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  Subjects -> GEOGRAPHY (Total: 493 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 277 Journals sorted by number of followers
Geophysical Research Letters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 184)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Space Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 159)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Atmospheres     Partially Free   (Followers: 149)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Planets     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 143)
Remote Sensing of Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 96)
Antipode     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Earth Surface     Partially Free   (Followers: 60)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Oceans     Partially Free   (Followers: 60)
Progress in Human Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Solid Earth     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58)
International Journal of Geographical Information Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
GIScience & Remote Sensing     Open Access   (Followers: 54)
Journal of Water and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 53)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Reviews of Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 49)
Remote Sensing Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Annals of the American Association of Geographers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Economic Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Applied Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Climate and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Urban Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Biogeosciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Annals of GIS     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Coastal Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Cartography and Geographic Information Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
GPS Solutions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of the Middle East and Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Dialogues in Human Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
China : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Imago Mundi: The International Journal for the History of Cartography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Geosciences (ADGEO)     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (AMT)     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Water International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of the American Planning Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Geography Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Cultural Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Cartographica : The International Journal for Geographic Information and Geovisualization     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Professional Geographer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Africa Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Crossings : Journal of Migration & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
The Geographical Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Geology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Computational Geosciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Tectonics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Geomatics, Natural Hazards and Risk     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
American Journal of Geographic Information System     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Annual Review of Marine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Buildings & Landscapes: Journal of the Vernacular Architecture Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Progress in Physical Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Indigenous Policy Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Geographical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Bulletin of Geosciences     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Geographical Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Geosciences Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Geographical Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Soil Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
GeoJournal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
American Journal of Human Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Geography and Natural Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
European Spatial Research and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Cartographic Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Atmospheric Measurement Techniques Discussions (AMTD)     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Iberian and Latin American Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Physical Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Health Geographics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Natural Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Middle East Development Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Borderlands Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Geographical Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Applied Geospatial Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Urban History Review / Revue d'histoire urbaine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Latin American Geography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
California Italian Studies Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Geo-spatial Information Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Nordic Journal of Migration Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Maps     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Social Geography Discussions (SGD)     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
GeoInformatica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Northern Scotland     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Asia Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Geographer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Ocean Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
The Canadian Geographer/le Geographe Canadien     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Creativity Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Australian Antarctic Magazine     Free   (Followers: 5)
Focus on Geography     Partially Free   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian Geographer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Current Research in Geoscience     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Australian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Map & Geography Libraries     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Transmodernity : Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Applied Geomatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Latinoamérica. Revista de estudios Latinoamericanos     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Geografiska Annaler, Series A : Physical Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Sedimentary Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Southeastern Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Bulletin of Geography. Socio-economic Series     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Limnological Review     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Western Archives     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Économie rurale     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Social Dynamics: A journal of African studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
New Zealand Journal of Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Burma Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
South Asian Diaspora     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
All Earth     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Lithosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Polar Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
History of Geo- and Space Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Earthquake and Tsunami     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Pastoralism : Research, Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Standort - Zeitschrift für angewandte Geographie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Norois     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Geodesy and Cartography     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eastern European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Mineralogia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Regions and Cohesion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Polar Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Southeastern Geographer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BioRisk     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Norsk Geografisk Tidsskrift - Norwegian Journal of Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Scottish Geographical Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Geosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Études rurales     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Polar Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Newfoundland and Labrador Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Regional Science Policy & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Provincial China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Cahiers franco-canadiens de l'Ouest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The South Asianist     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Reflets : revue d'intervention sociale et communautaire     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Maine Policy Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista de Geografía Norte Grande     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geoforum Perspektiv     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Estudios Geográficos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
PRISM : A Journal of Regional Engagement     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Norteamérica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Amerika     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
L'Année du Maghreb     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indiana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Les Cahiers d'Outre-Mer     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Southwest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revue archéologique du Centre de la France     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Terrestrial Observation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Méditerranée     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal de la Société des Océanistes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geochronometria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
South African Geographical Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
GEM - International Journal on Geomathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Terrae Incognitae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Bahamian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Études internationales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Recherches sociographiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Physio-Géo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
GEOMATICA     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
PSC Discussion Papers Series     Open Access  
Anales de Geografía de la Universidad Complutense     Open Access  
International Journal of River Basin Management     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Geográfica de América Central     Open Access  
Multiciencias     Open Access  
Investigaciones Geográficas (Esp)     Open Access  
Sociedade & Natureza     Open Access  
Región y Sociedad     Open Access  
Migración y Desarrollo     Open Access  
Migraciones Internacionales     Open Access  
Investigaciones Geográficas     Open Access  
Frontera Norte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Desarrollo Rural     Open Access  
Boletim de Ciências Geodésicas     Open Access  
Territoire en Mouvement     Open Access  
Quaestiones Geographicae     Open Access  
Limes. Cultural Regionalistics     Open Access  
Preview     Hybrid Journal  
Cuadernos de Geografía : Revista Colombiana de Geografía     Open Access  
Studia Universitatis Babes-Bolyai, Geologia     Open Access  
Recherches amérindiennes au Québec     Full-text available via subscription  
Rabaska : revue d'ethnologie de l'Amérique française     Full-text available via subscription  
Port Acadie : revue interdisciplinaire en études acadiennes / Port Acadie: An Interdisciplinary Review in Acadian Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Études/Inuit/Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Aurora Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista de la Asociacion Geologica Argentina     Open Access  
San Francisco Estuary and Watershed Science     Open Access  
Journal of Alpine Research : Revue de géographie alpine     Open Access  
Géocarrefour     Open Access  
Confins     Open Access  

