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Qualitative Inquiry
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.691
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 31  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1077-8004 - ISSN (Online) 1552-7565
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • Ghost Writings

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      Authors: Sheridan Linnell
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Three interlocutors; three deaths; more than three stories that multiply, entangle and unwind. Illness, suicide, voluntary euthanasia, and the slippages in between. Turning to other-than-human beings. Becoming a mistress of ceremonies. Embracing a methodology of sighs. Throwing us into that place where we matter to each other—where everything matters even as it falls away.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-11-17T08:15:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221135408
       
  • The Abject Swearing at the Figure of the Stranger

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      Authors: Dave Yan
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this autoethnographic poetry, I express my sense of Ulysses syndrome, reflecting upon the past 12 years since I left my motherland—China. In reading Ahmed’s work, the human “I” is conceptualized as the “the stranger,” reminiscent of the foreignness of the past, longing for an imagined life that he would live in. Yet, Kristeva’s pathologizing label of abjection horrifies its own existence of the human “I,” who cannot remember its youth and beauty, becoming an embodied Other. In his dreams, the abject “I” utters flights of poetry at the stranger by asking—how migration can be experienced as anything other than complication with all the mess, tension, and conflict it brings. In bringing the concept of abjection, it problematizes my understanding of be(com)ing the “figure of the stranger,” transforming the humanness that the human “I” represents in its wake.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-11-17T08:08:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221135398
       
  • In the Depths: Synergies Between the Doctoral Experience and Life in Hong
           Kong

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      Authors: Alexandra Ridgway
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      The process of gaining a PhD does not occur in isolation; it is situated within and against the contexts doctoral students find themselves in at any given time. Through sharing three diary entries penned in the depths of my PhD in Hong Kong in 2017, I highlight the interconnections between particularly memorable events and junctures within my doctoral journey. In so doing, I reveal the importance of journaling for identifying the echoes between personal and graduate school experiences to understand the complex terrain of doctoral life.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-11-17T08:03:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221135157
       
  • Variations of I: Setting the Poetic Tone for Student-Voiced Action
           Research

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      Authors: Adrian Schoone, Judy Bruce, Eileen Piggot-Irvine, Hana Turner-Adams
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we explore how the poetic rendering of an initial focus group transcript with five secondary school students in an alternative education setting in Aotearoa, New Zealand, set the tone for an entire action research. Each year, approximately 3,500 secondary school students are referred to alternative education provisions due to suspensions, exclusions, and truancy. Two-thirds of these students are rangatahi Māori (Māori young people). Alternative education teachers, however, know little about their students’ schooling histories. Using participatory action research, teachers explored critical moments from young people’s education journeys. Found poems created from the first focus group with students, including the creation of I poems, set the tone for action research. These poems exposed more widely the twofold I-Thou/I-It attitude that has shaped the students’ lived experiences, and as a response, researchers gave heed to I-Thou as they shaped the research approach.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-11-17T07:28:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221135136
       
  • Nothing Personal: An Anti-Asian Hate Crime

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      Authors: Vicky Wong
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This autoethnography reflects the author’s devastation and recovery after being victimized by a stranger amid a surge of racist and anti-Asian attacks during the pandemic. Triggers and images impact her mental health which highlights her need for professional trauma therapy. During healing, she discovers how leaching images and triggers can spark fear and anxiety. The author lives the irony of both a culture of campaigns against anti-Asian racism and a culture of violence targeting Asians. Overall, the autoethnography provides a deeper sense of the social and cultural issues involved in the post-traumatic effects of anti-Asian racist incidents.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-11-11T11:17:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221131025
       
  • Is There Quality in Qualitative Research'

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      Authors: Martyn Hammersley
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-11-08T01:17:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221135146
       
  • A Good Name: Pseudonyms in Research

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      Authors: Maria K. E. Lahman, Rowen Thomas, Eric D. Teman
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      People’s names and the places, animals, and items named by people are deeply personal and reflective of their culture and identity, yet in qualitative research, the standard is to use pseudonyms. This practice is thought to protect research participants, but when are “real” names most respectful and appropriate' How might researchers include research participants in these considerations' The purpose of this methodological article is to increase transparency and collaboration around the participant naming process, bringing much-needed attention to issues of power in the naming process in research. The authors review the literature and detail their reflexive engagement with pseudonyms; they advance issues for consideration and provide recommendations in the areas of power in participant naming, culturally responsive research, and pseudonym use with trans people and incarcerated people. Throughout the article, the authors interrupt the text with reflexive narrative interludes to share personal experiences with naming.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-11-08T01:15:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221134088
       
  • Hope Inquiry: Vital Moves From the Gut in the Middle Cut Together

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      Authors: Judith Guevarra Enriquez
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this encounter, I move in the middle of things, more specifically of other texts not my own for I did not bring them into being or strung them in their word order as you do. They are borrowed and yet they get and feel me. I attend to the doings of hope and not so much its what-ness or aboutness. I propose a hope inquiry that begins in the middle. Its inquiry does not ask what it really means or a getting into the bottom of things. There is no bottom, just the middle bits. Its question is an invitation to ponder and fold into at least three dance moves: (a) to attend to the not-yet-ness of things, places and possibilities; (b) to rest in presence, fully stuck in the here and now; and (c) to find returns, detours, and dead-ends with deep intent. Hope is an inward movement—a reconnection to one’s gut—our body-middle.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-11-03T12:33:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221134085
       
  • Toward a Practice of Qualitative Methodological Literature Reviewing

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      Authors: Darcy E. Furlong, Jessica Nina Lester
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      There is consensus around the value of conducting literature reviews across disciplines; however, little attention has been given to the potential(s) of engaging in a qualitative methodological literature review (QMLR). This article examines the possibilities of engaging in a QMLR by showing how it can inform qualitative research practice. After overviewing the history of literature reviews, we offer a series of questions that can inform and be integrated into a QMLR. We then demonstrate how such reviews can serve as an opportunity for qualitative inquirers to critically engage with the methodological literature with the intent of better understanding, enacting, and generating new methodological practices.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-10-31T01:46:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221131028
       
  • Higher Education in the Time of Trump and Beyond: Resistance and Critique

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      Authors: Marc Spooner
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      The current Qualitative Inquiry partial special issue titled “Higher Education in the Time of Trump and Beyond: Resistance and Critique” is based on a similarly themed plenary panel that was to take place at the International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry in 2020. Alas, like so many other events, it was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-10-20T01:09:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221131018
       
  • Autoethnography as Practice and Process: Toward an Honest Appraisal'

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      Authors: Graham Francis Badley
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, I attempt a contribution to “honest conversations” about the writing practices and processes of autoethnographers. My attempt may or may not be useful to those who judge their own autoethnographic writing as messy or even embarrassing.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-10-14T01:13:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221126702
       
  • (Navigating-Circling-Un/Doing)~Post-Qualitative Inquiry: A Collective
           Biography

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      Authors: Maureen A. Flint, Paul W. Eaton, Laura E. Smithers
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this collective biography, we follow the question: What does it do to think~post' We navigate~circle~un/do the entanglements of institutional and disciplinary boundaries and researcher identities, increasing striations of post-thinking within qualitative inquiry, teaching practices, ethics, and becoming. Our data include personal journals, crafts and collages, collective writing, dialogues, and images from a conference session where we engaged participants in our thinking. Our memory work enacts post-qualitative becomings, opening space for questioning and reflecting (&&&), undoing and unfolding individual subjectivities, and examining the vulnerabilities, tensions, and possibilities of becoming~post.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-10-13T05:06:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221126699
       
  • Ethical Principles, Social Harm and the Economic Relations of Research:
           Negotiating Ethics Committee Requirements and Community Expectations in
           Ethnographic Research in Rural Malawi

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      Authors: Nicola Ansell, Evance Mwathunga, Flora Hajdu, Elsbeth Robson, Thandie Hlabana, Lorraine van Blerk, Roeland Hemsteede
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Conventional research ethics focus on avoidance of harm to individual participants through measures to ensure informed consent. In long-term ethnographic research projects involving multiple actors, however, a wider concept of harm is needed. We apply the criminological concept of social harm, which focuses on harm produced through and affecting wider social relations, to a research project that we undertook in Malawi. Through this, we show how structural economic inequalities shape the consequences of research for the differently positioned parties involved. Specifically, we focus on dilemmas around transferring resources within three social fields: our relations with a Malawian ethics committee; our interventions in a rural community; and our efforts to engage the policy community. Each of these involved multiple and differently placed individuals within broader, multi-scalar structural relations and reveals the inadequacies of conventional codes of ethics.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-10-13T04:53:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221124631
       
  • Naturing With Big Data: How Writing Creation Myths Can Matter

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      Authors: Mihye An
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article draws on Barad’s posthumanist ethics of mattering as an alternative methodology to qualitative research with big data while foregrounding writing as mattering. Big data is outlined as linguistic matter to be understood in relational materiality and subjectivity. I then discuss writing in light of mattering from multiple angles. To illustrate, I present an example of a course in which students wrote their own creation myths in an affirmative manner by navigating a corpus of 80 existing ones. The final section sketches what an ethics of naturing with big data might be about.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-10-05T12:06:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221126701
       
