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  Subjects -> GEOGRAPHY (Total: 493 journals)
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GeoJournal
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.503
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 11  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1572-9893 - ISSN (Online) 0343-2521
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Continuum of space and place in digital manifestations: contours in
           digital spatiality

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      Abstract: Abstract Space and place discussed among geographers in varied spatial orders. Digital is a new dimension among geographers in the study of spatiality in cognitive imagination. Space and place denote two distinct spatial features in digital spatiality in a sense of cognitive imagination. Screens are an inseparable digital feature among digital devices in general and smartphones in particular. Screens are augmented to functions by doings of scrolling. Every scrolling made changes on the screen of smartphones in terms of appearance of digital features. The appeared digital features on the screen of smartphones might be accustomed or unfamiliar in a perception that whether users experienced the same or not in daily activities. The accustomed digital features can be understood as place while unfamiliar digital features can be mapped as space. Screen of smartphones gives a sense of space and place respectively in every scrolling' The paper is mapping digital manifestation of space and place and the extent of spatial turn in digital spatiality.
      PubDate: 2023-02-04
       
  • Patterns and determinants of rural–urban migration in the Garhwal
           Himalaya

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      Abstract: Abstract Rural–urban migration is the most adopted strategy in rural areas to overcome the risk associated with subsistence economy and to diversify income. The Garhwal Himalaya has the highest rate of rural–urban migration in India, which has serious repercussions. Despite this, there is a dearth of literature on the implications of rural–urban migration in the region. This paper attempts to fill this void. The objectives of the paper are to investigate various types, patterns, determinants, and implications of rural–urban migration in the Garhwal Himalaya. In order to meet the objectives, 15 villages were studied from five districts of the Garhwal Himalaya. A comprehensive questionnaire with diverse set of questions from various dimensions was employed in the study. Several migration related questions from both origin and destination were considered while framing and conducting the survey. Several focused group discussions and interviews were conducted in the study villages to understand the real drivers and implications of rural–urban migration in the region. The study reveals that rural–urban migration is a serious issue in Garhwal Himalayas, posing various socio-economic problems. Without immediate action, it will have serious repercussions. Finally, this study suggests minimizing the current rate of rural–urban migration in the Garhwal Himalaya.
      PubDate: 2023-02-02
       
  • Correction to: Simulating future intra-urban land use patterns of a
           developing city: a case study of Jashore, Bangladesh

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      PubDate: 2023-02-01
       
  • Spatial diffusion of COVID-19 in Algeria during the third wave

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      Abstract: Abstract The differential geographic impact of the third wave of COVID-19 is unknown in Algeria. We thus analyze the spatiotemporal variations of cases and deaths of COVID-19 in Algeria, between January and mid-August 2021. Cases and deaths due to COVID-19 were aggregated at the wilaya (province) level. The space–time permutation scan statistic was applied retrospectively to identify spatial–temporal clusters of COVID-19 cases and deaths. We detected 14 spatio-temporal clusters of COVID-19 cases, with only one high risk cluster. Among the 13 low risk clusters, 7 clusters emerged before the start of the third wave and were mostly located in wilayas with lower population density compared to the clusters that emerged during the third wave. For deaths, the largest geographic low-risk cluster emerged in southern Algeria, between April and early July 2021. Northern and coastal wilayas should be prioritized when allocating resources and implementing various quarantine and isolation measures to slow viral transmission.
      PubDate: 2023-02-01
       
  • Applying GIS using location allocation models for improved spatial
           planning of Civil Defence Services: a Case Study of the Karak Governorate,
           Jordan