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Dialogues in Human Geography
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.063
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 20  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2043-8206 - ISSN (Online) 2043-8214
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Uncanny frontiers: Amazon in outer space

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mia M. Bennett
      Pages: 181 - 185
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 181-185, July 2022.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T06:35:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221106827
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Rooting debt

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chiara De Cesari
      Pages: 328 - 331
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 328-331, July 2022.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T06:36:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221075703a
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Spacing sovereign debt

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      Authors: Kathryn Furlong
      Pages: 331 - 334
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 331-334, July 2022.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T06:36:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221075703b
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Collectively organized endurance through space and time to transform debt
           relations

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Melissa García-Lamarca
      Pages: 334 - 336
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 334-336, July 2022.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T06:36:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221075703c
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • ‘Sinews’ in Sinews

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      Authors: Sharad Chari
      Pages: 344 - 347
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 344-347, July 2022.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T06:41:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221074461a
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Arabia adrift

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      Authors: Fahad Bishara
      Pages: 347 - 350
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 347-350, July 2022.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T06:41:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221074461b
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Logistical futures and the Arabian Peninsula

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rafeef Ziadah
      Pages: 350 - 353
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 350-353, July 2022.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T06:41:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221074461c
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Witches as glitches: A response to Leszczynski and Elwood

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      Authors: Dillon Mahmoudi, Alicia Sabatino
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      This commentary critically engages with Leszczynski and Elwood's conception of the glitch, which is put forth as a way to grapple with digitally mediated spatialities that appear to be mistaken. By doing so, they reframe the glitch as a disruptive ‘signal’ of systemic oppression and as productive divergences. We argue for historicizing the glitch/glitch by engaging with feminist marxism, making possible the connection to previous forms of disruption and generative frictions. In response, we apply this approach by connecting the glitch to both witches and the industrial revolution in the home. We suggest epistemological clarity by connecting glitches to the capitalist orientations. We remain positively receptive toward Leszczynski and Elwood's work on the glitch/glitch as a vital endeavor to identify and exploit the spaces of rupture.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-10-03T06:39:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221129564
       
  • Glitching computational urban subjects

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      Authors: Helen Pallett
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      This commentary explores the epistemological vector of glitch/glitch proposed by Leszczynski and Elwood for the study of events which are non-performative or 'do not compute' in computational cities. There is a particular focus on the potential for this disposition to foreground more marginalised urban and computational subjects and their experiences. It argues that glitch/glitch can help analysts to identify and draw attention to instances where these subjects are able to more fully embody the role of citizen.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-09-27T04:43:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221129563
       
  • Unresolved tensions in green transitions: Retraining and the question of
           ‘how’'

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      Authors: Jesse Adams Stein
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      This commentary responds to Chantel Carr's article ‘Repair and care’ through a focus on the vexed question of carbon-intensive worker retraining in the context of urgent and necessary decarbonisation and industry change in Australia. There are many parallels between my research and Carr's, particularly in relation to an understanding of the potential of existing technical skillsets in industrial working populations. Like Carr, I reflect upon my empirical research – over the past decade – with current and former industrial tradespeople. This commentary reflects on what ‘retraining’ has actually meant, in practice, for industrial workers in deindustrialising Australia. I then identify a key tension that exists in relation to the question of retraining carbon workers. Climate change mitigation calls for the dramatic and wide-ranging transformation of industries, infrastructure, jobs, and skillsets. But the fact remains, humans are complex, with diverse needs, and they are now more likely to articulate these needs on an individual level, not collectively. With this in mind – and in a background in which much academic work draws attention to complexities and institutional shortcomings – how do we balance individualised requirements with the need for dramatic, macro-level transformation'
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-09-27T04:42:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221129207
       
  • On postcapitalist repair

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      Authors: Thomas S.J. Smith
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      This commentary responds to Carr's thoughtful intervention on the work of climate crisis by, first, foregrounding a pluriversal perspective on repair and, second, pushing Carr's work to more explicitly engage with forms of work enacting postcapitalist possibility. This could be framed as the move from ‘transition’ to ‘transformation’. In doing so, the role of geographers in intervening for transformation is flagged as one possible future direction for such work.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-09-27T04:42:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221129206
       
