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  Subjects -> GEOGRAPHY (Total: 493 journals)
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Journal of Latin American Geography
Number of Followers: 7  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1545-2476 - ISSN (Online) 1548-5811
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • Letter from the Editor

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      Abstract: Dear Readers,Over the past four years I have had the opportunity to work with an incredible group of scholars, editors, authors, peer reviewers, book reviewers, copy editors, designers, and editorial board members. As my term as JLAG's Editor-in-Chief comes to an end, I'd like to use this space to extend my sincerest thanks to all the people who make publishing JLAG possible.As we've written about previously in editorials, JLAG occupies a relatively unique space in academic publishing. From initial submission of manuscripts to final publication, JLAG is entirely non-profit, and nearly all revenues that all the journal produces are used to support CLAG's robust research and travel grant programs. This only functions ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-24T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Infrastructure and Latin American Environmental Geographies: An
           Introduction to our Special Issue

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      Abstract: Latin America's contested environmental geographies remain globally significant, in particular for the negotiation and analysis of predatory extractive frontiers and for fertile decolonising agendas that include claims for territory, plurality, and ontological multiplicity. Yet contemporary commitments to new infrastructure connect and complicate both extractive and decolonising agendas, with implications for Latin American environmental geographies and their analysis. Plans for new infrastructure include new highways, waterways, railways, ports, dams, and power stations, including in the Amazon basin (Bebbington et al., 2020). These plans support the region's extractive imperative (Arsel et al., 2016) but also ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-24T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Infrastructure in Brazil: From Marketization to Emancipation

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      Abstract: The trajectory of the Brazilian economy reveals that investments in economic infrastructure—mainly those related to the flows of capital accumulation, as is the case with logistics and electricity—have periodically played a leading role in economic growth strategies and cycles. Large projects, and their territorial impacts, have provided opportunities for business, jobs, and income, and have been legitimized by their ability to reconcile asymmetric interests. Under neoliberalization (from the 1990s onwards), economic use remained the main driving force—especially with regard to social infrastructure, such as water, sanitation, and housing—behind the socio-technical arrangements and rearrangements for the supply of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-24T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Hydroelectric Extractivism: Infrastructural Violence and Coloniality in
           the Sierra Norte de Puebla, Mexico

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      Abstract: "La revolución de hoy se hace con energías renovables."In response to the Covid-19 pandemic, governments throughout Abya Yala1 are seeking to raise revenue by expanding energy and materials extraction, deepening the development model of neoextractivism (Benites & Bebbington, 2020; Le Billon et al., 2021). Concomitantly, the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (2021, pp. 166-167) considers investments in so-called renewable energy infrastructures as the foremost "opportunity to achieve rapid recovery in the post-pandemic period" while "driving the big push for sustainability." Paradoxically, Latin American governments are thus set to fund their transitions to 'sustainable ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-24T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Toward a Reconfiguration of Mining Infrastructure in Mexico: Norms,
           Resistance, and Governance

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      Abstract: This paper offers a theoretical and analytical framework to identify how communities negatively affected by mineral extraction and its infrastructure can begin to transition toward an emancipatory approach to overcome their marginalization, which has been accentuated by the socio-environmental conflicts caused by mining. We call this kind of transition "reconfiguration of mining infrastructure." We argue that the nexus of extractivism and infrastructure is important because when infrastructure is considered less as an object and more as a socio-relational space, alternative options to the conflicts caused by extractive infrastructure can be unveiled and unpacked. In comparing two Mexican cases affected by mining ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-24T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Linkages of Suspended Infrastructure, Contestation, and
           Social-Environmental Unevenness: Colombia's Tolima Triangle Irrigation
           Megaproject

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      Abstract: Across Latin America, governments and development banks are pushing to develop and finance diverse infrastructures (A. Bebbington et al., 2020; D. H. Bebbington et al., 2018). Less discussed but also pressing are the many infrastructure projects in some state of suspension, tallied in a World Bank report (Watkins et al., 2017). Suspended projects range from small to large-scale investments in megaprojects. Uribe (2021) contends most infrastructure projects pass through states of suspension, whether "rutinarios, intempestivos, parciales, totales, transitorios, [o] indefinidos" (p. 226). In other words, delays or partial completion with a promise of continuance may be forms of suspension (Table 1 shows a few ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-24T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Producing Citizenship Through Infrastructure: The Political Materiality of
           Water Access in Urban Chile

