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  Subjects -> ANTHROPOLOGY (Total: 398 journals)
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Progress in Development Studies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.584
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1464-9934 - ISSN (Online) 1477-027X
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Development Research in Flux and in Demand: The Future of Progress in
           Development Studies

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      Authors: Adam Moe Fejerskov, Antonio A.R. Ioris, Maren Duvendack, Jessica Omukuti
      Pages: 7 - 10
      Abstract: Progress in Development Studies, Volume 24, Issue 1, Page 7-10, January 2024.

      Citation: Progress in Development Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-04T04:54:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14649934231212240
      Issue No: Vol. 24, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Weaving a Dense Web: A (Decolonial) Study into the Contributions of Host
           Organizations of Development Volunteers in Jalisco, Mexico

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      Authors: Joanna Jablonska-Bayro, Benjamin Haas
      Pages: 11 - 26
      Abstract: Progress in Development Studies, Volume 24, Issue 1, Page 11-26, January 2024.
      Despite increasing interest in the role played by global South receiving organizations of development volunteers, their agency and efforts are rarely investigated in detail. Our qualitative study explores the involvement of receiving partners in international volunteering spaces, using the German Weltwärts programme in Mexico as an example. By applying decolonial theory, and politics and ethics of care lens to our data, we explore how these organizations are ‘weaving’ a dense assistance and safety web around the volunteers. Such assistance is usually not monetized and mainly invisible in the discussion of volunteering for development. Our findings challenge the development discourse and the positionality of northern volunteers within the development architecture.
      Citation: Progress in Development Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-04T04:54:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14649934231202665
      Issue No: Vol. 24, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Book review: Ezroj, A. 2021: Carbon Risk and Green Finance

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      Authors: King Carl Tornam Duho
      Pages: 78 - 80
      Abstract: Progress in Development Studies, Volume 24, Issue 1, Page 78-80, January 2024.
      Ezroj, A. 2021: Carbon Risk and Green Finance. Abingdon, Oxon & New York, NY: Routledge. 138 pp. £110.00 (Hardback), £38.99 (Paperback), £27.29 (VitalSource eBook). ISBN: 9780367559915 (Hardback), 9780367559922 (Paperback), 9781003095996 (VitalSource eBook).
      Citation: Progress in Development Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-04T04:54:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14649934231200657
      Issue No: Vol. 24, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Book review: Pettenati, G. 2022: Landscape as Heritage: International
           Critical Perspectives

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      Authors: Katherine Chyna Dixon
      Pages: 80 - 82
      Abstract: Progress in Development Studies, Volume 24, Issue 1, Page 80-82, January 2024.
      Pettenati, G. 2022: Landscape as Heritage: International Critical Perspectives. London and New York: Taylor and Francis. 328 pp. £130.00 (cloth), £32.39 (e-book), £35.99 (paper). ISBN: 978-1-032-04934-2 (cloth), 978-1-003-19523-8 (e-book), 978-1-032-04623-5 (paper).
      Citation: Progress in Development Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-04T04:54:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14649934231205609
      Issue No: Vol. 24, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Book review: Amdani, Y., World of Opportunity: Bringing Sustainable
           Business to Fragile Economies

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      Authors: John P. Christie
      Abstract: Progress in Development Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Amdani, Y., World of Opportunity: Bringing Sustainable Business to Fragile Economies (ForbesBooks, 2023), 208pp. £7.79 and eBook $9.99. ISBN: 9798887501222.
      Citation: Progress in Development Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-13T05:47:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14649934231224143
       
  • University Work Experiences in International Development: Expanding
           Locations, Spaces and Pathways

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      Authors: Anke Schwittay
      Abstract: Progress in Development Studies, Ahead of Print.
      How can university work experiences contribute to reframing International Development from expert saviourism rooted in colonial legacies into a project of social justice and global solidarity' In this article, I propose the design of work-experiential pedagogies that integrate practical work experiences with critical theoretical teaching and an emphasis on students’ experiential knowledge. Such pedagogies call for an expansion of the forms of university work experiences, challenging students to reflect on their manifold personal and institutional locations, to explore the diverse spaces in which work experiences can take place and to experiment with multiple pathways for change. My proposal draws on teaching examples and student journeys at my home university in the UK.
      Citation: Progress in Development Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-06T05:57:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14649934231211676
       