  • Glitch cities

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      Authors: Agnieszka Leszczynski, Sarah Elwood
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      The generous responses to our intervention, Glitch epistemologies for computational cities, open onto knowing cities via glitches through an expanded attention to temporalities, subject/ivities, and power and politics in addition to our initial concern with urban spatialities. We respond to our interlocutors by engaging their responses as engendering more robust theorizations of what we here term glitch cities: pervasively digitally mediated and mediatized urban environments knowable not only through an attunement to configurations that appear out of place, but also those which present as being out of time, as counter-topographical against the violence of imposed legibility, and as more closely contending with subjects and subjectivities. We discuss how and why thinking more holistically about glitch cities while avoiding the tendency to reduce this epistemological claim to an archetype or conceptual singularity matters for digital urban geographies.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-09-23T06:12:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221129208
       
  • Dispositions towards automation: Capital, technology, and labour relations
           in aeromobilities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Weiqiang Lin, Peter Adey, Tina Harris
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      With the rapid rise of supercomputers, artificial intelligence, and advanced forms of robotics, recent years have seen a resurgence in interest in automation in the academy. In geography, scholars have yielded some important insights on the mottled relations between humans and machines as capital moves towards a more high-tech form of production. In this paper, we seek to extend these debates by delving into how labour's relations with automation do not always reactively vacillate between capitulation and adaptation. Instead, they are more ambiguously swayed by broader ‘dispositions towards automation’, which are generated either through practice, or by machines themselves that are designed to appeal to human desires and wants. Drawing on examples from aeromobilities and, particularly, airports, this paper shows how various in-process tendencies, or ‘points of meeting’, of human-technology assemblages enable and creatively rework automation in ways that are culturally specific and ideologically supportive of capital. We consider five different dispositions – namely, enchantment, aspiration, experimentation, gamification, and acquiescence – as starting points for further dialogues on technological relations and resistances in geography.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-08-30T06:44:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221121652
       
  • Dignity, mega-projects, and the problem of scale

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      Authors: John Lauermann
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      I extend Grossman and Trubina's argument about dignity in urban geography in one direction: the problem of scale. It is worth noting that both of their case studies – mega-events, and large housing estates – involve mega-projects. There is an inherent conflict between the micro-scale of the individual and community – where the lived experience of dignity occurs – and the much bigger scale of the mega-project – where much contemporary city-making occurs. Governance for the micro-scale is inherently skeptical of big urban transformations, prioritizing individual rights to the city: to home, to neighborhood, to public space. In contrast, governance for the mega-scale values big picture thinking and economies of scale, where the common good might trump the dignity of individual urban citizens. Reconciling these scalar conflicts is a foundational problem in the ‘urban age’ of rapid and global mega-urbanization.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-08-30T06:44:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221121650
       
  • Contemporary Brazil is Unequal and Divided and Milton Santos’
           geographical thought is still relevant

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rafael Sanzio Araújo dos Anjos
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T06:53:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221082345
       
  • Thinking through the anthropocene

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      Authors: Simon Dalby
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-07-28T05:52:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221088376
       
  • Repair and care: Locating the work of climate crisis

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      Authors: Chantel Carr
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      Climate crisis has arrived, and as predicted it has brought with it high levels of uncertainty. More frequent and extreme weather events expose infrastructural shortcomings, signalling a future characterised by profound disruption. It is time to turn our attention to the tangible work of climate crisis. Work is fundamental to embodied, material and spatial understandings of the world, yet it remains largely overlooked in social and cultural geography. What does the work of climate crisis look like, and who will do it' In this paper I argue that climate crisis demands more attention be paid to the deeply interwoven labours of repair and care. Reflecting on fieldwork across a range of carbon-intensive sectors and places, I locate the work of repair and care within the context of adaptation and mitigation action. Capacities to repair and care for our world and each other are profoundly important for adapting to the conditions of planetary breakdown. But the work of repair and care is also crucial for transitioning to low-carbon futures. A focus on this vital work suggests a deeply pragmatic and inclusive environmental politics and scholarship, bringing into dialogue rich veins of work within and beyond geography, on labour and everyday life.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-06-30T06:16:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221088381
       
  • Debt, colony, morality, and other odious cocktails: A review of Zambrana's
           Colonial Debts

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      Authors: Jose Caraballo-Cueto
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T05:49:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221102934
       
  • Dialogues for well being in an ecological emergency: Wellbeing-led
           governance frameworks and transformative Indigenous tools