  • Slippery Inquiry: Engaging With the Vague and Half-Glimpsed

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      Authors: Eva Pallesen
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, I inquire into the unsure, half-glimpsed kind of experiences, which tend to be excluded from analytical processes and research publications. Based on process thinkers, I argue that in these slippery moments, we are most open to movement, and hence to the other as other. I suggest that we have the capacity to engage with these moments through a loosened but highly focused mode of inquiry—akin to how we bodily respond to the solicitations of the environment when we walk, dance, or skate. By stressing the vague and half-glimpsed, I join others in questioning the academic norm of valuable knowledge as that which is fully illuminated, fully present, and clearly seen in radiant daylight. By pursuing the slippery research experience, I aim to contribute to the emerging stream on doing differently in the academy, including also re-doing academic traditions of writing.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-10-01T07:19:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221126705
       
  • Community Members as Fieldwork Guides in Disaster Settings: Ethics of Care
           Through a Relational Methodology of Empathy and Trust

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      Authors: Adeeba Hakkim
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This reflexive account of fieldwork with disaster-affected communities in Kerala, India, recounts the researcher’s engagement with positionality and ethics. A participatory method was adopted—enlisting local field guides who mediated the researcher’s interactions with participants. Apart from offering pragmatic solutions for accessing participants, the method enhanced the researcher’s contextual/cultural insight, and facilitated a relationship of trust. The researcher-guide dynamic is explored as a co-constructing and relational method that minimizes harm and maximizes benefit for participants. Ethics of care is elucidated as a practicable ethical framework for thinking and doing disaster research, illustrated with reference to the present method.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-09-28T12:52:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221126704
       
  • Grading Writing: A Poetic (Auto) Ethnography

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      Authors: Justin Nicholes, Alison Lukowski, Cody Reimer
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Grading has long been the source of negative emotions in Writing Studies for teachers and students alike; these negative emotions and experiences especially affect women-identifying professors and professors of color. This poetic research study presents the found poems of writing instructors in one predominantly White Midwest US university English department; poems came from restories from participants’ interviews about how they developed as assessors of writing. The aim is to foreground lived experiences of college professors who teach undergraduate writing for a living as the field continues to explore ethical and humane ways of assessment for all involved.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-09-28T07:31:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221124070
       
  • “What Do You Think Needs to be Done to Address Self-Harm'”:
           Centering the Perspectives of Youth Who Engage in Self-Harm Through Found
           Poetry

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      Authors: Michael R. Riquino, Sarah E. Reese, Jen K. Molloy, Van L. Nguyen, Emera Greenwood, Olivia LaFountain, Amber Cavasos, Megan S. Paceley, Sarah Jen, Briana McGeough
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In recent years, suicide and nonsuicidal self-injury researchers and practitioners have identified the need to amplify the lived experiences of individuals who experience and engage in self-injurious thoughts and behaviors in research and clinical practice (hereinafter referred to as “self-harm” to honor the words used by the youth who participated in this study). In the present study, we sought the wisdom and perspectives of youth who engage in self-harm in response to the following questions: What do you think needs to be done to address self-harm' What would you say to parents of youth who engage in self-harm' What would you say to other youth who are engaging in self-harm' Utilizing data from in-depth interviews (N = 59), we constructed a series of three found research poems to center their words and perspectives in answer to each of the research questions.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-09-20T11:27:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221124629
       
  • Betweener: A Bricolage Poem

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      Authors: Timothy Matthew Lee Sutton
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Inspired by Diversi & Moreira’s Betweener Talk and Betweener Autoethnographies, I employ poetic inquiry to sketch a nonessentialist position for research in the spaces between. My poetry is archival and it is poem-ish. Using repetition, I attempt to break through binary thinking, while simultaneously illustrating the difficulty in doing so. I seek possibility and potential in the twilit space of both/and rather than either/or. In-between spaces can be precarious, a source of uncertainty and fear, yet hope can also be found there.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-09-17T05:31:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221123959
       
  • Re(membering) and Re(claiming) in My Mama’s Kitchen: A Decolonial
           Feminist Video-Cued Qi Ethnography

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      Authors: Eleanor Xiaoxiao Mehta
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, I draw upon Endarkened Feminist Epistemology (Dillard, 2012) and Decolonial Feminist Research (Rhee, 2020) to explore the epistemology of my mother, a first-generation Chinese immigrant. Based on data generated from the video-cued qi ethnography methodology, I pay attention to my Mama’s ways of knowing as she cooks in the kitchen. Qi is a Chinese concept that means breath, spirit, and life force. I draw on qi as the ongoing connectivity toward wholeness and movement toward harmony in the way I collected and analyzed data. I share my findings as a series of interconnected poetry, images, and narratives to (re)member my mother’s life as well as mine as we re(claim) what we have forgotten and re(turn) to a place of wholeness. I conclude the article by exploring the implications for the Asian American Pacific Islander community and beyond, as we conduct the work of collective rememory.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-09-16T10:29:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221122314
       
  • Dancing the Data: A Duo-Ethnographic Exploration Toward Dialogic
           Reflexivity in Qualitative Data Analysis

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      Authors: Kristen M. Snyder, Elizabeth F. Turesky
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Qualitative researchers continue to push methodological boundaries to study social phenomena using arts-based practices. Research methodologists suggest that the arts open new possibilities in research through the very nature of the arts to stimulate and evoke perspectives. The arts promote dialogue, which yields new insights, highlights multiple meanings, and questions norm-based traditions. This article presents findings from a duo-ethnography to explore the application of the arts as a dialogic-reflexive process during the data analysis phase in qualitative research. Findings contribute with insights into how science and culture are combined methodologically to facilitate dialogic-reflexivity in research and meaning-making.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-09-16T10:26:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221118687
       
  • Communal Conversations: Black Women World-Making Through Mentorship

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      Authors: Nicole M. Brown, Ruby Mendenhall
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article focuses on the mentoring relationships Black women create and develop. The authors highlight how mentoring is communal and the ways these relationships serve to connect communities of Black women as resources of support. The article illuminates the generative power of Black women’s mentoring relationships to create alternate realities that make the academy more accessible, supportive, and beneficial for Black women. Black women engage in these mentoring relationships as acts of resistance by fighting to make space for their voices to be heard. As members of marginalized communities and outsiders within the academy, the article utilizes conversation as a method of inquiry, to share a curated exchange between the co-authors, Nicole M. Brown and Ruby Mendenhall, discussing the evolution of their decade’s long mentoring relationship.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-09-16T09:13:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221124015
       
  • The Cost of Living: An Autoethnography

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      Authors: Donna F. Henson
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This autoethnographic piece reflects on the cost of living and loving in this beautiful and broken, “crisis ordinary” world. In the interplay of the creative and critical, lyrical and liminal, I write on the human imperative to find heart in a hopeless place. I find inspiration in the poetry of Czelaw Milosz and kindness in communication and, in so doing, advocate for the small nothings that bring us solace and personal preservation in the face of big wicked problems and distant-witnessed disaster.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-09-16T09:02:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221124005
       
  • Thinking With Perplexities in the Context of Social Inclusion, Refugees,
           and Schools: Methodological Learnings

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      Authors: Jennifer Dodd, Sean Lessard, Vera Caine, Kathy Toogood, Jean Clandinin
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we explore the ideas of thinking with perplexity. We draw on Addams (1902) understanding of perplexity that is interwoven with ethics. Through turning toward a research study alongside teachers who engage with refugee students in a Canadian kindergarten classroom, we make visible how a turn toward perplexity disrupts our taken for granted knowing and holds open the possibilities for growth. Drawing on field texts, conversations, and reflective notes, we compose story fragments to unpack our understandings of perplexities.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-09-07T06:36:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221122360
       
  • Poststructuralism and Post Qualitative Inquiry: What Can and Must Be
           Thought

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      Authors: Elizabeth Adams St. Pierre
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      St. Pierre argues that the immanent concepts and onto-epistemological arrangements of scholars we call poststructural, postmodern, posthuman, and other “posts” do not enable preexisting, conventional, humanist 20th-century social science research methodologies that are not immanent. For that reason, scholars are now inventing and teaching new approaches to inquiry based on old philosophies of immanence in which those methodologies cannot be thought or done.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-09-07T06:34:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221122282
       
  • Audio Postcard

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      Authors: Peter Joseph Gloviczki
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      I write autoethnographically to explore Joni Mitchell’s return to the stage after a prolonged absence. In doing so, I aim to consider what it means to be present at a distance in the digital moment. I hope this work encourages others on their respective paths.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T11:04:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221122334
       
  • Post Philosophies and the Doing of Inquiry: Webinars and WEBing Sessions
           Become a Special Issue(s)

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      Authors: Candace R. Kuby, Vivienne Bozalek
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this guest co-editors’ introduction to the special issue(s) titled “Post Philosophies and the Doing of Inquiry,” the authors share the backstory to the webinar series, information about the webinars and how to locate the recordings, and how WEBing sessions with our (former) students came from the webinar series. A list of articles and article titles for the special issue(s) are also included.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T08:19:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221122288
       
  • Blair Performing as Orwell Performing as . . .

