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  Subjects -> GEOGRAPHY (Total: 493 journals)
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Progress in Human Geography
Journal Prestige (SJR): 4.602
Citation Impact (citeScore): 7
Number of Followers: 63  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0309-1325 - ISSN (Online) 1477-0288
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Geographical education II: Anti-racist, decolonial futures

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      Authors: Steve Puttick
      Abstract: Progress in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      This report critically reviews developments in geographical education through the themes of anti-racism and decoloniality, reflecting on the silences around these issues across previous progress reports and arguing that the present moment might be understood in terms of a decolonial turn. Publication trends and increasing attention associated with the turn are unevenly distributed, contested and attenuated by structural issues surrounding the recruitment and retention of more diverse geographers. The report concludes with suggestions for developing anti-racist, decolonial futures through improving representation, addressing disciplinary fragility, and giving greater attention to nuance and singularity.
      Citation: Progress in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2023-09-21T08:02:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03091325231202248
       
  • Progress in environmental geography and progress in human geography: new
           siblings

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      Authors: Lisa Campbell, Jamie Lorimer, Becky Mansfield, Dave Porinchu, Sarah Wright
      Abstract: Progress in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Progress in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2023-09-20T09:56:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03091325231195984
       
  • Trajectories of translation

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      Authors: Timur Hammond, Brittany Cook
      Abstract: Progress in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      Translation has been a core concern for geographers, particularly in the context of our discipline’s ongoing debate about how to world Geography otherwise. Rather than seeing translation as simply an act of bridging pre-existing differences, this article conceptualizes translation as an act producing differences-in-relation. It traces four “trajectories of translation” that bring geographers’ discussions of translation into new configurations: (1) Topoglossia, foregrounding the linkage between place and language; (2) imbrication, a metaphor for thinking difference-in-relation; (3) relays, an alternative to the metaphor of the bridge; and (4) communities, defined not by self-identity but by their shared practice of translation.
      Citation: Progress in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2023-08-29T10:18:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03091325231198240
       
  • Geography’s abolitionist turn: Notes on freedom, property, and the
           state

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      Authors: Madeleine Hamlin
      Abstract: Progress in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      Recent years have seen a burgeoning of scholarship in abolition geography. But what does it mean to theorize abolition in geography and what do geographers bring to abolition' This paper seeks to theorize geography’s abolitionist turn, tracing its roots from Du Bois’ ideas of abolition democracy through to contemporary iterations and variations. In doing so, it offers property and the state as key analytics: property insofar as it undergirds carcerality, racial capitalism, and settler colonialism alike, and the state insofar as it comprises both a site from which to make demands and a perpetrator of carceral and racial violence.
      Citation: Progress in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2023-08-17T12:04:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03091325231194657
       
  • Geographies of race and ethnicity 2: Black Feminist Geographies

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      Authors: Pat Noxolo
      Abstract: Progress in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      This second report on Geographies of Race and Ethnicity considers new developments in Black Feminist Geographies. It considers the spatio-temporal extensiveness of Black Feminist Geographies. It joins calls for more powerfully critical versions of intersectionality in Geography, using in/security as a means of conceptualising forms of negotiative agency. The article then considers the epistemic challenges posed by decolonial Black Feminisms, particularly from African writers. Finally, the article notes that Black Feminist Geographies are a locus for witnessing and honouring the complex humanity of the disproportionately large number of Black people who have died untimely deaths. To survive is a promise.
      Citation: Progress in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2023-08-10T05:05:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03091325231194656
       
  • Density as a politics of value: Regulation, speculation, and popular
           urbanism

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      Authors: Victoria Habermehl, Colin McFarlane
      Abstract: Progress in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      Density is at the centre of urban change, and is often politicised. Building on Geographical and Urban scholarship, we set out a critical approach to understanding density through a focus on value. Following a review of key approaches to density, we show that while value is often at stake in efforts to manage, change, defend, or promote densities of different kinds, it has rarely been the explicit focus of critical research on density. We address this by outlining how density propositions entail a politics of value through three inter-related urban domains: speculation, regulation, and the popular, followed by consequences for future research.
      Citation: Progress in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2023-07-28T12:33:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03091325231189824
       