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      Authors: Amanda Yates, Kelly Dombroski, Rita Dionisio
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      At a time of ecological emergency there are pressing reasons to develop more responsive wellbeing-led governance frameworks that engage with both human and more-than-human wellbeing. Attempts to incorporate wellbeing indices into wellbeing-led governance include the Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations, the Gross National Happiness index of Bhutan, and a variety of emerging wellbeing-led governance frameworks in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Some of these frameworks have begun to include more-than-human wellbeing indices in their toolkit, but like many geographers and Indigenous scholars, we are wary of the dangers of universalising and abstractionist ‘indexology’ ( Ratuva, 2016). In this paper, we review wellbeing-led governance frameworks with a view to more-than-human wellbeing and Indigenous knowledge. We outline an emerging pluriversal and prefigurative project where Indigenous scholars engage with partners in co-creation methods in place, incorporating Indigenous-Māori cultural perspectives into more situated and holistic wellbeing tools. We argue that while critique is important, so too is engaging in Indigenous-led research interventions fortransformative metrics and tools, particularlyin these times of socio-ecological crisis. As we ‘stay with’ this trouble ( Haraway, 2018), we hope to contribute to a culturally specific place-based set of wellbeing indices and tools to inform wellbeing-led governance for more-than-human wellbeing.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T04:09:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221102957
       
  • What is ‘affective infrastructure’'

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      Authors: Kai Bosworth
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      Recent work in analyses of infrastructure and affect theory has mobilized a concept of ‘affective infrastructure’ in two related but somewhat different ways. On the one hand, some scholars use the concept to draw our attention to the emotions produced by concrete infrastructure systems. On the other hand, scholars have sought to locate how affect might condition forms of political organization. The concept risks analytic confusion: is ‘infrastructure’ metaphor, analogy, or material-technical system' Is the concept historically, spatially, or empirically situated, or does it have potential generic parameters as well' This article seeks to reconstruct two ‘sides’ of affective infrastructure while drawing out its significance for infrastructural politics. Doing so also involves understanding the problem space from which it emerged: affective geographies and 20th century Marxism. This article's process of reading results in a cluster of attendant concepts that give ‘affective infrastructure’ further specificity: mediation, endurance, determination, technical alienation, temporalities of repair, and political organization. The article's wager is that the concept gains analytic utility when it is used to clarify the ratio between historically situated technical alienation as a power relation of enduring colonial capitalism and the project of organizing anti-colonial social relations that might work to transform the capitalist mode of production.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T06:37:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221107025
       
  • Arabia adrift

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      Authors: Fahad Bishara
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T06:36:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221074459
       
  • “Legalizing War/Militarizing Law”

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      Authors: Lisa Stampnitzky
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-05-30T06:14:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221102946
       
  • Legal Geography on the Edge

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      Authors: Nicholas Blomley
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-05-30T06:14:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221102938
       
  • Encounters with For a New Geography

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      Authors: Mariana Lamego
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T05:32:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221102955
       
  • Diversifying the compact city: A renewed agenda for geographical research

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      Authors: Håvard Haarstad, Kristin Kjærås, Per Gunnar Røe, Kristian Tveiten
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      The compact city has become part of the policy orthodoxy in dealing with climate change and other sustainability challenges, and scholars from a diverse set of disciplines have informed this policy through empirical research. In this paper, we argue that attuning research in this field to key perspectives and concepts in human geography and critical urban studies can help ‘diversify’ understandings of compact urbanism in ways that advance social and ecological justice. We show that the compact city has been conceived primarily through the lens of territorially bounded physical urban form, and thereby many of its social, political, and ecological implications are overlooked. Based on this critique, we propose a renewed agenda for compact urbanism that rearticulates it as a strategy for sustainable transformation by bridging socio-material and relational approaches and engaging the human geographical toolbox. Three entry points for this agenda are highlighted: (1) commoning the compact city; (2) metabolism of compact cities; and (3) antagonism in the compact city.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-05-25T06:22:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221102949
       
  • Glitch Epistemology and the Question of (Artificial) Intelligence:
           Perceptions, Encounters, Subjectivities

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      Authors: Casey R Lynch
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      Reflecting on Leszczynski and Elwood's theorization of glitch epistemology, this commentary argues for epistemological approaches to the question of (artificial) intelligence in geography focused around perceptions, encounters, and subjectivities. Such an approach denies technologies marketed as AI or otherwise as “smart” the ontological status ascribed to them, instead investigating how particular technologies may be perceived as intelligent within the context of contingent and situated encounters with always differentiated and differentiating subjects. Glitch and related epistemological approaches reorient attention to the uneven production of desire and expectations for particular kinds of technologies and create opportunities to radically reimagine our relationships to them.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T05:18:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221102952
       
  • From glitch epistemologies to glitch politics

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      Authors: Luis F Alvarez Leon
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      Given the influential (but incomplete) characterization of cities as computers, new ways of disrupting ruling urban computational logics become crucial to reimagine cities and urban life as they are constituted in the 21st century. Addressing this need, Agnieszka Leszczynski and Sarah Elwood center the notion of the glitch to develop glitch epistemologies. These are ways of knowing digitally mediated environments against the ruling urban computational logics. Building on the glitch's capability to both unveil and disrupt such dominant logics, the authors advance glitch epistemologies as a means of political and material urban change. This commentary examines the ramifications and potential of glitch epistemologies for reimagining cities. In view of such potential, the commentary argues for the urgent task of drawing their substantive connections to urban politics not only to realize the possibilities opened by glitch epistemologies to make new urban futures, but also to decide which futures to make.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T05:18:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221102951
       