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      Authors: Graham Francis Badley
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this narrative, I identify seven main roles which Eric Arthur Blair performs throughout his life. Blair-Orwell is shown as enacting or faking or impersonating such characters in his own life-drama as Class Warrior, Imperial Policeman, Autoethnographer, Womaniser, Soldier, Socialist, and Political Writer.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-09-02T09:28:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221114128
       
  • Two Truths and a Lie: An Ethnodramatic Exploration of Resistance and
           Relationships Between Women in Our Current Political and Social Climate

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      Authors: Carmen Meyers
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In 2021, I created the verbatim documentary play, Two Truths and a Lie, to address how verbatim documentary theatre can serve as a springboard for dialogue regarding perceived truths around the 2016 and 2020 elections. This new verbatim documentary interlaces my connection with three of the conservative women I interviewed in 2019 around their response to “What are your thoughts about the 2020 election'” and incorporating the game, Two Truths and a Lie, to engage audience discussion around bias and perceived truth. The play emerged from a ten-day playwright retreat at The Hundredth Hill Artist Residency and was performed in Bloomington, Indiana, in the summer of 2021. This article aims to unpack and chronicle my experience in creating and performing this new work by narrowing in on the project’s methodology with excerpts from the script, performance and (in)-show discussion reflections, and future outcomes.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-09-02T09:27:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221114126
       
  • Reimagining the Politics of Belonging Through Counterstorytelling: A
           Decolonial Praxis of Refusal and Desire

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      Authors: Urmitapa Dutta
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, I trace landscapes of decolonial inquiry centered on two questions: What is the work of decolonial inquiry' What are the imperatives of researchers committed to decolonial work' I engage with these questions from my relationally rooted place in solidarity with communities at the frontline of decolonial struggles in Northeast India. Adopting a multimodal counterstorytelling approach, I narrate two imperatives of decolonial inquiry: rooting and remembrance and theorizing from struggle, driven by an ethos of desire and refusal. Across these endeavors, I strive to reimagine a radical politics of belonging that transgresses colonially configured nation state borders.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-09-01T11:48:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221118690
       
  • Brown Boxes: An Autoethnographic Exploration of Cultural Identity and
           Fluid Positionality

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      Authors: Sarah Shandie Mohammed
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Through personal vignettes, the author explores how racial, religious, and citizenship aspects of cultural identity shift in meaning both across the lifespan and across borders. The author evokes tension and growth in the vignettes to communicate a felt understanding of the emotional implications of colonial displacement, offering an opportunity for readers to resonate with the diasporic experience. The author further calls for social scientists to reframe positionality as a persistent reflexive process that is as fluid and dynamic as we are (rather than a methods section feature) and similarly reframe diversity to find new ways to relate to one another.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-09-01T11:46:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221118688
       
  • AsianCrit and Autoethnography: A Future-Focussed Fugue of Critical
           Collaborative Inquiry

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      Authors: Aaron Teo
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the considerable influence of the “Asian Century” on Australian Government policy and the purported centrality of Asia to Australian national identity, the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic has simultaneously highlighted and intensified the deleterious impacts of anti-Asian racism. Specifically, Orientalist discourses and a “fear of invasion” that underpin the differential racialized treatment of the Asian diaspora in Australia have manifested in both old and new racisms that have had significant impacts on the mental and physical wellbeing of Asian Australians. In response to this crisis, this autoethnographic paper acknowledges the growing methodological complexity of Critical Race Theory and advances a novel, future-focussed Asian Australian social justice agenda in solidarity with other racialized minorities by interrogating the collaborative potential of Asian Critical Race Theory (AsianCrit) and Autoethnography through an investigation of their respective theoretical and methodological intersections.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-08-30T07:14:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221118692
       
  • Embracing Vulnerability: The Critical Practice of Reflexivity as a
           Non-Pacific Researcher Using Indigenous Methodologies

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      Authors: Suzie Schuster
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article focuses on the challenges I have encountered during my PhD journey regarding positionality and the complexities of being an insider–outsider researcher. I am originally from the global North, living in the global South and conducting research with communities in Samoa, my home of 30 years, though geographically located in New Zealand due to border closures. This autoethnographic reflection elaborates the complexities of being both an insider and outsider engaging in research focused on competitive swimming in Samoa, using Pacific methodology of talanoa. The article aims to highlight my competing identities and how I negotiated these within the data collection process. It concludes that it is necessary for non-Pasifika researchers to be cautious if using indigenous methods as there are ever-changing dynamics within cross-cultural fieldwork that requires adopting an intentional vulnerability within the research space.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T07:05:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221116099
       
  • Things That Tell: An Object-Centered Methodology for Restorying
           Women’s Longing and Belonging

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      Authors: Fee Mozeley, Sara Kianga Judge, Debbi Long, Jodie McGregor, Naomi Wild, Jay Johnston
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Developments in qualitative research methods recognize the benefits of working with material objects to evoke memories, stories, and reflections on specific topics. Through engagement with materialist theory and methods, our research demonstrates that more than simply eliciting storied responses, self-chosen material objects can in fact co-tell stories in novel ways. This article draws on our storied experiences as a group of women who took part in a four-day residential storying retreat. Our qualitatively driven research employed a range of multi-modal methodologies; however, this article focuses on a particular method that involved co-telling personal stories with the aid of self-selected objects. This method embodies the emotive and co-constitutive power, relational materiality, and reflective potency of object-centered storying. The article builds on and extends qualitative methodologies that value more-than-rational ways of researching.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-08-13T05:44:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221114125
       
  • A Visual Representation of Kalpaka Bulvāris in Riga, Latvia Following
           the Invasion of Ukraine

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      Authors: Courtney Queen, Brian Benfer
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Russia launched an unprovoked full-scale invasion of the sovereign country of Ukraine. This movement was historic as people around the world watched the events unfold, and before our eyes, the world watched a country be destroyed and civilians lose their homes, schools, hospitals, and lives. The invasion on February 24, 2022, was particularly emotional feeling incredibly close to home in countries like Latvia that also lost its independence in a similar manner just generations before. This is the visual representation of the events by the people of Latvia for the people of Ukraine during the first 2 weeks following the invasion.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-08-06T05:17:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221114129
       
  • “Complicated” Grief

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      Authors: Katherine Ludwin
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In an autoethnographic journey through two losses that occurred months apart, I explore my own sense of disbelief, pain, shock, and horror while accompanying each of my parents through their final months of illness that were anything but peaceful and calm. In a twin set of poems, the pieces problematize the pathologizing label of “complicated” grief by asking how—and if—loss can be experienced as anything other than complicated with all the mess, tension, and conflict it brings.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-08-06T05:14:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221114127
       
  • Longing as Method: A Rant on Yearnings for Our World, Academia, and
           Utopian Futurities Beyond Liberalism(s)

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      Authors: Lisbeth A. Berbary, Lauren A. Mohamed
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Together we found ourselves discussing current moments of racialized formations, pandemic practices, academic policing, equity projects (equity, diversity, and inclusion [EDI] initiatives), and our use, among it all. We were “formulating [our] critique of the ways that social justice movements have felt, and where [our] longing for something else was strongest.” This article, therefore, used longing as method for unearthing those embodied yearnings that arose within us against discontents, empty promises, and institutional lackings toward useful questionings, hope-full cravings, and progressive desires for more just futurities for our world(s), academies, and utopias beyond. In conversation with various radical thinkactors, this rant traces our longings as method for considering something otherwise. We begin with, and continually revisit, a question triggered by our readings of Ahmed: what is our use'
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T06:33:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221111379
       
  • Homecoming With Culturally Situated Philosophies of Being in Qualitative
           Inquiry

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      Authors: Kakali Bhattacharya
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, I enact moves of homecoming in which I reclaim knowledge that I had forgotten or never known. Drawing on wisdom traditions from my heritage, I discuss how I inform my philosophies of inquiry that are de/colonial, Par/Des(i), and transnational. I move between dreamspaces built by utopian desires and the materiality of our existence, connecting absurdity and nonsense as modes of inquiry and as critiques of and relief from multiply interconnected structures of oppression. Tracing back to a children’s literature author in British-occupied India, I use the notions of absurdity and nonsense to reimagine qualitative research from a justice-oriented perspective. I conclude with my chosen exile from the postqualitative labeling of qualitative research to focus on ways of being that are culturally situated, relational, and justice informed.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-07-26T09:09:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221111378
       
  • Preparing for the Research Ceremony: Indigenist Researcher Training

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      Authors: Margaret Hughes, Shawn Wilson, Stuart Barlo
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Preparing ourselves for the ceremony of research is akin to preparing ourselves to be in good relationship with Knowledge, and with whoever else participates in the research, including other human beings, more than human beings, and Country. In this article, I talk about the practice of cultivating the values and skills that make for good relationships, both as a researcher in training and through the mentoring relationships with my PhD supervisors. It is my hope that sharing my experience as a PhD student traversing this training and mentoring journey may support others preparing for research within a relational methodology. Throughout the conversation, I come back to the importance of cultivating and practicing the principles of respect, receptivity, generosity, humility, compassion, and care, and building the skills of attention, deep listening, and service.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-07-21T11:48:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221111381
       
