Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 118 of 118 Journals sorted alphabetically
ACSMs Health & Fitness Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Acta Facultatis Educationis Physicae Universitatis Comenianae     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Kinesiologiae Universitatis Tartuensis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ACTIVE : Journal of Physical Education, Sport, Health and Recreation     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Ágora para la Educación Física y el Deporte     Open Access  
Al.Qadisiya journal for the Sciences of Physical Education     Open Access  
American Journal of Sexuality Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Applied Sport Science     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Arab Journal of Nutrition and Exercise     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arquivos em Movimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arrancada     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Baltic Journal of Sport and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
BMC Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Child and Adolescent Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Childhood Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Comparative Exercise Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Cultura, Ciencia y Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
eJRIEPS : Ejournal de la recherche sur l'intervention en éducation physique et sport     Open Access  
Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Éthique & Santé     Full-text available via subscription  
Fat Studies : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Body Weight and Society     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
Food Science and Human Wellness     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Sports and Active Living     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Gelanggang Pendidikan Jasmani Indonesia     Open Access  
German Journal of Exercise and Sport Research : Sportwissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Geron     Full-text available via subscription  
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Marketing Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Health Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Health Promotion & Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Home Healthcare Now     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Human Movement Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Hygiene     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indonesia Performance Journal     Open Access  
International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 54)
International Journal of Athletic Therapy & Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
International Journal of Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
International Journal of Obesity Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-Being     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
International Journal of Spa and Wellness     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Sport, Exercise & Training Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Isokinetics and Exercise Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of American College Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Athlete Development and Experience     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Bioenergetics and Biomembranes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Exercise & Organ Cross Talk     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Human Sport and Exercise     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Motor Learning and Development     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Physical Activity and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Physical Activity and Hormones     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Physical Activity Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Physical Education and Human Movement     Open Access  
Journal of Physical Education and Sport Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Physical Education Health and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Science in Sport and Exercise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Sport and Health Science     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Sport Sciences and Fitness     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
Kinesiology : International Journal of Fundamental and Applied Kinesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Kinesiology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Malaysian Journal of Movement, Health & Exercise     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Médecine & Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mental Health and Physical Activity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
MHSalud : Movimiento Humano y Salud     Open Access  
Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Obesity Research & Clinical Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Obesity Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Obesity Science & Practice     Open Access  
Open Obesity Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pain Management in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
PALAESTRA : Adapted Sport, Physical Education, and Recreational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Physical Activity and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Physical Education & Sport Pedagogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology of Sport and Exercise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Quality in Sport     Open Access  
Race and Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBNE - Revista Brasileira de Nutrição Esportiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBONE - Revista Brasileira de Obesidade, Nutrição e Emagrecimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBPFEX - Revista Brasileira de Prescrição e Fisiologia do Exercício     Open Access  
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Retos : Nuevas Tendencias en Educación Física, Deportes y Recreación     Open Access  
Revista Andaluza de Medicina del Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Brasileira de Atividade Física & Saúde     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Cineantropometria & Desempenho Humano     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Internacional de Medicina y Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte : International Journal of Medicine and Science of Physical Activity and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue phénEPS / PHEnex Journal     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
SIPATAHOENAN : South-East Asian Journal for Youth, Sports & Health Education     Open Access  
Spor Bilimleri Dergisi / Hacettepe Journal of Sport Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sport and Fitness Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Sport Science and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Sport Sciences for Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
SPORTIVE : Journal Of Physical Education, Sport and Recreation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sports Biomechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Strength & Conditioning Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Timisoara Physical Education and Rehabilitation Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Turkish Journal of Sport and Exercise     Open Access  
Yoga Mimamsa     Open Access   (Followers: 3)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.112
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 37  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1715-5312 - ISSN (Online) 1715-5320
Published by NRC Research Press Homepage  [19 journals]
  • What’s the big IDEA' Incorporating inclusion, diversity, equity, and
           access (IDEA) in population health nutrition research and practice

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      Authors: Maria Baranowski, Nikki Webb, Joyce Slater
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Historically, the constructs of inclusion, diversity, equity, and access (IDEA) have not been sufficiently considered or included in population health nutrition research and practice. Consequently, current nutrition assessment benchmarks and knowledge translation tools may not accurately or adequately reflect diversity in the Canadian population or produce meaningful dietary guidance. The purpose of this current opinion paper is to introduce the population health nutrition research and practice framework and explore the current application of IDEA within this framework. Recommendations are offered to incorporate the constructs of IDEA along the continuum of future nutrition research and services to improve population nutritional health.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2024-02-06T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0215
       
  • Anti-inflammatory effects of sericin and swimming exercise in treating
           experimental Achilles tendinopathy in rat

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      Authors: Koksal Gundogdu, Ozgen Kılıc Erkek, Gulsah Gundogdu, Dilek Sayin, Gulcin Abban Mete
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of combining sericin with swimming exercise as a treatment for type-I collagenase-induced Achilles tendinopathy (AT) in rats, with a focus on inflammatory cytokines. An experimental AT model was established using type-I collagenase in male Sprague–Dawley rats, categorized into five groups: Group 1 (Control + Saline), Group 2 (AT), Group 3 (AT + exercise), Group 4 (AT + sericin), and Group 5 (AT + sericin + exercise). Intratendinous sericin administration (0.8 g/kg/mL) took place from days 3 to 6, coupled with 30 min daily swimming exercise sessions (5 days/week, 4 weeks). Serum samples were analyzed using ELISA for tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and total antioxidant-oxidant status (TAS-TOS), alongside histopathological and immunohistochemical assessments of Achilles tendon samples. Elevated TNF-α and IL-1β and decreased IL-10 levels were evident in Group 2; Of these, TNF-α and IL-1β were effectively reduced and IL-10 increased across all treatment groups, particularly groups 4 and 5. Serum TAS was notably lower in Group 2 and significantly increased in Group 5 compared to Group 2. Histopathologically, Group 2 displayed severe degeneration, irregular fibers, and round cell nuclei, while Group 5 exhibited decreased degeneration and spindle-shaped fibers. The Bonar score increased in Group 2 and decreased in groups 4 and 5. Collagen type-I alpha-1 (Col1A1) expression was notably lower in Group 2 (P = 0.001) and significantly increased in groups 4 and 5 compared to Group 2 (P = 0.011 and 0.028, respectively). This study underscores the potential of sericin and swimming exercises in mitigating inflammation and oxidative stress linked to AT pathogenesis, presenting a promising combined therapeutic strategy.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2024-01-29T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0377
       
  • The relationship between household food insecurity and overweight or
           obesity among children and adults in Canada: a population-based,
           propensity score weighting analysis

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      Authors: Andrée-Anne Fafard St-Germain, Joy Hutchinson, Valerie Tarasuk
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Household food insecurity is independently associated with adverse health outcomes among Canadians, but its association with overweight and obesity is poorly understood partly because of limited attention to confounding. This study assessed the relationship between food insecurity status and overweight/obesity in Canada. Cross-sectional data for individuals aged 2–64 years were drawn from the 2004 and 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey-Nutrition. Overweight/obesity was defined using body mass index calculated with measured height and weight. Food insecurity status was assessed with the 18-item Household Food Security Survey Module. The relationship was examined among preschool children (n = 2007), girls (n = 5512), boys (n = 5507), women (n = 8317), and men (n = 7279) using propensity score weighted logistic regressions to control for confounding. Relative to their food-secure counterparts, girls in moderately food-insecure households (39.7% vs. 28.5%), boys in severely food-insecure households (54.4% vs. 35.0%), and women in moderately and severely food-insecure households (58.9% and 73.1% vs. 50.7%) had higher overweight/obesity prevalence; men in moderately food-insecure households had a lower prevalence (48.9% vs. 66.3%). With propensity score weighting, no association existed between food insecurity and overweight/obesity among preschool children, girls, boys, or men. For women, moderate (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 1.61; 95% confidence interval (95%CI): 1.06–2.47) and severe (AOR: 2.33; 95%CI: 1.22–4.44) food insecurity was positively associated with overweight/obesity; the association was strongest for severe food insecurity and obesity (AOR: 3.38; 95%CI: 1.60–7.16). Additional research is needed to better understand the nature of the relationship among women. Problems of food insecurity and overweight/obesity among Canadian children and men should not be conflated in public health interventions.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2024-01-15T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0302
       
