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  Subjects -> GEOGRAPHY (Total: 493 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 277 Journals sorted by number of followers
Geophysical Research Letters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 184)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Space Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 159)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Atmospheres     Partially Free   (Followers: 149)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Planets     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 143)
Remote Sensing of Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 96)
Antipode     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Earth Surface     Partially Free   (Followers: 60)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Oceans     Partially Free   (Followers: 60)
Progress in Human Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Solid Earth     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58)
International Journal of Geographical Information Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
GIScience & Remote Sensing     Open Access   (Followers: 54)
Journal of Water and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 53)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Reviews of Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 49)
Remote Sensing Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Annals of the American Association of Geographers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Economic Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Applied Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Climate and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Urban Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Biogeosciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Annals of GIS     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Coastal Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Cartography and Geographic Information Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
GPS Solutions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of the Middle East and Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Dialogues in Human Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
China : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Imago Mundi: The International Journal for the History of Cartography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Geosciences (ADGEO)     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (AMT)     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Water International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of the American Planning Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Geography Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Cultural Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Cartographica : The International Journal for Geographic Information and Geovisualization     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Professional Geographer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Africa Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Crossings : Journal of Migration & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
The Geographical Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Geology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Computational Geosciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Tectonics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Geomatics, Natural Hazards and Risk     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
American Journal of Geographic Information System     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Annual Review of Marine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Buildings & Landscapes: Journal of the Vernacular Architecture Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Progress in Physical Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Indigenous Policy Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Geographical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Bulletin of Geosciences     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Geographical Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Geosciences Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Geographical Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Soil Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
GeoJournal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
American Journal of Human Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Geography and Natural Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
European Spatial Research and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Cartographic Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Atmospheric Measurement Techniques Discussions (AMTD)     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Iberian and Latin American Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Physical Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Health Geographics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Natural Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Middle East Development Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Borderlands Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Geographical Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Applied Geospatial Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Urban History Review / Revue d'histoire urbaine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Latin American Geography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
California Italian Studies Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Geo-spatial Information Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Nordic Journal of Migration Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Maps     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Social Geography Discussions (SGD)     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
GeoInformatica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Northern Scotland     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Asia Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Geographer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Ocean Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
The Canadian Geographer/le Geographe Canadien     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Creativity Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Australian Antarctic Magazine     Free   (Followers: 5)
Focus on Geography     Partially Free   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian Geographer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Current Research in Geoscience     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Australian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Map & Geography Libraries     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Transmodernity : Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Applied Geomatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Latinoamérica. Revista de estudios Latinoamericanos     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Geografiska Annaler, Series A : Physical Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Sedimentary Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Southeastern Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Bulletin of Geography. Socio-economic Series     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Limnological Review     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Western Archives     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Économie rurale     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Social Dynamics: A journal of African studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
New Zealand Journal of Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Burma Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
South Asian Diaspora     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
All Earth     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Lithosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Polar Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
History of Geo- and Space Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Earthquake and Tsunami     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Pastoralism : Research, Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Standort - Zeitschrift für angewandte Geographie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Norois     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Geodesy and Cartography     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eastern European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Mineralogia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Regions and Cohesion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Polar Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Southeastern Geographer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BioRisk     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Norsk Geografisk Tidsskrift - Norwegian Journal of Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Scottish Geographical Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Geosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Études rurales     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Polar Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Newfoundland and Labrador Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Regional Science Policy & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Provincial China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Cahiers franco-canadiens de l'Ouest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The South Asianist     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Reflets : revue d'intervention sociale et communautaire     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Maine Policy Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista de Geografía Norte Grande     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geoforum Perspektiv     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Estudios Geográficos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
PRISM : A Journal of Regional Engagement     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Norteamérica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Amerika     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
L'Année du Maghreb     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indiana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Les Cahiers d'Outre-Mer     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Southwest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revue archéologique du Centre de la France     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Terrestrial Observation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Méditerranée     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal de la Société des Océanistes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geochronometria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
South African Geographical Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
GEM - International Journal on Geomathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Terrae Incognitae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Bahamian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Études internationales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Recherches sociographiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Physio-Géo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
GEOMATICA     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
PSC Discussion Papers Series     Open Access  
Anales de Geografía de la Universidad Complutense     Open Access  
International Journal of River Basin Management     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Geográfica de América Central     Open Access  
Multiciencias     Open Access  
Investigaciones Geográficas (Esp)     Open Access  
Sociedade & Natureza     Open Access  
Región y Sociedad     Open Access  
Migración y Desarrollo     Open Access  
Migraciones Internacionales     Open Access  
Investigaciones Geográficas     Open Access  
Frontera Norte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Desarrollo Rural     Open Access  
Boletim de Ciências Geodésicas     Open Access  
Territoire en Mouvement     Open Access  
Quaestiones Geographicae     Open Access  
Limes. Cultural Regionalistics     Open Access  
Preview     Hybrid Journal  
Cuadernos de Geografía : Revista Colombiana de Geografía     Open Access  
Studia Universitatis Babes-Bolyai, Geologia     Open Access  
Recherches amérindiennes au Québec     Full-text available via subscription  
Rabaska : revue d'ethnologie de l'Amérique française     Full-text available via subscription  
Port Acadie : revue interdisciplinaire en études acadiennes / Port Acadie: An Interdisciplinary Review in Acadian Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Études/Inuit/Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Aurora Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista de la Asociacion Geologica Argentina     Open Access  
San Francisco Estuary and Watershed Science     Open Access  
Journal of Alpine Research : Revue de géographie alpine     Open Access  
Géocarrefour     Open Access  
Confins     Open Access  