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      Abstract: In both urban geography and urban political ecology, infrastructures have been studied to gain insights into the socio-material configurations of urban life (e.g., Caldeira, 2000, 2017; Simone, 2004, 2021; Holston, 2007, 2009; Amin, 2014; Silver, 2014; Coutard & Rutherford, 2016; Anand, 2017; McFarlane & Silver, 2017; Fredericks, 2018; Lawhon et al., 2018; Lemanski, 2020). This paper contributes to that body of work by examining the relationship between urban water infrastructures and the identity dimension of citizenship. To this end, this paper combines notions from urban political ecology and Foucault's work on biopolitics. While the former draws attention to water infrastructures as hybrid socio-natures ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-24T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Critiquing Sustainable Development as Materially Constituted:
           Infrastructure, Political Ecology, and Political Ontology in the Amazon

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      Abstract: As climate change accelerates to become the defining development issue of our century, so too does the need for a response. An enduring concept within global policy is 'sustainable development', currently fronting the United Nation's Agenda 2030 and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). These quantify sustainable development into seventeen goals, 169 targets, and 230 indicators. They link states, multilateral development banks and institutions, NGOs, civil society organisations, and, increasingly, the private sector with a US$90 billion "plan of action for people and planet" (UN, 2015). The concept of sustainable development, however, is old and much critiqued, primarily as vague and ill-defined. Derided as an ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-24T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Confederate Exodus: Social and Environmental Forces in the Migration of
           U.S. Southerners to Brazil by Alan P. Marcus (review)

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      Abstract: The history and memory of the confederate States of America and its inhabitants has long been the subject of academic and public debate. This is particularly true more recently, given instances of violence in the United States associated with Confederate symbols and heritage, such as the 2015 Charleston massacre, the 2017 Charlottesville tragedy, and uprisings in response to the 2020 police murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Less known about the Confederacy, however, is that, after the South's defeat in the U.S. Civil War in 1865, several thousand U.S. Southerners decided to emigrate to Brazil rather than face the possible incorporation of formerly enslaved people into Southern life and politics during the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-24T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Mapping the Amazon: Literary Geography after the Rubber Boom by Amanda M.
           Smith (review)

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      Abstract: Despite its remoteness, the amazon Basin is Latin America's most written about and filmed region when it comes to sagas about geographical exploration and economic exploitation. This huge region experienced the fabled Rubber Boom (ca. 1880 to 1912) and other extractive activities, such as tropical hardwood harvesting and oil drilling, that negatively affected the environment and Indigenous inhabitants. Early railroad and later road construction aimed at developing these resources also had an impact on the region. Extractive industries and development continue into the twenty-first century. All are taken to task in this remarkable book.To address the mistreatment of Amazonia geocritically, author Amanda Smith ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-24T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Poisoned Eden: Cholera Epidemics, State-Building, and the Problem of
           Public Health in Tucumán, Argentina, 1865–1908 by Carlos S. Dimas
           (review)

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      Abstract: Carlos s. dimas's new book provides the first history of cholera and its impact on governance and public health in the small but economically important northern Argentine province of Tucumán. Between cholera's first (documented) arrival in 1865 to the end of the book in 1908, "[C]holera was no longer a fearsome disease that destabilized society, but an accomplishable feat that illustrated the progress of medical communities" (p. 228). If written fifty years ago, the book would have probably focused on how Argentines finally discovered that cholera was a pathogenic germ that poisoned untreated water and how they came to control it, to the glory of science and sanitation. Instead, Dimas discusses the relationship ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-24T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • LGBTQ Politics in Nicaragua: Revolution, Dictatorship, and Social
           Movements by Karen Kampwirth (review)

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      Abstract: Nicaragua is not notable for being especially repressive nor particularly accepting in terms of gay rights, but it is notable that there is an absence, an ambivalence, and a lack of specific policies, especially when compared to other parts of Latin America. This is to say that Nicaragua has a consistent lack of specific laws and policies regarding homosexuality or trans individuals (the anti-sodomy law of 1992 to 2008 notwithstanding). As political scientist Karen Kampwirth posits in LGBTQ Politics in Nicaragua: Revolution, Dictatorship, and Social Movements, perhaps the knowledge that a number of gay and lesbian Sandinistas were fairly influential in the movement prevented the early adoption of anti-gay laws, as ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-24T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Under the Shade of Thipaak: The Ethnoecology of Cycads in Mesoamerica and
           the Caribbean by Michael D. Carrasco et al. (review)

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      Abstract: Each spring, i tour the california State University-Fullerton Arboretum with my biogeography students. Among the many sectors of the arboretum (most meant to resemble California biomes) is a sizeable section given over to cycads—odd because the group is not native to California. I would share my limited knowledge of the plants: that they are ancient conifers, that they are dioecious (separate male and female individuals), that they have highly toxic seeds that have been associated with neurological disease among Pacific Islanders, and finally, in spite of their frond-like leaves, that they are not palms. A few students would recognize them as fairly common front-yard ornamentals, known unfortunately as sago palm ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-24T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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