  • Independent and combined effects of calorie restriction and AICAR on
           glucose uptake and insulin signaling in skeletal muscles from 24-month-old
           female and male rats

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      Authors: Haiyan Wang, Amy Zheng, Dominic Thorley, Edward B. Arias, Gregory D. Cartee
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      We assessed the effects of two levels of calorie restriction (CR; eating either 15% or 35% less than ad libitum, AL, food intake for 8 weeks) by 24-month-old female and male rats on glucose uptake (GU) and phosphorylation of key signaling proteins (Akt; AMP-activated protein kinase, AMPK; Akt substrate of 160 kDa, AS160) measured in isolated skeletal muscles that underwent four incubation conditions (without either insulin or AICAR, an AMPK activator; with AICAR alone; with insulin alone; or with insulin and AICAR). Regardless of sex: (1) neither CR group versus the AL group had greater GU by insulin-stimulated muscles; (2) phosphorylation of Akt in insulin-stimulated muscles was increased in 35% CR versus AL rats; (3) prior AICAR treatment of muscle resulted in greater GU by insulin-stimulated muscles, regardless of diet; and (4) AICAR caused elevated phosphorylation of acetyl CoA carboxylase, an indicator of AMPK activation, in all diet groups. There was a sexually dimorphic diet effect on AS160 phosphorylation, with 35% CR exceeding AL for insulin-stimulated muscles in male rats, but not in female rats. Our working hypothesis is that the lack of a CR-effect on GU by insulin-stimulated muscles was related to the extended duration of the ex vivo incubation period (290 min compared to 40–50 min that was previously reported to be effective). The observed efficacy of prior treatment of muscles with AICAR to improve glucose uptake in insulin-stimulated muscles supports the strategy of targeting AMPK with the goal of improving insulin sensitivity in older females and males.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2024-01-05T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0522
       
  • The utility of heart rate and heart rate variability to identify limits of
           tolerance to moderate-intensity work in the heat: a secondary analysis

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      Authors: Jordan A. De Barros, Michael J. Macartney, Sean R. Notley, Robert D. Meade, Glen P. Kenny
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      We investigated the utility of heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) for identifying individuals who may terminate work early due to excessive heat strain. Forty-eight men and women (median = 36 years; Q1 = 20 years; Q3 = 54 years) attempted 180 min of moderate-intensity work at a fixed metabolic rate (∼200 W/m2; ∼3.5 METs) in a hot environment (wet-bulb globe temperature: 32 °C). Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were used to identify the ability of indices of HR (absolute HR, percentage of maximum HR, percentage of HR reserve) and HRV (root-mean-square of successive differences (RMSSD), high-frequency power, and detrended fluctuation analysis component alpha 1 (DFA α1)) to discriminate between participants who completed the 180 min work bout or terminated prematurely. Participants who terminated work prematurely (n = 26) exhibited higher HR and percentage of HR measures, as well as reduced RMSSD and DFA α1 after the first hour of work compared to participants who completed the bout. The discriminative utility of HR and HRV indices was strongest within the first hour of work, with percentage of HR reserve demonstrating excellent discriminative power (ROC area under curve (AUC) of 0.8). Stratifying participants by age and sex improved ROC AUC point estimates for most indices, particularly in female participants. The study provides preliminary evidence supporting the use of noninvasive cardiac monitoring for predicting work tolerance in healthy individuals exposed to occupational heat stress. HR and percentage of HR reserve were suggested to discriminate work termination most effectively. Further investigations are warranted to explore the influence of individual factors and refine the discriminative thresholds for early identification of excessive occupational heat strain.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2024-01-03T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0466
       
  • Healthcare professionals knowledge, attitude, practices, and perspectives
           providing care to Muslims in Western countries who fast during Ramadan: a
           scoping review

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      Authors: Katherine A.W. Hillier, Zoe L. Longworth, Hassan Vatanparast
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      The practice of fasting during the month of Ramadan is an obligation for healthy Muslims and involves abstaining from food and drinks from dawn to dusk for 29–30 consecutive days annually. With changes in dietary and lifestyle patterns, healthcare professionals (HCPs) play a significant role in supporting Muslims health during Ramadan. In this scoping review, we employed a systematic approach to map existing literature on HCPs’ knowledge, attitude, practices, and perspectives working with Muslims who fast during Ramadan in Western countries. Our aim was to identify research gaps and opportunities for improving healthcare services for Muslims during Ramadan. Literature searches were generated through multiple scientific literature databases, including Web of Science, Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Embase and reviewed following The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis extension for Scoping Reviews guidelines. From the eight sources included in this review, it was found that HCPs’ knowledge of Ramadan fasting practices vary, with many lacking adequate knowledge. While HCPs recognize potential health complications, adjustments to medications for fasting patients, especially those with diabetes, are often neglected. Challenges in care included language barriers, limited cultural training, and resource awareness. Strategies identified to address barriers include reducing language barriers, providing resources in relevant languages, and enhancing cultural competence training. Further research is required on HCPs’ knowledge providing care to Muslims during Ramadan, cultural competency training impact, and diverse healthcare interventions for fasting Muslims. Addressing these gaps may enhance culturally safe care and improve patient outcomes.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-12-21T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0462
       
  • AMPK and PGC-α following maximal and supramaximal exercise in men and
           women: a randomized cross-over study

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      Authors: Benjamin B. Arhen, J.R.M. Renwick, A.K. Zedic, E.S. Menezes, N. Preobrazenski, C.A. Simpson, T. Stokes, C. McGlory, Brendon J. Gurd
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      We tested the hypothesis that AMPK activation and peroxisome proliferator gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) expression are not augmented as exercise intensity (power output) increases from maximal to supramaximal intensities and conducted an exploratory analysis comparing AMPK activation and PGC-1α expression in males and females. Seventeen (n = 9 males; n = 8 females) recreationally active, healthy, young individuals volunteered to participate in the current study. Participants completed work matched interval exercise at 100% (Max) and 133% (Supra) of peak work rate (WRpeak). Intervals were 1 min in duration and participants were prescribed 6 and 8 intervals of Max and Supra, respectively, to equate external work across protocols. PGC-1α mRNA expression and activation of AMPK (p-ACC) were examined in muscle biopsy samples. Interval WR (watts; W), intensity (%WRpeak) and average HR (bpm), blood lactate (mmol/L) and rating of perceived exertion were all higher (all p 
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-12-19T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0256
       
  • A very low carbohydrate diet for minimising blood glucose excursions
           during ultra-endurance open-water swimming in type 1 diabetes: a case
           report

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      Authors: Shania N. Smee, Rebecca Johnson, Amy Rush, Raymond J. Davey
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Carbohydrate-restricted diets are used by people with type 1 diabetes (T1D) to help manage their condition. However, the impact of this strategy on blood glucose responses to exercise is unknown. This study describes the nutritional strategies of an athlete with T1D, who follows a very low carbohydrate diet to manage her condition during an ultra-endurance open-water swimming event. The athlete completed the 19.7 km distance in 6 h 43 min. She experienced minimal disruptions to glycaemia, reduced need for supplemental carbohydrate, and no episodes of symptomatic hypoglycaemia. This case report will hopefully encourage further experimental studies that inform and expand current clinical practice guidelines.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-12-18T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0266
       
  • Investigation of motor unit behavior in exercise and sports physiology:
           challenges and perspectives

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      Authors: Sebastian Möck, Alessandro Del Vecchio
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Several methods are in use to record and analyze neuronal activation, each with specific advantages and challenges. New developments like the decomposition of high-density surface electromyography (HDsEMG) have enabled novel insights into discharge characteristics noninvasively in laboratory settings but face certain challenges to be applied in sports physiology in a broader scope. Several challenges can be accounted for by methodological considerations, others require further technological developments to allow this technology to be used in more applied settings. This paper aims to describe the developments of surface electromyography and identify the challenges and perspectives of HDsEMG in the context of an application in sports physiology. We further discuss methodological possibilities to overcome some of the challenges to investigate specific research questions and identify areas that require further advancements.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-12-15T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0354
       