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Canadian Journal of Soil Science
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.52
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 11  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0008-4271 - ISSN (Online) 1918-1841
Published by NRC Research Press Homepage  [19 journals]
  • Perennial grain Kernza® fields have higher particulate organic carbon at
           depth than annual grain fields

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Laura K. van der Pol, Brian Nester, Brandon Schlautman, Timothy E. Crews, M. Francesca Cotrufo
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Soil Science, Ahead of Print.
      Conversion from annual to perennial grains such as intermediate wheatgrass Kernza® could sequester soil organic carbon (SOC). To date, no studies have quantified SOC under Kernza on working farms. We sampled three sites with paired fields under annual grains and converted to Kernza 5–17 years ago to 100 cm and compared their SOC stocks as distributed between mineral-associated organic matter (MAOM) and particulate organic matter (POM). POM-C was higher under Kernza cultivation but total and MAOM-C were similar. Our findings suggest that Kernza increases SOC at depth as POM. Further study is needed to assess whether this will result in long-term SOC sequestration.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Soil Science
      PubDate: 2022-09-23T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjss-2022-0026
       
  • Nitrous oxide emissions from productive and degraded potato fields in the
           Fraser Valley delta of British Columbia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chantel J. Chizen, Maja Krzic, T. Andrew Black, Rachhpal S. Jassal, Sean M. Smukler
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Soil Science, Ahead of Print.
      Soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions and potato yield were evaluated under 0, 90, and 120 kg N ha−1 fertilizer rates and two planting dates, at productive and degraded fields in the Fraser Valley delta. During the growing season, N2O emissions were comparable among N fertilizer rates. Following November rainfall, N2O emissions increased by three times with 120 kg N ha−1. In the degraded field, yield did not respond to the increasing N fertilizer rates. These findings suggest that lower N fertilizer rates, especially in fields with degraded soils, can lower N2O emissions from British Columbia potato production.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Soil Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjss-2022-0032
       
  • Comparing direct and indirect approaches to predicting soil texture class

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Daniel D. Saurette
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Soil Science, Ahead of Print.
      Soil texture, or the relative proportions of sand, silt, and clay, is a key soil attribute that influences many important physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils. Digital soil mapping is increasingly used to predict soil texture; however, few comparisons have been made between direct prediction of a texture class, and the indirect prediction of texture class by first predicting sand, silt, and clay content, and subsequently converting the predictions to a texture class. We predicted soil texture class for the 5–15 and 30–60 cm depth intervals of the Ottawa soil survey project using direct and indirect approaches which yielded a similar overall accuracy (28–36%) and kappa (0.19–0.27). The predicted soil maps had a similar spatial distribution of soil texture classes. We then used the Euclidean distance between the texture classes to adjust the model performance metrics, revealing the indirect approach provided the better soil texture class prediction. When comparing the predictions, the 5–15 and 30–60 cm maps were in perfect agreement for 53% and 42% of the study area, respectively, and in both cases texture class predictions were within one texture class for over 87% of the map area. For many studies, including legacy soil surveys, texture class information is available, and particle size distribution data are generally lacking. This study confirms that direct prediction of soil texture class performs almost equally with indirect prediction.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Soil Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjss-2022-0040
       
  • Adoption of beneficial management practices to improve soil health

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ananka Shah, Alfons Weersink, Richard Vyn
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Soil Science, Ahead of Print.
      Healthy soils are fundamental to building prosperous and resilient farms and to efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and enhance overall environmental impacts from agriculture. Understanding the adoption of beneficial management practices (BMPs) that promote soil health is necessary for these benefits to be obtained. Drawing from a survey of Ontario farmers (n = 247) with 60% being crop producers and 22% livestock farmers, we explore the variation in adoption for six soil health BMPs: cover crops, crop rotations, no-till, soil testing, conservation buffers, and organic amendments. Soil testing had the highest rate of adoption, while conservation buffers had the least. The majority of farmers (73%) implemented four or more BMPs as the use of practices such as a rotation with winter wheat, cover cropping, and no-till tend to be positively correlated. Adopters of the BMPs tend to operate larger farms both in the area operated and farm cash receipts than non-adopters. Improving soil health was the most widely selected motivation for adoption across all six BMPs. The most effective interventions to enhance adoption among non-adopters include financial incentives, easily accessible information and advice, and farmer-to-farmer learning. Our results suggest that farmers that adopt BMPs do so primarily to enhance soil health rather than solely for economic considerations. Encouraging use among non-adopters may require monitoring and promoting the benefits of soil health. The results should aid in the development of strategic frameworks that facilitate innovations in policy to enhance soil health.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Soil Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-22T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjss-2021-0187
       