  • Deploying the Line to Study Young Adults’ Material-Discursive Identity
           Work and Its Slippery-Sticky Attachments to Developmentalism: A
           Diffractive Analysis

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      Authors: Kelly Clark/Keefe, Kelly Mancini Becker, Erika R. White
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article shares what surfaced during diffractive analysis of data from a participatory arts-engaged research project called Life Lines. Drawing on material feminism, studio-inquiry practices were designed to assist young adults in creatively speculating alongside researchers over varied conceptualizations of identity, including dominant explanations centering on cognitive development and alternative framings emphasizing materiality’s role in subjective formation. Lines as both culturally inscriptive “engines of theory” and as materially sensitive artistic inquiry practices were enlisted to open new insights about how it is for young adult bodies to sustain developmentalism’s “cruel optimism” about coherence, stability, and progression.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-07-21T11:47:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221111373
       
  • The Return: Research-Based Theater With and for Ex-Military Personnel
           Experiencing Posttraumatic Stress

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      Authors: Michael Balfour, Linda Hassall
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article discusses The Return, a research-based theater project about posttraumatic stress, performed by actors and ex-military personnel. The objective of the project was to address the stigma of mental health in the military and encourage psychological help-seeking in the veteran and military population. The play combined verbatim text and dramaturgical re-authoring of material to explore the lived realities of mental health experiences of posttraumatic stress (PTS) in the military. Part of the ethical entanglements encountered lay in calibrating the risk–safety nexus, specifically in relation to questions of authenticity, narrative structure, decisions relating to casting actors and ex-military personnel, and how to negotiate the performance of a personal story of trauma. The article argues that performance is innately a process governed by “edgework” as much as safety, and therefore part of the ethical entanglement lies in the negotiations between risky aesthetics, “safe” spaces, and frameworks that enable critical vulnerability.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-07-21T11:45:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221101587
       
  • Hope for the Twin Cities: Poetic Reflections Amid Systemic Racism

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      Authors: Megan Butala, J. Scott Baker
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article is an example of how one preservice teacher utilizes poetry as a platform to convey emotion over time. Through reflection— retrospective and prospective—the following poetic triptych examines the past, present, and possible selves of one future educator and her hopes of beginning a teaching career, amid amplified visibility of systemic racism afflicting the Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN metroplex since the murder of George Floyd and subsequent racial strife in the community. Providing poetry as an avenue to discuss emotions of crises and stressors facing society—in teacher education and elsewhere—allows for in-depth self-reflexivity, essential to articulating emotional health and well-being.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-07-14T09:45:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221111375
       
  • Brother’s Room

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      Authors: Janette Graetz Simmonds
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      The memory of inhabiting the room of a departed brother is explored in this narrative poem.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-07-14T09:43:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221107331
       
  • Post Philosophies and the Doing of Inquiry Session 6: A conversation
           Between Erin Manning, Halbe Kuipers, Mayra Morales, and Diego Gil

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      Authors: Erin Manning
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article is derived from a webinar series conversation titled “Post Philosophies and the Doing of Inquiry.”How does your philosophical approach influence your ways of doing inquiry' What does this philosophical approach make thinkable or possible for inquiry'What are your perspectives on methodology(ies) and/or methods'How do you envision that in your approaches to doing inquiry'What mechanisms could be put in place at universities to help supervisors and/or committees support students engaged in philosophical modes of inquiry.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-07-14T09:38:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221106762
       
  • Diffracting Boundaries: Toward Post-Philosophies of Quantification and the
           Black Radical Tradition

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      Authors: Ezekiel Dixon-Román, Arlene Fernandez, Julian Quiros, Nicole Sansone
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article is derived from a webinar series conversation titled, “Post Philosophies and the Doing of Inquiry” co-hosted by Candace R. Kuby and Viv Bozalek. Featured in this conversation is Ezekiel Dixon-Román and he discusses some of the backgrounds to his scholarship and how he has come to his questions and approach of inquiry on/in quantification and the Black radical tradition. He and his students discuss their respective projects and the interventions they are making in the technologies and practices of quantification through their engagement with critical theory, Black radical thought, new materialisms, cybernetics, and media studies.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-07-12T05:12:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221101595
       
  • Ambulant Methods and Rebel Becomings: Reanimating Language in
           Post-Qualitative Inquiry

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      Authors: Maggie MacLure
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Language has been at the core of humanism, as a pre-eminently human capacity—the primary resource through which the world is mediated. What has/will become of language in the post-human turn' And what are the implications for post-qualitative method'
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-07-07T07:08:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221106756
       
  • The Sound of Social Studies Job Searches: The Possibilities of Posthuman
           Listening

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      Authors: Morgan Paige Tate
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This poetic inquiry was produced by a posthuman sound and listening of audio from a focus group of social studies education pre-service teachers. The (re)listening allowed me to hear the relation between social studies education, patriarchy, and sports. This inquiry attends to the potestas, or limiting forces, heard in the audio, and it reflects on the potentia, a generative force, of posthuman sound and listening as an opening to learn more about forces that affect pre-service social studies educators as they enter the field of teaching, while avoiding the field of football.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T05:41:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221107329
       
  • Preparing Future Scholars in Repressive Times

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      Authors: Kathryn Roulston, Amy E. Stich
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      The need for qualitative research that facilitates understanding of the social world is imperative as people around the globe encounter political, economic, environmental, health, and social crises. Higher education presses for preparing scholars to be creative, collaborative, and productive to examine these problems. In increasingly repressive contexts, the preparation of new scholars entails envisioning post-capitalist approaches to attend to how to live and work in the academy. This article uses concepts from Braidotti’s critical posthumanism and Lefebvre’s work on rhythmanalysis to imagine post-capitalist approaches to preparing future qualitative scholars for work in the neoliberal institution.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T11:12:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221103220
       
  • Three Refrains: Jumps in the Assemblage

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      Authors: Gabriel Edgardo Soler Santibanez
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article aims to explore the three types of refrain proposed by Deleuze and Guattari through Writing as Inquiry. I explore some memories of my childhood in a dictatorship, then the process of a breakup when I was at university, and the beginning of a mental health crisis. In this exploration, I reflect on the loss of my uncle, the role of songs in my life, and the changes in my territory through these difficult times. All of this is under the umbrella of the three refrains.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T11:11:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221103219
       
  • Landing Sites, Cities, and Nonplaces: Collaborating Across the Conference
           Circuit

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      Authors: Elizabeth de Freitas, Nathalie Sinclair
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article keeps tuned to the ritual of scholarly gathering, an activity continued somewhat differently today in the online meeting. We aim to speak to current concerns about place and belonging under new climatic and digital regimes. We pose the question, “What will be the spatial logic and shape of scholarly collaboration after lockdown and ‘zoomtopia’'” The article recounts our decade-long collaboration and is structured around 10 sketches of singular meetings—intensive encounters—where we met for 3 to 5 days and developed various theories about form, space, number, affect, body and the imagination.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T11:10:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221101592
       
  • Touching Text: Feeling My Way Through Research-Creation

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      Authors: Nike Romano
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores how artistic research practice, as a thinking through art, generates different understandings of the world. Having come to higher education through my visual arts practice, I trace threads of thinking-making practices that, while seeded in the studio, continue to generate new connections and concepts that in/form my PhD inquiry into different ways of learning in South African Higher Education contexts. Guided by Manning’s conceptualization of research-creation as an ecology of practices operative within the interstices of making and thinking, I show how artmaking as an intuitive process nudges my thinking through-and-around concerns obliquely, attuned toward different registers and levels of intensities, cutting across normative accounts of what it means to know. Referring to two bodies of my work, sum of the parts (2010) and Evidence of Things Unseen (2014), the article shows how materiality and making conjugate new languages that give expression to the ineffable obscured in the name of Science and Fine Art. Exploring the diffractive entanglements of thinking-making practices in the “between” of writing and drawing, the article shows how writing-with, drawing-with, doodling-with, and scrawling-with activate and agitate the spaces between words and images and do inquiry differently.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T11:08:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221099565
       
  • A Landscape of Ethics in Research-Based Theater: Staging Lives of Family
           Members Who Have Passed

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      Authors: Graham W. Lea, George Belliveau
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Blending academic and theatrical worlds in research-based theater (RbT) requires balancing academic demands of institutionalized research and aesthetic demands of theater. This duality becomes particularly significant regarding ethics. With so much possibility, it becomes imperative for practitioners to share, and learn from, vulnerable and challenging ethical experiences. This creates landscapes of ethical possibilities for RbT and guideposts for navigating them, established by the field, highlighting well-worn paths, pointing out pitfalls, and noting where few have yet to trod. Contributing to this cartography, we consider ethical questions encountered during development and production of three RbT projects involving family members who have passed: Homa Bay Memories, Brothers, and Unload. In doing so, we question which stories might be best left untold and the evolution of relationships throughout the research. Exploring these together helps to develop a landscape of ethical possibilities and establish guideposts to help illuminate challenges for future RbT projects.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T10:18:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221098991
       
