in our hearts and bodies, our special issue began to take shape. We are three scholars at different stages of our careers and with intersecting areas of expertise, but who are all grounded in reflexive ways of being, embodied ways of knowing, and artful ways of engaging. We acknowledge the scholars(hip) in each of these distinct areas and are grateful for the foundation on which we build. Thus, with our collective yearnings to centre an integrated way of at/tending to an emergent process of re/making and re/imagining knowledge, we offer this special issue with three intentions: to advance arts-based educational research in developing critical, social, and relational consciousness; to evoke/provoke embodied pedagogical practices that transform teaching/learning; and to contribute to re/humanizing education (Lyle, 2022) and social justice reform.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2024-01-22T11:54:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231219806
       
  • Norman

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      Authors: Patrick Lewis
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      A contemplation on the passing of Norman Denzin.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2024-01-22T05:57:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231219724
       
  • Eclectic Auto-ethno-graphy'

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      Authors: Graham Francis Badley
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, I discuss auto-ethno-graphy, here deliberately hyphenated to stress the crucial, constituent elements of the admittedly blurred genre of autoethnographic inquiry. I do so mainly to rescue the genre from the accusation that it is not only blurred but also inevitably uncritical.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-12-30T05:45:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231218983
       
  • Performance Autoethnography: EM Not Afraid to Utter Their Emotional Truth

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      Authors: Dave Yan
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this performance autoethnography, the author uses the poetic language, rather than silence, to express the emotional truth associated with their lived experience. Exploring the convergence of multiple identities, they use Tweets as prompts to elicit deepest inner experiences, striving to elucidate situated knowledges that emerge from within. This creative-relational-and-performative process of producing an aesthetic text serves as a cathartic outlet, bringing forth the deeply personal, cultural, and political dimensions of being-in-the-world. The methodological consideration accentuates the significance of individual expression and encompasses the truth-seeking and poetical examination of everyday engagement with this (in)visible lifeworld.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-12-19T05:19:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231218980
       
  • Feminist Collective Interpretation: Interpretation as Analysis

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      Authors: Dajanae Palmer, Darcy E. Furlong, Samantha Silberstein, Alycia Elfreich, Barbara Dennis, Pengfei Zhao, Suparna Bose, Lucinda Carspecken, Karyn Housh, Rossmary D Márquez-Lameda, Pooja Saxena, Sylvia Washington
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Interpretation is a key aspect to any qualitative research process. Inherent in analysis, researchers must ask what informs interpretations and whose interpretations are accepted as reality. These questions call attention to power and its connection with interpretational practices, while some might argue that it would be impossible to render any interpretations that are data. In this article, we describe our own feminist, collective analytic interpretation as being guided by a set of commitments rather than a set of procedures or a guiding theoretical framework. We highlight how our approach to collective interpretation through a set of feminist commitments is achieved. Then, we outline those commitments, leaving readers with an idea of how to build a feminist collectivist interpretation process into their own work specifically or contemplate the collaborative nature of interpretation in analysis of qualitative data more broadly.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-11-18T09:37:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231198120
       
  • How Many Intersections' Theoretical Synergy as a Rationale for
           Intersectional Biographical Analysis

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      Authors: Simone Varriale
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article develops an innovative approach to intersectional biographical interviewing for researchers working with highly diverse, partly unknown populations and focusing on systems of intersecting inequality, rather than “groups” or “lists” of intersections. Drawing on fieldwork with Black and Muslim Italian migrants with different class backgrounds, the article discusses theoretical synergy as a tool to redraw analytical boundaries vis-à-vis emergent knowledge of intersecting inequalities, and to connect different analytical dimensions in biographical analysis. Moreover, I introduce field-specific questions as a technique that captures the contextual effects of intersecting inequalities, minimizing the risk of essentialising minority ethnic participants.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-11-09T11:36:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231209950
       
  • Footprints After the Research Act

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      Authors: Mirka Koro
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This is a story of inspiration and (intellectual) freedom. This is a story of the of arts and multidimensional scholarly expression. This is a story of Remembering and gratitude.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-11-09T11:34:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231209949
       
  • ¿Quién Soy Yo' Voces Poéticas as Poetic Inquiry

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      Authors: Regina L. Garza Mitchell, Adriana Cardoso Reyes, Lisa R. Garcia
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we share the results of a year-long project (a poem) and the process by which we created the poem, which we term voces poéticas. The poem is the result of 11 pláticas held over the course of nearly one year and is composed of words, phrases, and sentences that represent our experiences and identities as Chicanas/Latinas/Mexicanas in the academy. Our pláticas provided a safe place where we shared and held space to reflect on our experiences at predominantly white institutions (PWI) and theorized our experiences in relation to other Chicanas/Latinas in the academy. At the heart of this process was a type of poetic inquiry we call voces poéticas that was used to analyze and share our findings. We describe this process of creation that we also view as an act of resistance.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-11-09T10:31:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231209953
       
  • Escaping, Living, and Writing

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      Authors: Graham Francis Badley
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      I use this narrative to trace ways in which writers such as Graham Greene and Michel de Montaigne escaped from tedium and unhappiness so that they could live better lives and write for greater pleasure and satisfaction. I then outline ways in which I have struggled to escape from the prison camp of strict academic writing.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-11-07T11:03:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231209955
       
  • Onto-Epistemicide and the Research Ethics Board: Toward a Reflexive Ethics

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      Authors: Giulia Carozzi, Lindsey K. Horner
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article posits that current priorities of many research ethics boards make them a self-undermining entity in that they perpetuate the erasure of certain knowledges and with them the bodies subjectivities and subjects that live them. Through obscuring the history, geography and onto-epistemology of the assumptions underpinning ethical review these boards reproduce dominant Eurocentric and postpositivist assumptions about what is and isn’t valid or worthy research. Employing Santos’s notion of epistemicide and joining it with Barad’s ethico-onto-epistem-ology we explore how the instruments of “Ethics” act as a mechanism for reinforcing what Massey labels a dominant “geography of productions of knowledge”
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-11-03T08:22:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231209064
       
  • Beginning at the End: Remembering Norman

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      Authors: Arthur P. Bochner
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Closing my eyes, I imagine Norman Denzin has entered my study. My mind conjures memories of Norman’s presence in my life extending over more than thirty years as I struggle through conversation to understand and accept that to reach the end of Norman’s life is to reach the beginning of another.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-31T05:01:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231209067
       
  • Norman Lives on Among Us, In Us, With Us, For Us

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      Authors: Christopher N. Poulos
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this essay, I pay tribute to Norman K. Denzin.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-31T04:59:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231207917
       
  • Between-ing: Collaborative Writing and the Unfoldings of Relational Space

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      Authors: Ken Gale, Jonathan Wyatt
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In conversation with Claire Parnet, Deleuze is quoted as saying, “(w)e were only two, but what was important for us was less our working together than this strange fact of working between the two of us.” Deleuze’s concept of “between-the-two” has been used by “Gale and Wyatt,” as a leitmotif for the collaborative writing with which they have engaged “between the two” and also in collaboration with others. The persistence and longevity of this usage has led to the possibility that an “image of thought” has been brought to life which is constitutive of the “us” rather than the “betweened.” In this, have “Gale and Wyatt” continued to swim in the calm, unquestioning, and welcoming waters of qualitative inquiry' Have they, in so doing, avoided those eddies, swirls, rip currents, and deep, dark waters of post qualitative inquiry that might be working to pull them out into the turbulent seas of free and wild concept making where, in becoming, their writing might move away from the applications and representations of simply human-centric thought and action and be of a more immanent doing' In this article, “Gale and Wyatt” address their alertness to the doing of this image of thought. They ask, does their collaborative writing rest more on the “two” of them, the people doing the writing, than on the “between” that talks more the materiality of relational space(s) unfolding amid them' In this article, they affirmatively critique this possibility. They ask: Between the two' How does this betweening work' What does this betweening do' Only two'
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-31T04:57:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231207130
       
  • Denzin’s Lighthouse

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      Authors: Marcelo Diversi
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      A letter of appreciation for Norman Denzin.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-27T10:37:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231209954
       
  • Surreal Encounters: Playing With the More-Than-Human at a Community Farm

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      Authors: Victoria Foster
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores synergies between surrealism and posthumanism, including ways of knowing the world in ways that simultaneously value and decenter the human, and inspire much-needed creative thinking about reworlding the planet. These are playful ways of knowing that embrace chance, accept paradox, and question conventional understandings of time. Such ideas are explored through the example of an arts-based research project at a community farm in Lancashire, United Kingdom. The project’s “surrealist sensibility” resulted not only in encouraging participants’ creativity but also in opening them up to encounters with the more-than-human and providing acknowledgment of how connected we really are.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-25T07:15:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231202936
       
  • Dear Norm

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      Authors: Angharad N. Valdivia
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This is a letter to Norman Denzin, who passed away in August 2023.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-24T07:13:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231208039
       
  • For Norman (and me)

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      Authors: Marc Spooner
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This is my tribute to Norm.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-21T11:55:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231207918
       