  • Using an ensemble learning approach in digital soil mapping of soil pH for
           the Thompson-Okanagan region of British Columbia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jin Zhang, Margaret G. Schmidt, Brandon Heung, Chuck E. Bulmer, Anders Knudby
      First page: 579
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Soil Science, Ahead of Print.
      Information on the spatial distribution of soil pH is essential for assessing soil quality and soil productivity. Digital soil mapping (DSM) is commonly used to predict soil characteristics over various types of landscapes. Over the past decade, researchers have made progress using machine learning techniques to provide reliable predictions of soil properties with limited data. DSM studies often use a single learning approach, which is constructed with a machine learner that systematically extracts soil–environment relationships from a large database, whereby a fitted model is used to predict soil information in an unmapped area. The practice of using an ensemble learning approach, especially one that combines several base learners, has rarely been tested in DSM. We developed a workflow for using an ensemble learning algorithm to predict soil properties for the Thompson-Okanagan region of British Columbia, Canada. Here, we focused on soil pH and tested a variety of base learners. Base learners with high prediction accuracies were then used to construct a SuperLearner (SL) to extract the complex relationships between soil properties and environmental variables. The fitted SL was then used to predict soil properties at 25 m spatial resolution at three depth intervals (0–5, 5–15, and 15–30 cm). Prediction accuracies were assessed using an independent test dataset, which indicated that the SL had a similar prediction accuracy to the best individual base learners. Using the heterogeneous ensemble learning approach with a weighted average stacked generalization process eliminated the need to choose the best base learner.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Soil Science
      PubDate: 2022-02-04T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/CJSS-2021-0091
       
  • Provincial-scale digital soil mapping using a random forest approach for
           British Columbia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Brandon Heung, Chuck E. Bulmer, Margaret G. Schmidt, Jin Zhang
      First page: 597
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Soil Science, Ahead of Print.
      Although British Columbia (BC), Canada, has a rich history of producing conventional soil maps (CSMs) between 1925 and 2000, the province still lacks a detailed soil map with a comprehensive coverage due to the cost and time required to develop such a product. This study builds on previous digital soil mapping (DSM) research in BC and develops provincial-scale maps. Soil taxonomic classes (e.g., great groups and order) and parent material classes were mapped at a 100 m spatial resolution for BC (944 735 km2). Training points were generated from detailed and semi-detailed soil survey maps. The training points were intersected with 26 topographic indices for mapping parent materials with an additional 9 climatic and vegetation indices for mapping soil classes. The soil–environmental relationships were inferred using the random forest (RF) classifier. The fitted models were used to predict 23 soil great groups, 9 soil orders, and 10 parent material classes. Accuracy assessments were performed using n = 14 570 validation points for parent material classes and n = 14 316 validation points for soil classes, acquired from the BC Soil Information System. The accuracy rates for soil great groups, orders, and parent material classes were 55%, 62%, and 69%, respectively, and kappa coefficients were 0.37, 0.41, and 0.59, respectively. This study demonstrated that when RF was trained using CSMs, the accuracy for the resulting DSM was higher than the original CSM. To assess prediction uncertainties, ignorance uncertainty maps were developed using class-probability layers generated by the RF models.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Soil Science
      PubDate: 2022-02-04T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjss-2021-0090
       
  • The impact of the investment period on soil and plant pollution by cadmium
           and nickel in Jableh city, in Lattakia Governorate

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Abd Al Karim Jaafar, Suleiman Salim, Hiba Salman
      First page: 621
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Soil Science, Ahead of Print.
      This research was conducted in Jableh city in the Latakia Governorate during 2019–2020 to study the level of pollution of the soils and plants of some greenhouses in Jableh city with the elements cadmium and nickel. Several greenhouses were randomly distributed in different areas in Jableh city based on the period of their investment (5, 10, 20, and 25 years), as the investment period was considered the variable factor between greenhouses. The homogeneity of greenhouse texture was taken into consideration as much as possible. Two-layer soil samples were collected (0–20 and 20–40 cm). Electrical conductivity, pH, the ratio of organic matter and the major basic elements (nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium), and the total cadmium and nickel in the soil, plants, and cucumber fruits were determined. SPSS was used (completely randomized design). The results showed that there was pollution of greenhouse soils with the elements cadmium and nickel in a manner that is proportional to the increase in the period of investment. They also showed that the content of cadmium and nickel in cucumber fruits in the oldest houses exceeded the permissible limits. A strong positive second-degree significant (1%) correlation was observed between the available phosphorus and the total cadmium and nickel in the soil, and a strong correlation between the soil and plant content of these two elements and an increasing investment period.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Soil Science
      PubDate: 2022-08-18T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjss-2021-0144
       
  • Using cultivated organic soil depth to form soil conservation management
           zones