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      Abstract: Abstract The present study aimed to assess the spatial distribution of the services of the Civil Defence Centres in Karak. The study explores the planning needs of those centres. The study makes suggestions for improving the performance efficiency of those centres. Such suggestions include establishing new facilities. The study uses location allocation models in the network analyst tool in the ArcGIS software as a proposed strategy to improve the spatial planning of urban services in Karak province. The management of the centres in these models can identify the areas which show the greatest demand for services. The study conducts spatial analysis to identify the number of inhabited blocks that are under the service coverage of each centre. The distance between each centre and the inhabited block that is under service coverage should not exceed 7 min of driving. The study finds that there are 88 inhabited blocks in Karak that are under the service coverage of a Civil Defence Centre. There are 23 inhabited blocks in Karak that are not under the service coverage of a Civil Defence Centre. The study recommends creating ten new Civil Defence Centres in order to ensure that 109 out of the 111 inhabited blocks in Karak are under the service coverage of a centre. In other words, these blocks would be provided with services within a duration that does not exceed 7 min of driving.
      PubDate: 2023-02-01
       
  • Simulating future intra-urban land use patterns of a developing city: a
           case study of Jashore, Bangladesh

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      Abstract: Abstract Increasing urban growth at an unprecedented rate entails adverse implications for societal, economic, and environmental sustainability. In the cities of Bangladesh, the land covers are experiencing rapid construction-associated land expansion, population growth, and socioeconomic development. Comprehensive assessment and understanding of the prospects for rapid land use/land cover (LULC) changes are essential for managing land surface resources and ensuring sustainable development. Therefore, this study aims to assess the historical land use/land cover (LULC) changes and simulate future potential intra-urban LULC growth patterns of Jashore City up to 2050. We used (i) Landsat images to analyze LULC change using maximum likelihood supervised image classification method; (ii) Markov-CA model to illustrate the LULC transition matrix during 2000–2020, (iii) Multilayer Perception Neural Network Markov Chain (MPNNMC) Model to simulate future LULC patterns. The result shows that built-up area expanded quickly, while cropland and water areas have had a large loss of coverage. The LULC change analysis derived from prior LULC was utilized for future simulations, where natural and anthropogenic factors were chosen as the driving variables in the MPNNMC model. The future LULC modeling shows that compared to 2020, the urban area is expected to increase by 23.64%, whereas cropland, vegetation, unused land, and water areas are expected to reduce by 1.16%, 5.47%, 9.55%, and 7.73% respectively, by 2050. The change analysis shows that urban areas will increase the fastest during 2020–2030. The findings demonstrate that the rapid and unplanned urbanization and the rise of the population due to migration resulted in the fastest LULC transformation. The study findings contribute to the long-term ecological development of Jashore City and potentially enhance environmental decision making.
      PubDate: 2023-02-01
       
  • Spatial analysis of Multi-level deprivation in urban settings of West
           Bengal

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      Abstract: Abstract The current research has been carried out to explore the spatial association of Multilevel deprivation within the urban setting of West Bengal, a state of India. In this cross-section study, 15 Socio-economic drivers have been used to construct an index of deprivation, reflecting the neighborhood's household condition, spatial variation wealth, physical infrastructure, health, hygiene, education and economic participation of urban residents. Principal Component Analysis is used to drive this sub-indicator which explains more than 83.293% of the variances. For the assessment of spatial association of multilevel deprivation, the Hierarchical clustering method has been used. Results show spatial variation exists in the level of deprivation. Index of deprivation identified heterogeneity in the level of poverty and their spatial association with deprivation. A strong negative association has been observed between the deprivation index and degree of urbanization, while a robust positive association has been marked with the poverty rate.
      PubDate: 2023-02-01
       
  • The landscape of informal economy research: a systematic review of
           transient trends, pivot, and emerging pattern: is there a spatial
           turn'