  • Aid Unchained: Examining Development Project Management Practices at Aid
           Chain Interfaces

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      Authors: Lena Gutheil, Dirk-Jan Koch
      Abstract: Progress in Development Studies, Ahead of Print.
      By analysing a comparative case study investigating a development project implemented in Uganda and Vietnam, the article aims to understand how donor directives travel and translate into actual practices in aid chains. Making use of Norman Long’s concept of the interface, we focus on the interfaces between organizations to examine the negotiation of everyday project practices. Based on practice theory, our analysis unpacks how directives are filtered through the power relationships that shape practices at the various interfaces. We find that organizational relations between southern organizations are just as power-laden as north–south relations. Our analysis also shows that neither the management directives nor the freedoms that were granted to the participating organizations resulted in uniform practices and that practices did not have the same implications for organizations. Hence, the aid chain concept tends to simplify the complexities inherent in project systems comprising a multiplicity of vertical and horizontal organizational relations.
      Citation: Progress in Development Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T06:24:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14649934231205441
       
  • Research Translation for International Development: A Literature Review
           and Framework for Evidence Use and Partner Engagement

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      Authors: Laura Riddering, Alexandra Towns, Priyanka Brunese, Yuehwern Yih
      Abstract: Progress in Development Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Many research-to-practice approaches exist, yet fundamental differences in interpretation and uneven application of research translation approaches create a real challenge in generating research-driven solutions for development challenges. In this review, we aim to clarify the plethora of approaches to increase research uptake into international development practice and policy. Through a qualitative analysis of 93 articles, we identified four interrelated factors that differentiate research translation approaches. Building off the variation expressed across these factors, we propose a conceptual framework called the Research Translation Continuum. This framework illustrates the range of ways to produce useful evidence and the range of ways that academics and practitioners can collaborate. Our study makes a unique contribution by providing a conceptual framework for guiding research translation efforts in international development. We conclude that critical reflexive engagement is needed to situate, use, and produce evidence for development policy and practice.
      Citation: Progress in Development Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-11T01:19:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14649934231211731
       
  • Examining the Role of Intergenerational Relations in Food Systems:
           Evidence from Western India

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      Authors: Anuprita Shukla
      Abstract: Progress in Development Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Food systems and their normative goal of achieving food security remain a robust global agenda. However, with the shifts toward a sustainable food system, there is an increasing interest in consolidating evidence on multiple dimensions of the food system. This article is an empirically grounded argument for using intergenerational relations to expand understanding of food systems by looking beyond the usual security outcomes and emphasising social welfare outcomes. Drawing on ethnographic research in an indigenous village in western India, I examine a rural, local food system and the transformations therein because of various socio-economic drivers, including changing livelihood opportunities. Evidence shows growing generational solidarity, with some positive effects for environmental sustainability and for revaluing indigenous culture, including traditional food systems, and generating new local livelihoods. Simultaneously, though, tensions are being created around intergenerational autonomy and cultural expressions. Moreover, the food transition has resulted in a decline in the nutritional content of local diets, which has health implications. This article raises questions whether trends towards sustainability and resilience are necessarily mutually reinforcing for natural resource-dependent indigenous communities and our natural environment.
      Citation: Progress in Development Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-07T07:10:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14649934231215116
       
  • How Is Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction Progressing in Terms of
           Development Cooperation' A Portfolio Analysis of DRR Aid

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      Authors: Suyeon Lee
      Abstract: Progress in Development Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In 2018, the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) created a new policy marker for disaster risk reduction (DRR) to help member states to monitor and report the progress made on the mainstreaming of DRR into their development activities. Drawing on this DRR marker, this study found that DAC members’ DRR mainstreaming remains in the incipient stage, with a significant gap between rhetoric and action. Important areas for improvement include a more comprehensive understanding of disaster risk; increased funding for activities principally targeting DRR, larger scale projects; enhanced financial stability without compromising other development objectives; and further integration of DRR and climate change adaption into development projects.
      Citation: Progress in Development Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-24T04:23:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14649934231210429
       