  • Chasing Charms as Concept

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      Authors: Amber Ward
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This lived approach to inquiry is situated in transcendental empiricism through, what Deleuze called, a sensibility of creating and becoming; the inquiry also chases charms as concept. I have invented the concept charms to help re-orient thought through a relational journey at the threshold of apprehension when naming it a concept. Nearly a dozen letters addressed to a Critical Studies scholar grapple with and question charms as concept—oftentimes in connection with other philosophical concepts. The inquiry lends itself to an immanent ontology when reading with poststructural philosophy, writing with and listening to the Critical Studies scholar, walking with a psychoanalytic scholar, and revising with two manuscript reviewers. It also invites readers to consider what and who they are entangled with/in and how those relations might encourage lived inquiry through a sensibility of creating and becoming.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T06:44:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221095505
       
  • The Subjectification of Black Engineering Educators: A Posthumanist
           Cartography

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      Authors: Siddique Motala, Khaled M. Abo-Al-Ez, Marco Adonis
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      We are three Black engineering educators in South Africa who are inspired by the work of Ezekiel Dixon-Román and Eve Tuck. We critique several so-called “universal truths” that are apparent in engineering education from a posthumanist standpoint and focus on the subjectification of Black engineering academics. We draw a cartography of engineering education, to show how subjectivities are influenced by powerful agencies. The cartography gives an idea of the potestas that is exerted upon educators as a result of historical forces. We then give an idea of the potentia that is possible through micro-instances of activism.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-17T04:30:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221099570
       
  • Positioning and the Thick Tangles of Spacetimemattering

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      Authors: Bronwyn Davies
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This paper re-turns to the concept of positioning, and to the thick tangles of spacetimemattering as they were at work in the paper “Positioning: the discursive production of selves” by Davies & Harré, published in 1990. In re-turning to the concept of positioning, and to its analysis, this paper asks what matters in scholarly work, and how it contributes to gendered, colonial relations of power. The paper explores the impact of the spacetimes scholars work in, on their thinking-in-being.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-15T11:38:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221103218
       
  • Road Trips and Guideposts: Identifying and Navigating Ethical Tensions in
           Research-Based Theater

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      Authors: Jennica Nichols, Susan M Cox, Marilys Guillemin
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Research-based Theater (RbT) combines research and theater to create novel opportunities for inquiry and knowledge translation. Ethical tensions are part of this process. We explore some tensions that can emerge through three types of ethics: professional ethics, institutional research ethics, and everyday ethics. We then propose a series of ethical guideposts developed by engaging RbT practitioners in reflecting on their practice. Like signs on a highway, ethical guideposts do not mandate a destination but rather flag that an approaching decision needs consideration. These guideposts seek to encourage greater attention to ethical aspects of RbT projects and to support ethical decision-making.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-15T11:36:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221099972
       
  • Iktomi Methodology

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      Authors: Chance White Eyes
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This essay responds to narrative analysis and other Indigenous Methodology skeptics who question the legitimacy of storytelling, oral tradition, and narrative analysis as legitimate forms of data and research. Iktomi Methodology (named after a Lakota character in oral tradition) is not only decolonizing, but is forward thinking, not only documenting what has happened in the past, but what could potentially happen in the future. Iktomi Methodology uses Tribal Critical Theory to legitimize Indigenous storytelling as valid forms of data and analysis of how to treat Indigenous students. The essay then uses a version of narrative analysis that incorporates a specific Native American character that arises often in stories on how to behave when it comes to dealing with challenges, “Iktomi” becomes the vessel through which educators can question current policy and practices to think differently about supporting Indigenous students in postsecondary education.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-15T11:26:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221099563
       
  • Participatory Relationships Matter: Doctoral Students Traversing the
           Academy

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      Authors: Veronica Mitchell, Susan Gredley, Lieve Carette
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we take our thoughts for a walk through our three different doctoral journeys and experiences with the Post Philosophies and the Doing of Inquiry Webinar Series (2020–2021). The webinars presented an example of Slow scholarship, enabling us to think deeply and differently from others and develop new ideas to take further. The online connections offered opportunities for extending learning spaces beyond traditional bounded structures. Here we explore the rich learning gained from each other’s experiences of research, learning, and teaching in different higher education settings and ways in which these intersected with the webinars during the global COVID-19 pandemic. We contend that the generosity of senior academics in leadership positions who embraced global networks of communication, connected students with experts, and learned with and from their students through communal egalitarian spaces has enormous potential to support students as they traverse often demanding and challenging doctoral journeys.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T12:04:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221101591
       
  • Spiderly Sympoiesis: Tensegral Tentacularity and Speculative Clews

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      Authors: Erin Kindlund Price, Adrienne van Eeden-Wharton
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      With Spider(s) as our guide, we tentatively prod and turn felt concepts of situatedness and entanglement; stickiness and attachment; plasticity and pliability; precarity, uncertainty, and leaps of vulnerability. Inspired by multitudinal spiderly threads, we turn to spinning—not as a rote practice, self-serving tidy manipulation or fabrication, but rather as a working-with-world in care-full tending and continual creation of a supportive mesh. The figure of the web allows a transdisciplinary, heterogeneous, and generative weaving-together through which to gather seemingly disparate theoretical threads, not only to consider Spider(s) anew but also to spin-with as a performative thinking-with in scholarly becomings. We follow and carry with us many Æffective encounters with tentacular companions and sticky traces. In Æsthetic (re)turning, we find value in the space for attentive, collaborative tending and response with/in the tensions of inquiry in a more-than-academic world.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T02:03:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221099566
       
  • Pursuing the Post Philosophical New: Taking Our Thoughts for a Walk

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      Authors: Oona Fontanella-Nothom, Denise Newfield
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      We meditate on and talk/write about issues that arose for us during the Post Philosophy series, specifically engaging with a topic entangled within each presentation, “the new.” Quandaries that emerged for us include the post philosophical raison d’être for the new, the possibility and nature of the post philosophical new, and its ethical, ontological, and epistemological consequences. Taking the form of conversation, we provide tracings of our collaboration, with its multiple, complex plug-in points, hauntological connections, and missed calibrations—an agencement set in motion by this series as a minor gesture and fueled by our thinking-with the work of the presenters.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T09:20:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221099969
       
  • An Empiricist Manifesto

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      Authors: Martyn Hammersley
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      A call to empiricists to rise up and reclaim reality.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T09:17:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221101602
       
  • Decolonizing the Literature Review: A Relational Approach

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      Authors: Lauren Tynan, Michelle Bishop
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      As two (ab)Original women, we consider how a relational approach to the literature review can reflect our broader Indigenous and decolonizing research methodologies. In our research training, we have been exposed to dominant literature review models that advocate for researchers to “identify the gaps” and “occupy a territory,” a process (and vernacular) that feels at odds with Indigenous, relational, and decolonizing principles. We intend to apply the teachings we have learned from Indigenous scholars to the literature review process by proposing a reframing of the literature review, to one that is relational.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T09:05:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221101594
       
  • Romance, Relationships, and Rights: Ethical Considerations and Dilemmas in
           a Research-Based Theater Project With Self-Advocate Co-Creators and Actors
           

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      Authors: Leyton Schnellert, Leah Tidey, Rachelle Hole
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are often excluded from conversations about sexual health; when included, well-meaning researchers and support workers often speak for individuals instead of creating opportunities for their voices to be heard. To support the sexual agency of people with intellectual disabilities, who refer to themselves as self-advocates (SAs), we embarked on a Research-based Theater (RbT) project, Romance, Relationships, and Rights, with the goal to address misconceptions of individuals with IDD and sexuality. Throughout the project, ethical tensions percolated from ableist assumptions about “legal capacity,” consent both on and off stage, and conflicting perspectives on aesthetics. Throughout this article, we discuss these ethical dilemmas and offer recommendations for future work with SAs in co-creating RbT through the lens of disability justice and critical disability studies.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T09:03:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221101586
       
  • Engagement, Authenticity, and Advocacy in “Youth Uncensored”: Ethics
           in Applied Theater Research With Street-Involved Youth

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      Authors: Diane Conrad
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      “Youth Uncensored” was an applied theater project with youth affiliated with an arts-based, nonprofit organization serving street-involved youth. The organization identified the need to educate service providers about the youth’s experiences to better meet youth’s needs. The youth were involved in all aspects of the process of creating workshops for service providers, from generating content for our scenes to devising, rehearsing, and performing scenes for service provider audiences, and participating in forum theater activations, in talk-back sessions, and in evaluating the project. For an evaluation of outcomes for youth, the youth created a 30-min video exploring the projects’ benefits and challenges. Through a close reading of the video, this article addresses the ethical issues that arose in relation to engagement, authenticity, and advocacy. Our ongoing efforts at negotiating this ethical terrain were crucial for the endurance and efficacy of the project.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T09:00:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221099567
       
  • Yarning Up Relations: Enacting a Relational Ethics in Cross-Cultural
           Research-Based Theater

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      Authors: Sarah Woodland, Kamarra Bell-Wykes, Carissa Lee Godwin
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This is a reflection on The Score, a Research-Based Theater (RbT) project that has just begun, and some emerging ethical entanglements surrounding the work. The Score is a collaboration between First Nations and non-Indigenous artists and researchers, produced by ILBIJERRI Theatre Company—a leading First Nations theater company based in Melbourne, Australia. The goal is to create a community-engaged, participatory model for theater in health education that addresses sexual health for First Nations young people, to be delivered in schools, prisons, community centers and community health settings. Drawing on Indigenous and applied theater research methods, our article situates the discussion of ethics in RbT within the concept of relationality. Through a process of yarning (discussion), we explore the complexity of relations within the project and how relationality infuses all aspects of the project design. We argue that this approach is essential in ensuring respectful, accountable, and decolonial theater-research praxis.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T08:57:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221099561
       