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      Abstract: Abstract Informal economy (IE) activities contribute significantly to the contemporary urban dynamic. Multifaceted and prolific studies of IE are nearing 50 years. The concept of IE exists in diverse forms with discussion from different perspectives from a vast intellectual landscape. However, there is a lack of systematic review of IE literature knowledge domain evolution in relation to the broad spatial turn that has taken place in social sciences. The objective of this study is to investigate the landscape of IE research to explore and identify transient trend, pivot and emerging pattern of research front as markers of the evolution of knowledge of IE literature from a spatial turn perspective. A preliminary review establishes the platform for a systematic review. A scientometric semantic mapping of IE research extracted from 1157 IE related articles retrieved from the Scopus database provided a panoramic view identifying intellectually significant articles/concepts to understand the intellectual base and its dynamic. The top 12 ranked articles were examined in-depth to further explore the IE spatial turn. Trends analysis confirmed that the IE schools of thought overlap and identified research fronts specialities. The study showed that “spatial turn” is yet to become a focus of IE studies in terms of research strategies and analytical methods. The findings suggest that the unexplored IE spatially integrated development strategies could be adopted for future research direction, with deployment of spatial analysis techniques. The recommendations are relevant to academics, professionals, and government agencies.
      PubDate: 2023-02-01
       
  • COVID-19 case-fatality variations with application to the Middle East
           countries

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      Abstract: Abstract During a pandemic outbreak, it is important for health officials to know the proportions of deaths among infected individuals and to understand how these proportions change overtime, to accurately predict the impact of the pandemic and to implement effectively new intervention policies and health protocols and to adjust them accordingly. However, most studies where efforts have been made to estimate accurately the case fatality rates did not address the issue of measuring the dynamics of the pandemic deadliness during its course. Daily data on COVID-19 cases and deaths were collected from selected MENA countries. In this paper, two new measures of the pandemic fatality are developed based on the estimated time it takes hospitalized infected patients to eventually die from the disease. The first measure assigns COVID-19 deaths to its most significant lagged number of cases based on a fixed-effects panel data model. The second fatality measure relates pandemic deaths and cases based on their respective change points. The results find notable variations of the pandemic lethality between the Middle East countries, likely due to the difference in the quality of health care. Although crude case-fatality rate does not identify the pandemic lethality variations during the ongoing of the disease, this paper develops two novel measures for COVID-19 case fatality which can identify the dynamics and the variations of the pandemic deadliness.
      PubDate: 2023-02-01
       
  • Forced governmentality: from technology to techne

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      Abstract: Abstract ‘Success replaces legitimacy’ (Foucault, 2004). This assertion serves as the premise for this paper, exploring corporations that accept responsibility—or are being forced to take responsibility—for certain public issues because they are successful and, therefore, are seen as legitimate actors in the defence of individual rights in the digital age. Specifically, this paper extends the theoretical utility of applying a Foucauldian perspective of governmentality to the corporation, as set out in Collier and Whitehead’s (2021) Corporate Governmentality: Building the Empirical and Theoretical Case. In particular we seek to extend one of the Collier and Whitehead’s proposed typologies: forced governmentality. Using the Foucauldian analytical language of governmentality, it is possible to illuminate aspects of corporate governmental ambition that were previously unavailable through the current discourses. The crux of the issue consists of modern technologies that create governmental problems but are governed by the companies that created them. Consequently, the private sector actors that contribute to the creation technological problems are being forced to manage related action spaces. Using Facebook as a case study, this paper identifies the characteristics of forced governmentality through a critical reading of Mark Zuckerberg’s Blueprint for Content Governance and Enforcement.
      PubDate: 2023-02-01
       
  • Livelihood transition and economic well-being in remote areas under the
           threat of cattle rustling in Nigeria

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      Abstract: Abstract Livelihood diversification has been recognized as an important strategy applied by vulnerable households to cope and adapt with institutional stresses, environmental and economic shocks. However, the complex interaction between cattle rustling, livelihood transition and well-being remains only partially explored. This study investigates the impact of cattle rustling on well-being as well as how cattle raiding is driving the livelihood transition. Using cross-sectional data of 1750 households analysed via multiple indicators and multiple causes (MIMIC), Logit and ordinary least squares regression, the results of this study elicit three key findings. First, cattle rustling has a significant negative effect on well-being. Second, there is a strong tendency for cattle raid affected households to transit out from farm labour, handicrafts and livestock production. However, affected households engaging in high return activities, such as trade and civil service, show a reduced likelihood of livelihood transition. Third, the constructed well-being index is low (0.33), indicating that households are actually transiting to low return sectors. However, participation in high return sectors requires resource investment capacities in terms of human, social and financial capital, which are substantially lacking in remote areas. In this sense, improving the level of literacy through both conventional and vocational education is key to achieving the rural welfare enhancement programmes.
      PubDate: 2023-02-01
       