  • Unresolved issues in regional economic resilience: Conceptual ways forward

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      Authors: Leonard Kwhang-Gil Lemke, Patrick Sakdapolrak, Michaela Trippl
      Abstract: Progress in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      Regional economic resilience (RER) remains the state-of-the-art concept in economic geography to investigate regional development in times of disturbance. We seek to contribute to a transformative notion of RER, which unfolds in light of global environmental change. In our review of conceptual and empirical RER applications, we reveal three unresolved issues: a focus on firms rather than diverse actors, trivial reflections on social–ecological interdependencies, and the need for more fluid understandings of socio-spatial relations. Based on these insights from neighboring geographical disciplines, we provide concrete propositions for theoretical enhancement to make RER fit for purpose.
      Citation: Progress in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2023-07-27T08:38:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03091325231191242
       
  • Geographies of green industries: The interplay of firms, technologies, and
           the environment

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      Authors: Zhengke Zhou, Calvin King Lam Chung, Jiang Xu
      Abstract: Progress in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      The emergence of green industries has been considered from multiple social science perspectives. Economic geographers view green industries as unevenly distributed firms forging green development paths. Sustainability transitions scholars view green industries as niche sectors struggling to mainstream green technologies in existing socio-technical systems. Political ecologists view green industries as metabolic actors whose development shapes and is shaped by the environment. Conceptualizing green industries as the interplay of green firms, socio-technical systems and the environment, this article proposes an integrative framework that synthesizes the three aforementioned perspectives for a research agenda of the geographies of green industries.
      Citation: Progress in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2023-07-25T10:06:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03091325231188377
       
  • Urban Geography III: Universities and their spaces

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      Authors: Donald McNeill
      Abstract: Progress in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      This Progress Report reviews recent literature that rethinks the spatiality of the university. First, it discusses the growing body of work that identifies the agency of universities in producing and shaping urban space, including their role in contributing to social injustice in cities. Second, it reviews understandings of universities as sites of relational knowledge production, linking this to the proliferation of studies of student (im)mobility. Third, it considers how the university works to spatially sort and place bodies – students, staff and non-humans.
      Citation: Progress in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2023-07-13T04:25:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03091325231188375
       
  • Elite capture and urban geography: Analyzing geographies of privilege

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      Authors: John Lauermann, Khouloud Mallak
      Abstract: Progress in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      Many cities have a two-tiered system for governing land: one set of rules for most people, and a different set for elite investors, large developers, and others who can bend, circumvent, or lobby against the rules. This reflects elite capture of urban institutions, as institutions are subverted to benefit special interests. We argue elite capture plays a systemic role in 21st century urban political economy. We review recent scholarship on four kinds of elite capture practices—rent seeking, opportunity hoarding, exploiting loopholes, and co-opting participatory planning—and illustrate them with a discussion of recent gentrification research.
      Citation: Progress in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2023-07-03T01:41:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03091325231186810
       
  • Towards relational geographies of gambling harm: Orientation, affective
           atmosphere, and intimacy

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      Authors: Gordon Waitt, Ross Gordon, Theresa Harada, Lauren Gurrieri, Gerda Reith, Joseph Cioriari
      Abstract: Progress in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      This paper reviews the progress of geographical research on the gambling industry and presents a framework to comprehend the role of space in gambling consumption and harm. It covers two themes: the casino’s place in urban governance and the agency of gamblers, and how space impacts gambling consumption and harm. The paper introduces a conceptual framework of orientation, affective atmosphere, and intimacy to better comprehend how gambling practices can increase or decrease risk. Finally, the paper suggests that this framework can help to better understand online sports gambling consumption and harm in the context of market growth.
      Citation: Progress in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2023-06-02T03:26:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03091325231177278
       