  • On Colonial Exceptionality, Neoliberal Coloniality, and Legal
           Interruptions

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      Authors: Jose Atiles
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T05:13:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221102936
       
  • Planetary Vegetal Thought

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      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T05:13:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221102931
       
  • Logistical futures and the Arabian Peninsula

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      Authors: Rafeef Ziadah
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T03:55:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221074475
       
  • ‘Sinews’ in Sinews

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      Authors: Sharad Chari
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T06:53:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221074460
       
  • Finding ‘new’ geographies in dedications, acknowledgements,
           and citations

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      Authors: Hannah Neate
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T05:43:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221088386
       
  • Henri Lefebvre's conception of nature-society in the revolutionary project
           of autogestion

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      Authors: Brian M. Napoletano, Pedro S. Urquijo, Brett Clark, John Bellamy Foster
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      Henri Lefebvre's intricate material-dialectical approach to the nature-society problematic, taken together with his advocacy of a praxis oriented to total transformation from the ground up through autogestion, offers a unified, critical, and dialectical approach to political ecology. Unfortunately, his work in these areas has too often been interpreted as divided and fragmentary, splitting his radical analysis of the production of space-time from his critical praxis related to autogestion. We offer a corrective to this by elaborating briefly on his use of Marx's material-dialectical approach, outlining how Lefebvre brings this method to bear on the nature-society problematic, and how his theorization of autogestion points to a radical praxis aimed at overcoming the social-ecological contradictions of capital. His engagement with Marx's theory of metabolic rift, and his advocacy of a radical project of autogestion as part of the critique of everyday life, serve to place the underlying issue of alienation in spatial terms, offering geography a transformative perspective that avoids positing closed systems and attempting to exhaust the various meanings assigned to nature. In this, Lefebvre demonstrates how the nature-society problematic overflows issues of ontological framing and language, calling for a unity of radical theory and practice to overcome the separations.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-03-30T06:10:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221088385
       
  • Glitch epistemologies for computational cities

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      Authors: Agnieszka Leszczynski, Sarah Elwood
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      This intervention advances glitches as epistemological vectors for apprehending and engaging the significance of digitally-mediated spatialities that appear nonperformative against normative scripts of urban computational paradigms. Drawing on two strands of contemporary thinking about glitches as systemic design features of digital systems and as generative fissures within them, we mobilize a queer orientation that stays with the generative tensions of urban spatialities that present as idiosyncratic and as interrupting. We mobilize this epistemological approach through illustrative U.S. based examples of seemingly abandoned shared e-bikes, performatively ‘ugly’ homes, and wilful property dilapidation wrought through the registers of desire and aesthetics. In so doing, we show how glitch empistemologies render visible how the technocapitalist manufacturing of normative spatial desires for particular kinds of urban sociospatialities and aesthetic visual signatures are both secured and interrupted on digitally-mediated and -mediatized terrains. Glitch epistemologies establish the significance of small-scale disorientations in digital urban mediations, engaging these nonperformativities and non-computes as unexceptional openings onto everyday possibilities for politics in computational cities.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T08:30:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221075714
       
  • Review commentary: Planetary Social Thought: The Anthropocene Challenge to
           the Social Sciences

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      Authors: Nigel Clark, Bronislaw Szerszynski
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T03:35:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221077151
       
  • Dignity in Urban Geography: Starting a Conversation

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      Authors: Katrin Grossmann, Elena Trubina
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      Studies in critical urban geography actively deal with injustices and humiliation, employing concepts like equity, justice, sustainability and the like, but strikingly, dignity is not among such current normative concepts. Analytic perspectives and definitions of dignity are widely discussed by philosophy, legal studies, and race and indigenous studies, but a dialogue of this literature with urban geographical work is still pending. This article initiates a conceptual conversation between these traditions. It reviews how dignity occurs in urban geographical work, then presents contemporary literature on the concept of dignity, and suggests a heuristic approach that can then serve geographical analyses. We outline the potential of scholarly engagement with the concept of dignity and its merits in considering two classic topics of urban geographical scholarship from a dignity-perspective: the employment of dignifying rhetoric for promotion of mega-events, and large housing estates as a stigmatized type of neighbourhood. We highlight affectual and relational perspectives of dignity, including the interpersonal and societal emergence of dignifying or humiliating practices, and the contingency of the concept of dignity across time and context. For critical urban studies and human geography, we thus establish dignity as the moral status of a person, of a collective, and of a place within a given context rather than a universal moral status.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T01:40:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221075697
       
  • Rooting Debt

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      Authors: Chiara De Cesari
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T05:37:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221075712
       
  • Geologizing the political ecology of intensive agriculture in the
           Anthropocene

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      Authors: László Cseke
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T12:31:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221075717
       
  • Collectively organized endurance through space and time to transform debt
           relations

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      Authors: Melissa García-Lamarca
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T12:30:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221075705
       