  • No Bull Here, Please: Ethical Demands and Expectations of Audiences

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      Authors: Christine Sinclair, John O’Toole
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article is based on a 2007 conference presentation that used Research-Based Theater (RbT) to identify and articulate the ethical questions facing playmakers and audiences, not to provide answers, but to challenge the participants to address them. The authors pose issues of purpose, power, ownership, permission, and audience participation, addressing ethical problems of RbT for performers, audiences, and informants. In the second part of the article, the authors refer readers to the literature to further explore how these issues have been addressed in a range of contexts worldwide . . . and the further questions they raise.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T08:53:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221099559
       
  • Theory-Practicing in Critical Times: Viv Bozalek in Conversation With
           Kathrin Thiele, Deirdre M. Donoghue, and Pınar Türer

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      Authors: Kathrin Thiele, Deirdre M. Donoghue, Pınar Türer
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article is derived from a webinar series conversation titled, “Post Philosophies and the Doing of Inquiry,” co-hosted by Candace R. Kuby and Viv Bozalek. The webinar sessions ran from August 2020 to September 2021. This webinar series was made possible by a research collaborative partnership between the University of Missouri System in the United States and the University of the Western Cape (or UWC) in Cape Town, South Africa. The session with Kathrin Thiele took place in April 2021 and the following article is the transcribed conversation with Kathrin Thiele, also including contributions by Deirdre Donoghue and Pınar Türer.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T08:43:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221099568
       
  • “Don’t I Have a Say'”: A Critical Autoethnography on Choice and
           Essentiality-of-Being

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      Authors: Christopher B. Williams
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this autoethnography, I reflect on the last 72-hours of telephonic experiences with my godmother’s decision to live or die before entering a nursing facility. “Don’t I have a say” is a broader critical reflection about older adults’ lack of personal choices with regard to their health care without advance directives and the caregiver’s best interest decision-making approach. The central ideas in this autoethnography illuminate choice theory and the essentiality of being. From my godmother’s point of view, choice theory and essentiality of being highlight the need for her “owning” her health care decision. From my perspective, choice theory offers new perspectives and solutions to best interest decision-making as a potential caregiver. While in the final hours of my godmother’s life, she “owned” the decision; however, years later, I am still processing what happens when a person wills death to have the final say.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T11:23:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221099974
       
  • The Seven Ages of an Academic Man' (First)

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      Authors: Graham Francis Badley
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      I use headings from Shakespeare’s Seven Ages of Man speech to structure a narrative about an academic’s progress through his own seven ages.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T11:17:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221099562
       
  • Wading the Quagmire: Aesthetics and Ethics in Verbatim Theater Act 1

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      Authors: Wolfgang Vachon, Joe Salvatore
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      The authors draw on their collective decades of theater creating and viewing to expose how they navigate the innumerable ethical and aesthetic enmeshments of verbatim theater. Mirroring the realms in which each writer works, Wading the Quagmire is an edited and manipulated refraction of conversations between the two authors presented through a script-based structure. Each author discusses, describes, and defends their approach, drawing on salient moments from their theater practice, sharing entanglements, and reflecting on the learnings of practice. In the end, the authors resist ethical prescriptions, while identifying the tight rules they work within and the consequences of breaking them.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T11:03:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221098988
       
  • Ethical Implications of Using Research-Based Theater to Challenge
           Hegemonic Narratives About Mental Health

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      Authors: Lauren Spring
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Many health researchers have started to see the benefits of partnering with playwrights to use theater as a tool to analyze and present complex findings. Such projects about mental health, however, remain few and far between and are especially fraught. This article argues that research-based theater can be an ideal tool for exploring and sharing counter-hegemonic “mad stories”—especially if the plays created can help interrupt, among other things, problematic biomedical narratives about individualized approaches to supporting those who are suffering. This article also incorporates excerpts from the script the author wrote as part of her doctoral thesis project about military trauma to highlight how, guided by mad theory and mad aesthetics, she has creatively woven some of the weightiest ethical conundrums encountered during the research and development process into the play itself, so that, their nuance and magnitude become a critical component of the story being presented.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T11:01:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221097638
       
  • On Generative and Generational Interlinkages and Intersections:
           Interdisciplinarity in Humanities, Culture, and Art

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      Authors: Iris van der Tuin, Amy Pekal
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This interview looks critically at how the humanities do not just study works of culture but work together with artists. Within the practice of a truly interdisciplinary approach, “artistic research” finds its way into the discussion as it operates at the intersection of many disciplines and as its transversal qualities continuously produce excess to maintain complexity within the given research context. These positions implicate us as researchers in culture and we work with as well as reflect on how these cultures always/already have an impact on our research, teaching, and learning.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T10:59:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221097628
       
  • Inquiry as Unthought: The Emergence of Thinking Otherwise

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      Authors: Lisa A. Mazzei, Alecia Y. Jackson
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article is derived from a webinar series conversation titled “Post Philosophies and the Doing of Inquiry,” co-hosted by Candace R. Kuby and Viv Bozalek. This article is based on a conversation that the authors had, facilitated by Candace Kuby, on November 19, 2020.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T10:53:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221096854
       
  • Ethical Engagement and Relational Materialism: A Dialogue

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      Authors: Aaron M. Kuntz, Michelle Wooten
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article is derived from a webinar series conversation titled, “Post Philosophies and the Doing of Inquiry.” During the webinar panelists were asked to respond to four questions:1. How does your philosophical approach influence your ways of doing inquiry'2. What does this philosophical approach make thinkable or possible for inquiry'3. What are your perspectives on methodology(ies) and/or methods' How do you envision that in your approaches to doing inquiry'4. What mechanisms could be put in place at universities to help supervisors and/or committees support students doing post philosophy inspired ways of inquiring'
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T05:31:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221097054
       
  • Undisciplined: Research-Creation and What It May Offer (Traditional)
           Qualitative Research Methods

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      Authors: Sarah E. Truman
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      As part of the Post Philosophies and the Doing of Inquiry interview series, Sarah E. Truman discusses research-creation at the intersection of arts, theory, and research, and what it may offer traditional qualitative research. Truman gives a theoretical orientation and talks through some research events as exemplifications.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T12:54:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221098380
       
  • Relational and Aesthetic Accountability: Considerations of a
           Research-Based Playwright

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      Authors: Julia Gray
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Research-based Theater (RbT) is shaped by both the form of theater, as an embodied, gestural, spatial, imaginative multi-dimensional art form, and traditions of research surrounding knowledge production, specifically qualitative research. When ethical tensions and questions arise in RbT they are often framed as a dichotomy, such as the ways aesthetic or artistic interests of creating a compelling piece of theater for audiences contrast with responsibilities to research. By drawing on the frame of an aesthetic of relationality, and an example from my work as an RbT playwright from the project Cracked: new light on dementia, I consider the ways both theater and research might be more clearly aligned. This includes how relational and aesthetic accountabilities can offer an important foundation for considering how RbT might be rooted in caring practices and might influence theater-making and the traditions of scientific research more broadly.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T12:51:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221098203
       
  • Through a Glass Brightly: Generative Ethical Tensions in Research-Based
           Theatre

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      Authors: Amir Michalovich, Yael Mayer, Laen Avraham Dov Hershler, Laura Yvonne Bulk, Christina Cook, Hila Graf, Michael Lee, George Belliveau, Tal Jarus
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This qualitative case study methodically explores ethical tensions that arose in the Research-based Theatre (RbT) project, Alone in the Ring (AitR), as a case. We borrowed Elliot Eisner’s set of tensions in Arts-Based Research (ABR), exploring the extent to which they manifested as ethical tensions in AitR. Following analysis of in-depth interviews with key project members, we identified five areas of ethical tension in AitR, adapting Eisner’s framework to account for the ethical dimensions of the tensions, their generative quality, and their temporal and social dimensions, as they manifested in AitR. Complicating Eisner’s general tensions for ABR, this article advances an adapted, RbT-specific framework with meta-language to reflect on the ethical terrain of RbT using the richness and specificity afforded by a case study. The framework is particularly useful for RbT practitioners seeking to maximize the benefits of RbT for knowledge translation, arts-based inquiry, and community engagement.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T12:46:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221097677
       
  • Ethics in Research-Based Theater: Why Stories Matter

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      Authors: Susan Cox, Marilys Guillemin, Jennica Nichols, Monica Prendergast
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T12:43:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221097641
       
  • Research-Based Theater in the Pediatric Oncology Setting: Balancing
           Ethical Tensions