  • Critical Qualitative Research Leader and Friend: Norman Denzin as Teacher
           of Academic Activism

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      Authors: Gaile S. Cannella
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article demonstrates the profound role that Norman Denzin played as a qualitative researcher and friend to those of us in academia. Examples of his writing, contributions, and responses to those of us working in academia are provided. Norman was an activist who demonstrated how to survive within the often narrow confines of academia and also how to become a radical academic activist who creates expanded, more just spaces for thought and action. His work will continue to increase our possibilities. We honor and thank him for being our friend, supporter, and model.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-21T11:53:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231208038
       
  • Writing a Hero: A Textual Struggle in Memory of Prof. Norman Denzin

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      Authors: Grant Kien
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      A struggle with text in memory of Prof. Norman Denzin. When we stack these treasures altogether, we build a monument.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-21T11:51:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231208040
       
  • I Dream of Norman

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      Authors: Carolyn Ellis
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-16T10:23:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231203956
       
  • (Un)Learning Archival Methods From Young Archivists: A Lesson in
           Spatiality, Vitality, and Reciprocity

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      Authors: Jaye Johnson Thiel
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Finding inspiration from recent calls to consider the body, affect, movement, and otherwise as/in archives, this article focuses on events that took place with young archivists engaged in the act of drawing at a community center. These data-stories are put in conversation with spatial theory, children’s geographies, and feminist new materialisms to make sense of child-created archives and to offer researchers a way to (un)learn archival methods by acknowledging artifacts, as not only reflecting the community of makers but also reflecting the vibrancy of materials and space as an archival reciprocity.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-16T10:20:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231200791
       
  • The Graphic and the Grotesque: Doing History With Your Dad’s Violent,
           Funny (and Possibly Racist) Comic Strips

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      Authors: Mike Kugler
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Scholars know little of the inner lives of past children. Discovering a large collection of adolescent art, now older than 80 years old, seems like an archival treasure. James “Jimmy” Kugler (1932–1969) of Lexington, Nebraska, drew more than 120 sheets of comic strips, including retelling the Pacific theater of World War II as a violent confrontation of humanoid “Frogs” and “Toads.” The rest of the collection are gangster horror stories and violently humorous, single-panel drawings. What historical context helps make sense of such art' My father died over 50 years ago, and few if any of his classmates and loved ones are still alive. I describe searching through local newspapers, telephone directories, contemporary American propaganda and comic books, movies, just about anything that my father might have read, watched or seen. I treat the project as a microhistory of adolescent rebellion inspired by wartime propaganda and popular culture. What we may want from the past, I argue, contrasts what the past cannot give us. I hope to depict the necessity, and limits, of historical explanation and speculation.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-16T10:16:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231200264
       
  • The Archived Child: Strategies for Amplifying Children’s
           Contributions to History

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      Authors: Mona Gleason
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Using examples drawn from letters written by rural youth from the western Canadian province of British Columbia during the interwar period, I explore three interrelated interpretive strategies or dispositions for amplifying young peoples’ contributions to history: empathic inference, relational agency, and the axiom that children are heirs to the future. The letters are part of a larger archival collection of the province’s Elementary Correspondence School, the first of its kind in Canada, and provide historians with uniquely valuable child and youth focused perspectives on schooling, family, work, and other aspects of their lives. Supported by examples from the letters, I argue that young peoples’ contributions to historical change are most clearly legible when interpretive strategies, including the historical methods and methodological dispositions historians adopt, reject traditional conceptions of history as exclusively or mainly adult driven.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-14T11:03:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231198535
       
  • Coming to Terms With the Invective Latency of Ethnographic Relations: A
           Plea for (Auto)Ethnographic Positioning Analysis

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      Authors: Heike Greschke
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, I outline the framework of (auto)ethnographic positioning analysis. Using the example of an unpleasant field experience, I first develop the “metainvective positioning circle,” a heuristic model that I use to address the crisis of ethnography, its consequences for methodological development, and its implications for contemporary ethnographic practice. In the further sections, I outline how (auto)ethnographic positioning analysis combines various previously established methodological procedures, how it differs from them, and how it goes beyond them. Furthermore, I highlight key features of (auto)ethnographic positioning analysis and the most promising moments in the research process for its application.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-14T10:59:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231193766
       
  • A Song for Norman

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      Authors: Kitrina Douglas
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this short essay I offer a few reflections on how Norman Denzin has influenced my life, friendships, and scholarship. I feel there is little I can say or do that would match the gratitude I feel, so I offer a song.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-14T10:11:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231201590
       
  • Remembering Norman

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      Authors: Elizabeth Adams St.Pierre
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this brief essay, I offer reflection on Norman Denzin’s role as an academic activist in qualitative inquiry.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-13T11:54:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231203950
       
  • “Norman Denzin is the Hub”

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      Authors: Serge F. Hein
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This tribute is to Norman K. Denzin. In it, I reflect on my experiences with him and his work and his influence on me as a scholar and a person.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-13T11:53:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231203945
       
  • Pursuing, Practicing, and Portraying Qualitative Research: An Interview
           With Norman K. Denzin

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      Authors: Andrew F. Herrmann, Tony E. Adams, Sara B. Dykins Callahan
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      At the Second International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry (May 2006), the authors, then graduate students, interviewed Norman Denzin for Carolyn Ellis’s Advanced Qualitative Methods graduate course at the University of South Florida. Only a few parts of the interview had ever been published. The authors include the transcript of the interview here.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-13T11:51:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231202939
       
  • I Was Arriving: Exploring Healing and Knowing in My Own Creation(s)

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      Authors: Ramona Elke
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Aniin. Boozhoo. Tansi. I identify as Anishinaabe and Metis on my late mother’s side and of Celtic-Germanic ancestry on my father’s side. I was arriving: exploring healing and knowing in my own creation(s) is a métissage, sharing moments of a life lived in longing to become a good relation, a useful medicine, to the beings in this world of anguish and dis-ease. This is a re-presencing of some teachings I have received from the interstitial spaces of making, and writing poetry, allowing me a place to fall into when I don’t know where to go or what to do. This work is an honoring of the oral/storytelling tradition—a sharing of what I have come to know in this walk—the medicines living in me. Making puts us in our bodies where we are forced to feel the suffering and joys of others. In this embodied walk, we, hopefully, become models for others to do the same, thus creating spaces where folx are invited to grow their capacity to answer the calls to justice for All Our Relations.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-11T11:41:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231202938
       
  • Explorations in Non-Binary Poiesis: A Sartorial Path to Wholeness in Queer
           Body

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      Authors: Calder Cheverie
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      The path toward coming home to an embodied sense of wholeness in queer identity is often a long journey marked by personal severance. For trans and non-binary people, the arts have become an invaluable space for reclamative wayfinding and liberation. Artistic pathways offer processes to (re)presence the severed parts of ourselves that were laid down to survive in a binary framework that collapses wholeness. Here, I offer forward a sartorial expression of non-binary poiesis as a reclamative act of (re)weaving the lost threads of self. In the disassembling of my adopted aesthetic, sewing and sartorial expressions become a pathway home to wholeness in queer body, where (re)stitching binary endpoints gestures toward a third space for belonging.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-11T11:40:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231202946
       
  • In Memory of Norman Denzin

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      Authors: Alejandro Noboa
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      The author offers a few words in the memory of Norman Denzin, detailing especially Denzin’s impact on qualitative research as a multilingual endeavor.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-10T12:41:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231200801
       
  • Remembering Norm

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      Authors: Bronwyn Davies
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This is my response, from the heart, to the loss of Norm Denzin. The invitation to contribute to this special issue, focussing on remembering Norm, gave me a chance to find words to talk about what his loss meant to me, and to find words to say just how profound has been the contribution he made to the world—and will go on making.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-10T12:39:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231200794
       
  • Norman and Ishi: A Performative Ethnography

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      Authors: Mitchell Allen
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This performative piece is a fictional conversation between Norman Denzin and Ishi, the Yahi Indian, in the Land of the Dead after Norman’s passing. Norman wrote a book about Ishi and was working on a second one when he died.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-10T12:38:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231200581
       
  • Children’s Creations and Archiving Practices: Methodological Matters
           Special Issue Introduction

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      Authors: Melissa Freeman, Elliott Kuecker
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This introduction provides a context for the collection of essays that follow in this special issue on research methodology related to studying children’s creations in archives. First, we center children’s creations as significant sources for interdisciplinary researchers interested in learning more about children’s contributions to history, the historical record, and childhood studies. We then describe some of the politics and practices—including preservation, cataloging, and circulation—within formal and informal archiving that may have implications for scholars attempting to use archived children’s creations. We then offer some examples of research that focus on children’s perspectives, accounts, or archival sources, highlighting some of the ethical concerns these have raised. Finally, we introduce the papers that make up this issue, with contributions from many disciplines and discussions of several media types.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-10T12:37:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231198269
       
  • Meet “Me” in the Field(-Notes): The Selves and Self-Relations
           of Autoethnography