  • Spacing sovereign debt

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      Authors: Kathryn Furlong
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T12:29:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221075689
       
  • Geographies of ruralization

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      Authors: Jamie Gillen, Tim Bunnell, Jonathan Rigg
      First page: 186
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      This paper proposes ‘ruralization’ as a concept that human geographers are well placed to develop across the rural-urban geography divide and in dialogue with scholars in cognate fields. We understand ruralization as the processual, more-than-residual, and geographically-variegated socio-spatial dynamics of contemporary human engagements with rural land, livelihoods, and lifestyles. Our approach comprises three prominent dynamics of ruralization experienced through residents’ entanglements with rural and urban Southeast Asia: in situ ruralization, extended ruralization, and rural returns. We argue in favor of a rural-urban relationality rather than urban-centered socio-spatial transformation and urge geographers to take seriously the lives and geographies of people in the Global South whose perspectives on urbanization are entangled with ongoing rural dynamics. Our contribution is intended as a corrective to notions of the urbanization of everywhere in a zero-sum relationship with a residual rural, and as a way of demonstrating the importance of human geographical experiences to wider debates, concerns, and conversations.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T03:35:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221075818
       
  • Geographies of ruralisation or ruralities' The death and life of a
           category

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      Authors: Laurie Parsons, Sabina Lawreniuk
      First page: 204
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      The rural sphere has suffered from underrepresentation in recent years in part due to growing interest in the urban. A perhaps equally important aspect of the decline has been the troubling of the spatial boundaries that define the rural and urban among scholars of mobilities and translocality. Exploring the decline of the rural in relation to these literary works, this commentary interrogates current geographical thinking on spatial categories, positing the concept of ruralities as a means to reinvigorate rural space on its own terms.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T07:50:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221102937
       
  • In what sense ruralization'

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      Authors: Swarnabh Ghosh
      First page: 208
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      This commentary offers an analysis of Gillen et al.’s (2022) ‘Geographies of ruralization’. Through a reading of the authors’ conceptualization of ‘in-situ’ and ‘extended’ ruralization, I raise two sets of questions. The first pertains to the relationship between ruralization – which the authors conceptualize primarily in terms of rural social reproduction – and transformations in agricultural production and agrarian political economy under contemporary capitalism. The second invites the authors to further elaborate on the historical specificity of the concept of ruralization, the politico-epistemological standpoint of their conceptualization, and the theoretical framework within which the concept is embedded.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-07-06T06:45:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221102947
       
  • Rural revitalization in China: Towards inclusive geographies of
           ruralization

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      Authors: Ningning Chen, Lily Kong
      First page: 213
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      This commentary welcomes Gillen et al.'s geographies of ruralization as an alternative to the urban-centered analysis of socio-spatial transformation in post-reform China. We offer three perspectives to further develop such alternative articulation by drawing on China's most recent geographical experiences of rural revitalization. The first is the “top-down” process of rural revitalization launched by different levels of Chinese state agents and how this is divergent from local needs or embedded in bottom-up engagement. The second is the temporal dimension of ruralization highlighting how uses of the past are implicated in and legitimize the state agenda of rural revitalization. The third directs attention to the entanglement of nature and culture—that is, how a harmonious human–nature approach to rural revitalization is produced in discourse and practice. We argue that these alternative insights offer possibilities of developing more inclusive geographies of ruralization in the Global South and beyond.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T05:18:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221102933
       
  • The problem of the urban-rural binary in geography and political ecology

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      Authors: Ian G Baird
      First page: 218
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      Geographers have been challenging problematic spatial concepts for decades. Gillen et al. usefully add to this work by disrupting the urban–rural binary in human geography, suggesting that we take people in the Global South more seriously, especially those ‘whose perspectives on urbanization are entangled with ongoing rural dynamics’. They advocate for advancing the concept of relational ruralization. In this commentary, I express my general support for Gillen et al.'s efforts to expose the limitations associated with the urban–rural divide. However, I go somewhat beyond their work to suggest that human geographers should consciously reduce the primacy of the urban–rural binary when conceptualizing space, especially when looking at activities that transcend the urban–rural. There are more productive ways to consider connections.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T05:13:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221102953
       
  • Beyond the rural–urban aporia

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      Authors: Arnisson Andre Ortega
      First page: 223
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      In a more interconnected world, how do we come to grip with interrelationships and connectivities that cut across long-held spatial categories, such as the rural and the urban' Amidst the uneven emphasis on urban theorization, there must be ways of theorizing the relationalities from vantage points beyond the “urban.” Gillen et al.'s article is a well-written piece that provides an important contribution to efforts that aim to theorize beyond the rural–urban divide. For this commentary, I discuss its theoretical gains and potential for analysis. However, I also express my hesitation towards the use of an umbrella term (“ruralization”) that is anchored upon a problematic rural–urban binary. Perhaps a way to move forward is to take on a postcolonial suggestion that pushes for what Leitner and Sheppard call a theoretical “ecosystem of possibilities,” which encourages more theoretical conceptualizations from diverse voices, while drawing from various contextual realities and multiple “constitutive outsides” beyond the “rural” or “urban.”
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T03:39:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221102948
       