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      Authors: Paul Robert D’Alessandro
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Research-based theater (RbT) in health care and medical education settings generates unique ethical discourses, particularly when involving pediatric patients. Ed’s Story: The Dragon Chronicles (Ed’s Story) is a verbatim play based on the journal of a teenaged oncology patient, and 25 interviews conducted after his death with his family and multidisciplinary health professional team. The development, dissemination, and evaluation of Ed’s Story will be retrospectively analyzed in order to highlight and discuss ethical tensions, with specific focus on tensions related to participants, including Ed and the interviewees; RbT practitioners and researchers; and audiences, namely, medical trainees who participated in mandatory curriculum viewing. Where applicable, similar projects described in the literature will be reviewed in order to highlight strategies to mitigate these tensions.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-05-31T08:38:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221097637
       
  • Writing-With a Parasite Dis/Coloring One’s Skin: Toward Inquiries of
           Change

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      Authors: Francois Jonker
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, I explore the potential emerging from writing-with a parasite (Pityriasis Versicolor) living on my skin at the time of writing. My parasite and I respond to the invitation to engage with Sarah Truman’s techniques for thinking about research-creation and Aaron M. Kuntz’s conception of methodological parrhesia. Together, we co-parasite (through para-citation, perhaps'), jointly and diffractively between the pages of Truman and Kuntz so as to experiment with our own situated entanglement and intra-actions with the process of inquiry by asking: how might we engage inquiry, not as a mode of static and distanced observation but as a process of change attuned to our own material intermingling' We do so by posing questions about emergence: (a) How might we activate the productive tensions between situated knowledges and the notion of emergence' (2) How might we engage the ever-emergent material-relational dimension of inquiry through an in-actment of “middling”' (c) How might we conceive of inquiry as the practice of parrhesia—a mode of care-full truth-making with-in emergence'
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-05-31T08:30:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221096848
       
  • Creating Openings for Co-Theorizing

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      Authors: Fikile Nxumalo, Eve Tuck
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article is derived from a webinar series conversation titled, “Post Philosophies and the Doing of Inquiry.” During the webinar sessions the panelists, Dr. Fikile Nxumalo and Dr. Eve Tuck, discussed the ways in which their philosophical orientations contribute to how they enact inquiry as co-theorizing.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-05-31T08:24:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221095053
       
  • Out at School: Imagining a Slow Ethic of Care in Research-Based Theater

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      Authors: Bishop Owis, Pamela Baer, Jenny Salisbury, Tara Goldstein
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article invites us to reconsider how we engage in ethical tensions and decision-making with the stories we are gifted as artist-researchers. Using a verbatim theater piece titled Out at School, we explore three moments of discomfort and growth that moved our collective approach toward a slow ethic of care. Within three ethical moments of dissonance, we investigate how to navigate a slow ethic of care in a project that is iterative and constantly shifting within and against our social and political world. By moving away from the desire for resolution, we argue for a process that understands the need to sit within ethical tensions as a way to commit to an ongoing slow ethic of care. We discuss our process, production, and performance as an invitation to critically reflect on ethical practices in research-based theater and reimagine ways to call in and move forward.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T06:14:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221097633
       
  • Research-Based Theater in Schools: Ethical Challenges, Conundrums, and
           Choices

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      Authors: Richard Johnson Sallis
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article focuses on the ethical challenges which may arise when a research-based theater (RbT) project is undertaken with students in a school or in another educational setting. It focuses on three case studies where I worked as an RbT practitioner with students in a single-sex boys’ school and Pre-Service Teachers (PSTs) in a Master of Teaching program. For over 15 years, I have worked as an RbT practitioner, and I have developed a set of ethical principles pertaining to the writing and the performance of the RbT piece. I discuss in this article that even with such ethical principles in place, unforeseen critical incidents of an ethical nature may arise in an RbT project that may lead the RbT practitioner to reappraise the effectiveness of these principles in their work.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T05:22:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221098201
       
  • The Pull of Opposing Forces: An Inquiry Into the Ethical Dimensions of an
           Emergent Research-Based Theatre Project

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      Authors: Dorothy Morrissey
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, the author conducts a retrospective interrogation of the ethical issues embedded in the development (over a 5-year period) of a one-woman play, Goldilocks’s Testimony, about the accumulation over time of the organizational processes and practices that marginalize women in workplaces. She describes the play’s developmental trajectory, from conception through to the final performance to date as a serendipitous one. In the article, she explores many of the ethical issues that emerged over the course of this trajectory, some of which became apparent only in hindsight. In her exploration, she attends explicitly to the many opposing forces she negotiated over the lifetime of the project.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T05:14:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221097059
       
  • “Trajectories Matter”: Affect, Neuroqueerness, and Music
           Research-Creation in an Early Childhood Classroom

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      Authors: David Ben Shannon
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, the author considers his ongoing experience as a PhD student to argue for the significance of “trajectory” toward doctoral and early career research. He suggests that his background in special education shapes his methodology (critical disability studies), his research-creation praxis, and his approach to theory. He exemplifies this through two research-creation projects: Neuroqueer(ing) Noise, which was an in-school project in an early childhood classroom, and Oblique Curiosities, which is an ongoing composition project. The author then offers four propositions for doctoral students interested in drawing from “post philosophies.” This article is of relevance to postgraduate students interested in post philosophies, research-creation, or arts-based early childhood educational research.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T11:52:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221096844
       
  • Perhaps I am Still Waiting for Godot'

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      Authors: Graham Francis Badley
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this narrative, I use notions from Beckett’s Waiting for Godot to help me reflect on concerns about uncertainty, identity, the advantages and disadvantages of waiting, as well as the strange invention of Godot himself (or her-self).
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-04-22T11:07:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221090647
       
  • Performing Orwell in Progress

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      Authors: Norman Conti
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This piece was written, memorized, ripped-up, forgotten, improvised, and rewritten in collaboration with returning citizens, police officers, actors, faculty, students, and other chosen family in the Spring semester of 2021. The work was undertaken within an iteration of Roger Guenveur Smith’s Phi Beta Kappa course Performing History/Biography in Progress, co-facilitated by Susan Stein, that had been blended with a version of the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program originally designed for police recruits and incarcerated citizens. Running in a pandemic, during the trial of the former police officer who murdered George Floyd and in the wake of the January 6th insurrection the course became a dialogic exchange in autoethnography where people separated by severe social boundaries could meet in the Zoom platform’s electronic box and overcome social distance.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-03-26T03:43:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221087782
       
  • Common—Reading—Placing—Writing

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      Authors: Graham Francis Badley
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      I create here another sort-of-life text, a narrative in which I suggest ways in which we could or should practice human approaches to reading and writing. I patch together scraps recovered from the rubbish heap of my own personal and professional history.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-03-09T09:16:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221077711
       
  • Poetic Portraiture as Critical Arts-Based Pedagogy and Methodology: Older
           Women’s Relationships Through the Life Course

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      Authors: Sandra L. Faulkner, Wendy K. Watson, Madison A. Pollino, Jesse Reese
      First page: 987
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      We conducted life history interviews with 18 older women about their lives and used poetic portraiture as a form of a poetic inquiry to present women’s stories. Poetic portraits are a representation of an interviewee in verse that focus on embodied aspects of their life story. Graduate students in a relational communication seminar created poetic transcriptions of the interviews as a form of qualitative thematic analysis and used the transcripts to create a visual and poetic portrait of each woman. We discuss the benefits of using poetic portraiture as research representation and reflective research practice.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T10:54:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221097058
       
  • “I Just Wanna Be a Woman”: Some Not So Simple Ways: Families,
           Femininity and/as Affective Entanglement

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      Authors: Valerie Walkerdine
      First page: 998
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Catherine is age 21 years. She is part of a research project that has followed her life from age 4 until 21 years. She is driving along in her car and we hear a song, with the lines “I just wanna be a woman” sung plaintively over and over again. This article considers what the song might mean in the context of what we learn from a very close reading of observation and interview data with her, her parents, and teachers at various stages of her life. The article describes the process of conducting a slow reading and argues that it presents to us an approach to what I call “affective entanglement” as an antidote to classificatory prescriptions of causality. We begin to understand how the complexity of the entanglement of family lives, lived at particular historical periods and in specific geographical locations, gives us a detailed insight into not only the entanglements that shape Catherine’s life, but also allow us to understand something about the affective transmission of class, gender, and sexuality in all its complexity.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T05:27:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221098204
       
  • “Connection With the Creator So Our Spirits Can Stay Alive”: A
           Community-Based Participatory Study With the Métis Nation of Alberta
           (MNA)—Region 3

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      Authors: Carla S. Ginn, Craig W. C. Ginn, Cheryl Barnabe, Lawrence Gervais, Judy Gentes, Doreen Dumont/Vaness Bergum, Noelle Rees, Ashley Camponi
      First page: 1007
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we describe our Métis-guided community-based participatory research exploring health protective factors for mental health and addiction within the Métis Nation of Alberta (MNA)—Region 3. There is much research regarding the detrimental effects of colonialism but a lack of Métis-guided research contributing to understanding of individual, family, and community well-being. The primary aim of our study was to explore health protective factors for mental health and addiction challenges. Our study was informed by Indigenous ways of knowing, focusing on the connectedness of all things, and participatory action research, a philosophy and method focused on inclusion and community incorporation of local knowledge. Participants described the need to foster respect, trust, courage, wisdom, humility, truth, humor, esteem, honesty, acceptance, identity, and love, emphasizing well-being through connection with Creator. All authors but the first are members of the MNA—Region 3.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T08:46:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221099968
       