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      Authors: Tobias Boll
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Autoethnographers write about culture and cultural practice by primarily writing about their own experience—about themselves. This article asks who—or what—the “self” is that autoethnographers engage with, study, and write about. It argues that the ethnographic self is not just the object and agent of the autoethnographic research process but also a product of it, particularly of autoethnographic writing. Doing autoethnography is less a matter of writing up, than of writing into existence the self that is the prerequisite of the research in the first place. Drawing on Mead’s distinction of a pre-reflexive “I” and a reflexive “Me” as oscillating phases of the social self, the article develops a typology for analytically distinguishing the multiple “I”s and “Me”s that make up the autoethnographic self: in the field, in fieldnotes, and in other types of ethnographic texts. Autoethnographic Positioning Analysis is applied to fieldnotes and analytical texts from an ongoing research project to illustrate how these different selves are produced and related to each other in a way that results in fieldnotes (or other texts) passing as accounts of “the” ethnographic self. This not only helps accomplish the shift between familiarization and alienation with the field (and one’s self) that is crucial for analytic and reflexive ethnography but can give insights into the social and moral structure of the field. Far from the notion of autoethnography as self-absorbed “mesearch,” this article argues that good autoethnography is indeed a methodical search for a reflexive “Me” in the field(-notes).
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-10T12:35:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231196921
       
  • A Mile in Their Shoes: Poetic Inquiry for Qualitative Caregiver Research

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      Authors: Sally Duplantier, Jessica Nina Lester
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Poetic inquiry as a form of arts-based research can penetrate the complexity, ambiguity, and multidimensional nature of representing participant emotions. This methodological approach allows researchers to explore the sensitive intersection of competing emotions without flattening the layered and often conflicting experience of participants’ embodied experiences. In this article, we share participant-voiced poems generated from interviews with family caregivers of Alzheimer’s patients and invite readers to sit with how these poems transcend mere descriptions and instead offer an emotive experience that defies words alone.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-07T11:00:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231196187
       
  • Norman Denzin and America

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      Authors: David Carless
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      A personal appreciation of the life and work of Norman Denzin.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-04T06:08:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231199410
       
  • Merging Eco-Literacy, Visual Poetry, and Arts-Informed Practices: A
           Curriculum of Eco-Justice Education

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      Authors: Andrejs Kulnieks
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Writing poetry over finger-paintings that are created with natural dyes is an embodied reflexive practice that can help students connect with ideas about eco-justice as they develop a deeper relationship with the Earth. As Kimmerer (2013) explains, “The exchange between plants and people has shaped the evolutionary history of both” (p. 124). Writing practices also shape who we are becoming. Through the creation of visual poetry, I investigate the importance of engaging with language and landscapes to develop relationships with one another.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-04T06:06:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231186566
       
  • Archival Attunements: Researching Children’s Drawings “About
           the War”

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      Authors: Christopher M. Schulte
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Based on the author’s experiences of working with materials from the Dale B. Harris Papers, specifically a series of children’s drawings “about the war,” this article engages the concept of attunement as a strategy to address the challenges of encountering children’s creations from the past. The article begins with an introduction to the concept of attunement, drawing into dialogue the work of Erin Manning and Jane Bennett, for example, as well as related scholarship from art education, qualitative studies, and childhood studies. This introduction is then used to express how the concept of attunement has been central to the author’s approach to researching childhood art. After discussing the connection between attunement and the author’s practice as a researcher, the idea of archival attunements is introduced, a turn of phrase used to animate the experiences, potentials, and challenges of encountering children’s art from the past.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-10-04T06:03:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231200579
       
  • Broad Shoulders

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      Authors: Jim Denison
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This brief narrative represents a tribute to Norman Denzin’s leadership.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-09-30T01:46:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231203954
       
  • Composing Cultural Connections: Exploring Tensions of Creating Composite
           Ethnodramatic Characters

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      Authors: Danielle Hradsky
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article discusses tensions of creating composite characters in ethnodramas, with particular focus on characters’ cultural identities. Six teacher characters were composed from 12 research participants for Connections, an ethnodrama that highlights the importance of cultural identity when engaging with teaching for reconciliation between First Nations and non-Indigenous Australians. This article presents the author’s ethnodrama methodology, as well as excerpts from the ethnodrama itself, before unpacking complexities related to composing characters’ cultural identities. It is suggested that composing characters protects participant anonymity but opens new possibilities and uncertainties that should be carefully considered as part of the ethnodramatic process.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-09-28T11:12:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231196182
       
  • Historians, Emotions, and Children’s Trauma in the Archives

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      Authors: Jack Hodgson
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This reflective essay focuses on the emotionality of children’s creations in the archives, particularly where children’s creations give insight into traumatic histories. I argue that history will be better placed when historians write more openly about the inherently distressing nature of the materials they consume. It is impossible to be unaffected by such material and acknowledging this will make our work more transparent by outlining to readers the context it was written in. The complex, emotive interpretive task historians face is demonstrated using two children’s drawings—one from the Spanish Civil War and the other from the Darfur Genocide.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-09-27T01:16:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231200265
       
  • The Pleasures and Power in a Trans Identity: A “Found Poem” Found in a
           Discussion About Fashion

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      Authors: Elizabeth Grace Olson, Keira Mills, Su Yun Bae
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This poem represents the qualitative findings from a study on transgender individual’s relationship to fashion. Eight transgender young adults were interviewed about their gender identity and presentation, as well as their use of clothing and fashion style to represent themselves. Within these interviews, all participants shared the pleasures and power they derive from their transgender identities. Using direct quotes, and intentionally arranging phrases and stories found within the interview transcripts, the authors created this found poem. A research poem was chosen to best represent this data as it allows the participants to maintain their power using their voices directly to more authentically represent their pleasures and joys in their identities. Themes that emerged, and are represented by the six color groups of stanzas, which include making connections to others and the queer community (red); gaining a unique perspective of the world (orange); finding opportunities and enjoying fluidity (yellow); enhancing pleasure in the body and physical representation of gender (green); creating power in visibility and representation (blue); and embracing the delight and freedom in a trans identity (purple).
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-09-22T12:45:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231196183
       
  • Centering Negative Emotional Responses: The Utility of Strategic
           Membership Researcher Status in Sino-German Cross-Cultural Trainings

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      Authors: Mei-Chen Spiegelberg
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the utility of strategic membership researcher status in the case of Sino-German cross-cultural training courses to understand the paradoxical practices that reinforce and mitigate cross-cultural conflicts in transnational contexts. Drawing upon autoethnographic positioning analysis, I connect my own negative emotional experiences with positioning dynamics to reconstruct conflictual social events. This approach not only exposes the implicit field logic but also reveals the arrangement of social relations in an unexpected way. These findings highlight the epistemic potential of combining position-analytic and emotion-analytic reflexivity. In so doing, this article provides a practical, methodological model and furthers scholarship on the utility of autoethnography for the study of social relations.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-09-22T10:46:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231196922
       
  • An Academic and a Small Shelf

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      Authors: Ian Stewart
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      The following brief paper is an evocative autoethnography of the lockdown life of an academic and the impact on his home and family, presented as a poem. It is followed by a reflection on relevant literature and some practical ethnographic research questions arising.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-09-22T09:57:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231196923
       
  • “Darn It, This Pen Leaks! But Wasn’t It a Pretty Design'” Tracing
           Contours of the Aesthetic in One Young Woman’s Letters Home From Camp

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      Authors: Melissa Freeman
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Everyday aesthetics offers a way to disclose the complexity of a seemingly routine activity like doing the dishes. In this article, I consider the aesthetic allure of one 15-year-old’s letters home from camp preserved in a university’s archives. By returning aesthetics to experience, philosophical hermeneutics restores the experience of understanding to its multi-sensuous materialization. When things speak to us and we in turn respond to them, we are both transformed. Betty Kaufman’s letters vividly depict her experiences at the Laurel Falls Camp for Girls. How, I wondered, does aesthetics perform its mode of being' What are its topological contours' What might qualitative researchers co-responding with archival materials gain from this form of entanglement with understanding'
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-09-22T09:56:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231198461
       
  • An Autoethnography of and in Solidarity: Post- and Decolonial Critique and
           Autoethnographic Positioning Analysis

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      Authors: Sebastian Garbe
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores autoethnography as a critical research methodology in dialogue with post- and decolonial critique. It draws on an (auto)ethnographic research on and within the transnational solidarity network of the Mapuche people in which encounters of solidarity across difference are understood as postcolonial “contact zones.” This contribution hereby suggests three important opportunities for autoethnographic positioning analysis by looking at (a) different layers of the author’s field access, (b) the author’s strategic membership within the international solidarity activism, and (c) experiences of being rejected. This article argues that the careful and systematic analysis of such ethnographic episodes is able to (a) generate important epistemological insights within a particular research field, in this case transnational solidarity and networked social movement activity, and (b) highlight and reflect upon the researcher’s “complicity” within fieldwork. The first part of this contribution briefly introduces post- and decolonial debates on solidarity across difference and moves on to suggesting autoethnographic positioning analysis as a methodological approach for studying/supporting the transnational solidarity activism, drawing upon the author’s research with the Mapuche.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-09-22T09:41:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231196918
       