  • Beyond binaries' Spatial possibilities in Southeast Asia

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      Authors: Jamie Gillen, Tim Bunnell, Jonathan Rigg
      First page: 227
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      The thoughtful and incisive responses to our article push us to address the central tension in our conceptualization of ruralization, which concerns how it both unsettles and reproduces binary thinking. On the one hand, we draw upon work in Southeast Asia that confounds binary mappings of urban versus rural space and associated divisions of labour in ways that redress the intellectual preponderance of the urban and urbanization. On the other hand, by proposing ruralization to do this, we arguably entrench a new variant of the binary (ruralization vs. urbanization). To address this tension, our response to the commentaries focuses on the ways in which they engage with the rural–urban binary. The conclusion briefly comments on the tricky pathways to theorize in step with the voices, practices, and imaginations of people in the Global South.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T06:33:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221108773
       
  • The distribution of non-sense and the cultivation of the
           less-than-sensible

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      Authors: Klaus Dodds
      First page: 252
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      Ben Gerlofs’ article on the transgressive qualities of humour reminds us that it humour is a deadly serious business. Getting it wrong can be costly, even fatal. Comedians and humourists have along with journalists and academics been targeted by regimes and individuals who don’t care for interventions that expose either the nonsensical nature of regimes and/or assault cultural and religious norms. In this short intervention, some comments are offered about the popular geopolitics of humour and laughter alongside a discussion about future directions.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-02-02T05:31:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221075713
       
  • The distorted mirrors of humor

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      Authors: Leticia Neria
      First page: 256
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      Research on humor has generated many different perspectives. Among them is a discussion of how humor acts to cause discomfort. Humor as a means of expression also appears in specific spaces and moments. The study of these spaces and moments, what is expressed through humor, the humorous mechanisms chosen by a collectivity, and who this collectivity may be, are broad-spectrum phenomenological issues that deserve further inquiry.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-03-24T04:26:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221088387
       
  • Humour, for whom'

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      Authors: Philip Kirby
      First page: 260
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      This commentary reflects on the gender politics of the case studies examined in Ben Gerlofs’ excellent article, ‘Deadly Serious: Humor and the Politics of Aesthetic Transgression’. In addition, it considers the innate difficulties of studying an entity (humour) that diverse disciplines have found impossible to completely define.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-02-02T05:30:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221075696
       
  • Does humor need to be serious to be taken seriously': Commentary on
           Ben A. Gerlofs; #x201C;Deadly Serious: Humor and the politics of aesthetic
           transgression”

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      Authors: Jennifer L. Fluri
      First page: 264
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      This commentary engages with Gerlofs’ (2022) article on the humor and politics of aesthetic transgression. It is intended not as a critique of Gerlofs’ work but rather to generate additional discussion about his approach to examining humor and aesthetics, and with the hope of additional discussion and debate about how to study humor in human geography. I also ask, does humor need to be serious to be taken seriously as a category of analysis' Can we view humor's dynamism and incongruities as an opportunity to push against and beyond binaries and categorizations' Does humor in its enactment challenge the very idea of categorization or congruent analyses and shouldn’t that be something we celebrate rather than attempt to control and contain'
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T02:41:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221088384
       
  • Taking humor seriously

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      Authors: Verónica Crossa
      First page: 268
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      Understanding humor on its own terms is not an easy task. This commentary responds to Ben Gerlofs's (2022) article, “Deadly serious: Humor and the politics of aesthetic transgression,” by highlighting some of the important contributions made in his article and drawing out the empirical richness of his discussion. In doing so, I hope to discuss some of the ways in which humor has been analyzed in the geographical literature as well as potential gaps that remain to be addressed.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-03-18T07:32:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221088388
       
  • Ammunition, not a ride: Humor, human geography, and the fragile
           absurdities of power

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      Authors: Ben A Gerlofs
      First page: 272
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      In this author's response, I close this forum on the spatiality and political utility of humor by responding to a superb set of critical commentaries – for which I am extremely grateful – in three parts, with the sobering contemporary reality of the comedian-president facing down a brutal invasion serving as a critical, conjunctural point of entry. First, humor can be, as the commentators highlight in different ways, extremely serious business. Second, context matters. And, third, there's a great deal more work to be done. In each of these areas, I respond to some of the many significant issues and questions raised by the commentators that remain for the study of humor, both within geography and as a matter of interdisciplinary inquiry.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T03:39:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221102954
       
  • Montage space: Borderlands, micronations, terra nullius, and the
           imperialism of the geographical imagination