  • Balancing at the Beginning of Words—Revisiting the Idea of Open
           Awareness in Qualitative Research

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      Authors: Helena Dahlberg
      First page: 1019
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, my aim is to explain the phenomenological approach of openness in research. The understanding of open questioning is concerned with Merleau-Ponty’s analysis of the intimacy of siding with the world, and this relationship puts distinctive demands on researchers to be aware of the phenomena in the study. I also use the Feldenkrais approach that offers a body awareness practice that examines the border between humans and the world. The article shows how the phenomenological approach, together with the Feldenkrais practice, can guide researchers on the important road between nonverbal, lived experience and scientific, verbal activities.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T12:02:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221099564
       
  • Jane Addams’s Pragmatist Method Extended: Care Work Between Abstract
           Rules and Situated Practice

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      Authors: Kaspar Villadsen
      First page: 1027
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Although Jane Addams has long been recognized as a pioneer in North American pragmatism, efforts to develop her thought into a distinct research program have been limited. This article develops Addams’s work as a method of sociological inquiry by focusing on her notions of “perplexity,” “moral adjustment,” and “sympathetic understanding.” Emphasizing the essential role of language in moral conflicts and reconstruction, the article incorporates Charles Wright Mills’s concept of “vocabularies of motives.” Together, these notions offer a framework for exploring the moral dilemmas that care workers experience when responding to the imposition of standardization of their working practices. A case study demonstrates how care workers, while coping creatively with the effects of a service reform, develop motive vocabularies in defense of their professional ethics. Such situated creativity on “the shop floor” of social services remains relatively under-explored and under-theorized.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T05:30:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221097050
       
  • Body of Evidence: Time and Desire in Embodied Archives

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      Authors: Lara Lookabaugh
      First page: 1039
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, I bring a feminist geographic analysis of embodied life and desire into a study of archives. Drawing on my experience as a library and archives professional and feminist geographer navigating the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, I use two examples from UNC’s Wilson Library. I argue that archives are lived, messy spaces where history unfolds not linearly, but in proximity to bodies—bodies who physically handle materials before and after they may become “archival,” who make connections between actors or events throughout time and space, and whose lived experience and desires shape how they interact with archives. Archives do not merely exist as “the archive,” but are constantly being made through the interactions and desires of people across time and space. From this premise, we who utilize archives can be attentive to the labor of archival work that is often erased in scholarship and consider how embodied life shapes a non-linear temporality in archives.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T08:47:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221096855
       
  • Weaving Different Discourses to Understand the Field: Mystory as an
           Analytical Tool

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      Authors: Gemma Piercy
      First page: 1051
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      The bricolage of discourses that is part of the mystory approach offers a way to make sense of disparate resources relevant to the study of everyday life. These resources can include popular culture and social media materials, interviews and observations, and academic literature. Here, I explain what mystory is, as well as how and why I fused together personal (autoethnographic), popular and different kinds of academic discourses as bricolage. By layering difference discourses (popular, field-based, academic) with personal reflections (memory), I created coherent narratives that explicitly answered research questions. By weaving these different discourses into distinct patterns of thinking and writing, I found a way to balance my voice alongside the voices of my research participants and other artifacts of their world of cafés, roasteries, coffee, and the Internet to overcome writers’ block. As such, this is also a story of how I found my voice through autoethnography.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T11:58:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221096850
       
  • Propositional A/r/tography: An Analytical Protocol

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      Authors: Alexandra Lasczik, Katie Hotko, Amy Cutter-Mackenzie-Knowles, Tahlia McGahey
      First page: 1062
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores a/r/tography’s speculative and propositional potentials and returns to the a/r/tographic renderings to offer new approaches to a/r/tographic analyses. Propositional a/r/tography provokes ways to think with the renderings that can perform as analytical gateways for experimentation with further layered generative and iterative data creations consequentially. This protocol emerged from deep engagement in data creation processes in response to c/a/r/tographic fieldwork with young people in, on, with, and through the world heritage listed Gondwana Rainforest site in Southeast Queensland, Australia. As such, the propositional a/r/tographic analytical protocol was created as an emergent response to making, materialities, and mappings. It is anticipated that the analytical protocol be engaged as speculative propositions for thinking and experimentation with and through the a/r/tography renderings.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T08:49:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221093418
       
  • The Persistence of Life and Play in በርበረ
           [ber-be-re] Transcripts

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      Authors: Joseph Isaac
      First page: 1077
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In their record of events, transcripts act as the representative account of their participants’ dialogue and actions, crystallizing these moments into coherent narratives that detail “what exactly happened.” However, this coherence obscures the many choices that go into a transcript’s production, from the descriptions offered to the descriptions left out. Nowhere is this perhaps clearer than in the recipes of “made dishes,” which promise the faithful reproduction of their subjects’ sensory experience. Reading this author’s localized experience of the spice mix በርበረ [ber-be-re] through the recipes of six writer-editors,1 this article adopts a methodology of diffraction to illustrate the transcript’s many practices of domination. This article argues that while the transcript colonizes the space of exchange it describes, it can also act as a space of playful resistance, detailing በርበረ’s persistence of life, hope, and possibility even among the ex/inclusions of its transcripted recipe.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T08:25:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221098202
       
  • Searching for Home: Autoethnographic Reflections of a Black Girl

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      Authors: Breonna (Bree) Riddick
      First page: 1087
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Stories serve as entry points—bringing us together and bringing us to ourselves. Critical autoethnography bridges the space between scholarship and personal storytelling as a method of theorizing. Holman Jones explains, “The ‘critical’ in critical autoethnography reminds us that theory is not a static or autonomous set of ideas, objects, or practices. Instead, theorizing is an ongoing process that links the concrete and abstract, thinking and acting, aesthetics, and criticism . . . ” Through autoethnography from a critical perspective, I share stories of silence, grief, fear, loss, and rediscovery as a Black woman in a world where the values of White supremacy run rampant. Through narrative performance, I trace my experiences of race, place, gender, childhood, and movement into adulthood. I describe my sense of feeling pulled away from my roots and the beginning of my process of reclamation. Boylorn shares with us, “Our stories are not our own, and we constantly negotiate entrances and exits in the stories of others and in the delicate balance between our public and private lives. Our life stories often mimic the way our lives are lived: layered, complicated, interconnected, with blurred lines of distinction.” Without stories, we cannot heal.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-09-01T11:45:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221090656
       
  • Just Help Me: A Research Poem by Black Mothers

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      Authors: Amittia Parker
      First page: 1092
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This poem was created using the findings in a constructivist grounded theory study on Black maternal mental health and supports for mental health. During in-depth interviews, Black mothers in a midwestern metropolitan context shared their experiences with their mental health, strengths, struggles, supports, and solutions. This author—a Black mother from the same community—created this poem using the participants’ spoken words to radically center their voices and expertise. This poem is a stand-alone creative tool to inspire critical self-reflection and action to enhance existing supports and create better support for Black mothers.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-03-26T06:50:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221087684
       
  • Space in Between

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      Authors: Serap Asar Brown
      First page: 1094
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      My poetic inquiry originated from reflecting on Ken Plummer’s (2019) book, Narrative Power, where Plummer insightfully discusses the intertwined nature of narratives with our lives. My poem is about the power of narratives to shape lives (i.e., toward suffering or liberation) and the role of human agency in giving life to narratives. My interest rests on the point of power in between narratives where there is a possibility for change, in which humans are the key players. This inquiry draws on narratives, memory, memory-making, imagination, and remembering.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T09:35:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221093416
       
  • The Garden, Grief, and All That Is

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      Authors: Janette Graetz Simmonds
      First page: 1096
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this narrative poem, the author explores the experience of grief and growth
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T06:15:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221093422
       
  • “Sharing a Moment”: An Open Letter

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      Authors: Graham Francis Badley
      First page: 1097
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      I have used a letter format to respond to an invitation in a paper by Joanne Yoo to share thoughts and experiences about our academic and writing lives.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-03-09T08:59:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221080752
       
  • Scenes From Masked and Anonymousi

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      Authors: Norman K. Denzin
      First page: 1101
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      The title of Bob Dylan’s 1971 movie Masked and Anonymous provides a framework for reading the function of masks in the midst of the COVID-19 crisis.
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-03-18T09:27:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221080786
       
  • Masks/Virus/Human Entanglements: Response to Denzin’s Scenes From
           Masked and Anonymous

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      Authors: Bronwyn Davies
      First page: 1104
      Abstract: Qualitative Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      If the “I” of new materialism is, in Bennett’s words, “Absorbent. . . continually ingressed, ensnared, and informed by an outside,” what happens to that absorbent “I” when faces are hidden behind masks, as Denzin writes: anonymous, “hiding the truth of our presence,” fearful of the Trickster, Covid-19, lurking everywhere' What sense can we make of the entanglement of masks/virus/humans' What are we, what have we become, what are we becoming behind our masks' We seek to protect ourselves and others from the virulent airborne particles and lose our humanity, and we leave our bare faces hanging out, and embrace the “outside.”
      Citation: Qualitative Inquiry
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T05:39:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778004221106757
       
 
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