  • Openings

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      Authors: James Salvo
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      The work of good editing creates openings for others to express their own ideas. The world is such that—to put it in the language of game theory—we must play cooperatively in the academy. The urgency of things needing our attention and action does not leave time for us to play strategic games wherein we compete with those who would be allies in our striving toward the flourishing of all.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-09-19T11:25:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231200793
       
  • Reading Facebook After Norman K. Denzin’s Passing

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      Authors: Ronald J. Pelias
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This essay is a tribute in memory of Norman K. Denzin. It recalls the thoughts that were running through the author’s mind when he learned of Norman Denzin’s passing on Facebook.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-09-19T11:22:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231200580
       
  • Owning the Lies

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      Authors: Grace Ann Giorgio
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This autoethnography contests notions that family secrets and lies are always disruptive to family cohesion by exploring how secrets and lies hold a family together. Drawing from shared memories, I address my siblings directly to reveal our experiences of navigating our parents’ secrets and lies from each other that contributed to our own adoption of such practices. The story shows how we eventually found better ways to support our parents and one another into adulthood by learning to “own the lies” and not eschew them. Owning the lies means knowing each of our love debts to one another and to the social worlds we inhabit beyond the family dynamic.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-09-19T11:18:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231198534
       
  • What Do Doors Do' Door Storyings, Matterings, Adventurings, and
           Commonings

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      Authors: Carol A. Taylor, Jo Albin-Clark, Karen Broadhurst Healey, Hannah Hogarth, Zoe Lewis, Suvi Pihkala, Sharon Louise Smith, Joy Cranham, Liz Latto
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      What do doors do'OpenCloseInvite InShut OutJamStickWedge openWelcome: Entice and InviteOffer a glimpse intoBarSLAM SHUTGet kicked inGet kicked shutSplinterWarpHangSit ajarGently linger in our mindsCause hurt and separationAffecting thoughtsMoments of joy or painLonging, WaitingFearful longing,Fearful waiting,AnticipatingWonderingHaunting“Come-on-in”This article is based on research-creation experimentations arising from the provocations “what do doors do'” and “how do doors matter'” We ponder how knowledge-making practices come to life when you take a little time to notice the mattering of doors. We use collaborative feminist praxis to generate arts-based post-qualitative entanglements as generative invitations for door storying that illuminate the potentialities of commoning practices.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-09-19T11:15:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231196184
       
  • Inviting Me In

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      Authors: Johnny Saldaña
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Saldaña outlines the influence Norman K. Denzin had on my academic and artistic career.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-09-13T08:36:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231197842
       
  • “Norman as Academic Shane”

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      Authors: Bryant Keith Alexander
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      On hearing the news of Norman Denzin’s death, the author engages a performative reflection, as film analysis, comparing the character of Shane from the 1953 Western movie to Norman Denzin. A social justice theme is played out in the text, keying in on Norman’s commitment to analyzing the Western motif.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-09-13T08:34:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231199402
       
  • Post-Academia: Life, Liberty, and Happiness'

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      Authors: Graham Francis Badley
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this narrative autoethnography, I reflect on living in Post-Academia. First, I discuss how universities have become more managerial and less collegial. Then, I consider my own move from being an academic to becoming a post-academic (even verging on the post-humous). Finally, I look at the possibilities of living a sort of flourishing life in post-academia, enjoying a new sense of liberty, and accepting, despite increasing decrepitude, enough happiness to see me through.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-09-13T08:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231198017
       
  • The AcademicAssessmentMachine: Posthuman Possibilities of/for Doing
           Assignments and Assessments Differently

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      Authors: Carol A. Taylor, Jacob Huckle
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article brings a posthuman approach to assignments and assessments as they are configured in and by normative practices in educational institutions, including schools and universities. Composed as a collaborative posthuman autoethnography, we use the figuration of the AcademicAssessmentMachine to illuminate how educational assessment-as-usual positions, hierarchizes, grades, and disposes human bodies—both teachers and students—in ways that are affectively damaging and socially unjust. In rethinking educational assignments and assessment as a more-than-human affair, we swerve its purpose and doings toward more affirmative possibilities. We ask how might we disrupt the AcademicAssessmentMachine while being caught within it ourselves'
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-09-13T08:30:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231196186
       
  • Transcorporeal Witnessing: Re-Figuring Toxic Entanglements Through the
           Arts

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      Authors: Claudia Eppert, Diane Conrad
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article seeks to extend discourses of embodiment by deploying Alaimo’s concept of transcorporeality in the context of our grappling with complexities of bearing witness to deforestation and ecological destruction in Alberta’s Tar Sands. Transcorporeality captures senses of porosity among human, nonhuman, and more-than-human bodies and constitutes a productive perspective from which to ethically engage with ecological destruction. Through our artwork and dialogic exchange with each other, and our embodied thinking with the works of other artists and scholars concerned with ecological atrocity, we attend to challenges, nuances, and possibilities of witnessing in ways that both attune to our embodiment and seek to decenter the human. We contend that arts-based practices of being, knowing, and doing offer openings for re-figuring the toxic entanglements that pervade current ecological relations and illustrating pathways toward more regenerative futures.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-09-02T06:12:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176764
       
  • Academic Writing Otherwise: A Rumination

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      Authors: Graham Francis Badley
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this rumination on academic writing otherwise, after Taylor and Benozzo, I address a number of important issues they raise. These include notions such as the academic-writing-machine, authorship, writership, and postauthorship. Throughout the article, I compare and contrast their views with examples from a variety of sources including some of my own articles. I especially comment on the fitness of autoethnography, bricolage, postacademic, and quasi-posthumous writing as well as academic ranting as examples of writing otherwise.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-08-31T08:30:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231183947
       
  • Writing About Dance: Representations of Strength in the Struggle for
           Social Justice

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      Authors: Kendra Lowery
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how I grappled with questions about the meaning, purpose, and process of playful writing to represent a dance performance based on the oral history narrative of Sybil Jordan Hampton, the sole African American enrolled in her class at Little Rock Central High in Arkansas from 1959 to 1962. Through the presentation of six moments from the dance that I captured through photographs, I explore the possibilities of writing about dance using graphic art to invoke critical reflection and social justice-oriented action, rather than solely as a representation of the dance performance. I examine the complexities surrounding playful writing, layered representations in writing about dance that represents lived experience, and consider whether nontraditional text presented as graphic art enhances the potential for meaning making about social justice action.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-08-28T08:41:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231193761
       
  • “Positioning” Analysis With Autoethnography—Epistemic Explorations
           of Self-Reflexivity: Introduction to the Special Issue

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      Authors: Heike Greschke
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      (Auto)ethnographic positioning analysis is a new approach that mobilizes the demarcation between evocative and analytic autoethnography and combines the strengths of both with positioning theory. It is considered a suitable methodology for addressing the ongoing crisis of ethnography, understood as a continuing expression of the moral explosiveness of ethnographic relations in a socially divided and connected world. This introduction outlines the special issue’s line of argument and justifies its goal and contribution to the persisting crisis of ethnography. The individual contributions are presented, focusing on how each study “positions” analysis autoethnographically and what this indicates about the respective research fields.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-08-23T08:50:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231193762
       
  • Putting “Us” in Place: A Contrapuntal “Position” on Research
           Access in Over-Researched Contexts

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      Authors: Patricia Ward
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article centers the labor aid workers perform to manage researchers in the humanitarian aid sector in Jordan. It examines how workers move and manage researchers’ bodies (including the author’s) as part of their daily job routines. Drawing from sociological and postcolonial scholarship on labor and the body to document the latter highlights multiple “knowledge producers” that shape and contest data collection in this context. The goal in describing this process is twofold. First, this article seeks to elaborate understandings of power relations in data collection processes, particularly in postcolonial settings considered over-researched. Second, it aims to broaden the scope and utility of analytic reflexivity through contrapuntal thinking about researchers’ positions in the research process.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-08-23T08:48:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231193767
       
  • A Self-reflexive Positionality to Navigate the Invective Latency of
           Ethnographic Relations: Insights From Lebanon and Germany

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      Authors: Irene Tuzi
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Positionality has become increasingly important in ethnographic and autoethnographic research. The recent “reflexive turn” in migration studies has encouraged scholars to discuss the concept from different perspectives (e.g., gender, ethnicity, and class). Yet, positionality is relational: It is the result of ongoing interactions between how researchers present themselves in the field and how research participants perceive these presentations. Because self-positioning and positioning of others are mutually bound to each other, positionality reflects a continuous negotiation between actors who may be motivated by different interests. For this reason, it is necessary for researchers to analytically reflect upon the implications of these mutual positionings to more fully understand how to navigate research fields. This is especially important for sensitive research fields—like migration and forced migration—characterized by inequalities, hierarchical structures, and unequal power relations. The present article uses insights from fieldwork conducted among Syrian refugees in Lebanon and Germany between 2017 and 2019 to show how configurations of “humanitarian paternalism” and researchers’ false expectations to save the world can frame positionality as a meta-invective action. Positionality informed by self-reflexivity can help to explore the invective latency of field relations and let contradictions, discomfort, and disharmonic elements emerge. This does not mean that field relations will become more equal and that power structures and inequalities will be reduced as a result. However, being aware of these invective elements offers the opportunity to explore a level of analysis that is often overlooked and make steps toward decolonizing research methodologies and knowledge production.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-08-23T08:45:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231193764
       