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Raphaël Deragon, Anne-Sophie Julien, Jacynthe Dessureault-Rompré, Jean Caron
      First page: 633
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Soil Science, Ahead of Print.
      Cultivated Organic soils in Montreal's southwest plain are the most productive soils in the province of Quebec. After their initial drainage to enable farming, Organic soils are susceptible to many forms of degradation and soil loss. In this study, we characterized the physical, chemical, and pedological properties of 114 sites from five peatlands to form soil conservation management zones. We attempted to use the maximum peat thickness (MPT) as a soil degradation proxy. The MPT can be defined as the thickness of the layer of peat until coprogenous or mineral materials are reached. The latter are undesired growing media and are not considered in MPT calculation. A series of multivariate analysis of variance indicated that MPT was moderately related to soil degradation (optimal model's Pillai's trace = 0.495). Three soil degradation groups were defined, separated by two MPT thresholds: 60 and 100 cm. When looking at 17 different depth-property combinations, shallower sites (MPT < 60 cm) showed signs of soil degradation significantly higher than sites with an MPT above 60 cm. The second threshold was proposed for practical purposes. Then, these thresholds were used to separate the study area into spatially distinct management zones. Important spatial contrasts were found. This supports the theory that precision agriculture techniques are needed to target fields to optimize soil conservation interventions. The relationship between the MPT and soil degradation should be further explored to account for other degradation factors, and to better identify degraded soils and soils at risk.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Soil Science
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjss-2021-0148
       
  • The impact of land conversion from boreal forest to agriculture on soil
           health indicators

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: P. Benalcazar, A.C. Diochon, R. Kolka, R.R. Schindelbeck, T. Sahota, B.E. McLaren
      First page: 651
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Soil Science, Ahead of Print.
      Climate change is creating opportunities for agricultural expansion northward into the boreal forest. Converting forested land to agricultural land generally results in significant losses of organic matter (OM), which can impact soil health (SH). The objectives of this study were to assess the effects of land conversion on indicators of SH and to use the Comprehensive Assessment for Soil Health (CASH) framework to integrate measures of these indicators into a score to evaluate land conversion effects. Total carbon and nitrogen were also measured in this study. Soils (0–5 and 5–15 cm) were collected from six dairy farms near Thunder Bay, ON, that included a mature forest, a field converted from forest to agriculture 50 years ago. Land conversion resulted in significant declines in permanganate oxidizable carbon, wet aggregate stability, soil respiration, and concentrations of OM, autoclave citrate extractable protein, total nitrogen, and total carbon. Lower CASH scores in the soils converted to agriculture are interpreted to represent a decline in SH but the scores, along with soil organic matter (SOM) concentrations, remain high (CASH = 80; OM = 6%). There was no effect of time since conversion, suggesting that any degradation to SH happens quickly and is closely tied to declines in SOM.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Soil Science
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjss-2021-0170
       
  • Impact of conservation tillage on runoff, soil loss, and soil properties
           on acrisols and ferralsols in central Benin

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tobi Moriaque Akplo, Félix Kouelo Alladassi, Mahougnon Charlotte Carmelle Zoundji, Julien Avakoudjo, Pascal Houngnandan, Dieudonné Gustave Dagbénonbakin, Aliou Saïdou, Moncef Benmansour, Emil Fulajtar, Guillaume Lucien Amadji, Hessou Anastase Azontondé, Achille Ephrem Assogbadjo, Romain Glèlè Kakaï
      First page: 659
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Soil Science, Ahead of Print.
      The present study is aimed at assessing the impact of different tillage practices and mulch input rates on soil erosion and soil properties in Central Benin. The experiment was carried out at two sites (Dan and Za-zounmè) using a randomized complete block design. The effect of three tillage practices: contour ridging (CR), slope ridging (SR), and no-tillage (NT) and four mulch input rates (0, 3, 5, and 7 t·ha−1) was investigated. The runoff, the soil, and nutrients losses were measured during the major rainy seasons of 2018 and 2019. Bulk density, gravimetric moisture, and water infiltration were collected in 2019. The effect of the interaction between tillage practices and mulch input rates was significant on runoff amount, runoff coefficient, soil loss, N, P, and K losses, and soil moisture. Over the investigated seasons, CR + 7M decreased runoff amount, runoff coefficient, soil loss, and N, P, and K losses by 100% compared to the treatments. NT was found to be effective in runoff and soil erosion controlling when combined with a mulch quantity greater than 3 t·ha−1, and NT + 5M and NT + 7M reduced the soil loss, respectively, by more than 30% compared to the farmer’s practice (SR + 0M) at both sites. Contour ridge treatments yielded more soil moisture than NT and slope ridge treatments. Whatever the tillage practice, the greatest gravimetric moisture was recorded on 5 and 7 t·ha−1 plots (i.e., CR + 7M, NT + 7M, and SR + 7M). This study provides decision makers with requisite information for effective soil erosion management in Benin where mechanization aids are limited.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Soil Science
      PubDate: 2022-02-16T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjss-2021-0080
       
  • Nitrogen use efficiency of wheat and canola from urea treated with
           different types of double inhibitors