  • Social geography III: Emotions and affective spatialities

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      Authors: Elaine Lynn-Ee Ho
      Abstract: Progress in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      The emotions and the affective qualities of space (i.e. affective spatialities) have featured prominently in social geography research. This report discusses how recent studies have taken seriously earlier critiques of affect theory, foregrounding intersubjective relations, collectives and the socio-spatial hierarchies of power instead. The emotions can be mobilised to serve entrenched interests or challenge power hierarchies in social life, including through digitally mediated spaces. Whether in real or digital life, emotional labour and emotion work are constitutive of temporality, sociality and spatiality. The report concludes by reflecting on what ‘caring-with’ the emotions means for our institutions and the international academy.
      Citation: Progress in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2023-05-16T05:30:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03091325231174191
       
  • Geography and ethics II: Justification and the ethics of anti-oppression

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      Authors: Jeremy J Schmidt
      Abstract: Progress in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      This report on geography and ethics focusses on the justification of normative evaluations. Justifying why actions are right or wrong often relies on appeals to high-order principles, such as the common good. But this is not always the case, as this report shows by identifying an ethics of anti-oppression that relies instead on struggles against individual and social harms and the conditions that generate them. Through resistance, ethics of anti-oppression also shift the terms of normative justification across a range of considerations within geography and beyond it, from refugees and asylum seekers to food production and blockades against extractive infrastructure.
      Citation: Progress in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2023-05-12T05:46:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03091325231174965
       
  • Cultural geographies II: In the critical zone' – Environments,
           landscapes and life

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      Authors: Harriet Hawkins
      Abstract: Progress in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      In this second review of recent cultural geography research, I use the concept of The Critical Zone (originally from US Geoscience) as a lens. The environment is far too voluminous a field of cultural geographic research to be surveyed here, but it is too significant a body of research to be overlooked. Here, three key dimensions of Critical Zone studies offer a means to navigate this work: (i) multi-scalar (temporal and spatial) considerations of matter, energy and forces; (ii) biotic and abiotic relations; and, (iii) a commitment to producing knowledge beyond disciplinary silos. Discussion explores each of these in turn before reflecting, to close, on what cultural geographical thought and practice might add to considerations of the criticality of the critical zone.
      Citation: Progress in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2023-04-14T04:08:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03091325231152945
       
  • Geographies of migration III: The digital migrant

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      Authors: Francis L Collins
      Abstract: Progress in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      There is a growing focus on digitisation, datafication, automation and artificial intelligence in migration studies. This report reviews accounts of these technological innovations with a particular emphasis on their impacts for how migration is conceived and governed. The discussion overviews research that identifies and describes forms of digitisation and datafication, examines the role of automation and artificial intelligence in migration management, and discusses the links between and ethics of digitally mediated migrations and digital solidarities with mobile people. In closing, the report raises questions about the intellectual and political agenda of a purported sub-field of digital migration studies.
      Citation: Progress in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2023-04-12T10:32:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03091325231157709
       
  • Political ecology III: Praxis - doing, undoing, and being in radical
           political ecology research

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      Authors: Farhana Sultana
      Abstract: Progress in Human Geography, Ahead of Print.
      Praxis is central to political ecology scholarship but replete with tensions and ambiguities. This report explores advancements in praxis across epistemological, methodological, pedagogical, and political dimensions. Praxis in political ecology has benefited from detailed insights drawn from Indigenous, decolonial, postcolonial, feminist, anti-racist, and multi-species scholarship, among others. Attention to praxis allows for enriched research that has the potential to be useful and transformational for marginalized communities and better inform policy-making. Political ecology can remain relevant and meaningful when praxis is foregrounded and reflexively interrogated and performed for both intellectual advancements and radical socio-ecological justice.
      Citation: Progress in Human Geography
      PubDate: 2023-04-11T04:04:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03091325231157360
       
 
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