  • Cuban Youth: Changing Attitudes Towards Sexual and Reproductive Health

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      Authors: Fiona Samuels, Maxine Molyneux, Jasmine Gideon
      Abstract: Progress in Development Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Cuba remains one of the few countries still governed by a communist party. Despite its socialist commitments, including to gender equality, these have not been fully achieved and norms concerning gender roles are often at variance with revolutionary values. Focusing on youth and particularly young women, this article draws on primary data collected in Cuba in 2018–19 to explore young people’s sexual and reproductive health decisions. The analysis highlights how despite the family planning services and educational opportunities made available to them, young women’s reproductive and sexual choices are often determined by men and by values that accord primacy to marriage and motherhood, as conservative values are increasingly gaining a foothold.
      Citation: Progress in Development Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-24T04:22:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14649934231205358
       
  • The Bitter and the Sweet: Managerial Perceptions of the Well-Being of
           Ethiopian Female Apparel and Horticultural Workers

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      Authors: Elsje Fourie, Bilisuma Dito, Konjit Gudeta, Karen Schelleman-Offermans, Valentina Mazzucato, Kai Jonas
      Abstract: Progress in Development Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Observers of Ethiopia’s entry into export-oriented global value chains generally agree that social upgrading is crucial if these chains’ largely female workforce is to reap the benefits of participation. They disagree, however, on the extent to which a ‘business case’ can be made to involve in this upgrading the managers who link frontline workers to international buyers. This article takes a novel approach to these questions by directly asking these managers and those who advise them on human resources how they understand the well-being of their frontline workers. Drawing on 37 qualitative semi-structured interviews, we find great variation in the extent to which such actors are interested in pursuing worker well-being and social upgrading beyond basic compliance. This is indeed due in part to the sectoral dynamics that have shaped managers’ views of what constitutes a profitable labour regime but also by sociocultural factors that include managers’ own national contexts, gender and class.
      Citation: Progress in Development Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-19T07:10:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14649934231210099
       
  • What Do Practitioners Want from Research' Exploring Ugandan and American
           Development Practitioners’ Interest in Research

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      Authors: Julia Fischer-Mackey
      Abstract: Progress in Development Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Are development practitioners interested in research' If so, what kinds of research interest them, and for what purposes' Is the research they have access to meeting their needs for program design and management' These questions are central to understanding why research is used (or not), yet they are often overlooked by efforts to promote development research use. I interviewed practitioners in Washington, DC and Uganda to explore how they relate to research, and I identified six types of interest in research. Understanding practitioners’ diverse interests in research, and better aligning research agendas and knowledge mobilization efforts with them, may lead to more research use and more informed development practices.
      Citation: Progress in Development Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-14T07:38:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14649934231195721
       
  • Gender and the Multilateral Development Banks: From WID to GAD to
           Retroliberal WID

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      Authors: Adrian Robert Bazbauers, Nadeen Madkour
      Abstract: Progress in Development Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Multilateral development bank (MDB) engagement with ‘gender’ is controversial in review and uneven in practice. The authors analyse 1,928 gender-focused projects financed by the World Bank and regional development banks between 1967 and 2021. We propose three eras into which MDB gender engagement divides and argues that isomorphic pressures have aligned their approaches. The article concludes that gender is not an investment priority and projects have conceptually narrowed over time to focus on private entrepreneurship at the expense of addressing systemic gendered inequalities. This is significant for what the MDB finance signals to investors the feasibility of development projects.
      Citation: Progress in Development Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-14T07:37:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14649934231210100
       
  • Religion and Development: Alternative Visions, Credibility, and Networks
           as Religious Assets for Sustainable Development'

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      Authors: Jens Koehrsen, Marian Burchardt
      Abstract: Progress in Development Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Religious organizations have become crucial actors in international development. However, scholarly discussions have largely ignored the dynamics that shape their impact on the ground. This article examines these dynamics by assessing three claims about the specific developmental assets of religious organizations: (a) their credibility in the eyes of their beneficiaries; (b) their control over far-flung social networks; and (c) the idea that religious organizations pursue alternative visions of development. Drawing on existing research, we study these claims in two development sectors: healthcare and environmental sustainability. The results complicate linear narratives of the positive impact of religions on development. Dynamics internal to the religious field sometimes lead to practices that run counter to the Sustainable Development Goals, while institutional pressures in the field of international development push religious organizations to become more similar to their secular counterparts. We suggest the need for alternative frameworks that go beyond prevailing secularization and de-secularization narratives to pay attention to the institutional field dynamics that shape religious development initiatives.
      Citation: Progress in Development Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-13T05:07:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14649934231206302
       
  • Between Hope and Loss: Peruvian Women Activists’ Visual Contestations of
           Extractive-led Development

