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  Subjects -> ANTHROPOLOGY (Total: 398 journals)
Showing 1 - 90 of 90 Journals sorted by number of followers
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 370)
Global Change, Peace & Security: formerly Pacifica Review: Peace, Security & Global Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 305)
Cultural Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 200)
Annual Review of Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 193)
Current Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 190)
American Anthropologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 167)
Ethnography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 95)
Ethnos: Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
American Ethnologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Journal of Anthropological Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Anthropology Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Anthropological Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53)
History and Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Social Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Contemporary Ethnography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Human Development: A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Memory Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Critique of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
American Journal of Physical Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Discourse Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Social Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of World Prehistory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Qualitative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Medical Anthropology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Ethnology : An International Journal of Cultural and Social Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of African History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Anthropology & Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Anthropological Review     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Medical Anthropology: Cross-Cultural Studies in Health and Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Archaeology, Ethnology and Anthropology of Eurasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Anthropological Forum: A journal of social anthropology and comparative sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Ethnohistory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Anthropology & Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
African Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Museum Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Human Evolution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
City & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
African and Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Anthropology of the Middle East     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Material Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Australian Historical Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
French Politics, Culture & Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
American Journal of Primatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Anthropology & Archeology of Eurasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Evolutionary Anthropology Issues News and Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Anthropological Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Pragmatics & Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Ethos     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Field Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Anthropology of Work Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Visual Anthropology: Published in cooperation with the Commission on Visual Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Culture & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Anthropology & Humanism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Latin American & Caribbean Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Mental Health, Religion & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Archeological Papers of The American Anthropological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Buildings & Landscapes: Journal of the Vernacular Architecture Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Anthropology Now     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Cultural Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Linguistic Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Reviews in Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Visual Anthropology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Anthropology in Action : Journal for Applied Anthropology in Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Food and Foodways: Explorations in the History and Culture of     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Dialectical Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Museum Anthropology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Asian and African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Geografiska Annaler, Series B : Human Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Ethnomusicology Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Tourism Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Cultural History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Anthropology News     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Anthropological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
E&G Quaternary Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Anthropology of Consciousness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
L'Homme     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cahiers d’études africaines     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
African American Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
East Central Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
POLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Osteoarchaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Anthropologie et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Progress in Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asian Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
L'Anthropologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Antiquaries Journal, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Historical Biology: An International Journal of Paleobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Transforming Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Myth & Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Chinese Sociology & Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Collaborative Anthropologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Transcultural Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Ateliers d'anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Focaal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Cultural Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Levant     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Anthropologie et santé     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anthropological Journal of European Cultures     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Turcica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Human Organization     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Primates     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Australian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Histories of Anthropology Annual     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Modern Greek Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Gradhiva     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Civilisations     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Oceania     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Arctic Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Polynesian Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal des anthropologues     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Canadian Studies/Revue d'études canadiennes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Quotidian : Dutch Journal for the Study of Everyday Life     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cuadernos de Antropologia Social     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
The Australian Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Acta Ethnographica Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Listening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Terrain     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Exchange     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
General Anthropology Bulletin of The General Anthropology Division     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Gesture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Social Science Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Burma Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Revista de Antropologia     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Alteridades     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Anatomical Science International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Socio-anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
South Asian Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Quaternaire     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Behemoth     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
South Asian Diaspora     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Images re-vues : histoire, anthropologie et théorie de l'art     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Antipoda : Revista de Antropología y Arqueología     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Recherches sociologiques et anthropologiques     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Durkheimian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
HOMO - Journal of Comparative Human Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bulletin de l’APAD     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Estudios Atacameños     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
L'Atelier du CRH     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Transnational American Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Structure and Dynamics: eJournal of Anthropological and Related Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Zoosystematics and Evolution - Mitteilungen Aus Dem Museum Fur Naturkunde Zu Berlin     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cadernos de Estudos Africanos     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. Ciências Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuicuilco     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Desacatos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Andes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Boletin de Antropologia Universidad de Antioquia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indiana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Antropologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tabula Rasa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal for the Anthropology of North America (JANA)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Southwest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cahiers de l'Urmis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Totem : The University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tipití : Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethnographic Praxis in Industry Conference     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intersecciones en Antropologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chungara (Arica) - Revista de Antropologia Chilena     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Apparence(s)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Terrae Incognitae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Nuevo mundo mundos nuevos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Scripta Ethnologica     Open Access  
Revista de Antropología Social     Open Access  
Mitologicas     Open Access  
Liminar. Estudios Sociales y Humanisticos     Open Access  
Avá. Revista de Antropologia     Open Access  
Treballs de Sociolingüística Catalana     Open Access  
Anthropologischer Anzeiger     Full-text available via subscription  
Mélanges de la Casa de Velázquez     Partially Free  
Recherches amérindiennes au Québec     Full-text available via subscription  
Runa : Archivo para las Ciencias del Hombre     Open Access  
Papeles de Trabajo. Centro de Estudios Interdisciplinarios en Etnolingüística y Antropología Socio-Cultural     Open Access  
Trace     Open Access  
Interações (Campo Grande)     Open Access  
Journeys     Full-text available via subscription  
human_ontogenetics     Hybrid Journal  

