Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 116 of 116 Journals sorted alphabetically
ACSMs Health & Fitness Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Acta Facultatis Educationis Physicae Universitatis Comenianae     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Kinesiologiae Universitatis Tartuensis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ACTIVE : Journal of Physical Education, Sport, Health and Recreation     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ágora para la Educación Física y el Deporte     Open Access  
Al.Qadisiya journal for the Sciences of Physical Education     Open Access  
American Journal of Sexuality Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Applied Sport Science     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Arab Journal of Nutrition and Exercise     Open Access  
Arquivos em Movimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arrancada     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Baltic Journal of Sport and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
BMC Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
Child and Adolescent Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Childhood Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Comparative Exercise Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Cultura, Ciencia y Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
eJRIEPS : Ejournal de la recherche sur l'intervention en éducation physique et sport     Open Access  
Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Éthique & Santé     Full-text available via subscription  
Fat Studies : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Body Weight and Society     Partially Free   (Followers: 2)
Food Science and Human Wellness     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Sports and Active Living     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gelanggang Pendidikan Jasmani Indonesia     Open Access  
German Journal of Exercise and Sport Research : Sportwissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Geron     Full-text available via subscription  
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Marketing Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Health Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Home Healthcare Now     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Human Movement Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indonesia Performance Journal     Open Access  
International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 54)
International Journal of Athletic Therapy & Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 93)
International Journal of Obesity Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-Being     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
International Journal of Spa and Wellness     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Sport, Exercise & Training Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Isokinetics and Exercise Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of American College Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Athlete Development and Experience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Bioenergetics and Biomembranes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Exercise & Organ Cross Talk     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Human Sport and Exercise     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Motor Learning and Development     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Physical Activity and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Physical Activity and Hormones     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Physical Activity Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Physical Education and Human Movement     Open Access  
Journal of Physical Education and Sport Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Physical Education Health and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Science in Sport and Exercise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Sport and Health Science     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Sport Sciences and Fitness     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Kinesiology : International Journal of Fundamental and Applied Kinesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Kinesiology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Malaysian Journal of Movement, Health & Exercise     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Médecine & Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription  
Mental Health and Physical Activity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
MHSalud : Movimiento Humano y Salud     Open Access  
Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Obesity Research & Clinical Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Obesity Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Obesity Science & Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Obesity Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pain Management in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
PALAESTRA : Adapted Sport, Physical Education, and Recreational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Physical Activity and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical Education & Sport Pedagogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology of Sport and Exercise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Quality in Sport     Open Access  
Race and Yoga     Open Access  
RBNE - Revista Brasileira de Nutrição Esportiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBONE - Revista Brasileira de Obesidade, Nutrição e Emagrecimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBPFEX - Revista Brasileira de Prescrição e Fisiologia do Exercício     Open Access  
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Retos : Nuevas Tendencias en Educación Física, Deportes y Recreación     Open Access  
Revista Andaluza de Medicina del Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Brasileira de Atividade Física & Saúde     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Cineantropometria & Desempenho Humano     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Internacional de Medicina y Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte : International Journal of Medicine and Science of Physical Activity and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue phénEPS / PHEnex Journal     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
SIPATAHOENAN : South-East Asian Journal for Youth, Sports & Health Education     Open Access  
Spor Bilimleri Dergisi / Hacettepe Journal of Sport Sciences     Open Access  
Sport and Fitness Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Sport Science and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sport Sciences for Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
SPORTIVE : Journal Of Physical Education, Sport and Recreation     Open Access  
Sports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sports Biomechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Strength & Conditioning Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Timisoara Physical Education and Rehabilitation Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Turkish Journal of Sport and Exercise     Open Access  
Yoga Mimamsa     Open Access   (Followers: 3)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Annals of Work Exposures and Health
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.728
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2398-7308 - ISSN (Online) 2398-7316
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [423 journals]
  • A Healthy Workforce Needs Comprehensive Reproductive Healthcare

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      Pages: 1095 - 1098
      Abstract: The May 2018 Annals of Work Exposures and Health special issue on gender, work, and health, was initiated with a call for research on work exposures that evaluated the different experiences of workers by sex (biological differences) and/or gender (socially constructed differences) and subsequent impacts on health (Quinn and Smith, 2018). Working age populations worldwide are increasingly diverse and men, women, all gender identities, should be included with safety, dignity, and income equality. Healthy, secure workers are needed to develop and sustain a robust workforce.
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annweh/wxac071
      Issue No: Vol. 66, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • Pregnancy Outcome in Women Exposed to Metal Fume in Welding: A Canadian
           Cohort Study