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      Authors: James Riding, Carl T Dahlman
      First page: 278
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      This article extends work in human geography on thinking space relationally and topological space, arguing for a relational conceptualization of space that employs montage in small seemingly confined spaces to tell big relational stories. Empirically it explores a micronation projected onto watery western Balkan no-man's [sic] land and reveals an exploitation of Balkan history and geography that underpins perceptions of the southeast European peninsula. Liberland is a new right-libertarian unofficial country that claims a disputed tract of middle Danube riverbank in a contested riverine borderscape between Croatia and Serbia, where the fantasy geography of emptiness and terra nullius reappears in a new imperial present. The hackneyed performances that self-proclaimed micronations undertake to legitimize themselves are placed alongside a relational story of regional cultural landscape and more-than-human geographies in this fluvial political–ecological borderland in order to undermine alt-right libertarianism, Balkanism, and imperialism.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T05:17:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221102597
       
  • Planting flags in water

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      Authors: Natalie Koch
      First page: 302
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      In this commentary, I respond to James Riding and Carl Dahlman's article, Montage space: borderlands, micronations, terra nullius, and the imperialism of the geographical imagination. I build on their arguments about ‘more-than-dry landscapes’ to consider how the relationship between fluid and non-fluid landscapes sheds light on the construction and contestation of political space. To do so, I offer additional examples of how people plant flags in water, shedding light on the political implications of how physical territories are imagined, claimed, and sometimes, simply created at the fluid/non-fluid interface.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T05:12:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221108770
       
  • Where is Liberland' Ideology and power beyond territory

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      Authors: Amaël Cattaruzza
      First page: 307
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      In response to James Riding and Carl Dahlman's thought-provoking article, I wish to question the link between the self-proclaimed micronation Liberland and the territory of Gornja Siga. Indeed, if we consider that the real location of Liberland is in cyberspace, and not on the small terra nullius stuck on the banks of the Danube, at the Croatian-Serbian border, the reflection refers to other ‘geographical imaginaries’, putting forward the libertarian ideology of the protagonists, and the articulation between militant networks and technologies, which make possible the emergence of this ‘private state’ without a proper territory. Would the claim of Gornja Siga be then only the territorial camouflage of a political movement ‘off-ground’'
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-06-16T05:49:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221108771
       
  • The state of water

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      Authors: Rachael Squire
      First page: 312
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      This brief response to Riding and Dahlman's compelling paper offers two reflections that seek to build on their rich analysis of the complex geographies and geopolitics of Liberland. Firstly, it explores how the ‘restless river’ might be further enlivened as an actor within this intriguing context. It then digs further into the non-human complexities of the project by suggesting that the animals of Liberland warrant further attention. In doing so, it seeks to add additional complexity to the challenge of rethinking ‘traditional ways’ of writing about disputed territories and to shed further light on the violence associated with ascriptions of ‘terra nullius’.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T06:36:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221107024
       
  • Legitimizing land grabs in a digital age

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      Authors: Michelle Ann Miller
      First page: 316
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      In this commentary, I respond to Riding and Dahlman’s call to counter land grabs rooted in terra nullius claims. While this cyber-spatial montage provides a richly layered account of the representational dynamics and performative practices of a self-proclaimed country, I argue that the authors’ more-than-human theorization dilutes rather than sharpens their critical edge. Landscapes and natural resources have certain materialities that shape their governance, but Riding and Dahlman's invocation of ‘more-than-human geographies of responsibility against alt-right libertarianism, Balkanism, and imperialist imaginaries’ downplays the onus of responsibility on humans to prevent land grabs and mitigate their socioecological consequences.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-06-16T05:49:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221108772
       
  • Montage space: Extra scenes

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      Authors: James Riding, Carl Dahlman
      First page: 321
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      In this author's reply, we outline the four commentaries on our article and consider them as interpretations of the same relational story: part of the montage. By intersplicing the four commentaries with extra scenes from ‘Montage Space’, we explore again the riverine, more-than-dry, and more-than-human that both Koch and Squire choose to take downstream, the human land grab that Miller recenters, and the paradox existing between the material geography of a disputed river island and the proclamation of a virtual state, which Catarruza identifies. The four critical engagements with ‘Montage Space’ work to add depth to our own exposition of a squelchy island space and the strange creation of a new state in this contested borderscape, where statehood was violently imposed onto a space deemed to be empty and characterless rather than a vital part of a territorial dispute and a wetland biosphere reserve.
      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T03:44:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221107026
       
  • The cyclical nature of spectacular and slow state violence

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      Authors: Jessie H. Clark
      First page: 326
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-02-08T10:15:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221075703
       
  • Debt here, there and everywhere

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      Authors: Christopher Harker
      First page: 337
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T12:29:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221075698
       
  • “Oceanic stories as method”

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      Authors: Mae Miller-Likhethe
      First page: 341
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T07:23:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221074461
       
  • Response: On the politics of oceanic knowledge production

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      Authors: Laleh Khalili
      First page: 354
      Abstract: Dialogues in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Dialogues in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T06:21:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20438206221094673
       
 
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