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  Subjects -> GEOGRAPHY (Total: 493 journals)
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Journal of Linguistic Geography
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ISSN (Print) 2049-7547 - ISSN (Online) 2049-7547
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [353 journals]
  • Maps meet myths: Understanding Jahai place naming through Geographical
           Information Systems

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      Authors: Villette; Julia, Burenhult, Niclas, Purves, Ross S.
      Pages: 1 - 10
      Abstract: Placenames are seemingly universal, with the potential to reveal different systems of organizing information in everyday communication. We report on the relationship between placenames in Jahai, an indigenous language spoken by the Jahai people of the Malay Peninsula, and the environment. Our approach explores the tendency to organize names using a hierarchy of kinship associated with the cnεl, mythological entities in origin stories, which appears to map onto catchment areas. By associating linguistic data with these ethnographic inputs and geographical properties calculated in a Geographic Information System, we generate and make suggestions for productive ways of understanding placenames as systems.
      PubDate: 2022-05-02
      DOI: 10.1017/jlg.2021.11
       
  • Linguistic traits as heritable units' Spatial Bayesian clustering
           reveals Swiss German dialect regions

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      Authors: Romano; Noemi, Ranacher, Peter, Bachmann, Sandro, Joost, Stéphane
      Pages: 11 - 22
      Abstract: In the early 2000s, the SADS, an extensive linguistic atlas project, surveyed more than three thousand individuals across German-speaking Switzerland on over two hundred linguistic variants, capturing the morphosyntactic variation in Swiss German. In this paper, we applied TESS, a Bayesian clustering method from evolutionary biology to the SADS to infer population structure, building on parallels between biology and linguistics that have recently been illustrated theoretically and explored experimentally. We tested three clustering models with different spatial assumptions: a nonspatial model, a spatial trend model with a spatial gradient, and a spatial full-trend model with both a spatial gradient and spatial-autocorrelation. Results reveal five distinct morphosyntactic populations, four of which correspond to traditional Swiss German dialect regions and one of which corresponds to a base population. Moreover, the spatial trend model outperforms the nonspatial model, suggesting a gradual transition of morphosyntax and supporting the idea of a Swiss German dialect continuum.
      PubDate: 2022-05-02
      DOI: 10.1017/jlg.2021.12
       
  • Dialect proficiency and Mandarin rating in dialect identification: The
           case of Jiangsu province

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      Authors: Jiao; Dan, Gnevsheva, Ksenia
      Pages: 23 - 33
      Abstract: This paper investigated origin identification in Jiangsu province, China. In total, ten localities were involved, including nine from Jiangsu province and the city of Beijing. Listeners were presented with recordings of forty speakers (four speakers from each locality) speaking local Mandarin and were asked to identify the region of origin of the speaker and score their Mandarin. Results revealed significant effects of speaker dialect and listener dialect in the identification of speaker origin. Firstly, listeners were able to make distinctions between speakers of Jiangsu province dialect and speakers of non-Jiangsu province dialect (Beijing speakers). Secondly, listeners from Jiangsu province were significantly better than non-Jiangsu listeners at correctly identifying the origin of speakers. In addition, we found significant effects of speaker gender, speaker dialect proficiency, listener dialect proficiency, and speaker Mandarin rating on the identification accuracy of speaker origin in individual analyses of dialect areas.
      PubDate: 2022-04-25
      DOI: 10.1017/jlg.2021.13
       
  • Phonetic variation and its spatial distribution in urban Austria:
           /l/-vocalization as a sociolinguistic marker'

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      Authors: Fischer; Ann Kathrin, Kleczkowski, Nina, Ziegler, Arne
      Pages: 34 - 45
      Abstract: This paper investigates German /l/-vocalization in the dialect region of South/Central Bavarian. In Austria, /l/-vocalization is said to be restricted to Central Bavarian, constituting the most salient dialect feature. However, its existence within the transition zone of South/Central Bavarian, including the urban and surrounding area of Graz, is often assumed. By analyzing natural speech data of different age groups from Greater Graz in a formal and an informal communication situation, we see that /l/-vocalization is already a well-established phenomenon, whereby the older age-group vocalizes considerably more often than the younger one. This suggests that /l/-vocalization serves as a sociolinguistic rather than a dialect marker indicating regional identity.
      PubDate: 2022-05-23
      DOI: 10.1017/jlg.2022.1
       
  • Towards an updated dialect atlas of British English

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      Authors: MacKenzie; Laurel, Bailey, George, Turton, Danielle
      Pages: 46 - 66
      Abstract: This paper presents the results of a survey of phonological, lexical, and morphosyntactic variation in British English, based on over 14,000 responses. We map twelve variables using geospatial “hotspot” analysis. One of our aims is to document the patterning of under- and unstudied variables. A second aim is to track changes in real time, which we do by comparing our findings to those of the 1950s-era Survey of English Dialects (SED; Orton, 1962). We improve upon previous dialectological work by paying careful attention to the phonemic status of mergers and splits: In our contemporary data, we do this by asking subjects if they have a phonemic contrast; in the SED data, we do this by superimposing the isoglosses for individual phones. We find evidence for both stability and change; we document previously unverified patterns. Perhaps most importantly, we identify a number of directions for future research.
      PubDate: 2022-05-30
      DOI: 10.1017/jlg.2022.2
       
 
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