  • GLP-1 response during pregnancy: variations between trimesters and
           associations with appetite sensations and usual energy intake

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      Authors: Inès Auclair Mangliar, Anne-Sophie Plante, Myriam Chabot, Claudia Savard, Simone Lemieux, Andréanne Michaud, S. John Weisnagel, Félix Camirand Lemyre, Alain Veilleux, Anne-Sophie Morisset
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Further research is required to understand hormonal regulation of food intake during pregnancy and its association with energy intake. The objectives are to (i) compare postprandial responses of plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) between trimesters, (ii) compare postprandial appetite sensations between trimesters, and (iii) examine trimester-specific associations between GLP-1 levels, appetite sensations, and usual energy intake. At each trimester, participants (n = 26) consumed a standard test meal following a 12 h fast. Plasma GLP-1 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method at fasting and at 30, 60, 120, and 180 min postprandial. A visual analogue scale assessing appetite sensations was completed at fasting and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 min postprandial. Mean energy intake was assessed using three web-based 24 h dietary recalls at each trimester. Lower postprandial GLP-1 responses were observed in the 2nd (p = 0.004) and 3rd trimesters (p 
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-12-14T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0301
       
  • Options for substantiating protein content claims for conventional foods

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      Authors: James D. House, André Brodkorb, Mark Messina, Michelle Braun, Elaine S. Krul
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      In Canada and the United States, front-of-package protein content claims require data to support the quality of the protein. In general, protein quality reflects the product of the amino acid composition of the food protein relative to human amino acid requirements and a measure of digestibility. The currently accepted method in both jurisdictions is the protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) that requires the measurement of true fecal protein (nitrogen) digestibility. The latter must be measured in vivo using a rat model. This requirement for animal testing is inconsistent with international efforts to reduce the usage of animals in testing for regulatory purposes. The current commentary positions four options to remove the need to use animal testing for determining protein quality, when considering protein content claim substantiation. These options include (i) a focus on protein quantity alone; (ii) the use of the amino acid score alone, with no correction for digestibility; (iii) the use of a fixed digestibility coefficient to estimate protein quality; and (iv) the use of in vitro methods to measure protein and/or amino acid digestibility. The relative merits and deficiencies of the options are positioned with the goal of encouraging dialogue within the regulatory agencies to move towards alternative approaches for substantiating protein content claims on foods, including those derived from plant-based sources.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-12-13T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0243
       
  • The human skeletal muscle metaboreflex contribution to cardiorespiratory
           control in males and females in dynamic exercise

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      Authors: Michael G. Leahy, Jenna M. Benbaruj, Owen T. Payne, Glen E. Foster, A. William Sheel
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      There is a significant effect of sex and muscle mass on the cardiorespiratory response to the skeletal muscle metaboreflex during isometric exercise. We therefore tested the hypothesis that sex differences would be present when isolated following dynamic exercise. We also tested the hypothesis that single and double leg post-exercise circulatory occlusion (PECO) following heavy exercise would elicit a cardiorespiratory response proportional to the absolute muscle mass. Healthy (24 ± 4 years) males (n = 10) and females (n = 10) completed pulmonary function and an incremental cycle test to exhaustion. Participants completed two randomized, 6 min bouts of intense cycle exercise (84 ± 7% V̇O2peak). One exercise bout was immediately followed by 3 min PECO (220 mmHg) of the legs while the other exercise bout was followed by passive recovery. Males completed an additional session of testing with single leg PECO. The mean arterial pressure during PECO and control was greater in males compared to females (p = 0.004). The was a significant time by condition by sex interaction in the heart rate response to PECO (p = 0.027). There was also a significant condition by sex interaction in the ventilatory response to PECO (p = 0.026). In males, we observed a dose-dependent cardiovascular, but not ventilatory, response to muscle mass occluded (all p 
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-12-11T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0387
       
  • Comparison of 10 × 1-minute high-intensity interval training (HIIT)
           versus 4 × 4-minute HIIT on glucose control and variability in females
           with type 2 diabetes

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      Authors: A. Marcotte-Chénard, R. Tremblay, L. Deslauriers, P. Geraldes, M. Gayda, D. Christou, W. Mampuya, J.P. Little, E. Riesco
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Two high-intensity interval training (HIIT) regimens are often used in research and clinical settings. Yet, there has been no direct comparison to determine if one can improve glucose control and variability to a greater extent in individuals living with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Fourteen older females with T2D participated in a semi-randomized control trial where HIIT10 (10 × 1-min intervals at 90% heart rate max; HRmax) and HIIT4 (4 × 4-min intervals at 90% of HRmax) were compared to a control condition (CON; no exercise). Continuous glucose monitoring was used to assess glucose control and variability over 24 h after each condition. Both HIIT10 (−2.1 ± 1.1 mmol/L) and HIIT4 (−2.1 ± 1.3 mmol/L) acutely lowered glucose compared to CON (−0.7 ± 0.8 mmol/L; p = 0.001), with no difference between exercise conditions. This glucose-lowering effect did not persist over the 24-h post-exercise period, as both mean glucose (p = 0.751) and glucose variability (p = 0.168) were not significantly different among conditions. However, exploratory analyses focusing on individuals with less optimal glucose control (above median 24-h mean glucose in the CON condition; n = 7) revealed that 24-h mean glucose (7.4 [7.14–8.92] vs. 8.4 [7.5–9.9] mmol/L; p = 0.048), glucose variability (p = 0.010), and peak glucose (p = 0.048) were lower following HIIT10 compared to CON, while HIIT4 reduced time spent in moderate hyperglycemia compared to CON (p = 0.023). Both HIIT10 and HIIT4 acutely lower glycemia, but the effect does not persist over 24 h. However, in individuals with worse glucose control, HIIT10 may improve mean 24-h glucose and glycemic variability, while HIIT4 may reduce time spent in moderate hyperglycemia.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-12-05T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0326
       
  • Ameliorative effects of aqueous extract from rosemary on oxidative stress
           and inflammation pathways caused by a high-fat diet in C57BL/6 mice

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      Authors: Ana Mara de Oliveira e Silva, Raquel Oliveira Pereira, Anne Karoline de Souza Oliveira, Fernanda Santana Harris, Illana Louise Pereira de Melo, Thiago Henrique Almeida-Souza, Luciana Tedesco Yoshime, Caroline dos Santos Melo, Jymmys Lopes dos Santos, Elma Regina Silva de Andrade-Wartha, Bruno Cogliati, Daniel Granato, Jorge Mancini-Filho
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Rosemary is an herb exhibits biological properties, attenuates inflammation, oxidative stress, and improves lipid profile. Here, we evaluated the effects of rosemary aqueous extract (RE) on mice fed with a high-fat diet (HFD). Male C57BL/6 mice were administered a control diet or HFD for 10 weeks. The treated groups received RE in the diet at different concentrations: 25, 250, and 500 mg/100 g. After 10 weeks, serum concentrations of glucose, lipid, insulin, leptin, adiponectin, and cytokines were evaluated and the oxygen radical absorbance capacity was determined. Histological analysis was performed to determine the concentrations of triacylglycerides (TG), total cholesterol, cytokines, and antioxidant enzymes as well as the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism, oxidative stress, and inflammation. The dietary RE ameliorated HFD-induced weight gain, adipose tissue weight, glucose intolerance, and insulin, leptin, and free fatty acid levels. Reduction in hepatic TG deposition was observed. The levels of inflammatory cytokines decreased, and the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism increased. RE mitigated oxidative stress and reduced the production of reactive oxygen species in HepG2 and 3T3-L1 cells. Therefore, RE is a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of inflammation and oxidative stress outcomes associated with obesity.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-12-04T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0157
       