  • Slow News From Nowhere and Other Utopias'

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      Authors: Graham Francis Badley
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this extension to Scribbling Towards Utopia, I concentrate on two authors who make their own utopian strivings key features of their work: William Morris, the English socialist, and John Dewey, the American philosopher and liberal educator. I also borrow ideas from Jasmine Ulmer’s Writing Slow Ontology to suggest that our utopian hopes will, if ever, only be attained slowly and not quickly.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-08-14T09:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231188059
       
  • Heirs of the Enlightenment'

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      Authors: Graham Francis Badley
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, I select a number of Enlightenment figures and suggest that, despite inevitable contradictions, they should still serve as exemplars for a modern age of a series of values such as freedom, tolerance, and social justice. I believe, however, that The Enlightenment is, nevertheless, a work in progress.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-08-03T08:07:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231186583
       
  • The Hustle: How Struggling to Access Elites for Qualitative Interviews
           Alters Research and the Researcher

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      Authors: Clementine Collett
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      When conducting qualitative research on elites, researchers often face issues regarding time-constraints, power asymmetries, and rapport building. In this article, I outline the methodological concept of “the hustle” so that we might better understand how these issues intersect and how the difficulty to access elites for interviews alters research and researcher. The hustle is defined as the pushing or jostling of the qualitative researcher in the face of resistance to access research settings or participants. Inspired by my own hustle when researching elites who design AI recruitment technology (AI-rec-tech), I argue that the hustle has four major effects: first, it requires the researcher to act as networker; second, it influences how much data can be collected; third, it dictates research design; and fourth, it alters interview dynamics. The hustle is an important conceptual umbrella which draws together themes which have arisen in qualitative research on elites for decades.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-07-27T08:32:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231188054
       
  • Blurry Lines: Reflections on “Insider” Research

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      Authors: Laura Yvonne Bulk, Bethan Collins
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Insider research poses a range of benefits and challenges for researchers and the communities being researched. It is commonly advocated for disability research but there is limited work exploring disabled researchers’ experiences. Influenced by autoethnography and through a process of asynchronous structured conversations, we reflected on our experiences as two blind researchers. Through our collective reflective process and analysis, we created three main themes: insider research is complex and subjective, there is judgment about the “right” thing to do, and insider research requires “different” work. We argue that insiderness is more than sharing characteristics: it is a situated, fluctuating, and “felt” experience. The complexities, judgments, and emotional labor associated with insider research can challenge researchers in potentially very personal and unexpected ways. We propose that further investigation is required about how researchers can best prepare for, engage ethically throughout, and be supported through the insider research process.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-07-22T09:25:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231188048
       
  • Global Trains of Thought: Coupling Derailment, Environment, Racism,
           Movement, Progress

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      Authors: Kurt Borchard
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article is an assemblage of thematically inter-relatable quotations promoting critically oriented, non-linear complexity of thought. The quotes concern: recent derailments and safety protocols; what trains carry; ideas about linearity, sequence, and simultaneity; environmental issues; trains used in genocide, race-based segregation and exploitation, and immigration; trains communicating art, symbols, and meaning; and quotes from literary figures, artists, and social theory. A central question emerges: Do the contents and arrangements of our (ever longer) cause-and-effect chains together constitute globally indeterminate, unanticipated consequences and both random and systemic interconnectivity, bridging industrial and post industrial eras, networks, and concerns'
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-07-21T07:18:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231186570
       
  • Methodological Considerations for Endarkened Narrative Inquiry

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      Authors: Keondria McClish-Boyd, Kakali Bhattacharya
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article extends the previous conversation around endarkened narrative inquiry, a culturally situated approach informed by Black feminist thought, womanism, endarkened feminist epistemology, and narrative inquiry. In this article, we reclaim narrative in the context of a methodological process that centers Black women-centric ontoepistemologies, informed by theoretical perspectives and existing literature, to focus on Black women’s ways of storying their lives. We also discuss the creation of wisdom whisper as a methodological consideration for data collection. Finally, we reflect on the methodological mentoring and negotiations that took place to culturally situate this methodology and offer a method of inquiry aligned with a Blackness-centered framework of analysis.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-07-19T08:21:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231186565
       
  • Polyvocal Poetry: Learning to Teach Amid Crises

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      Authors: J. Scott Baker
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the perspectives of 18 preservice teachers in a Midwest, USA university teacher preparation program through poetic inquiry. The polyvocal poetry, created from the transcripts of two focus groups, explores the emotional health and well-being of preservice teachers in their field placements amid crisis, such as the COVID pandemic, systemic racism, and the resulting mental health and financial strains facing students in the aftermath. This article further contemplates a researcher’s need to maintain authenticity while working closely with evocative data to construct polyvocal poetry.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-07-18T08:25:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231186569
       
  • Justice Can Never Arrive: The Opening of the Call to Social Justice in
           Qualitative Inquiry

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      Authors: Serge F. Hein
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Most qualitative social justice research is guided by a critical theory–based understanding of justice, which conceives of justice as something that can be achieved, made present. For Derrida, however, justice can never arrive, be present; it is in fact impossible. Justice always exceeds our specific expectations of the future. Derrida’s second definition of deconstruction, which deals with the unstable relationship between justice and law, is examined, followed by a discussion of the deconstructibility of the law and the undeconstructibility of justice. Derrida’s concept of justice is ontological, whereas critical theory’s concept of justice is epistemological. For Derrida, and continental philosophy in general, however, epistemology has its ultimate basis in ontology. An important implication of Derrida’s concept of justice for critically informed qualitative social justice research is that justice cannot function as a guiding principle or ideal. Thus, the call to justice is an infinite one that researchers can never satisfy.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-07-18T08:23:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231186564
       
  • Multi-Method Qualitative Text and Discourse Analysis: A Methodological
           Framework

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      Authors: Audrey Alejandro, Longxuan Zhao
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      The growing interest in combining different approaches to qualitative text and discourse analysis has so far not been met with adapted methodological resources. This article aims to address this gap by developing a methodological framework for combining qualitative text and discourse analysis. First, we introduce four traditions that we identify as four families of methods of text/discourse analysis with different logics: Discourse Analysis, Foucauldian Discourse Analysis, Thematic Analysis, and Qualitative Content Analysis. Second, we review the literature to show how these methods have been combined across disciplines and case studies. Third, we build upon existing literature to unpack the benefits and challenges of multi-method text/discourse analysis, and offer strategies to help navigate the problems that may arise. Overall, this article introduces multi-method qualitative text and discourse analysis (MMQTDA) as a methodological framework to provide guidance and offer solid foundations for an emerging methodological conversation in qualitative text research.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-07-14T11:47:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231184421
       
  • “Connecting the Dots”: Developing a Doctoral Qualitative
           Community of Practice

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      Authors: Ioannis Costas Batlle, Kia Banks, Josie Rodohan, Bryan C Clift, Sheree Bekker
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article focuses on the development of a community of practice (CoP) for qualitative doctoral researchers at the University of Bath (UK). Although the sources of support that qualitative doctoral researchers can access have grown substantially across the United Kingdom, United States, Australia, and South Africa (e.g., supervisor meetings, discrete courses, and standalone workshops), they generally remain “disjointed,” forcing qualitative doctoral researchers to individually navigate these “siloed” sources. In this article, we describe our solution to the problem—creating a doctoral CoP capable of “connecting the dots”—by drawing on 3 years of experience leading the CoP. We focus and reflect on our facilitation approach, session design, and challenges faced with the goal of sharing “best practice.”
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-07-12T06:34:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231183943
       
  • Saturation: An Overworked and Misunderstood Concept'

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      Authors: Malcolm Tight
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      All qualitative researchers are familiar with the idea of saturation: that researchers should continue to collect and/or analyze data until nothing new is being added to their arguments or conclusions. Saturation is, however, used and understood in a variety of ways, often appearing as an unevidenced and dogmatic statement seeking to justify that a piece of research is complete. This article explores the application of the idea of saturation in qualitative research, noting its association with grounded theory and the particular interest taken in it by health researchers. It concludes that it is both a misunderstood and an overworked concept.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-07-11T10:13:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231183948
       