  • Assessment of spatio-temporal distribution of human-elephant conflicts: a
           study in Patharia Hills Reserve Forest, Assam, India

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      Abstract: Abstract Human–wildlife conflicts (HWCs) are escalating globally because of human population growth and increased per capita demand for and consumption of natural resources. These conflicts may be exacerbated where anthropogenic land uses are encroaching on designated conservation or protected areas. Large mammals, such as the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus), are increasingly victimized in HWCs as movement across large-scale areas places them at odds with land areas used by humans. The number of human–elephant conflicts (HECs) reported in India involving the Indian elephant (E. m. indicus) have also increased. Managers require better information on the pattern and distribution of HECs to mitigate them and conserve elephants. To address this, we studied 1306 HECs reported from 2015 to 2019 in Patharia Hills Reserve Forest, southern Assam, India. We visited these 1306 sites based on our inventory of complaints filed and recorded the village where the incident occurred, the types and extent of damage, the approximate cost of damage and information about elephants. Conflicts peaked at crop maturity. Ninety-five percent of damage reported involved rice crops (644 ha) belonging to 1245 farmers, and 59 incidents involved household and property damaged. The estimated cost of HEC during the study period was 85,688 USD. The average affected cropland size of each farmer was 0.52 ha. Of the identified 23 HEC-affected villages, four villages were mildly affected (10 or < 10 incidents), 12 villages were moderately affected (11–50 incidents), three villages were highly affected (51–100 incidents), and a remaining four villages were severely affected (> 100 incidents). In villages reporting more HECs, long-term management practices, such as community training for on-sight deterrent of elephants, can be adopted to reduce conflicts. In these areas, villagers also reported the damage compensation process implemented by the government was slow. Expediting the compensation process coupled with increased community training and cultivation of deterrent crops may help reduce villagers’ animosity toward elephant conservation.
      PubDate: 2023-02-01
       
  • Geospatial characterisation and distribution of Illegal gold mining
           (galamsey) operations in Upper West Region, Ghana

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      Abstract: Abstract Recent interest by governmental, non-governmental and civil society organisations in monitoring, tracing, tracking and flushing out illegal mining activities in Ghana has intensified due to the fact that large tracts of arable lands, forests and water resources are destroyed by this group of illegal miners. Yet, the scale of operation, types, characteristics and spatial distribution of illegal mining activities across the 16 regions of Ghana remain inadequate in the scientific literature. This study investigates the types, characteristics and spatial distribution of galamsey activities in Upper West Region. Cross-sectional spatial data were sourced using Garmin GPS extre 30 and corroborated with key informant interviews in Wa East, Wa West and Nadowli-Kaleo Districts. From the results, a total of 2505 individual sightings under 6 major galamsey types (underground pit, dig and check, dig and wash, chamfi, mill house and shormp) were uncovered. The results showed that Wa West District is dominated by the dig and check galamsey while Wa East District hosts the large majority of the underground pits. In addition, Nadowli-Kaleo District is dominated by the underground pit galamsey. Wa East District was the hotspot of illegal mining activities (1644 sightings) in the region. Based on the characterisation, this study, argued that galamsey activities in Upper West Region are still at the rudimentary stage as compared to other geographies in Ghana. Constant monitoring of the where and how ASM activities are being carried out in the region is pertinent in eradicating and reclaiming galamsey degraded lands.
      PubDate: 2023-02-01
       
  • Food is inevitable but the land is mismanaged: exploring the impacts of
           local actors utilization of land resources on food security in Nigeria