  • Effects of 7-day quercetin intervention on motor unit activity and muscle
           contractile properties before and after resistance exercise in young
           adults randomized controlled trials

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      Authors: Taichi Nishikawa, Tetsuya Hirono, Ryosuke Takeda, Masamichi Okudaira, Toshiyuki Ohya, Kohei Watanabe
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      We investigated whether the alteration of the motor unit recruitment threshold (MURT) caused by quercetin ingestion intervention for 7 days modifies motor unit activation patterns before and after a single session of resistance exercise. Twenty young male and female adults were divided into two groups: ingestion of placebo (PLA) or quercetin glycosides at 200 mg/day (QUE). High-density surface electromyography during submaximal contractions was measured to assess the motor unit firing rate (MUFR) and MURT of the vastus lateralis muscle before (PRE) and after (POST) resistance exercise (DAY1). The same measurements were repeated after 7 days of placebo or quercetin glycoside ingestion (DAY8). In QUE, MURT decreased more from DAY1-PRE to DAY8-PRE (29.1 ± 9.1 to 27.1 ± 9.5% MVC, p 
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-11-30T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0208
       
  • Awareness and knowledge of the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for
           Adults among adults living in Canada

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      Authors: Kaitlyn D. Kauffeldt, Olivia Varkul, Amy E. Latimer-Cheung, Guy Faulkner, Melissa C. Brouwers, Tala Chulak-Bozzer, Rebecca Jones, Kirstin N. Lane, Zachary J. Weston, Jennifer R. Tomasone
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Awareness and knowledge of national movement behaviour guidelines are needed to influence individual behaviour and public health policies. This study assessed the awareness and knowledge of the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Adults Aged 18–64 Years and Adults Aged 65 Years or Older (24HMG) recommendations among adults living in Canada across three timepoints. Online surveys were distributed to representative samples of adults living in Canada over a 6-month period. Findings suggest that short-term dissemination efforts were successful in increasing awareness of the 24HMG following guideline release. However, other strategies, such as education, may be needed to influence knowledge of guideline recommendations.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-11-21T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0255
       
  • Effects of male paratroopers’ initial body composition on changes in
           physical performance and recovery during a 20-day winter military field
           training

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      Authors: Jere Borgenström, Heikki Kyröläinen, Kai Pihlainen, Jani P. Vaara, Tommi Ojanen
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Changes in physiological markers and physical performance in relation to paratroopers’ initial body composition were investigated during a 20-day winter military field training (MFT) and the subsequent 10-day recovery period. Body composition, serum hormone concentrations and enzymatic biomarkers, and physical performance of 58 soldiers were measured before, during, and after MFT. Comparisons were done according to soldiers’ body fat percentage before MFT between low-fat (12% body fat) groups. Correlations between body fat percentage preceding MFT and changes in muscle mass, physical performance, and serum hormone concentrations and enzymatic biomarkers were investigated. It was hypothesized that soldiers with a higher fat percentage would have smaller decrements in muscle mass, physical performance, and serum testosterone concentration. The change in muscle and fat mass was different between groups (p
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-11-21T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0002
       
  • The influence of physical activity and sex on carotid artery longitudinal
           wall motion in younger healthy adults

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      Authors: Carol G. Bryans, Josh Gopaul, Chloe E. Athaide, Christopher J.A. Pugh, Jason S. Au
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Carotid artery longitudinal wall motion (CALM) is a novel preclinical marker for atherosclerosis that describes the axial anterograde and retrograde motion of the intima–media complex. While regular physical activity and sex are known to independently influence arterial stiffness, their roles on axial arterial wall behaviour are unknown. The purpose of this study is to examine whether physical activity and sex impact CALM. We hypothesized that CALM retrograde displacement and total amplitude would be greater in females and active individuals, as a function of arterial stiffness. Fifty-seven young healthy adults (30 females; aged 22 ± 3 years) were evaluated for CALM outcomes and arterial stiffness and grouped by physical activity based on active (V̇O2 = 44.2 ± 8.9 mL/kg/min) or sedentary (V̇O2 = 33.7 ± 6.7 mL/kg/min) lifestyles defined by the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines. Arterial stiffness and CALM were measured by carotid–femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) and vascular ultrasound at the right common carotid artery with speckle tracking analysis, respectively. cfPWV was greater in males (p  0.05). Apparent sex differences in vascular function extend to novel CALM outcomes but may be confounded by blood pressure. We recommend sex-balanced design and reporting in future studies due to possible anterograde-shifted CALM patterns in healthy males.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-11-14T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0325
       
  • Amygdalin and exercise training exert a synergistic effect in improving
           cardiac performance and ameliorating cardiac inflammation and fibrosis in
           a rat model of myocardial infarction

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      Authors: Xiao Guo, Feng-Xia Qu, Ji-Dong Zhang, Fa Zheng, Yue Xin, Rong Wang, Jing-Yuan Li, Hai-Ying Li, Chang-Hong Lu
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigated the effects of amygdalin (AMY, a cyanogenic glycoside widely distributed in the fruits and seeds of Rosaceae plants) on cardiac performance and ventricular remodeling in a rat model of myocardial infarction (MI). We also investigated whether the combination of AMY with exercise training (ExT) has a beneficial synergistic effect in treating MI rats. MI was induced by the ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery in male SD rats. ExT or AMY treatment was started 1 week after MI and continued for 1 week (short-term) or 8 weeks (long-term). Cardiac function was evaluated by echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters. Heart tissues were harvested and subjected to 2,3,5-triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride, Masson's trichrome, hematoxylin-eosin, and immunohistochemical staining. Gene expression was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Western blot gave a qualitative assessment of protein levels. AMY or ExT improved cardiac function and reduced infarct size in MI rats. AMY or ExT also suppressed myocardial fibrosis and attenuated inflammation in the infarct border zone of hearts from MI rats, as evidenced by inhibition of collagen deposition, inflammatory cell infiltration, and pro-inflammatory markers (interleukin 1β, interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and cyclooxygenase 2). Notably, the effects of AMY combined with ExT were superior to those of AMY alone or ExT alone. Mechanistically, these beneficial functions were correlated with the inhibition of MI-induced activation of the transforming growth factor-β/Smad pathway. Collectively, AMY and ExT exert a synergistic effect on improving cardiac performance and ameliorating cardiac inflammation and fibrosis after MI, and the effects of long-term intervention were better than short-term intervention.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-11-09T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0135
       
  • Acute oral antioxidant consumption does not alter brachial artery flow
           

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      Authors: Trevor J. King, Heather L. Petrick, Philip J. Millar, Jamie F. Burr
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Endothelium-dependent vasodilation can be tested using a variety of shear stress paradigms, some of which may involve the production of reactive oxygen species. The purpose of this study was to compare different methods for assessing endothelial function and their specific involvement of reactive oxygen species and influence of aerobic training status. Twenty-nine (10 F) young and healthy participants (VO2max: 34–74 mL·kg−1·min−1) consumed either an antioxidant cocktail (AOC; vitamin C, vitamin E, α-lipoic acid) or placebo (PLA) on each of two randomized visits. Endothelial function was measured via three different brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) tests: reactive hyperemia (RH-FMD: 5 min cuff occlusion and release), sustained shear (SS-FMD: 6 min rhythmic handgrip), and progressive sustained shear (P-SS-FMD: three intensities of 3 min of rhythmic handgrip). Baseline artery diameter decreased (all tests: 3.8 ± 0.5 to 3.7 ± 0.6 mm, p = 0.004), and shear rate stimulus increased (during RH-FMD test, p = 0.021; during SS-FMD test, p = 0.36; during P-SS-FMD test, p = 0.046) following antioxidant consumption. However, there was no difference in FMD following AOC consumption (RH-FMD, PLA: 8.1 ± 2.6%, AOC: 8.2 ± 3.5%, p = 0.92; SS-FMD, PLA: 6.9 ± 3.9%, AOC: 7.8 ± 5.2%, p = 0.15) or FMD per shear rate slope (P-SS-FMD: PLA: 0.0039 ± 0.0035 mm·s−1, AOC: 0.0032 ± 0.0017 mm·s−1, p = 0.28) and this was not influenced by training status/fitness (all p > 0.60). Allometric scaling did not alter these outcomes (all p > 0.40). Reactive oxygen species may not be integral to endothelium-dependent vasodilation tested using reactive, sustained, or progressive shear protocols in young males and females, regardless of fitness level.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-11-09T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0218
       