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Primates
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.591
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1610-7365 - ISSN (Online) 0032-8332
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Bone-related behaviours of captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) during
           two excavating experiments

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      Abstract: Abstract After stone tools, bone tools are the most abundant artefact type in the Early Pleistocene archaeological record. That said, they are still relatively scarce, which limits our understanding of the behaviours that led to their production and use. Observations of extant primates constitute a unique source of behavioural data with which to construct hypotheses about the technological forms and repertoires exhibited by our hominin ancestors. We conducted two different experiments to investigate the behavioural responses of two groups of captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes; n = 33 and n = 9) to disarticulated, defleshed, ungulate bones while participating in a foraging task aimed at eliciting excavating behaviour. Each chimpanzee group was provided with bone specimens with different characteristics, and the two groups differed in their respective experience levels with excavating plant tools. We found that several individuals from the inexperienced group used the provided bones as tools during the task. In contrast, none of the individuals from the experienced group used bones as excavating tools, but instead continued using plant tools. These chimpanzees also performed non-excavating bone behaviours such as percussion and tool-assisted extraction of organic material from the medullary cavity. Our findings serve as a proof-of-concept that chimpanzees can be used to investigate spontaneous bone tool behaviours such as bone-assisted excavation. Furthermore, our results raise interesting questions regarding the role that bone characteristics, as well as previous tool-assisted excavating experience with other raw materials, might have in the expression of bone tool-assisted excavation.
      PubDate: 2022-11-19
       
  • Mixed-species association and a record of a hybrid offspring between
           Trachypithecus pileatus and Trachypithecus phayrei in Bangladesh

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      Abstract: Abstract The term mixed-species association has a broad range of definitions, from temporary foraging association to permanent group living. A mixed-species association mostly involves species from closely related taxa and is found in birds, mammals and fish. It ranges from passive association with little interaction to coordinated behavioural interactions between the group members of a mixed-species group. Mixed-species association can result in the production of hybrid offspring in the wild. In this study, we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first observational evidence of mixed-species association between the two threatened primate species Phayre’s langur (Trachypithecus pileatus) and capped langur (Trachypithecus phayrei), in fragmented forest patches of northeast Bangladesh. We also report a presumed hybrid offspring between these species. We conducted a short-term study from December 2021 to April 2022 in three forest patches based on information from eco-tourism guides. We confirmed the presence of three mixed-species troops; in two of the groups an adult male T. phayrei had permanently immigrated into a group of T. pileatus, and in the other one an adult male T. pileatus had permanently immigrated into a group of T. phayrei. A long-term detailed study is needed to elucidate the reasons for these mixed-species associations, their behavioural patterns, the fate of the presumed hybrid offspring, and to understand the genetic relatedness between the individuals.
      PubDate: 2022-11-16
       
  • Modifying the diets of captive proboscis monkeys in a temperate zoo to
           reduce weight loss and renal disease