  • Red Thread Dancing Feather Dreaming

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      Authors: Darlene St. Georges, Alexandra Fidyk
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      We offer a dream dance in visual, metaphoric, and haptic image by engaging creation-centered poetic inquiring as a unique rendering of embodied reflexivity through the arts. Our lyric text, a songscape, framed by the interplay of chorus and storying verse, enacts the movement and mood of a dance. Red threads and feathers, as partners, symbolize the voice and agency of entities becoming within the complex relational-ecologies with whom we live. This songscape advances creation-centered research by demonstrating Whitehead’s ontology of becoming—process prioritized over substance—where bodily feelings provide the earthen richness through which images, emotions, hopes, and thoughts emerge. Working from modes of reflexivity within animate paradigms advances relational consciousness by foregrounding agential landscapes, ancestors, psychscapes, and our dependent co-arising. Here, relational consciousness reveals Nature—in all its forms—as a co-creative.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-07-04T08:52:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176102
       
  • Arts–Research Collaboration: Reflections on Collaboration as
           Creative Method

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      Authors: Jennie Morgan, Shelley Castle
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      What is arts–research collaboration and how does it work' What does arts–research collaboration as method for qualitative inquiry do' What is the effect of collaboration on creative practice and academic research' Drawing on a collaboration between an anthropologist and an artist, this article addresses a surprising lack of qualitative inquiry into collaboration between creative practitioners and academic researchers. By recounting how the authors developed and used collaboration as method, the article identifies and analyzes underpinning qualities of how they worked together through arts–research activities. It advances existing debate by agitating for more theoretically grounded accounts of collaboration, including those that take a processual view on making and creativity to argue for considering collaboration, itself, to be materials from which creative practice and outputs emerge.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-07-04T08:41:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176280
       
  • Reducing Methodological Footprints in Qualitative Research

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      Authors: Mirka Koro, Jennifer Wolgemuth, Ethan Trinh
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This conceptual paper proposes that all methodologies create a footprint like the carbon footprint. Design and implementation of new methodologies require limited resources and funding, and these resources are not equitably distributed on a global scale. Thus, we argue for more ecological uses of methodologies, especially in the context of data collection and interdependent relations of knowledge/information creation. Like the excessive use of energy sources, potentially unnecessary productions of new data, information, and evidence should not be regarded as unproblematic, let alone virtuous. Rather, qualitative researchers, funding agencies, and other bodies that evaluate research, should question whether new data, information, evidence are needed and at what cost. We also propose more data recycling, data sharing, open access data, and other ecological ways of supporting shared knowledge and monitoring excessive data production.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-07-03T06:03:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231183944
       
  • Beautiful Mis/takes

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      Authors: Jee Yeon Ryu
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In the following three fragments, I illustrate how I am learning to practice reflexivity through the arts—with a story, piano improvisation, and poem—to evoke possibilities for more empathetic and humanistic ways of teaching and learning that embody what truly matters at the heart of children’s lived and living experiences of exploring music and piano playing. I integrate text, digitally edited photographs, and music video as artistic expressions of my praxis toward more heartful, healing, and joyful ways of teaching and learning.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-06-21T05:29:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176089
       
  • Composting Storytelling: An Approach for Critical (Multispecies)
           Ethnography

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      Authors: Riikka Hohti, Tuure Tammi
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Stories produce bodies that produce stories in an endless intra-active metabolic continuum. Stories do not only represent material worlds but also shape and make new worlds. Starting from these premises, this article develops “composting storytelling,” a methodological approach to heterogeneous, open-ended, small stories interwoven with everyday interaction. Drawing on years-long ethnographic work in a school greenhouse, and multispecies and critical animal studies literature as well as feminist storytelling, the authors develop a twofold argument. First, composting storytelling can be mobilized as a critical research approach in which critique emerges along with horizontal movement from closer, warm assemblages to more distant or erased, cool assemblages. Furthermore, multispecies storytelling can inform the broader field of qualitative research by positioning the ethnographer and the field in a relationship characterized by a hesitant ethics of knowing. The study draws attention to the polyphony of voices and temporalities, foregrounds intra-active transformation, and suggests a more modest position for the human protagonist.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-06-12T06:43:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176759
       
  • Water Stories

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      Authors: Celeste Nazeli Snowber
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This poetic article explores the relationship between water and ecology and how an embodied awareness and insights surface out of the practice of swimming. The connections between the inner and outer landscapes of waterways and the land are written into being as they nourish embodied resonances. Moving and writing are inextricably linked and open a syntax of poetry and prose founded in the rhythm of a swimming practice. Themes of yearning, longing, timelessness, existence, and creativity emerge out of these visceral explorations. The article integrates poetry and photographic images of the author’s swimming practice. Water stories is situated within the methodologies of embodied inquiry and poetic inquiry and supports the intersection and layers between what it means to think, move, and write in performative ways.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-06-09T06:24:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176277
       
  • Multiverse, Feminist Materialist Relational Time, and Multiple Future(s):
           (Re)configuring Possibilities for Qualitative Inquiry

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      Authors: Nikki Fairchild
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Critical feminist materialist theorizing opens up possibilities for enacting different ways of knowledge making. In this article, I connect feminist materialist inquiry with time and temporality to develop a line of inquiry to reimagine the nature of multiple future(s). Employing theorizing developed by Francesca Ferrando, Karen Barad, and Donna Haraway, and thinking with the concepts of Multiverse, spacetimemattering, and agential cuts, I develop the concept of feminist materialist relational time as a methodological possibility for inquiry. Using examples from my own and others’ scholarship, I propose that feminist materialist relational time articulates ways in which affirmative and transversal ethico-onto-epistemologies can reconsider power, mattering, enactment, and exclusions, creating multiple future(s) for qualitative inquiry. I argue that the entanglement of past/present/future as events and forces in flux highlights the multiplicity of temporality where past/present/future are now, then, immanent, processual, always already in the making, and formed of intra-acting bodies.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-06-09T06:22:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176753
       
  • Different Together: A Poetic Reading of Arts-Inspired Creations as
           Embodied Explorations of Social Cohesion

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      Authors: Daisy Pillay, Kathleen Pithouse-Morgan, Inbanathan Naicker
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      We, a diverse group of South African academics, study embodied reflexivity through poetry, and this article is an account of poetic inquiry inspired by assemblages created by the participants in a symposium, Object Inquiry for Social Cohesion in Public Higher Education. As the symposium’s cofacilitators, we wondered how and what we might learn from reading the assemblages poetically as embodied explorations of social cohesion. We describe the symposium before demonstrating how we used poetry to represent, analyze, and synthesize our responses to the assemblages. Through the presentation of dialog pieces derived from our discussions, we articulate the collective growth and development of our understanding. Then, we share a final poem, which encapsulates our learning. Finally, we consider how this poetic study could help us and others in higher education seeking to understand and strengthen social cohesion and social justice.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-06-05T08:02:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176099
       
  • Accessing Embodied Knowledges: Poetry as Culturally Relevant Pedagogy

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      Authors: Sepideh Mahani
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Poetry is an act of embodied reflexivity because it interweaves our perceptions and emotions with acts of cognition, to make sense of the world we live in. It allows us to uncover the lived experiences of our body in a direct and an unapologetic way from the inside out. In this article, I reflect on times that writing poetry and engaging in poetic inquiry empowered me to share stories and depict moments that shaped me. It allowed me to make sense of my bodily experiences as an educator, a researcher, and an Iranian–Canadian woman hoping to promote awareness of social injustices in my motherland. It guided me as I encouraged minoritized students to consider poetic inquiry as a way to access and understand their embodied experiences. In this way, I will discuss how poetic inquiry is a culturally responsive approach to creating new knowledges as it fosters reflexivity, amplifies student voices, and encourages students to share their lived experiences while seeking social justice.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-06-05T07:19:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176104
       
  • Writing Through Pain: Ars Spirituality, the Black Atlantic, and the
           Paradox of Diasporic Belongingness

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      Authors: A. Lamont Williams
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      By way of autoethnographic poetry, I reflect on my personal struggles related to racial consciousness as I embarked on a journey—from America, across the Atlantic, and eventually, to the Indian Ocean off the East Coast of (mother) Africa. The story of my apparent racial crisis is viewed through multiple lenses, as I infuse the pivotal readings of The Black Atlantic, Lose Your Mother, The Collected Poems of Langston Hughes, and personal experiences both in autoethnographic and in poetic form.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-06-05T07:14:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176096
       
  • Entangling Reciprocity With the Relational in Narrative Inquiry

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      Authors: Bodil H. Blix, Jean Clandinin, Pamela Steeves, Vera Caine
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we develop, through drawing forward fragments of our experiences, a concept of reciprocity as always situated within the relational ontology of narrative inquiry. Reciprocity is most commonly understood within a transactional sense, an exchange of goods. We show important aspects of reciprocity in narrative inquiry, including the importance of intentionally creating and responding to spaces where reciprocity occurs and can be sustained over time and place, and the potential reciprocity holds to change who we, and those with whom we work, are. As we reconsider the ways in which reciprocity is not understood as a transaction in a relational methodology, new questions about the entanglement of reciprocity and recognition emerge. We understand that recognition does not necessarily have to be reciprocal, but recognition is necessary to compose a space where reciprocity can live in our ordinary interactions with others.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-06-05T07:05:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231172227
       