  • Lack of change in blood pressure and arterial stiffness after high dairy
           intake in hyperinsulinemic subjects: a cross-over randomized controlled
           trial

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      Authors: Hana Arghavani, Sarah O'Connor, Catherine Fortier, Iwona Rudkowska
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      To evaluate the effects of high dairy (HD) (≥4 servings/day), compared to adequate dairy (AD) (2–3 servings/day as per Canada's Food Guide for Healthy Eating (2007)), on blood pressure (BP) and measures of arterial stiffness in hyperinsulinemic subjects. In this cross-over clinical trial, hyperinsulinemic adults were randomized to AD and HD for 6 weeks. Anthropometric, glycemic, and lipid parameters were analyzed and dietary intake was evaluated; BP, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, and measures of arterial stiffness were assessed. Twenty-seven participants completed the study. Dairy intake was 2.2 ± 1.2 servings/day during AD. In addition, lower total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol were observed without significant change in BP or arterial stiffness between before and after AD. During HD, the subjects consumed 5.8 ± 1.9 servings/day of dairy products, providing a higher intake of protein, saturated fat, calcium, phosphorus, sodium, and potassium compared to the baseline diet. After the HD, subjects had higher body fat, fasting insulin, homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index, and triglycerides without altering BP or arterial stiffness compared to before HD. Overall, adequate or high intake of total dairy did not modify BP or arterial stiffness in hyperinsulinemic adults after 6 weeks.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-11-08T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0053
       
  • Is low-volume high-intensity interval training a time-efficient strategy
           to improve cardiometabolic health and body composition' A meta-analysis

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      Authors: Mingyue Yin, Hansen Li, Mingyang Bai, Hengxian Liu, Zhili Chen, Jianfeng Deng, Shengji Deng, Chuan Meng, Niels B. J. Vollaard, Jonathan P. Little, Yongming Li
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      The present meta-analysis aimed to assess the effects of low-volume high-intensity interval training (LV-HIIT; i.e., ≤5 min high-intensity exercise within a ≤15 min session) on cardiometabolic health and body composition. A systematic search was performed in accordance with PRISMA guidelines to assess the effect of LV-HIIT on cardiometabolic health and body composition. Twenty-one studies (moderate to high quality) with a total of 849 participants were included in this meta-analysis. LV-HIIT increased cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF, SMD = 1.19 [0.87, 1.50]) while lowering systolic blood pressure (SMD = −1.44 [−1.68, −1.20]), diastolic blood pressure (SMD = −1.51 [−1.75, −1.27]), mean arterial pressure (SMD = −1.55 [−1.80, −1.30]), MetS z-score (SMD = −0.76 [−1.02, −0.49]), fat mass (kg) (SMD = −0.22 [−0.44, 0.00]), fat mass (%) (SMD = −0.22 [−0.41, −0.02]), and waist circumference (SMD = −0.53 [−0.75, −0.31]) compared to untrained control (CONTROL). Despite a total time-commitment of LV-HIIT of only 14%–47% and 45%–94% compared to moderate-intensity continuous training and HV-HIIT, respectively, there were no statistically significant differences observed for any outcomes in comparisons between LV-HIIT and moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) or high-volume HIIT. Significant inverse dose–responses were observed between the change in CRF with LV-HIIT and sprint repetitions (β = −0.52 [−0.76, −0.28]), high-intensity duration (β = −0.21 [−0.39, −0.02]), and total duration (β = −0.19 [−0.36, −0.02]), while higher intensity significantly improved CRF gains. LV-HIIT can improve cardiometabolic health and body composition and represent a time-efficient alternative to MICT and HV-HIIT. Performing LV-HIIT at a higher intensity drives higher CRF gains. More repetitions, longer time at high intensity, and total session duration did not augment gains in CRF.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-11-08T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0329
       
  • Assessing the potential for healthier consumer food substitutions in
           Canada: population-level differences in dietary intakes of whole grains,
           refined grains, red meats, and legumes

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      Authors: Gabriella Luongo, Emily Jago, Catherine L. Mah
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      The potential for healthier consumer food substitutions is an important factor in the study of food environments, dietary choices, and population nutrition promotion. The burden of diet-related non-communicable diseases is unevenly distributed across Canada and variation in the food environment sub-nationally may be an important explanation. We used population-based 24 h dietary recall data from the 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey—Nutrition for Canadian adults (n = 13 919) to examine dietary intakes of two food group pairings (whole grains/refined grains and legumes/red meats) where consumer substitutions have been recognized to be of importance in promoting healthy and sustainable population diet. We used an ANOVA followed by pairwise comparisons with Bonferroni correction to estimate differences in intakes between provinces for daily weight and proportion of total energy consumed. Based on the Global Burden of Disease Study, Canadians consumed below the average daily requirements of legumes and whole grains and well above the required range of red meat, suggesting room for broad improvements to population diet. Findings also demonstrate that there is potential for targeted shifts in dietary intakes among non-consumers of certain foods (e.g., legumes). This study may inform intervention development for the consumer nutrition environment including food accessibility and affordability to reduce non-communicable disease risk.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-11-06T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0260
       
  • Associations between cooking skills, cooking with processed foods, and
           health: a cross-sectional study

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      Authors: Melissa A. Fernandez, Katerina Maximova, Jayne A. Fulkerson, Kim D. Raine
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      To improve health outcomes, home cooking has been suggested as a solution to reduce intakes of processed foods. However, little is known about how cooking skills or cooking with processed foods influence health. This cross-sectional study examined associations between diet and health outcomes with cooking skills and cooking with processed foods. The dataset included a nationally representative sample of 18 460 adults from Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) annual component rapid response modules on food skills. In the CCHS rapid response modules, diet and health outcomes (fruit and vegetable intake, general health, mental health, and obesity) and data related to cooking skills and cooking with processed foods were collected through self-report. Separate logistic regression models were fitted for each outcome, controlling for age, income, and education, and stratified by sex. Adults with poor cooking skills were less likely to have adequate fruit and vegetable intake (≥5 servings per day) (p 
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-11-06T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0293
       
  • Social desirability, dietary intakes, and variables related to attitudes
           and behaviours towards eating among French-speaking adults from Quebec,
           Canada: The PREDISE study

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      Authors: Benoît Boulanger, Alexandra Bédard, Élise Carbonneau, Luc Pelletier, Julie Robitaille, Benoît Lamarche, Simone Lemieux
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      The primary objective of this study was to examine how social desirability is associated with self-reported measures of dietary intakes and variables related to attitudes and behaviours towards eating. This analysis was conducted in 1083 adults (50.0% women) from the PREDISE study. Social desirability was assessed using the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding (BIDR) questionnaire, which includes two subscales: (1) self-deceptive enhancement (SDE), i.e., having an overly positive self-image and (2) impression management (IM), i.e., intentional response distortion to please. BIDR total score and IM subscore were positively associated with the Canadian Healthy Eating Index (C-HEI) (ß = 0.24 and ß = 0.50; p ≤ 0.0003), calculated using data from three self-administered 24 h food recalls. All BIDR scores were positively associated with self-determined motivation for eating regulation (0.03 ≤ ß ≤ 0.06; p 
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-11-06T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0261
       
  • Whole-protein enteral nutrition formula supplementation reduces
           Escherichia and improves intestinal barrier function in HIV-infected
           immunological nonresponders