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      Authors: Ahmed A. Lasisi, Olalekan O. Akinremi, Darshani Kumaragamage
      First page: 673
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Soil Science, Ahead of Print.
      Urease inhibitor (specifically, N-(n-butyl) thiophosphoric triamide, NBPT) and nitrification inhibitors (NIs) have been used to minimize nitrogen (N) loss from urea. However, their effects on improving crop N use efficiency (NUE) are usually inconsistent. A 2-year study was conducted to determine the best combination of NBPT and different NIs on urea that will maximize NUE while reducing nitrate leaching. Treatments consisted of untreated urea, NBPT-treated urea, and six types of (NBPT + NI)-treated urea that were surface applied at 80 kg N ha−1 on plots seeded to canola (2019) and wheat (2020) at Carman and Portage in Manitoba, Canada. Plots at Carman had lysimeters installed to measure leached water and nitrate. The sites had at least 35% lesser rainfall than climate normal during each growing season. At each site, average grain yields, N removal, and residual nitrate were not significantly different between untreated urea and inhibitor-treated urea. Over the 2 years, there was no significant benefit of NBPT or NBPT + NI on crop NUE at each site. Cumulative leached nitrate (19–40 kg N ha−1) did not differ significantly among urea treated with and without inhibitors. This is because >50% of the precipitation occurred when the effectiveness of NI had elapsed. Although NBPT and NI are known to reduce N losses to the atmosphere, this study suggests that the agronomic benefit and nitrate leaching prevention by NI applied in the spring may be limited in regions where large precipitation occurs later in the growing season or during non-growing season.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Soil Science
      PubDate: 2022-03-31T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjss-2021-0159
       
  • Carbon loss in tile drainage and surface runoff from a clay loam soil
           after a half century of continuous and rotational cropping

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      Authors: X.M. Yang, C.F. Drury, W.D. Reynolds, M.D. Reeb
      First page: 685
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Soil Science, Ahead of Print.
      Tile drainage and surface runoff are major pathways for pollution of water resources by agricultural nutrients and chemicals. Little is known, however, of the pathways and amounts of carbon entry into water resources from agricultural land. This paper evaluates dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) losses in tile drainage and surface runoff from a Brookston clay loam after more than a half century of monoculture maize (Zea mays L.), continuous bluegrass sod (Poa Pratensis L.), and maize-oat (Avena sativa L.)–alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)–alfalfa rotation. Water loss in tile drainage and surface runoff accounted for 27%, 32%, and 18% of annual precipitation (876 mm) for rotation, monoculture maize, and continuous sod, respectively. Tile drainage comprised 66%–89% of water loss from rotation and continuous sod, but only 15% from monoculture maize, with the remaining 85% of water loss from monoculture maize due to surface runoff. On an annualized basis, the measured dissolved C loss was 79 and 83 kg C ha–1 yr–1) from rotation and continuous sod, respectively, while 49 kg C ha–1 yr–1 was lost from monoculture maize. As up to 9% off-gassing loss of CO2 from water samples was measured, total dissolved carbon losses in tile drainage and runoff water were likely greater. For Brookston clay loam soil, leaching into tile drains was the dominant mechanism for dissolved carbon loss from long-term continuous sod and crop rotation, while surface runoff was the dominant mechanism for dissolved carbon loss from long-term monoculture maize.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Soil Science
      PubDate: 2022-02-16T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjss-2021-0073
       
  • Forage mixed planting can effectively improve soil enzyme activity and
           microbial community structure and diversity in agro-pastoral interlacing
           arid zone

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      Authors: Tingting Zhang, Lifang Wang, Wenjing Liu, Saiji Rihu, Juan Li, Dejian Zhang
      First page: 697
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Soil Science, Ahead of Print.
      Aiming at the problems of serious soil desertification and continuous reduction of effective soil nutrients in the agricultural and animal husbandry interlaced arid area in Inner Mongolia, this study used Aohan alfalfa, old awn wheat, and fodder oats at the Siziwang Banner, Ulanchabu City, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. There were a total of five treatments, namely, single seeding alfalfa, single seeding old awn wheat, single seeding fodder oats, alfalfa and old awn wheat mixed sowing, and control. The results showed that the urease activity and microbial biomass nitrogen content of mixed planting were higher than other treatments. With the advancement of the growth period, the bacteria α-diversity index showed an upward trend; β-diversity analysis showed that planting method was the main factor affecting bacteria diversity and sampling time was the main factor affecting fungi diversity. In summary, mixed planting treatment was more helpful to improve soil enzyme activity, microbial biomass, and enrich soil microbial diversity, which was of great significance to maintain the balance of soil ecosystem. It is hoped that this study will contribute to the theoretical basis and practical experiences for efficient utilization of microbial resources in the field of soil improvement.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Soil Science
      PubDate: 2022-02-18T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjss-2021-0106
       
  • Ferric chloride amendment reduces phosphorus losses from flooded soil
           monoliths to overlying floodwater

