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  Subjects -> GEOGRAPHY (Total: 493 journals)
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Oxford Open Climate Change
Number of Followers: 6  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2634-4068
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [425 journals]
  • Divergences between mainstream and social media discourses after COP26,
           and why they matter

    • First page: kgae006
      Abstract: AbstractUN climate conferences (COPs) have become powerful opportunities for driving public attention to climate issues and raising awareness via mainstream and social media coverage. While there is an abundance of studies examining various elements of the media arenas separately, there are currently no comparative analyses of how mainstream media outlets and social media opinion leaders react to and thereby shape discourses around COPs. Using Bourdieu’s field theory to conceptualize agents in the two arenas as ‘adversaries’, we use manual content analysis to compare reactions to the 2021 Glasgow climate conference (COP26) across the five top English-language online newspapers in Australia, India, the UK and the USA with those of prominent users and organizations on Facebook and Instagram. We find entirely different appraisals of the conference between the two arenas: Where the mainstream media outlets highlighted the progress of the summit, social media leaders were eager to criticize its failures and those of world leaders to take sufficient action. We discuss the implications of this divergence, specifically (i) the extent to which it hinders the cultivation of cohesive narratives about critical climate issues, and (ii) how the failure frame advocated by social media opinion leaders may de-legitimize international policy initiatives and undercut public support for and engagement with these efforts.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/oxfclm/kgae006
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • 2023 Record marine heat waves: coral reef bleaching HotSpot maps reveal
           global sea surface temperature extremes, coral mortality, and ocean
           circulation changes

    • First page: kgae005
      Abstract: AbstractCoral reefs, the most sensitive ecosystem to high temperature, are on the precipice of mass extinction from global warming [1, 2]. 2023 was the hottest year in recorded history on land and in the sea, with dramatic and unexpected temperature increases [3, 4]. Coral Reef Bleaching HotSpot maps provide unique insight into global ocean circulation changes in response to greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing that caused dramatic global temperature rises [1, 2]. The highest excess daily air temperatures recorded in 175 countries, as well as the most prolonged excessive sea surface temperatures, were centered around Jamaica. 2023 marked the worst coral reef bleaching yet in the Northern Hemisphere, with the Southern Hemisphere poised to follow in early 2024. The HotSpot maps strongly suggest accelerated ocean poleward heat transport, slowdown in upwelling, and decreased deep water formation linked to sharply increased 2023 anomalous sea surface and air temperatures. The 2023 distribution of severe heat and bleaching follows both spatial patterns and temporal trends first shown from a baseline 1982–2001 global SST trend analysis [5]. Increased warming of both hot and cold ocean currents shows that horizontal mixing of tropical heat to the poles is accelerating, and that vertical mixing with cold deep water is slowing down, leading to increased ocean stratification, which will cause sea temperature to increase more rapidly and CO2 mixing with the deep ocean to decrease.
      PubDate: Thu, 09 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/oxfclm/kgae005
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Lost options commitment: how short-term policies affect long-term scope of
           action

    • First page: kgae004
      Abstract: AbstractWe propose to explore the sustainability of climate policies based on a novel commitment metric. This metric allows to quantify how future generations’ scope of action is affected by short-term climate policy. In an example application, we show that following a moderate emission scenario like SSP2-4.5 will commit future generations to heavily rely on carbon dioxide removal or/and solar radiation modification to avoid unmanageable sea level rise.
      PubDate: Mon, 12 Feb 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/oxfclm/kgae004
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Embodied emissions policies—design options and political
           mobilization potential

    • First page: kgae003
      Abstract: Abstract The topic of greenhouse gas emissions embodied in products is gaining in prominence and the possibilities for measuring and verifying them are improving. This provides fertile ground for those who demand that climate policy should address such embodied emissions. There are different design options for policies targeting embodied emissions. Such differences affect which groups can be mobilized in their favour. This paper shows that procurement standards which target intermediate products can mobilize the support of relatively low carbon producers of high carbon materials, while product standards which target final products can mobilize the support of producers of relatively low carbon materials and knowledge-intensive service providers.
      PubDate: Fri, 09 Feb 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/oxfclm/kgae003
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Nexus dynamics: the impact of environmental vulnerabilities and climate
           change on refugee camps

    • First page: kgae001
      Abstract: AbstractClimate change and forced migration are often thought about in terms of the sheer numbers of people who might be displaced by a transforming environment. But the potential for ‘environmental refugees’—whether from long-term degradation or short-term catastrophe—extends far beyond those directly affected. Understanding the forces that produce, respond to and amplify such forced migration patterns requires a complex and nuanced view of them. In this article, I explore the question of environmental displacement through the lens of nexus dynamics and look at how environmental refugees complicate our understandings of place, belonging, stability and resilience. I do so through a focus on the largest global refugee camps in the world and the particular environmental vulnerabilities that each faces. Using Cox’s Bazar in Bangladesh (Rohingya refugees), Dadaab in Kenya (Somali refugees) and Za’atari in Jordan (Syrian refugees), I examine the ways that political, economic and ecological factors have driven the inhabitants to the camps, keep them vulnerable within them, and raise questions about both their and the camps’ respective futures. By cataloguing some of the environmental risks within the region of each camp and examining each camp’s response in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, I consider the broader logic, viability and purpose of each of these camps, as representative of parallel spaces globally. What does resilience and vulnerability mean in a refugee camp' How does a nexus dynamics approach to climate change and migration help us to understand a complex system such as this'
      PubDate: Wed, 17 Jan 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/oxfclm/kgae001
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • A tentative anatomy of Christian responses to anthropogenic climate change

    • First page: kgae002
      Abstract: AbstractThis pilot study addresses the differences in responses to anthropogenic climate change expressed in published normative statements for a cross section of Christian denominations and groupings from the UK and USA as well as international groupings. Grid-group cultural theory is tentatively employed to better understand these differences. Because the cosmologies identified by grid-group theory have as their basis the metaphor of the body, this is in effect a tentative anatomy of Christian responses to anthropogenic climate change. As a test case, this paper explores whether or not it is fruitful to attempt to challenge a given cosmological outlook to better communicate climate change and how this might be achieved or whether to speak to that cosmological perspective and how this might be achieved. In addition, this paper explores how each distinctive cosmology might contribute helpfully in responding to anthropogenic climate change. Finally, avenues of further work to expand this approach are explored.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 Jan 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/oxfclm/kgae002
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 1 (2024)
       
 
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