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      Authors: Danfeng Lu, Yue-Xin Wang, Shi-Tao Geng, Zunyue Zhang, Yu Xu, Qing-Yan Peng, Shao-You Li, Jian-Bo Zhang, Kun-Hua Wang, Yi-Qun Kuang
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      People living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLWH) have persistent malnutrition, intestinal barrier dysfunction, and gut microbial imbalance. The interplay between gut microbiota and nutrients is involved in the immune reconstitution of PLWH. To evaluate the effects of whole-protein enteral nutrition formula supplementation on T-cell levels, intestinal barrier function, nutritional status, and gut microbiota composition in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected immunological nonresponders (INRs) who failed to normalize CD4+ T-cell counts, with a number 
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-11-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2022-0450
       
  • Maternal folic acid supplementation does not impact skeletal muscle
           function and metabolism in male and female CD-1 mouse offspring

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      Authors: Caitlin Saint, William Gittings, Jordan Bunda, Cameron Giles, Sandra M. Sacco, Rene Vandenboom, Wendy E. Ward, Paul J. LeBlanc
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Folic acid fortification of all white flour, enriched pasta, and cornmeal products became mandatory in Canada to reduce risk of neural tube defects at birth. Furthermore, Health Canada and the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada recommend women take daily prenatal folic acid supplements in addition to folic acid fortified foods during pregnancy. However, the influence of maternal folic acid supplementation on offspring development, specifically the highly abundant and metabolically active skeletal muscle, is currently unknown. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of supplemental folic acid (four times higher than normal dietary consumption), in utero and throughout suckling on muscle size, function, and metabolism in male and female CD-1 mouse offspring. The major findings were that maternal exposure to supplemental folic acid (i) had no impact on postpartum growth rates or muscle mass in female and male offspring, (ii) had no impact on skeletal muscle contractile kinetics in females and male offspring, and (iii) increased maximal phosphofructokinase activity in extensor digitorum longus of female and male offspring. These findings suggest that exposure to folic acid supplementation in utero and throughout suckling at levels four times higher than recommended had minimal effect on skeletal muscle size, function, and metabolism regardless of sex. Future research is needed explore the underlying biological pathways and mechanisms affected by folic acid supplementation during pregnancy and lactation on offspring skeletal muscle tissue, specifically in humans.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-11-01T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0207
       
  • Neuromechanical characterization of the abductor hallucis and its
           potential role in upright postural control

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      Authors: Tushar Sharma, Paige V. Copeland, Mathew I.B. Debenham, Leah R. Bent, Brian H. Dalton
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      There is growing evidence to support a role for the abductor hallucis (AH) in standing balance control; however, functional properties of the muscle that may provide more insight into AH's specific contribution to upright posture have yet to be characterized. This study was conducted to quantify functional neuromechanical properties of the AH and correlate the measures with standing balance variables. We quantified strength and voluntary activation during maximal voluntary isometric contractions of the great toe abductor in nine (3 females and 6 males) healthy, young participants. During electrically evoked twitch and tetanic contractions, we measured great toe abduction peak force and constructed a force–frequency curve. We also evaluated peak abduction force, contraction time (CT), half-relaxation time (HRT), rate of force development (RFD), and relaxation rate (RR) from twitch contractions evoked using doublet stimuli. Strength, VA, CT, HRT, RFD, and RR were correlated to centre of pressure standard deviation (COP SD) and velocity (COP VEL) variables of the traditional COP trace and its rambling and trembling components during single-legged stance. AH twitch properties (e.g., CT: 169.8 ± 32.3 ms; HRT: 124.1 ± 29.2 ms) and force–frequency curve were similar to other slow contractile muscles. Contractile speed related negatively with COP VEL, suggesting AH may be appropriate for slow, prolonged tasks such as ongoing postural balance control. Correlation coefficient outcomes for all variables were similar between rambling and trembling components. Our results provide further evidence for the importance of AH neuromechanical function for standing balance control, at least during a challenging single-legged posture.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-11-01T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0226
       
  • Actovegin improves skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration and
           functional aerobic capacity in a type 1 diabetic male murine model

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      Authors: Brandon Kosik, Steen Larsen, Andreas Bergdahl
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Insulin deficiency in type 1 diabetes (T1D) leads to an impairment of glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function. Actovegin is a hemodialysate of calf blood, which has been shown to enhance glucose uptake and cell metabolism in healthy human skeletal muscle. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of Actovegin on skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration and functional aerobic capacity in a T1D mouse model. Effects on the expression of mitochondrial proteins, body mass, and food and water consumption were also investigated. Streptozotocin-induced T1D male C57B1/6 mice (aged 3–4 months) were randomized to an Actovegin group and a control group. Every third day, the Actovegin and control groups were injected intraperitoneally with (0.1 mL) Actovegin and (0.1 mL) physiological salt solution, respectively. Oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity of the vastus lateralis muscle was measured by high resolution respirometry in addition to the expression levels of the mitochondrial complexes as well as voltage-dependent anion channel. Functional aerobic capacity was measured using a rodent treadmill protocol. Body mass and food and water consumption were also measured. After 13 days, in comparison to the control group, the Actovegin group demonstrated a significantly higher skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity in an ADP-restricted and ADP-stimulated environment. The Actovegin group displayed a significantly lesser decline in functional aerobic capacity and baseline body mass after 13 days. There were no significant differences in food or water consumption between groups. Actovegin could act as an effective agent for facilitating glucose metabolism and improving OXPHOS capacity and functional aerobic capacity in T1D. Further investigation is warranted to establish Actovegin’s potential as an alternative therapeutic drug for T1D.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-11-01T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0004
       
  • Measurements of in vivo skeletal muscle oxidative capacity are lower
           following sustained isometric compared with dynamic contractions

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      Authors: Miles F. Bartlett, Liam F. Fitzgerald, Rajakumar Nagarajan, Jane A. Kent
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Human skeletal muscle oxidative capacity can be quantified non-invasively using 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) to measure the rate constant of phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery (kPCr) following contractions. In the quadricep muscles, several studies have quantified kPCr following 24–30 s of sustained maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). This approach has the advantage of simplicity but is potentially problematic because sustained MVICs inhibit perfusion, which may limit muscle oxygen availability or increase the intracellular metabolic perturbation, and thus affect kPCr. Alternatively, dynamic contractions allow reperfusion between contractions, which may avoid limitations in oxygen delivery. To determine whether dynamic contraction protocols elicit greater kPCr than sustained MVIC protocols, we used a cross-sectional design to compare quadriceps kPCr in 22 young and 11 older healthy adults following 24 s of maximal voluntary: (1) sustained MVIC and (2) dynamic (MVDC; 120°·s−1, 1 every 2 s) contractions. Muscle kPCr was ∼20% lower following the MVIC protocol compared with the MVDC protocol (p ≤ 0.001), though this was less evident in older adults (p = 0.073). Changes in skeletal muscle pH (p ≤ 0.001) and PME accumulation (p ≤ 0.001) were greater following the sustained MVIC protocol, and pH (p ≤ 0.001) and PME (p ≤ 0.001) recovery were slower. These results demonstrate that (i) a brief, sustained MVIC yields a lower value for skeletal muscle oxidative capacity than an MVDC protocol of similar duration and (ii) this difference may not be consistent across populations (e.g., young vs. old). Thus, the potential effect of contraction protocol on comparisons of kPCr in different study groups requires careful consideration in the future.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-10-31T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0315
       
  • High-intensity interval training attenuates impairment in regulatory
           protein machinery of mitochondrial quality control in skeletal muscle of
           diet-induced obese mice

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      Authors: James B. Tincknell, Benjamin A. Kugler, Haley Spicuzza, Nicolas Berger, Huimin Yan, Tongjian You, Kai Zou
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Mitochondrial quality control processes are essential in governing mitochondrial integrity and function. The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of 10 weeks of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on the regulatory protein machinery of skeletal muscle mitochondrial quality control and whole-body glucose homeostasis in diet-induced obese mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were assigned to low-fat diet (LFD) or high-fat diet (HFD) group. After 10 weeks, HFD-fed mice were divided into sedentary and HIIT (HFD + HIIT) groups for another 10 weeks (n = 9/group). Graded exercise test, glucose and insulin tolerance tests, mitochondrial respiration, and protein markers of mitochondrial quality control processes were determined. HFD-fed mice exhibited lower ADP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration (p 
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-10-18T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0286
       