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      Abstract: Abstract In animal husbandry, diets should help in maintaining a healthy body condition, support reproduction, and promote species-specific longevity. It is recommended to feed folivorous primates kept in zoos a high-fiber diet, i.e., leaves, although satisfying such a requirement is challenging in temperate regions because it is difficult to obtain fresh leaves, especially in autumn and winter. As equally important for their appropriate treatment, it is valuable to provide details of clinical reports of medical problems and pathological findings, although such clinical reports are rather limited. Therefore, in foregut-fermenting proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus), we (1) described the individual clinical reports of renal disease and weight loss at the Yokohama Zoological Gardens in Japan, (2) determined the nutritional profile of the diets supplied to these animals because other potential triggers for their renal disease and weight loss could be excluded, (3) modified the diet regimen to minimize weight loss and the development of hypercalcemia and hypophosphatemia, and (4) assessed the effects of such dietary modification by comparing the body weight and the Ca and P concentrations and the Ca/P ratios in the blood before and after diet modification with a comparison of these measurements between zoo and free-ranging individuals. Based on the nutritional profile of the diets, we concluded that the reported cases of renal failure might be caused by consumption of leaves with a Ca/P ratio far above the appropriate level in autumn and winter. Additionally, the dietary modification of minerals and metabolizable energy achieved certain beneficial effects on zoo-kept proboscis monkeys.
      PubDate: 2022-11-10
       
  • Demography and life-history parameters of mantled howler monkeys at La
           Flor de Catemaco: 20 years post-translocation

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      Abstract: Abstract Translocations usually aim at maintaining and enhancing wild populations. Thus, the long-term monitoring of translocated individuals is critical for assessing translocation success. In this study, we report the demographic and life-history parameters of mantled howler monkeys that were translocated to La Flor de Catemaco (Los Tuxtlas, Mexico) to determine the success of the translocation process. Nine individuals belonging to two social groups living in areas that were going to be destroyed were released into La Flor de Catemaco between 2002 and 2004. Before 2022 there were no resident monkeys at the site. From January 2012 to December 2021, we recorded births, deaths, migrations, and group formation (1535 sampling days). The population grew until reaching 35 mantled howler monkeys. Two new groups including both individuals born at the site and migrants were founded. Mean ± SD group size was 8.1 ± 1.1 individuals. We recorded 42 births and 14 deaths, mostly of young infants (< 6 months of age). We recorded emigrations and immigrations of adult and immature individuals as well as several instances of individuals that remained and reproduced in their natal groups. Mean female age at first birth was 57.8 ± 18.5 months, interbirth intervals were 23.3 ± 11.3 months, and birth rates were 0.5 ± 0.2 births per female per year. The growth and persistence of the groups at the site, as well as similarity in demographic and life-history parameters between this and unmanaged populations, suggest that mantled howler monkeys living at La Flor de Catemaco represent a stable population and thus that this was a successful translocation.
      PubDate: 2022-11-08
       
  • Birth of a wild black howler monkey (Alouatta pigra) at an anthropogenic
           site

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      Abstract: Abstract We present the first description of a diurnal live birth of a wild black howler monkey (Alouatta pigra). The mother formed part of a group of five individuals inhabiting an anthropogenic setting in the tropical lowlands of southeast Mexico. A total of 7 h and 50 min passed from the rupture of the amniotic sac early in the day to the crowning of the infant from the birth canal. The delivery of the infant lasted ~ 3 min. We describe the event while referencing images and time points in a supplementary video recording. We place our findings in the context of the available reports of live births in the Alouatta genus, time of day, birth duration, and group activity budget on the day of the birth. While primates tend to give birth at night to reduce complications from group interactions, the observed birth took place during the day, which may have been possible due to an alteration in group time allocation. Our report provides in-depth details of the events of a birth and important information regarding the natural history of the black howler monkey.
      PubDate: 2022-11-05
       
  • Partner choice in genito-genital rubbing among female bonobos (Pan
           paniscus) is highly dependent on physical proximity