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      Abstract: Abstract Land is a sine qua non of human existence, and has been conceived as integral and most valuable resources, which are indispensable for human development. Hitherto, in spite of massive land space and fertile soil, land mismanagement constitutes a serious challenge to the attainment of sustainable food security in Nigeria. Ostensibly, the increased level of food importation in the country is a function of a number of factors from inadvertent mismanagement of land resources by local actors The study explores the extent of involvement of local actors in utilization of land resources on food security. It also assess the challenges of land mismanagement on food security, and examines the influences of land mismanagement on rural–urban migration vis-à-vis food insecurity in Nigeria. Sustainable Land Management and Marxism theories were used. Descriptive research design was employed, which uses in-depth interview guide in sourcing for useful information. Purposive and snowball sampling techniques was employed for the study. Data collected were analysed using content analysis. The study concluded that mismanagement of land in Nigeria has encourages decline in quality of environment, quality of food production, and price increase in the food commodity, which has a debilitating effect on food security in the country.
      PubDate: 2023-02-01
       
  • Geopolitics of water securitisation in Central Asia

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      Abstract: Abstract Over the years ensuring water securitisation in Central Asia is assuming geopolitical dimensions. Historical experiences, the rapid industrialisation and diversification of agricultural practices along with the pattern of water distribution in the Central Asian space rooted in historical trajectories to a greater extent are some of the factors contributing to the dynamics of water insecurity in Central Asia. It needs to be underlined here that though Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan constitute the upstream countries but their dependence on gas from Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan and Kazakhstan to a greater extent limits the “hydro-hegemony” model. However, the same model can be applied in the context of China–Kazakhstan water dispute over sharing the river Ili. At the same time, what one witnessed over some time is the proliferation of identity-based primordial conflict largely accentuated due to sharing of scarce water resources. This is aptly visible in the Ferghana region of Central Asia where three Central Asian countries—Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan–Uzbekistan—share a common border along with water bodies also. The existence of the contested geopolitical space, climate change, competition over scarce resources like water and its impact on human security are some of the factors responsible for aggravating the insecurity of Central Asia. In this regard, the existing regional mechanisms also need to be strengthened which to a substantial extent address the issue of the water crisis in a more holistic manner.
      PubDate: 2023-02-01
       
  • Awareness and perception of climate change by smallholder farmers in two
           agroecological zones of Oyo state Southwest Nigeria

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      Abstract: Abstract This study evaluated the awareness and perception of climate change among smallholder farmers across two agroecological zones (AEZs) of Oyo state Southwest Nigeria. A multistage sampling technique was employed to select 400 respondents from eight local government areas. Climate data were analysed for differences within and between the two AEZs with the Mann–Kendall and Kolmogorov–Smirnov tests, respectively. A structured questionnaire was used for data collection and responses are presented as frequencies and percentages. A Tobit regression model was used to unravel the determinants of awareness and perception of climate change among the farmers. Significant differences were observed in the climate variables within and across the AEZs. The farmers were aware of, and perceived changes in temperature, rainfall, increasing incidence of pests and the occurrence of diseases, drought, and a prolonged dry season as indicators of climate change. The Tobit regression analysis pointed to agroecological zones, land tenure systems and religion as significant determinants of climate change awareness and perception among the farmers. The results of this study posit that an increase in the level of understanding of climate change indicators among smallholder farmers will birth a deeper interpretation of the effects of climate change on agriculture. This will assist smallholder farmers in preparing effective and scaled-up indigenous responses to combat the effects of climate change on their farming systems.
      PubDate: 2023-02-01
       
  • Remote sensing for identification of trip generating territories in
           support of urban mobility planning and monitoring