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      Authors: Katy Jenkins
      Abstract: Progress in Development Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This paper critically explores how women anti-mining activists conceptualize development, in the context of living with and resisting large-scale resource extraction in Cajamarca, Peru. I contend that participatory photography provides an opportunity to contest hegemonic development narratives and the notions of ‘lack’, ‘poverty’ and ‘progress’ that are bound up with such narratives, enabling participants to simultaneously evoke both hoped-for alternative futures and nostalgic renditions of a threatened present. Moving beyond an explicit and immediate focus on the socially and environmentally destructive nature of large-scale mining, I explore how the women instead document productive Andean livelihoods and everyday ways of life, capturing the ways in which hoped-for futures are enacted in the present. The women activists articulate their resistance through photography, identifying and celebrating practices of hope in their everyday lives and communities and providing an emotive counter-narrative to extractive-led neoliberal development discourses. The paper reveals that participatory photography approaches generate critical insight into the emotion-suffused ways in which development is understood by grassroots activists in contexts of extractivism.
      Citation: Progress in Development Studies
      PubDate: 2023-11-23T06:19:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14649934231193813
       
  • Book review: Myers, G. 2020: Rethinking Urbanism: Lessons from
           Postcolonialism and the Global South

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      Authors: Antonio Sianes
      Abstract: Progress in Development Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Myers, G. 2020: Rethinking Urbanism: Lessons from Postcolonialism and the Global South. Bristol: Bristol University Press. 250pp., £79.99. ISBN: 9781529204452 (paperback).
      Citation: Progress in Development Studies
      PubDate: 2023-11-20T03:59:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14649934231209515
       
  • Book review: Bliesemann de Guevara, B., & Bøås, M. (eds), Doing
           Fieldwork in Areas of International Intervention: A Guide to Research in
           Violent and Closed Contexts

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      Authors: Nihaya Jaber
      Abstract: Progress in Development Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Bliesemann de Guevara, B., & Bøås, M. (eds), Doing Fieldwork in Areas of International Intervention: A Guide to Research in Violent and Closed Contexts (Bristol: Bristol University Press, 2022), 288 pp. Hardback £75.00 and US $115.00. ISBN 9781529206883
      Citation: Progress in Development Studies
      PubDate: 2023-11-20T03:58:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14649934231202053
       
  • Book review: Bahana, D., Singh, S. and Msibi, T. (ed.), South Africa:
           Gender, Sexuality, and Violence in South African Educational Spaces

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      Authors: Mitra Tanomand
      Abstract: Progress in Development Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Bahana, D., Singh, S. and Msibi, T. (ed.), South Africa: Gender, Sexuality, and Violence in South African Educational Spaces (Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2021), 315 pp., £109.99 (cloth), £109.99 (paper), ISBN: 9783030699871 paper.
      Citation: Progress in Development Studies
      PubDate: 2023-11-14T09:36:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14649934231193452
       
  • Something for Everyone' Addressing Conservative Opposition to
           Universal Basic Income Programmes

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      Authors: Colin D. Wooldridge, Andrew F. Johnson, Katherine J. Roberto
      Abstract: Progress in Development Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Trial universal basic income (UBI) programmes in developing nations around the world have yielded positive results with respect to individual health outcomes, income, women’s empowerment, decreased child labour and much more. Concomitantly, UBI trials provide evidence that fears that UBI decreases labour force participation are based more on classist mythology than reality, and, rather, increases employment. Despite these promising results, implementation of UBI programmes will mean overcoming significant partisan political forces. As such, the focus of this commentary is to explore the most prominent barrier to the implementation of UBI programmes in both developing and wealthy nations, namely, conservative political opposition. UBI programmes are generally promoted by liberal politicians and implemented in liberal jurisdictions. However, these programmes can advance outcomes aligned with conservative principles. We chronicle the current and historical conservative opposition to UBI and argue for UBI programmes using common conservative talking points, positioning them as holistic market-based solutions to counter fragmented social services, means to foster vocational opportunities and a catalyst to promote economic growth. A discussion of how reframing UBI programmes to align with conservative principles alters attitudes towards UBI is included. The acceptance of UBI programmes across the political spectrum is paramount for achieving widespread implementation.
      Citation: Progress in Development Studies
      PubDate: 2023-09-18T02:26:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14649934231193799
       
 
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