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      Abstract: Abstract Sociosexual interactions of non-human primates have multiple functions, and information on partner choice could help us to determine the major purpose of these behaviors. Female bonobos (Pan paniscus) frequently engage in genito-genital (GG) rubbing, which is categorized as a sociosexual behavior. The functions of GG rubbing may vary across allopatric bonobo populations, especially in relation to its use in social bonding. Thus, we aimed to examine the use of GG rubbing in the formation and maintenance of social bonds by examining partner choice in this context in the habituated bonobo population at Wamba, Democratic Republic of the Congo. We examined the effect of female age (and correlated dominance rank) on the proportion of solicited GG rubbing, and the effects of age difference, proximity index, and grooming index on the successful GG rubbing occurrences. Our results showed that female age significantly affected the proportion of solicited GG rubbing, indicating that older and higher-ranking females solicited this activity more frequently. Individuals of female–female dyads who were close in age and dominance rank frequently engaged in GG rubbing. The more the females in a dyad were in physical proximity, the more they engaged in GG rubbing. No correlation was observed between grooming and GG rubbing. These results indicate that partner choice in GG rubbing is highly dependent on physical proximity, and suggest that characteristics of female gregariousness might be important with respect to this choice among bonobos.
      PubDate: 2022-11-04
       
  • The Primates 2022 most-cited paper award

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      PubDate: 2022-11-02
       
  • Good case studies reveal something important

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2022-11-02
       
  • Acknowledgements

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      PubDate: 2022-11-01
       
  • Different: What apes can teach us about gender, by Frans de Waal

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      PubDate: 2022-11-01
       
  • Behavioral responses to riparian and anthropogenic edge effects in mantled
           howler monkeys (Alouatta palliata) in a disturbed riverine forest

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      Abstract: Abstract Fragmented forests contain natural edges, including riparian zones, and anthropogenic edges. Edges generally have lower plant density and fewer large trees than forest interior. Riparian edges, however, contain gap-specialist trees yielding leaves with high protein content, providing primates with important resources. We examined mantled howler monkeys’ behavioral responses to riparian and anthropogenic edges at La Suerte Biological Research Station (LSBRS), Costa Rica. We predicted the monkeys would spend more time resting and feeding and less time traveling, and be less spatially cohesive, in both anthropogenic and riparian edges compared to forest interior due to lower resource abundance in edges, and in anthropogenic compared to riparian edge due to higher leaf quality in riparian zones. From 2017 to 2020, we collected data across forest zones on activity and spatial cohesion patterns via focal sampling, recording data every 2 min. Howler monkeys were significantly more likely to rest and significantly less likely to travel in both anthropogenic and riparian edges compared to forest interior; however, there were no differences between these edge types. There were significantly more monkeys within a 5-m radius of focal subjects in both anthropogenic and riparian edges compared to forest interior, but no differences between these edge types. While prior research found no differences across zones when only anthropogenic edge and forest interior were compared, results of this study demonstrate that howler monkeys at LSBRS modify their activity patterns in anthropogenic and riparian edge zones compared to forest interior, highlighting the importance of focusing on both natural and anthropogenic edge zones to fully understand primates’ behavioral responses in fragmented landscapes.
      PubDate: 2022-11-01
       
  • Self-interest precludes prosocial juice provisioning in a free choice
           group experiment in bonobos

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      Abstract: Abstract Previous studies on prosociality in bonobos have reported contrasting results, which might partly be explained by differences in experimental contexts. In this study, we implement a free choice group experiment in which bonobos can provide fruit juice to their group members at a low cost for themselves. Four out of five bonobos passed a training phase and understood the setup and provisioned fruit juice in a total of 17 dyads. We show that even in this egalitarian group with a shallow hierarchy, the majority of pushing was done by the alpha female, who monopolized the setup and provided most juice to two adult females, her closest social partners. Nonetheless, the bonobos in this study pushed less frequently than the chimpanzees in the original juice-paradigm study, suggesting that bonobos might be less likely than chimpanzees to provide benefits to group members. Moreover, in half of the pushing acts, subjects obtained juice for themselves, suggesting that juice provisioning was partly driven by self-regarding behavior. Our study indicates that a more nuanced view on the prosocial food provisioning nature of bonobos is warranted but based on this case study, we suggest that the observed sex differences in providing food to friends corresponds with the socio-ecological sex difference in cooperative interactions in wild and zoo-housed bonobos.
      PubDate: 2022-11-01
       
  • Distribution and diversity of primates and threats to their survival in
           the Awi Zone, northwestern Ethiopia