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      Pages: 1099 - 1110
      Abstract: AbstractObjectivesWelding is a physically demanding job that entails exposure to metal fume and particles. There is little information on the effect of welding exposures on the outcome of a pregnancy conceived during a period when a woman was employed as a welder.MethodsWomen welders recruited to the Workers Health in Apprenticeship Trades—Metal and Electrical (WHAT-ME) study were followed-up every 6 months for up to 5 years (January 2011–August 2018), and every pregnancy recorded. At the first 6-month follow-up, a detailed questionnaire was completed for the most recent day in welding, and this information was collected again at each follow-up and also from questionnaires completed during pregnancy. The date of conception was estimated for each pregnancy and the job at that date identified. Exposures to ergonomic factors, work schedule and perceptions of noise, heat and cold were extracted for the job at conception. Exposures to metals (aluminum, chromium, manganese, and nickel) and particles in welding fume were estimated from previously validated exposure algorithms reflecting the welding process, base metal and consumables of the job at the conception date. The effects of exposures were estimated in multilevel multivariable models allowing for confounding.ResultsThere were 242 pregnancies conceived by a welder working in her trade, 87 were before the first follow-up, 3 were after first follow-up but detailed information was not collected, 22 of those potentially included in the assessment group were in-trade but not welding leaving 122 pregnancies in 90 welders for analysis. Of these 91 resulted in a live birth and 31 in a fetal loss (27 miscarriages and 4 stillbirths). Mean birth weight for live births was 3365 g and gestation 39.4 weeks. Final models showed that risk of fetal loss increased with manipulating heavy objects [odds ratio (OR) = 5.13, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.04–12.92], whole-body vibration (OR = 5.86, 95% CI 1.81–18.92), a higher rating for noise exposure intensity (OR = 1.52, 95% CI 1.24–1.85), and decreased with use of local exhaust ventilation (OR = 0.20, 95% CI 0.03–1.18). Gestation decreased with perceived heat intensity (β = −0.15, 95% CI −0.29 to −0.02) and number of previous pregnancies (β = −0.35, 95% CI −0.65 to −0.05). Birth weight was lower in those reporting whole-body vibration (β = −596 g, 95% CI −924 to −267) and increased with the welder’s body mass index (β = 36 g, 95% CI 12–61). Estimates of exposure to metals and particles were unrelated to gestation or birth weight. In a bivariate analysis, allowing for the same welder reporting >1 pregnancy, estimated airborne aluminum exposure (and to a lesser degree exposure to nickel and particles) was related to greater risk of fetal loss (OR = 1.52, 95% CI 1.04–2.24) but neither aluminum nor the other estimated elements of welding fume added to the final model.ConclusionsIn this group of women actively engaged in welding during the time surrounding conception, the outcome of pregnancy was strongly related to work exposures, particularly vibration (reported in grinding tasks), manipulation of heavy objects, and perceived intensity of noise and heat. The study was unable to show an independent effect of exposure to metal fume constituents.
      PubDate: Sat, 30 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annweh/wxac024
      Issue No: Vol. 66, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • Urinary Metals as a Marker of Exposure in Men and Women in the Welding and
           Electrical Trades: A Canadian Cohort Study

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      Pages: 1111 - 1121
      Abstract: AbstractObjectivesMen and women working in the welding trades undergo the same apprenticeship training but it is unknown whether, once in the trade, their exposures differ. Comparison of urinary metal concentrations, having adjusted for estimated airborne exposure, may provide an answer.MethodsMen and women were recruited to a cohort study of workers in the welding and electrical trades (the Workers Health in Apprenticeship Trades-Metal working and Electrical [WHAT-ME study]). They completed a recruitment questionnaire and further questionnaires every 6 months for up to 5 years. At each follow-up, they gave details on employment and, if welding, answered trade-specific questionnaires. Urine samples were collected by mail. Welding exposure matrices were developed to estimate metal exposures from welding process, base metal, and consumables. Urinary metal concentrations, determined by ICP-MS, were compared by trade (welding or electrical). Within welding, the relation of urinary concentrations to estimated airborne exposure was examined, with adjustment for potential confounders including sex, use of respiratory protective equipment (RPE), and time spent outdoors. Natural logarithms were taken of exposure estimates and urinary concentrations, to reduce skew. All regression analyses included creatinine concentration.ResultsUrinary metal concentrations were analysed for 12 metals in 794 samples. Antimony, arsenic, lead, and mercury had a high proportion of samples with no metal detected and were not considered further. The urinary concentrations of aluminum, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, manganese, nickel, and zinc were compared for welders (434 samples) and electrical workers (360). After adjustment for potential confounders, welders had higher urinary concentrations for aluminum (β = 0.13 95%CI 0.03–0.24) and chromium (β = 0.66 95%CI 0.55–0.77). Of 434 welder urines, 334 could be matched securely to detailed information about the most recent day welding. For these, an estimate of airborne exposure was made for aluminum, chromium, manganese, and nickel. Male welders were estimated to have higher airborne exposure to chromium and nickel than women welders. No difference was seen in the estimated exposures for aluminum or manganese (or total dust). Regression analyses of the relation of urinary metals to estimated exposure showed a good concordance for aluminum (β = 0.09 95%CI 0.04–0.15 (P < 0.001) and chromium (β = 0.11 95%CI 0.05–0.17 P < 0.001). The concordance for manganese and nickel was positive, but much weaker. Urinary concentrations of aluminum and nickel were somewhat lower with increasing time wearing RPE and, for chromium and nickel, with time working outdoors. Having adjusted for estimated exposure, creatinine and other confounders, male welders had lower urine concentrations of aluminum (β = −0.35 95%CI −0.51 to −0.19 P < 0.001) chromium (β = −0.38 95%CI −0.57 to −0.19 P < 0.001) and manganese (β = −0.36 95%CI −0.49 to −0.23 P < 0.001) than female welders.ConclusionWelders had higher urinary concentrations of aluminum and chromium than electrical workers. Exposure estimates of aluminum and chromium for welders were a valid representation of the airborne exposures to these metals. Although male welders were estimated to have higher exposures of chrome and nickel than female welders, the higher urinary metal concentrations in women welders is of concern, particularly for women who may conceive while in the trade.
      PubDate: Fri, 25 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annweh/wxac005
      Issue No: Vol. 66, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • Employment Precarity and Increased Risk of Hazardous Occupational
           Exposures Among Residents of High Socioeconomic Hardship Neighborhoods