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      Abstract: Abstract This article aims is to apply a methodology to identify Trip Generating Territories (TGT) in order to discuss the relationship between transport and land use. To achieve this goal, indirect methods were applied through digital processing of orbital remote sensing images along with spatial analysis, using the Kernel Density Estimation (KDE) method. The image processing results have revealed an overall accuracy of 71% for differentiation and characterization of intra-urban classes use through the adopted typologies. In this way, through data on land use and occupation, it was possible to map out the density of the trip generating territories associated to the main built surfaces and that can indicate a higher potential of trip attraction in the urban area. Additionally, the relationship between land use and public transport system was observed in the city of Petrolina-Brazil, the empirical area of study, and the highest concentration of TGT was observed to be located in the central portion of the city, on its surroundings and on the margins of some arterial roads. Thus, it is possible to extract, in the preliminary analysis, information to support the city's transport and mobility planning.
      PubDate: 2023-02-01
       
  • Gendered participatory resource mapping: case studies of upland and
           coastal indigenous communities in Mindanao, Philippines

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      Abstract: Abstract Participatory mapping (PM) approaches are grounded on local spatial knowledge, community interests and needs. Indigenous cultural communities/indigenous peoples (ICCs/IPs) in the Philippines have been involved in participatory mapping research in the past decades. Though remarkable advances have been achieved in involving IPs in participatory mapping activities, information on PM applications that incorporate gender in their analysis remain limited or unavailable. This research provided baseline information and assessed the natural, economic and social resources of two IP communities (Higaonons and Subanens) with different geographic settings (upland and coastal), using a participatory mapping approach with a gender perspective. The PM approach involved sketch mapping, which was carefully digitized using GIS and subjected to quantitative analysis to assess the accessibility of resources. Focus group discussions were also conducted to explain the histories, contexts and social relations associated with the elements in the sketch maps. Content analysis of primary data collected surfaced gendered perspectives and issues on the availability, accessibility, and utilization of resources in both communities. Aside from gender, geographic setting also influenced the accessibility of resources. Overall, the participatory mapping process developed a sense of appreciation and ownership to the resources that the communities identified. The findings of this study can guide decision-makers in crafting gendered policy interventions and empower community members especially the women to play an active role in the planning and management of their community.
      PubDate: 2023-02-01
       
  • Economic globalization and the COVID-19 pandemic: global spread and
           inequalities

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      Abstract: Abstract In just a few weeks, COVID-19 has become a global crisis and there is no longer any question of it being a major pandemic. The spread of the disease and the speed of transmission need to be squared with the forms and characteristics of economic globalization, disparities in development between the world’s different regions and the highly divergent degree of their interconnectedness. Combining a geographic approach based on mapping the global spread of the virus with the collection of data and socio-economic variables, we drew up an OLS model to identify the impact of certain socio-economic factors on the number of cases observed worldwide. Globalization and the geography of economic relations were the main drivers of the spatial structuring and speed of the international spread of the COVID-19.
      PubDate: 2023-02-01
       
  • A review of the pathways, opportunities, challenges and utility of
           geospatial infrastructure for smart city in Nigeria

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      Abstract: Abstract Smart city is one of the fastest growing socio-economic and scientific initiative in the world. Still, it is only in principle and a mere blueprint for many developing countries. This study reviews literature on smart city in Nigeria and developing countries. Our aim is to explore ways to improve the quality of Nigeria’s urban areas, based on recent research on the concept of smart city and its implementation. We summarise key research findings, and gather evidence that shows what composition of urban governance, social, economic, and environmental factors, that would influence actualising a smart city in Nigeria. Although knowledge has grown tremendously in the current literature on the definition, significance, governance, policy, and implementation of a smart city, its significance in Nigeria and other developing countries is supplemental. As an environmentally friendly initiative, a smart city will support urban sustainability and livelihood in Nigeria in a myriad of ways—environmental protection, and mainstream urban services, including public security and safety, access to quality health care, efficient power supply, clean water distribution, assets management, smart transportation, etc. However, despite her unique traditional urban agglomeration trends, Nigeria is unambitious and constrained towards actualising a smart city. Actualising a smart city in Nigeria and other developing countries would require radical and ambitious policies on development of human and infrastructural capacity, as well as institutional reinforcement. This highlights the need for more research, of which we are optimistic that the findings of this research will support with its new insight and clear guidelines.
      PubDate: 2023-02-01
       
 
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