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      Abstract: Abstract Habitat loss and fragmentation affect the diversity and distribution of primates in a human-modified landscape. Ethiopia has a high diversity of primates, but increasing human pressure has negatively impacted their distribution and abundance across the country, primarily due to deforestation. To date, the diversity and distribution of primate species are poorly known in northwestern Ethiopia. From October 2020 until September 2021, we assessed the diversity and distribution of primate species in 26 forest patches in the Awi Zone, Northwestern Ethiopia using line transect surveys, and we examined the potential conservation threats to the survival of these taxa. Across transects, we encountered 459 groups of four primate taxa: olive baboons (Papio anubis), grivet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops), Boutourlini’s blue monkeys (Cercopithecus mitis boutourlinii), and black-and-white colobus monkeys (Colobus guereza spp. guereza). The latter two are endemic to Ethiopia. We observed black-and-white colobus monkeys in all surveyed forest patches, while we observed Boutourlini’s blue monkeys in 18 patches. Black-and-white colobus monkeys were the most frequently observed (n = 325 sighting; relative encounter frequency = 70.8%), while grivet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) were the least (n = 34 sighting; relative encounter frequency = 7.4%) in the region. Similarly, the relative encounter frequency of olive baboons was 9.2% (n = 42 sighting). The overall mean group size for each species was: Boutourlini’s blue monkeys (26.1 individuals), black-and-white colobus monkeys (8.8 individuals), grivet monkeys (34.1 individuals), and olive baboons (41.4 individuals). We identified agricultural expansions, exotic tree plantations, deforestations, firewood collections, livestock grazing, and killings over their crop-feeding behaviors as the main threats to primates and their habitats in the region. This study provides crucial information on an area likely to support primate species that we know very little about. Assigning protected connecting forest patches should be an urgent priority for the conservation of the primates in this region.
      PubDate: 2022-11-01
       
  • Immunohematological features of free-living Alouatta belzebul (Linnaeus,
           1766) red-handed howler monkeys in the Eastern Amazon

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      Abstract: Abstract The red-handed howler monkey (Alouatta belzebul) is one of the 35 threatened Brazilian primate species found in two highly endangered Brazilian biomes. Their Amazonian native populations have been declining due to exponential deforestation associated with human activities, especially the construction of dams. The studied population (n = 27) was located in the Belo Monte dam Area of Influence. For the first time, we presented hematological parameters and the basic profile of T (CD3) and B (BSAP PAX5) cells by immunocytochemistry. The results supported the hypothesis that the immuno-hematological profile is influenced by sex, age, and season. Eosinophils were significantly higher in females (p = 0.03), monocytes statistically greater in juveniles (p = 0.04), and total plasma protein increased significantly (p > 0.001) during the dry season. Furthermore, adults showed a statistically higher average absolute number of B lymphocytes than young individuals (p = 0.03), in contrast to T lymphocytes. Even without knowing the full history of antigenic exposure, these results not only contribute to elucidating the boundaries between health and disease but may help lay the groundwork for future research into the effects of anthropogenic stress on immune activation.
      PubDate: 2022-11-01
       
  • My life with primates

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      Abstract: Abstract In this paper I recall some of the significant moments of my career as a primatologist, including some of the intellectual conflicts I encountered between anthropology, sociology and zoology. From an initial interest in ethics and evolution, I undertook research on rhesus monkeys in captivity and then on chimpanzees in the wild. Influenced by Japanese primatology as well as Western approaches, this led to my work on the problems of describing primate behaviour, but this more theoretical approach was superseded by empirical work embodied in the founding of the Budongo Conservation Field Station. I describe the initial creation of the field station in 1990 and some of the research directions we have followed since that time. The paper ends with a focus on conservation, this being of increasing importance as the Budongo Forest faces ever increasing threats from industry.
      PubDate: 2022-10-15
       
  • Seasonal food changes and feeding behaviour adaptations of savanna
           chimpanzees at Nguye in Ugalla, Tanzania