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      Authors: Emily Van, Darshani Kumaragamage, Geethani Amarawansha, Doug Goltz
      First page: 707
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Soil Science, Ahead of Print.
      The accumulation of phosphorus (P) in agricultural soils and subsequent losses to waterways contribute to eutrophication in surface water bodies. In agricultural lands prone to prolonged flooding during spring snowmelt, P may be released to overlying floodwater and transported to lakes downstream. Ferric chloride (FeCl3) is a potential soil amendment to mitigate P losses, but its effectiveness for flooded soils with snowmelt is not well documented. Thirty-six intact soil monoliths taken from four agricultural fields in Manitoba's Red River Valley region were surface-amended with FeCl3 at three rates (0, 2.5, and 5 Mg ha–1) to evaluate the effectiveness of FeCl3 in minimizing P losses to porewater and floodwater. Over 8 weeks of simulated snowmelt flooding, porewater, and floodwater samples taken weekly were analyzed for concentrations of dissolved reactive P (DRP), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), and pH. Change in the redox potential was also measured weekly. With time of flooding, redox potential decreased in all soil monoliths. At early stages of flooding, the porewater pH values were significantly lower in FeCl3-amended monoliths but increased with flooding time. Porewater and floodwater DRP concentrations increased in all soils when flooded, but the magnitudes varied. Amendment of FeCl3 decreased the DRP concentrations from 17% to 97% in porewater and 26% to 99% in floodwater, with the effectiveness varying depending on the soil, FeCl3 rate, and flooding time. Amendment of FeCl3 increased porewater concentrations of Ca, Mg, Fe, and Mn. Soil amendment with FeCl3 at both rates shows promise in mitigating redox-induced P losses from flooded soils.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Soil Science
      PubDate: 2022-02-25T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjss-2021-0135
       
  • Pelleted manure compost improves mine spoil properties enhancing plant
           growth and phyto-stabilization of potentially toxic metals

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      Authors: Srimathie P. Indraratne, Gary M. Pierzynski, Lucas R. Baker, P.V. Vara Prasad, Pavithra S. Pitumpe Arachchige
      First page: 719
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Soil Science, Ahead of Print.
      Feedlot manure is rich in plant nutrients and can immobilize potentially toxic metals. However, pelleted manure compost as an amendment material in mine spoils (chat) is not well studied. This study was conducted to investigate the impact of pelleted cattle manure on improving chat properties facilitating phyto-stabilization and the establishment of grasses. A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted with unamended and amended chat (lime treated) with pelleted manure at three rates (60, 120, and 180 Mg ha−1) with and without bentonite (B), using two native grasses, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and wheatgrass (Pascopyrum smithii (Rydb.) A. Löve). Leachates from pots were collected periodically until harvest. Nutrients and metal concentrations were measured in chat treatments, and metal concentrations were measured in plant tissues and leachates. Manure-amended chat reduced leachate Cd and Zn on average by >75% and >80%, respectively. Above-ground dry matter yield increased by >2.5-fold and >4-fold, respectively, in switchgrass and wheatgrass with the increase of 3-fold manure rate. The manure rate at 180 Mg ha−1 reduced plant Cd and Zn by 50% and 20%, respectively, in wheatgrass, and 30% and no reduction, respectively, in switchgrass, compared to the 60 Mg ha−1 manure rate. Overall, pelleted manure compost significantly increased available nutrients and decreased available metals in amended chat, with no significant effect of B. This study indicated that pelleted manure, preferably at 180 Mg ha−1 rate with lime, can be used in acidic metal-contaminated chat to facilitate the establishment of perennial native grasses and reduce the potentially toxic metal availability.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Soil Science
      PubDate: 2022-02-25T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjss-2021-0157
       
  • Proposed new soil order — Leptosolic order for Canadian System of
           Soil Classification

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      Authors: C. James Warren, Daniel D. Saurette, Richard J. Heck, Louis-Pierre Comeau
      First page: 733
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Soil Science, Ahead of Print.
      Shallow soils occur throughout the world and are recognized as Leptosols at the highest level in the World Reference Base. These soils are notionally characterized as having a lithic contact close to the soil surface. Within the Canadian System of Soil Classification (CSSC), shallow soils are currently handled at the family level according to the depth at which the lithic contact is encountered. At the series level, these soils are usually designated as a shallow phase of a non-shallow soil series, ignoring the hierarchical structure of the CSSC. Shallow soils occur almost anywhere in Canada where the glacial drift is thin. The presence of bedrock close to the surface impacts drainage, the amount of available moisture, depth for rooting, and has a major influence on soil formation. Consequently, it is proposed that the importance of shallow soils be elevated to the order level, to be consistent with the frequency of their occurrence in the Canadian landscape and for consistency with other soil classification systems of the world. This requires integration at the great group and subgroup levels within all orders of the CSSC, as well as changes to the current formal definition of soil. These proposed modifications include nullifying the minimum 10 cm depth requirement as part of the current definition of soil in the CSSC for closer consistency with ecological land classification and other soil classification systems of the world. Proposed modifications to the current key to the soil orders, great groups, and subgroups are presented and discussed.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Soil Science
      PubDate: 2022-03-11T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjss-2021-0186
       