  • Nine Women: Collages of Spirit-Collages of Self

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      Authors: Indrani Margolin, Abbey Jones
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Collaging invites the twists and turns of meaning-making and insight. This Reflexive Inquiry illuminates the collages of nine artist women and celebrates the potency of harnessing Creative Consciousness through meditation, collaging, and dialogue. We aim for balance between juxtaposing evocative imagery, poetic rendering, responding with creative critical social justice understanding, and humility in this undertaking to evoke feeling and insight. The metaphor of the canoe crossing the river illustrates this journey. The fiercely powerful women in this inquiry were provided a pathway to heal from internalized injustices, empower themselves to take positive action, and discover a harmonized state from within.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-06-03T08:13:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176103
       
  • Salsa Rhythms and Soul Connections

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      Authors: Rebecca J. Lloyd, Stephen J. Smith
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      The rhythmic interplay of accent, tempo, and musical mood is expressed in the bodily postures, gestures, and expressions of attuned responsiveness in Salsa Dura, a genre of salsa music from the 1970s featuring improvisational dance solos. These dancers embrace the feelings and flows of soloing musicians going off and breaking free from any predictable form and structure. We inquire into how world-class salsa dancers and educators feel themselves moved by such intricate rhythms to experience soul connections. Video recordings and interviews yield insight into the call and response dynamics of this essentially tactful practice of alterity.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-06-03T07:14:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176094
       
  • Impossible Perfection: A Storytelling Reflection

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      Authors: Thomas W. Gretton, Anna Farello, Thomas O. Minkler, Jasmine Caya, David W. Eccles
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This storytelling reflection article presents the psychological preparation of elite Rugby Union referees in the buildup to competition through a creative nonfiction story. Based on data from 15 individual referee interviews, we present referee experiences of psychological preparation through a co-created, creative nonfiction story titled Impossible Perfection. The primary aim of this article is to contribute to understanding about the lived experiences of refereeing at the elite level and in particular the role of psychological preparation in elite referee performance, by showcasing Impossible Perfection in full. Second, we present research team reflections on the key themes woven throughout Impossible Perfection and elaborate on what these themes may communicate about the experiences of elite referees. Finally, we comment on the utility of creative nonfiction as a method and reflect on its efficacy for investigating elite referees.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-06-02T11:26:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176763
       
  • Fleshing Out the Embodied Potentialities of Positionality

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      Authors: Sandeep Kaur Glover
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Through this pulsating textual exploration, I viscerally uncover the potentialities of positionality and reflexivity in the context of research and pedagogical practice by tending to the emergent tensions of my own lived/living body. I weave in and out of the interstitial intimacies of embodied, performative, and living inquiries in situating myself amid my multi-identities and social locations to unearth how embodied arts-based approaches cultivate sensorial, cultural, and critical consciousness and invite multidimensional representations of human experience that transgress fixed dichotomies of insider/outsider status in qualitative research. This sensorial inquiry dwells in the in-between sites of breath and bone, ambiguity, and paradox, to reveal how embodied arts-integrated inquiries offer transformative possibilities for (re)humanization, healing, and social justice in arts-based and qualitative research and educational practice.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-06-02T11:21:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176100
       
  • The Art of Data Analysis: Disturbing Knowledge and Performing Critical
           Inquiry

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      Authors: Mirna Carranza
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Using theater and performance, the building of “We are not the Others” brought into discussion—How does the researcher ethically “code” data to re-present the stories of Women Immigrants who are understood as the Other to achieve the social justice goals' This article explores these questions and asks, “What is the purpose and politics of an embodied performance of/by the Other for White audiences'” These questions framed the processes of creating the re-telling of stories and were integral to the ethical engagement of audiences in a way that drew them in, to understand their own implications.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-06-02T11:16:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176282
       
  • Research With Marginalized Communities: Reflections on Engaging Roma Women
           in Northern England

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      Authors: Lydia Hubbard, Michael Hardman, Olivia Race, Maria Palmai, Gyula Vamosi
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article critically explores research with marginalized communities. We provide an insight into our work with the Roma community, reflecting on innovation, opportunities, and barriers, alongside the need for more work in this area. A particular focus here surrounds novel methodologies for exploring the health and well-being of such groups and ways of co-producing research. This article also raises awareness around arts-based social prescribing with marginalized communities and the need to upscale work in this regard. Through doing so, we hope to influence practice, raise awareness around work with the Roma community and enable more creativity within the broader field.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-05-30T08:28:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176770
       
  • Reintegration as Border Pedagogy: A Female Text

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      Authors: Lorie C. Wright
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Adult literacy learners often survive on the periphery while holding burdens of invisible barriers. In this article, I explore the border between those in the mainstream and those seeking reintegration and community. Finding resonance with artography, I resist methodological enclosure just as the individuals I work with resist the boundaries that attempt to define them. Emboldened by critical arts-based research, I employ artography to examine my experiences as an adult literacy facilitator supporting formerly incarcerated women. Through metaphorical, poetic, and artful inquiry, I explore a border pedagogy, reaching for a shift in consciousness. Understanding borders as the barrier that separates formerly incarcerated learners from mainstream community, I have attempted a pulling of threads to unravel and then re-stitch an understanding (of) the lines that (no longer) blindly hem us in.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-05-27T08:05:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176087
       
  • Online Interviews as New Methodological Normalcy and a Space of Ethics: An
           Autoethnographic Investigation into Covid-19 Educational Research

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      Authors: Hongming Fan, Bingqing Li, Truly Pasaribu, Raqib Chowdhury
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Worldwide travel restrictions during the Covid-19 pandemic abruptly changed the norms of conducting qualitative research. Online interviews, long regarded as a second choice to their offline counterparts, are no longer seen as supplementary since they emerged as the dominant mode of data collection during the pandemic. This study employs an autoethnographic approach to investigate the authors’ experiences of adjusting to alternative methodological approaches. The investigation critically reflects on how the author’s agencies in allocating and gathering instructional, social, and economic resources led to a researcher identity reconfigured by choices in making ethical commitment in data collection. This article also sheds light on how the authors, constrained by limited resources, gained better understanding of ethics in practice through negotiation with participants and obtained rich data by exercising their agencies. The article argues that researchers need to place both online and offline methods on equal footing to facilitate a more ethically sensitive approach to data collection.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-05-26T11:06:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176283
       
  • Emergence: (Un)Common Intervention

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      Authors: Malvika Agarwal, Sandra Poczobut
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Emergence: (Un)common Intervention is a video that introduces a multimodal, interdisciplinary, and sensory art installation created by the artists, educators, and PhD students Malvika Agarwal and Sandra Poczobut. The composite of moving images and photos portray various iterations of the installation. The video captures a sensory aspect of the art, which reflects on the role of emergence and intra-action in engendering embodied reflexivity as a way to advance socially just pedagogies. It serves as an invitation for educators, students, and artists to consider collective processes of embodied reflexivity in their work through artistic undertakings in education.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-05-26T06:49:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176273
       
  • Teddy’s Loquats

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      Authors: Janette Graetz Simmonds
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this narrative poem, the author reflects on the passing of a personal childhood era in seeking food for lunch on school days.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-05-24T12:54:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176761
       
  • Competition and Collaboration in Higher Education: An (Auto)Ethnographic
           Poetic Inquiry

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      Authors: Áine McAllister, Nicole Brown
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Higher education is in flux with more precarity, a stronger focus on effectiveness, and productivity having resulted in a competitive and hostile culture. For this article, we take a proactive approach to counteract the narrative of silencing by exploring the opportunities collaboration may afford. Drawing on our personal experiences, professional knowledge, and research, we engaged in a collaborative form of poetic inquiry. Our contribution in this article lies with the links we make between collaboration, creativity through autoethnographic poetic inquiry, and translanguaging. This approach constitutes a model for collaboration which counteracts the silencing impact of the contemporary competitive academic culture.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-05-24T12:52:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176278
       
  • An Upwell Near Father’s Day and Some Thoughts on Embodied
           Reflexivity

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      Authors: David W. Jardine
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article interweaves recent personal, embodied, often deeply emotional events regarding kin and rivers and memory with reflections on how inquiry into such things summons up mixed and contested ancestors and the joyous, sometimes-painful, difficult task of working through such things in the art of writing.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-05-24T12:50:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176090
       
  • Every Seashell Is a Story

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      Authors: Ellyn Lyle
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Living and being with/in education is messy work because we are necessarily products of the worlds we inhabit. Photopoetic inquiry helps us navigate the messiness by drawing us into images where we might contemplate the accompanying text while writing our way into new understandings. This intertextuality explicitly encourages the integration of self and subject and reveals what is hidden while concurrently encouraging us to let go of rigid constructs that limit us. Thinking here of Bill Pinar’s self-shattering and emancipatory reaggregation, I wonder in the attached video how consciousness of lived and living curriculum can help us engage with empathy and understanding when we encounter realities not our own. In opening up these spaces for critical consciousness, photopoetic inquiry cultivates social conscience and becomes central to our pursuit of rehumanizing praxis.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-05-24T11:10:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176093
       