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      Abstract: Abstract We studied the feeding strategies of savanna chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) at Nguye in Ugalla, Western Tanzania (05°13'S, 30°28'E). Among the driest most open chimpanzee habitats, Ugalla is covered mainly by woodlands. We analysed undigested contents in chimpanzee faeces, and conducted a vegetation survey and a 1-year phenology survey every 2 weeks. The fruits of some trees with the highest biomass had high appearance rates in faeces (e.g. Parinari curatellifolia and Diplorhynchus condylocarpon). Herbaceous Aframomum mala fruits grew in large patches in savanna woodland near forest edges along rivers and had the highest appearance frequency over the longest seasonal period in faeces. Other species with higher appearance rates in faeces for long seasonal periods included Grewia mollis at the forest edge and Thespesia garckeana growing on termite mounds at the forest edge. These two tree species had low biomass. Thus, savanna chimpanzees fed on some tree foods with higher biomass, herbaceous fruits instead of scarcer tree fruits, and fruits at forest edges and in forests which occupy a small portion of the study area, in addition to woodlands which occupy a large proportion. The forest edge and interior run continuously for long distances along rivers. Forest occupies 2% of this area, but chimpanzees can continuously obtain food by moving along riverine forest. To compensate for fruit scarcity in the non-fruiting (early rainy) season, chimpanzees ate fibrous, low-quality plant parts. Chimpanzees formed smaller parties when ripe fruits and unripe legumes were scarcer. Using these feeding strategies, chimpanzees adapted to savanna woodlands.
      PubDate: 2022-10-03
       
  • Correction to: Fission–fusion dynamics in a wild group of Japanese
           macaques (Macaca fuscata) on Kinkazan Island caused by the repeated
           separation of an alpha male being followed by females

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      PubDate: 2022-09-22
       
  • Correction to: My path to primatology: some stories from the field

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      PubDate: 2022-09-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s10329-022-01020-1
       
  • Infant adoptions in wild bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata)

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      Abstract: Abstract Though uncommon, adoption of orphaned infants has been observed in both wild and captive non-human primates. In two groups of wild bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata), we observed five instances of infants being cared for after they lost their mothers at a pre-weaning age (< 6 months). Orphaned infants had one or more caregivers (juvenile, subadult, and adult female or male) involved in carrying, grooming, hugging, and protecting them. Adoption did not appear to be related to the age/sex class of the infant, or directly to the mother’s rank. Although the dominance rank of the mother of an orphaned infant did not have a direct effect on orphan survivorship, it determined the number of caregivers available to the orphaned infant, and infant survivorship was positively related to the number of caregivers of the orphaned infant. Thus, survivorship was likely a function of the mother’s sociality. Two other infants born to high-ranking mothers were also adopted by more individuals and survived longer than the infants of low-ranking mothers.
      PubDate: 2022-09-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s10329-022-01017-w
       
  • Geographic, climatic, and phylogenetic drivers of variation in colobine
           activity budgets

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      Abstract: Abstract Folivorous primates are typically considered time minimizers because the constraints of their unique digestive systems require them to spend a large portion of their activity budgets resting. However, inter- and intraspecific behavioral variation in their activity budgets may be influenced by local geographic and climatic conditions and evolutionary history. We compiled 48 studies representing ten genera, 31 species, and 50 populations to assess geographic (elevation, latitude), climatic (precipitation, temperature), and phylogenetic correlates of colobine activity budgets. Time spent resting negatively correlated with time spent feeding, moving, and socializing. Except for time spent socializing, activity budgets were independent of phylogeny, with more time spent feeding and less time resting in higher-elevation habitats and at lower temperatures. Among the four most common genera in our sample, only in Rhinopithecus did time spent feeding increase with higher elevations (range, 950–3950 m above mean sea level) and lower temperatures (range, 0.9–25 ℃). Only in Trachypithecus did time spent resting decrease with lower temperatures (range, 19–25 ℃). Our findings suggest that there are no apparent effects of geographic or climatic gradients on colobine activity budgets except for Rhinopithecus and Trachypithecus, whose activities are biased in favor of energy maximization rather than time minimization. Compared with other colobines, the ability of Rhinopithecus to adapt their activity budget at high elevations may make them less vulnerable to climate change, while the greater sensitivity of Trachypithecus to heat may make them more vulnerable to climate change.
      PubDate: 2022-09-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s10329-022-01015-y
       
 
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