  • Proposed revision to Canadian System of Soil Classification: broaden
           taxonomic criteria for applying LFH horizons to include nonforest soils

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      Authors: J.J. Miller, D.S. Chanasyk, R.L. McNeil
      First page: 745
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Soil Science, Ahead of Print.
      In the first edition (1974) of Canadian System of Soil Classification (CSSC), the taxonomic criteria for LFH organic horizons allowed application to any soil and land use developed under imperfectly to well-drained conditions. However, in the third edition (1998) of CSSC, the narrower taxonomic criteria for LFH horizons restricted application to only forest soils. A limited survey was conducted of some soil scientists across Canada to ask them if they had observed LFH horizons in nonforest soils. Distinct LFH horizons were observed across Canada under agriculture such as in no-till fields, tame and native pastures, and in reclaimed soils. They have also been observed in urban areas such as golf courses and grass-recreation fields. LFH horizons could also potentially develop under other nonforest land uses across Canada. Since no-till and native and tame pastures are most dominant in the prairies, the potential for LFH horizons is greatest in this region than elsewhere. However, they may occur anywhere in Canada where accumulation exceeds decomposition of organic material and they contain more than 17% organic carbon by weight or 30% organic matter. Therefore, we propose that the taxonomic criteria for applying LFH horizons be revised and broadened to include nonforest soils and be applicable to any soil order (where relevant) within Canada, and be at the discretion of the field pedologist. It is critical to identify and monitor LFH horizons over time because they are important for soil health, climate change, greenhouse gases, carbon sequestration, nutrient cycling, soil erosion, and hydrology.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Soil Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-11T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjss-2021-0152
       
  • The influence of freeze–thaw cycles on the mechanical properties of
           paleosols: based on a multiscale research

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      Authors: Chen Yiqian, Zhang Peiran, Bai Yang, Zhou Zihao, Che Yongxin, Yang Huimin
      First page: 755
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Soil Science, Ahead of Print.
      To investigate the multiscale effects of freeze–thaw cycles on the mechanical properties and structural damage of paleosols, remodeled paleosol specimens at natural moisture content were subjected to multiple freeze–thaw cycles, followed by scanning electron microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) pore testing, and triaxial shear testing, and then the shear strength deterioration mechanism of paleosols was elaborated on from three aspects: fine, mesoscopic, and macroscopic. The main experimental results were as follows: (1) at the fine level, the NMR T2 spectrum distribution curve showed one primary and two secondary peaks, in which the main spectrum occupied the majority, and the spectrum area showed an exponential function distribution relationship with the number of freeze–thaw cycles. With the accumulation of freeze–thaw cycles, the medium and large pores increased significantly. (2) At the mesoscopic level, when the specimens underwent freeze–thaw cycles, the interparticle contact pattern and particle morphology changed and the particle roundness increased. As the freeze–thaw cycle continued, fissures gradually developed and increased the most after the first freeze–thaw cycle, but the probability entropy of soil particles showed a decreasing trend with the increase of the number of freez–thaw cycles. (3) At the macro level, the number of freeze–thaw cycles gradually accumulated, the specimen stress–strain curve softened significantly, the shear strength deterioration effect was obvious, the deterioration value was the largest after one freeze–thaw cycle and gradually stabilized after 10 cycles, and the deterioration effect of cohesion was greater than that of the internal friction angle.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Soil Science
      PubDate: 2022-09-02T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjss-2021-0183
       
  • Predicting soil organic matter and soil moisture content from digital
           camera images: comparison of regression and machine learning approaches

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      Authors: Perry Taneja, Hiteshkumar Bhogilal Vasava, Solmaz Fathololoumi, Prasad Daggupati, Asim Biswas
      First page: 767
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Soil Science, Ahead of Print.
      Appropriate soil management maintains and improves the health of the entire ecosystem. Soil appropriate administration necessitates proper characterization of its properties including soil organic matter (SOM) and soil moisture content (SMC). Image-based soil characterization has shown strong potential in comparison with traditional methods. This study compared the performance of 22 different supervised regression and machine learning algorithms, including support vector machines (SVMs), Gaussian process regression (GPR) models, ensembles of trees, and artificial neural network (ANN), in predicting SOM and SMC from soil images taken with a digital camera in the laboratory setting. A total of 22 image parameters were extracted and used as predictor variables in the models in two steps. First models were developed using all 22 extracted features and then using a subset of six best features for both SOM and SMC. Saturation index (redness index) was the most important variable for SOM prediction, and contrast (median S) for SMC prediction, respectively. The color and textural parameters demonstrated a high correlation with both SOM and SMC. Results revealed a satisfactory agreement between the image parameters and the laboratory-measured SOM (R2 and root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.74 and 9.80% using cubist) and SMC (R2 and RMSE of 0.86 and 8.79% using random forest) for the validation data set using six predictor variables. Overall, GPR models and tree models (cubist, RF, and boosted trees) best captured and explained the nonlinear relationships between SOM, SMC, and image parameters for this study.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Soil Science
      PubDate: 2022-03-31T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjss-2021-0133
       