  • Dysanapsis is not associated with exertional dyspnoea in healthy male and
           female never-smokers aged 40 years and older

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      Authors: Yannick Molgat-Seon, Mathieu A.T. Sawatzky, Paolo B. Dominelli, Miranda Kirby, Jordan A. Guenette, Jean Bourbeau, Wan C. Tan, A. William Sheel
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      In healthy adults, airway-to-lung (i.e., dysanapsis) ratio is lower and dyspnoea during exercise at a given minute ventilation (V̇E) is higher in females than in males. We investigated the relationship between dysanapsis and sex on exertional dyspnoea in healthy adults. We hypothesized that females would have a smaller airway-to-lung ratio than males and that exertional dyspnoea would be associated with airway-to-lung ratio in males and females. We analyzed data from n = 100 healthy never-smokers aged ≥40 years enrolled in the Canadian Cohort Obstructive Lung Disease (CanCOLD) study who underwent pulmonary function testing, a chest computed tomography scan, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing. The luminal area of the trachea, right main bronchus, left main bronchus, right upper lobe, bronchus intermedius, left upper lobe, and left lower lobe were 22%–37% smaller (all p 
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-10-17T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0246
       
  • Does probiotic ingestion reduce the risk of preeclampsia' A systematic
           review

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      Authors: Nayara Valiati, Esthela M. Puel, Cristine M. Stefani, Renata M. Lataro
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      We aimed to systematically review the literature on the effects of probiotic consumption on the risk of preeclampsia (PE) development. Eight databases, clinical trial registries, and grey literature were searched until February 2022. Studies were included if they (1) were randomized clinical trials (RCTs), (2) included pregnant women aged ≥ 18 years old, (3) used probiotics products, and (4) were written in the Latin alphabet. A random-effects meta-analysis was performed using the risk ratio as the effect measure with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for PE. The search strategy identified 359 records, from which six RCTs were included. The six RCTs evaluated pregnant women with comorbidities and enrolled 593 women that received probiotics and 625 receiving placebo. None of the included RCTs analyzed healthy women. Probiotics increased by 12% the PE risk (RR 1.12, 95% CI, CI = 0.83–1.53, p = 0.46, χ2 = 3.31, df = 5 (p = 0.65), I2 = 0%). The certainty of the evidence, evaluated through the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach, was rated as very low. In conclusion, probiotics supplementation may slightly increase PE rates in pregnant women with comorbidities. The risk may be higher in obese women and for periods of ingestion longer than eight weeks. However, the evidence certainty is very low. PROSPERO registration No.CRD42021278611.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-10-16T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0089
       
  • The combined treatment of insulin and naringin improves bone properties in
           rats with type 1 diabetes mellitus

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      Authors: Valeria A. Rodríguez, Gabriela Picotto, María A. Rivoira, Alfredo Rigalli, Nori Tolosa de Talamoni
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      We have studied the effects of individual and combined treatment of insulin (I) and naringin (NAR) on the bone structure and biomechanical properties of femurs from streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups: (1) controls, (2) STZ-induced diabetic rats, (3) STZ-induced diabetic rats treated with I, (4) STZ-induced diabetic rats treated with NAR, and (5) STZ-induced diabetic rats treated with I + NAR. Bone mineral density (BMD), bone histomorphometry, biomechanical testing, and bone biomarker expressions were accomplished in femur of all animals, as well as serum biochemical analyses. The combined treatment of I + NAR increased the body weight and the femur BMD from STZ-induced diabetic rats. The bone biomechanical properties and the bone morphology of the femurs from STZ-induced diabetic rats were also improved by the combined treatment. The increased number of osteoclasts in STZ-induced diabetic rats was partially prevented by I, NAR, or I + NAR. NAR or I + NAR completely blocked the decrease in the number of osteocalcin (+) cells in the femur from STZ-induced diabetic rats. RUNX family transcription factor 2 immunostaining was much lower in STZ-induced diabetic rats than in control animals; the combination of I + NAR totally blocked this effect. The combined treatment not only ameliorated bone quality and function, but also normalized the variables related to glucose metabolism. Therefore, the combination of I + NAR might be a better therapeutic strategy than the individual I or NAR administration to reduce bone complications in diabetic patients.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-10-11T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0267
       
  • Hamstring stiffness and injury risk factors during the handball season in
           female players

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      Authors: Danguole Satkunskiene, Antanas Skarbalius, Audinga Kniubaite, Mantas Mickevicius, Audrius Snieckus, Saulius Rutkauskas, Sigitas Kamandulis
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Monitoring the muscle mechanical properties and functions of female athletes throughout their training season is relevant to understand the relationships between these factors and to predict noncontact injuries, which are prevalent among female athletes. The first aim of this study was to determine whether female handball players’ passive stiffness of the hamstring muscles is associated with hamstring extensibility, strength of knee flexors and extensors, and lower limb stiffness. Additionally, the study monitored fluctuations in these factors over 25 weeks. The study utilized an isokinetic dynamometer to record hamstring passive stiffness, extensibility, and hamstring and quadriceps strength of 18 young handball players. Lower limb stiffness was determined from a countermovement vertical jump conducted on a force plate. The countermovement jump involved the calculation of the peak force during the eccentric phase and the mean force during the concentric phase. The results showed a positive correlation between hamstring passive stiffness and lower limb stiffness (r = 0.660, p 
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-10-11T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0005
       
  • Females show less decline in contractile function than males after
           repeated all-out cycling

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      Authors: SangHoon Yoon, Lauren A. Cederbaum, Julie N. Côté
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Females demonstrate greater fatigue resistance during a range of exercise modalities; however, this may be confounded by the lower mechanical work completed. Accordingly, this study examined the sex-specific peripheral and central fatigue mechanisms during repeated all-out cycling and whether they are affected by total mechanical work performed. A total of 26 healthy young adults (12 females) performed 10 × 10 s all-out cycling interspersed by 30 s passive recovery. Metabolic responses, peripheral and central fatigue, were quantified via changes in pre- to post-exercise blood lactate, potentiated quadriceps twitch force (and contractile properties) evoked via supramaximal electrical stimulation of the femoral nerve, and voluntary activation of the knee extensors, respectively. During exercise, mechanical work, vastus lateralis muscle activation (via surface electromyography), and deoxygenation (via near-infrared spectroscopy) were recorded. Sex comparison analyses were performed before and after statistically controlling for total mechanical work (via ANCOVA). Mechanical work and muscle activation plateaued at similar sprint repetition (sprint 5) and voluntary activation change (pre vs. post) was similar between the sexes. Females, however, showed lower %work decrement (i.e., fatigability; P = 0.037) and peripheral responses as evident by lower reductions in quadriceps twitch force (P 
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-10-11T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0184
       
  • Social determinants of long-term reported changes in physical activity and
           healthy eating during the COVID-19 pandemic in Canada: multiple
           cross-sectional surveys analysis from the iCARE study

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      Authors: Sarah O'Connor, Ariane Bélanger-Gravel
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      The long-term consequences of COVID-19 on healthy behaviours (physical activity practice and healthy eating) among Canadians remain largely unexplored. The objectives were (i) to describe the proportion of Canadians who reported a change in healthy behaviours, 9 and 20 months since the beginning of COVID-19; and (ii) to identify the social determinants associated with healthy behaviour changes. Using two representative Canadian surveys from the International COVID-19 Awareness and Responses Evaluation study (January 2021, n = 3000; November 2021, n = 3002), reported changes in healthy behaviours were assessed as follows: “In general, how have the following behaviours changed since the start of COVID-19'”: (1) Increase; (2) No change; and (3) Decrease. The association between individual determinants and changes in healthy behaviours was analyzed using weighted univariate polytomous logistic regression models. In January 2021, 41% and 22% of respondents reported a decline in physical activity and healthy eating, respectively, while in November 2021, 34% and 20% of respondents reported a decline in physical activity and healthy eating, respectively. The main determinants associated with changes in healthy behaviours were younger age (18–25 years), area of residency, student status, changes in bodyweight, financial concerns/insecurity, anxiety/depression, and ethnicity. Changes in healthy behaviours were also associated with household composition, presence of chronic diseases, and occupation. In sum, this study depicted long-term changes in healthy behaviours during COVID-19, with differential changes according to social determinants of health. This study highlighted the presence of health inequalities in Canada during COVID-19 and supports the implementation of personalized programs in prevention of healthy behaviour degradation.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-10-11T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0206
       