  • Merging Eco-Literacy, Visual Poetry, and Arts-Informed Practices: A
           Curriculum of Eco-Justice Education

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      Authors: Andrejs Kulnieks
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Writing poetry over finger-paintings that are created with natural dyes is an embodied reflexive practice that can help students connect with ideas about eco-justice as they develop a deeper relationship with the Earth. As Kimmerer (2013) explains, “The exchange between plants and people has shaped the evolutionary history of both” (p. 124). Writing practices also shape who we are becoming. Through the creation of visual poetry, I investigate the importance of engaging with language and landscapes to develop relationships with one another.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-05-24T11:07:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176105
       
  • The Gift of Loss: A Rhizomatic Connection Journey

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      Authors: Christine L. Cho
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this piece, I explore how embodied reflexivity stop moments, juxtaposed with the photographic f-stop, inform the various stages of my creative process. Through deconstruction, fragmentation, and reconstruction of my images, I work to navigate and embrace loss to reconnect with myself as artist/daughter. Through the lens of my father’s camera, I engage in a form of relational consciousness: hearing his voice guide my composition and technical approach to my images and then freeing my consciousness to create on a more visceral level using the interdisciplinary approaches that are the foundation of my art making. I detail how my process became a form of conversation through the lens as well as a rhizomatic healing journey. Throughout, I question how dominant society regulates and controls how and what we grieve, who is grieved, and I advance the idea that grief and loss should be embraced as a gift.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-05-20T11:29:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176097
       
  • Ethics Beyond the Checklist: Fruitful Dilemmas Before, During, and After
           Data Collection

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      Authors: Maja Nordtug, Marit Haldar
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we aim to contribute to current discussions about ethical conduct in qualitative research practice. We provide examples of how ethics is a recurring issue throughout a research process and not just an issue to safeguard procedurally. The examples on which we build our argument are based on three research projects from two countries, namely, Norway and Denmark, focusing on three different groups, namely, the elderly, parents, and children. Through our analyses of these ethical dilemmas, we aim to provide reflections on dilemmas encountered in three different qualitative research projects at three different stages, specifically before, during, and after data collection. We thus provide a way for researchers to frame their work with ethical dilemmas as a continuous process beyond the checklist. Furthermore, we frame complex ethical dilemmas as something not to avoid but as a continuous part of a fruitful analytical process.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-05-19T05:52:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176088
       
  • Scribbling Toward Utopia

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      Authors: Graham Francis Badley
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      I first invoke Joan Didion’s essay “Slouching Towards Jerusalem.” Her concern was to move away from the dystopia that parts of the United States had become through drug use and other temptations toward a more utopian state. My attempt uses a number of examples where utopias have been imagined and some where the main lesson is cautionary rather than optimistic. Even Sir Thomas More’s Utopia had its faults while the East German vision of a socialist utopia collapsed into tyranny and farce. My scribbles are modest attempts to promote a just society, a kind of utopia—maybe.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-05-19T05:44:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231165465
       
  • Con Artist: Non-Cosplay Participation at Popular Culture Conventions as an
           Arts-Based Method of Inquiring Into Resistance and the Undoing of Rules

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      Authors: M’Balia Thomas
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      I conduct an inquiry into my participation as an African American woman at two popular culture conventions, the 2017 Dragon Con (Atlanta) and the 2018 annual general meeting of the Jane Austen Society of North America (Kansas City). Through a methodological approach to Con-ing—attending a popular culture convention—as arts-based inquiry and utilizing techniques of autoethnography, I inquire into my participation in spaces that, while intended to be havens of adult play, reproduce and reinforce discourses and material practices that can limit the play and participation of marginalized Others.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-05-18T12:04:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176095
       
  • In Motion: An Adaptation of Enriched and Inclusive Audio Description
           Practices

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      Authors: Carolina Bergonzoni
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In Motion is an audio-described video piece that applies techniques from audio-described museum tours. The piece, sound recording, and audio description were done by the author, allowing for an enriched audio description, which combines the practice of verbally describing images with sound recordings and personal insights from the author/describer. I propose that audio description (AD) can advance social justice since it can only exist if it includes disability justice and provides an opportunity for embodied reflexivity through art-based practices. In Motion is representative of how accessibility can be part of the creative process and not an afterthought. It also shows how audio description can advance social and disability justice.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-05-18T11:55:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176092
       
  • Relational Ethics Through the Flesh: Considerations for an Anti-Colonial
           Future in Art Education

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      Authors: Nicole Rallis, Shannon Leddy, Rita L. Irwin
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we reflect on our teaching practices that include the development of an artist-in-residency program in one teacher education course and one graduate course in the Fall of 2022 at The University of British Columbia. During these residencies, Carrier Wit’at artist and printmaker Whess Harman and Indigenous scholar and a/r/tographer Jocelyne Robinson of the Algonquin Timiskaming First Nation demonstrate through their art practices how love and land are central tenets to relational ethics. We engage with Cherrie Moraga and Gloria Anzaldua’s theory in the flesh alongside the artists-in-residencies as we consider an anti-colonial future in art education. We propose the concept of relational ethics through the flesh as a reflexive, embodied, social justice–oriented way of being in the world.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-05-18T11:53:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231176091
       
  • Haecceity Altercation: Thisness as Pedagogy

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      Authors: David A. G. Clarke
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      I write into the haecceity of recent events in and around my teaching in environmental education to explore the concept of thisness as pedagogy.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-05-04T06:23:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231172224
       
  • The And Article: Collage as Research Method

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      Authors: Victoria de Rijke
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In 1994, Denzin and Lincoln suggested an immediate future for qualitative research, very akin to collage. This article begins by examining a seminal early collage work by Kurt Schwitters and ends with an example of the author’s own meta-collage as a means of exploring the model as both a “borderlands epistemology,” an art form, and a research practice. Claims for collage’s potential for rich data collection plus iterative, inclusive, critical practice are made, as with that of bringing the “unthought known” using synecdoche and serendipity to the surface, championing arts-based, “And” methods.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-04-28T11:53:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231165983
       
  • Rewriting Social Science: The Literary Turn in Qualitative Research

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      Authors: Martyn Hammersley
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In the past few decades, there have been efforts to transform qualitative inquiry, drawing on resources from both imaginative literature and art. There have long been tensions within social science that have encouraged the use of these resources, but the recent “literary turn” is more radical. The assumptions underpinning it are examined, and it is argued that what is most important is the purpose for which modes of expression are employed and how well they serve this. The problem with the literary turn is that it frequently involves substitution of the purposes of art or politics for those of social science.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-04-24T12:31:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231165981
       
  • Potential and Pitfalls: Settler Scholar Engagement in Indigenous Research

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      Authors: Sarah Panofsky, Lisa Hartwick, Marla J. Buchanan
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the potential and pitfalls of approaching Indigenous research as settler scholars in an attempt to redress the intergenerational damage of colonization on Indigenous culture and to contribute to a process of healing. We consider Indigenous historical trauma and survivance, and their intersections with Western psychological models and Western research paradigms. We then work with the principles of Indigenous Storywork (Archibald, 2008) to consider our own complex engagement in Indigenous research to bring to light how a profound commitment to relational ways of knowing and being are required elements of culturally appropriate and culturally safe psychological research.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-03-29T04:54:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231163537
       
  • Heroic Coding: A New Method for Apocalyptic Scenarios

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      Authors: Diego Palacios-Díaz, Herman Moreno-Londoño
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article aims to describe a new coding and data analysis method for qualitative researchers, especially in education and health inquiry. We label this method Heroic Coding, a proposal for understanding the role of education and health personnel in apocalyptic scenarios. We propose this method as a subtype within Literature and Language Coding methods described in Saldaña’s The Coding Manual for Qualitative Researchers. Heroic Coding employs, in the first cycle coding, an eclectic strategy and, in the second cycle, an elaborative strategy to refine conceptual dimensions about heroes and heroic subjectivities. This article uses a data set from empirical research in education policy enactments to illustrate Heroic Coding in action. Furthermore, we reflect on future possibilities and limitations of this coding method for qualitative research in apocalyptic conditions.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-03-21T10:33:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231162071
       
  • Dangerous Liaisons in the Wasteland' A Found Document

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      Authors: Martyn Hammersley
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-02-18T12:00:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004231155866
       
  • Longing for Home or Promising of One: A Found Poem Exploration of Young
           Female Migrant’s Experiences of Displacement—Voices From Sweden

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      Authors: Mostafa Hosseini
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Poetry can fulfill different purposes—it can be therapeutic, a testimony, or a rebellious expression of injustice. This article presents a thematic found poem exploration, of six Afghan female migrants, aged 19 to 24. They arrived in Sweden between 2013 and 2016. I have translated the interviews verbatim from Dari to Swedish and finally into English. The following poems reflect a period of my participants’ lives related to the complexity of uprootedness, nostalgia, and their struggles of in-betweenness and belonging. In addition, it also reflects their hope, aspirations, and commitments of remaking home and rebuilding life.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2023-02-02T11:30:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221150011
       
 
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School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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