  • Biochemical components of Sphagnum and persistence in peat soil

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      Authors: Gwendolyn T. Pipes, Joseph B. Yavitt
      First page: 785
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Soil Science, Ahead of Print.
      The amounts and arrangements of polysaccharides (cellulose and hemicellulose), proteins, phenolic lignin, and pectin that make up plant tissue, in part, determine its decay rate. Lignin-rich and/or nitrogen-poor tissue has been described as biochemically recalcitrant causing a slow decay rate. Although a controversial mechanism for organic matter storage in soils with mineral particles, biochemical recalcitrance is still poorly understood in organic peat soil (Histosols). To investigate the role of Sphagnum in formation of peat soil, we characterize biochemical components for 10 species and examine persistence of the components in soil to 150 cm depth in three peatland ecosystems. We hypothesize that species from hummock microforms have more biochemical structural components and cohesion than species from hollows. Relative proportions of biochemical components changed markedly between plant material and the top 10 cm of peat soil, suggesting that decomposition occurred at the peat soil surface, but thereafter relative proportions of biochemical components did not vary significantly to 150 cm deep. A few differences in biochemical components that distinguished hummock species from hollow species persisted to the deepest depth sampled. Although persistence of the lignin-like component was expected, persistence of soluble and ionically bound pectin compounds was surprising as these biopolymers are thought to be readily decomposable. Our findings indicate that structural components of Sphagnum, specifically polysaccharides and pectin in addition to oft-cited phenolic lignin-like components, persist in peat soil and should not be overlooked in trying to understand carbon dynamics in Sphagnum-dominated ecosystems.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Soil Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-14T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjss-2021-0137
       
  • Antagonistic effect of copper and zinc in fertilization of spring wheat
           under low soil phosphorus conditions

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      Authors: Noabur Rahman, Derek Peak, Jeff Schoenau
      First page: 797
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Soil Science, Ahead of Print.
      Sound micronutrient management requires an understanding of nutrient interactions and transformation processes in soil–plant systems which can regulate bioavailability and plant uptake. A series of studies were conducted under controlled environment and field conditions to evaluate wheat response to Cu and Zn fertilization on P-deficient soils from western Canada. The grain and straw yields of wheat were reduced in two (Waskada and Tisdale) of three soils used in the controlled environment study, while yield was not affected at the Echo field site in 2016 when both Cu and Zn sulfate fertilizer were applied at 5 kg·ha–1 rates. Zinc concentration in soil and plant tissues was increased to apparent toxic levels with fertilizer addition in Waskada soils. An imbalance in tissue P:Zn concentration related to micronutrient fertilization was observed in Waskada and Tisdale soils. The availability of Cu and Zn in post-harvest soils was increased with increasing rate of these fertilizers' addition. Chemical and spectroscopic speciation using sequential extraction and X-ray absorption near edge structure, respectively, revealed that Cu and Zn were mostly speciated as carbonate phases, and complexation of these elements with carbonate and phyllosilicate minerals is likely the process controlling bioavailability in the soils.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Soil Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-14T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjss-2021-0189
       
  • A proposed Folic subgroup for the Organic Cryosols

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      Authors: Paul Sanborn, Chuck Bulmer, Marten Geertsema, Scott Smith
      First page: 811
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Soil Science, Ahead of Print.
      Cryosols with thick surface organic horizons consisting of folic material derived from forest litter and feathermosses occur on northerly slope aspects in the Rocky Mountains of northern British Columbia. Designation of a new Folic Organic Cryosol subgroup in the Canadian System of Soil Classification would enable more realistic depiction of soil landscape patterns in future soil inventories.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Soil Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-07T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjss-2021-0182
       
  • In situ passivation effect of fertilizer passivation solutions with
           various pH on Pb-F contaminated soil

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      Authors: Ying Jiang, Yunzhu Chen, Xuemei Wang, Zilichao Neng, Wanming Zhang
      First page: 817
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Soil Science, Ahead of Print.
      The Maoniuping rare earth mine in Mianning, Liangshan Prefecture, is the largest rare earth deposit in China and the second largest rare earth deposit in the world. During the mining of rare earths, F and Pb, both types of heavy metal waste can directly or indirectly enter the soil, causing local soil contamination, which in turn poses a threat to the health of local residents. In this study, soil samples were incubated with fertilizer passivation solutions with pH values of 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9, with the soil water content adjusted to 50% of the maximum water holding capacity in the field. The Pb-F contamination of the soil samples was analyzed to determine the existing states of the soil F and Pb and to study the remediation effect of fertilizer passivation solutions on the Pb-F contaminated soil. The results showed that under different passivation conditions, the pH, Pb, and F of the soil substantially changed and the passivation effect was enhanced over time. The pH of the soil significantly increased. The analysis of the effects of F and Pb treatment revealed that when the passivation fertilizer solution of pH 5 was used, the available Pb and F in the soil decreased the most, and the residual state of Pb and F increased to 77.86% and 57.24%, respectively.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Soil Science
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjss-2021-0140
       
 
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