  • The deleterious effects of maternal protein deprivation on the brainstem
           are minimized with moderate physical activity by offspring during early
           life

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      Authors: Elenilson Maximino Bernardo, Anderson Apolônio da Silva Pedroza, Diorginis José Soares Ferreira, Severina Cassia de Andrade, Allifer Rozendo, Matheus Santos de Sousa Fernandes, Tercya Lucidi Silva, Mariana Pinheiro Fernandes, Claudia J. Lagranha
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Maternal protein malnutrition during developmental periods might impair the redox state and the brain’s excitatory/inhibitory neural network, increasing central sympathetic tone. Conversely, moderate physical exercise at an early age reduces the risk of chronic diseases. Thus, we hypothesized that a moderate training protocol could reduce the harmful effects of a low-protein maternal diet on the brainstem of young male offspring. We used a rat model of maternal protein restriction during the gestational and lactation period followed by an offspring’s continuous treadmill exercise. Pregnant rats were divided into two groups according to the protein content in the diet: normoprotein (NP), receiving 17% of casein, and low protein (LP), receiving 8% of casein until the end of lactation. At 30 days of age, the male offspring were further subdivided into sedentary (NP-Sed and LP-Sed) or exercised (NP-Ex and LP-Ex) groups. Treadmill exercise was performed as follows: 4 weeks, 5 days/week, 60 min/day at 50% of maximal running capacity. The trained animals performed a treadmill exercise at 50% of the maximal running capacity, 60 min/day, 5 days/week, for 4 weeks. Our results indicate that a low-protein diet promotes deficits in the antioxidant system and a likely mitochondrial uncoupling. On the other hand, physical exercise restores the redox balance, which leads to decreased oxidative stress caused by the diet. In addition, it also promotes benefits to GABAergic inhibitory signaling. We conclude that regular moderate physical exercise performed in youthhood protects the brainstem against changes induced by maternal protein restriction.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-10-10T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0122
       
  • The effect of chronic exercise training and acute exercise on power
           spectral analysis of heart rate variability

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      Authors: Robert F. Bentley, Paul Dorian, Emily Vecchiarelli, Laura Banks, Kim A. Connelly, Andrew T. Yan, Wesseem Osman, Jack M. Goodman
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Moderate to vigorous physical activity performed regularly is cardioprotective and reduces all-cause mortality, concomitant with increased resting heart rate variability (HRV). However, there are contradictory reports regarding the effects of chronic and acute exercise on nocturnal HRV in those performing exercise well-beyond physical activity guidelines. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the power spectral analysis components of HRV in middle-aged endurance athletes (EA) and recreationally active individuals (REC) and explore acute exercise effects in EA. A total of 119 EA (52, 49–57 years) and 32 REC (56, 52–60 years) were recruited to complete 24 h Holter monitoring (GE SEER 1000) in the absence of exercise. Fifty one EA (52, 49–57 years) then underwent 24 h Holter monitoring following an intense bout of endurance exercise. Power spectral HRV analysis was completed hourly and averaged to quantify morning (1000–1200 h), evening (1900–2100 h), and nocturnal (0200–0400 h) HRV. EA had greater very low frequency (VLF) and low frequency (LF) (both p < 0.001) compared to REC. LF/high frequency (HF) was greater in EA at 0200–0400 h (p = 0.04). Among all participants, the change in HR and HF from 1000–1200 to 0200–0400 h was negatively correlated (r = −0.47, p < 0.001). Following acute exercise in EA, only nocturnal HRV was assessed. VLF (p < 0.001) and HF (p = 0.008) decreased, while LF/HF increased (p = 0.02). These results suggest that in EA, both long-term and acute exercises increase nocturnal sympathovagal activity through an increase in LF and decrease in HF, respectively. Further work is required to understand the mechanism underlying reduced nocturnal HRV in middle-aged EA and the long-term health implications.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2023-09-26T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2023-0007
       
 
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  Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 118 of 118 Journals sorted alphabetically
ACSMs Health & Fitness Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Acta Facultatis Educationis Physicae Universitatis Comenianae     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Kinesiologiae Universitatis Tartuensis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ACTIVE : Journal of Physical Education, Sport, Health and Recreation     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Ágora para la Educación Física y el Deporte     Open Access  
Al.Qadisiya journal for the Sciences of Physical Education     Open Access  
American Journal of Sexuality Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Applied Sport Science     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Arab Journal of Nutrition and Exercise     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arquivos em Movimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arrancada     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Baltic Journal of Sport and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
BMC Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Child and Adolescent Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Childhood Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Comparative Exercise Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Cultura, Ciencia y Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
eJRIEPS : Ejournal de la recherche sur l'intervention en éducation physique et sport     Open Access  
Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Éthique & Santé     Full-text available via subscription  
Fat Studies : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Body Weight and Society     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
Food Science and Human Wellness     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Sports and Active Living     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Gelanggang Pendidikan Jasmani Indonesia     Open Access  
German Journal of Exercise and Sport Research : Sportwissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Geron     Full-text available via subscription  
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Marketing Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Health Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Health Promotion & Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Home Healthcare Now     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Human Movement Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Hygiene     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indonesia Performance Journal     Open Access  
International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 54)
International Journal of Athletic Therapy & Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
International Journal of Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
International Journal of Obesity Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-Being     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
International Journal of Spa and Wellness     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Sport, Exercise & Training Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Isokinetics and Exercise Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of American College Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Athlete Development and Experience     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Bioenergetics and Biomembranes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Exercise & Organ Cross Talk     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Human Sport and Exercise     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Motor Learning and Development     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Physical Activity and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Physical Activity and Hormones     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Physical Activity Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Physical Education and Human Movement     Open Access  
Journal of Physical Education and Sport Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Physical Education Health and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Science in Sport and Exercise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Sport and Health Science     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Sport Sciences and Fitness     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
Kinesiology : International Journal of Fundamental and Applied Kinesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Kinesiology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Malaysian Journal of Movement, Health & Exercise     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Médecine & Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mental Health and Physical Activity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
MHSalud : Movimiento Humano y Salud     Open Access  
Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Obesity Research & Clinical Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Obesity Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Obesity Science & Practice     Open Access  
Open Obesity Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pain Management in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
PALAESTRA : Adapted Sport, Physical Education, and Recreational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Physical Activity and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Physical Education & Sport Pedagogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology of Sport and Exercise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Quality in Sport     Open Access  
Race and Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBNE - Revista Brasileira de Nutrição Esportiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBONE - Revista Brasileira de Obesidade, Nutrição e Emagrecimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBPFEX - Revista Brasileira de Prescrição e Fisiologia do Exercício     Open Access  
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Retos : Nuevas Tendencias en Educación Física, Deportes y Recreación     Open Access  
Revista Andaluza de Medicina del Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Brasileira de Atividade Física & Saúde     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Cineantropometria & Desempenho Humano     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Internacional de Medicina y Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte : International Journal of Medicine and Science of Physical Activity and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue phénEPS / PHEnex Journal     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
SIPATAHOENAN : South-East Asian Journal for Youth, Sports & Health Education     Open Access  
Spor Bilimleri Dergisi / Hacettepe Journal of Sport Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sport and Fitness Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Sport Science and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Sport Sciences for Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
SPORTIVE : Journal Of Physical Education, Sport and Recreation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sports Biomechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Strength & Conditioning Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Timisoara Physical Education and Rehabilitation Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Turkish Journal of Sport and Exercise     Open Access  
Yoga Mimamsa     Open Access   (Followers: 3)

           

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JournalTOCs
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Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
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