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      Pages: 1122 - 1135
      Abstract: AbstractBackgroundWhile there is evidence that workers in nonstandard employment arrangements are disproportionately exposed to recognized occupational hazards, existing studies have not comprehensively examined associations between employment precarity and exposure to occupational hazards for these workers in the USA. The aim of this study was to examine relationships between employment precarity and occupational hazards in two contiguous high socio-economic hardship neighborhoods in Chicago.MethodsUsing a community-based participatory research approach, community researchers administered a community-developed survey to 489 residents of Greater Lawndale who reported current or recent employment in a job that met at least one characteristic of precarious employment (e.g. unpredictable schedule, insecure work, no living wage/benefits). Employment precarity was calculated using a modified version of the Employment Precarity Index (EPI) developed by the Poverty and Employment Precarity in Southern Ontario group. We modeled the association between employment precarity and occupational exposures using logistic regression models.ResultsWe identified a high prevalence of precarious employment in this sample, as well as a high prevalence of self-reported exposure to recognized occupational hazards. Increases in relative employment precarity were significantly associated with self-reported exposure to chemical and biological hazards, physical hazards, and slip, trip, strike, fall, trap or crush hazards at work.ConclusionsResults highlight the importance of using community research approaches and robust measures of employment characteristics, such as the EPI, to evaluate associations between employment precarity and hazardous exposures. These results suggest that variability in employment situations and resultant relative employment precarity are important predictors of exposure to recognized occupational hazards. Findings also suggest that health inequities observed among precariously employed workers may be partly explained by increased risk for exposure to occupational hazards, which has implications for community health and should be investigated in future longitudinal research.
      PubDate: Wed, 24 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annweh/wxac062
      Issue No: Vol. 66, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • Comparing Anxiety and Depression in Information Technology Workers with
           Others in Employment: A UK Biobank Cohort Study

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      Pages: 1136 - 1150
      Abstract: AbstractObjectivesDespite reported psychological hazards of information technology (IT) work, studies of diagnosed mental health conditions in IT workers are lacking. We investigated self-reported mental health outcomes and incident anxiety/depression in IT workers compared to others in employment in a large population-based cohort.MethodsWe evaluated self-reported mental health outcomes in the UK Biobank cohort and incident diagnosed anxiety/depression through health record linkage. We used logistic regression and Cox models to compare the risks of prevalent and incident anxiety/depression among IT workers with all other employed participants. Furthermore, we compared outcomes within IT worker subgroups, and between these subgroups and other similar occupations within their major Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) group.ResultsOf 112 399 participants analyzed, 4093 (3.6%) were IT workers. At baseline, IT workers had a reduced odds (OR = 0.66, 95%CI: 0.52–0.85) of anxiety/depression symptoms and were less likely (OR = 0.87, 95%CI: 0.83–0.91) to have ever attended their GP for anxiety/depression, compared to all other employed participants, after adjustment for confounders. The IT technician subgroup were more likely (OR = 1.22, 95%CI: 1.07–1.40) to have previously seen their GP or a psychiatrist (OR = 1.31, 95%CI: 1.06–1.62) for anxiety/depression than their SOC counterparts. IT workers had lower incident anxiety/depression (HR = 0.84, 95%CI 0.77–0.93) compared to all other employed participants, after adjustment for confounders.ConclusionsOur findings from this, the first longitudinal study of IT worker mental health, set the benchmark in our understanding of the mental health of this growing workforce and identification of high-risk groups. This will have important implications for targeting mental health workplace interventions.
      PubDate: Sat, 27 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annweh/wxac061
      Issue No: Vol. 66, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • Evaluating Occupational Noise Exposure as a Contributor to Injury Risk
           among Miners

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      Pages: 1151 - 1161
      Abstract: AbstractObjectivesThis study: (i) assessed the relationship between noise exposure and injury risk, comprehensively adjusting for individual factors, psychosocial stressors, and organizational influences; (ii) determined the relative importance of noise on injuries; (iii) estimated the lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL) of noise on injury risk to determine the threshold of noise considered hazardous to injuries; and (iv) quantified the fraction of injuries that could be attributed to hazardous noise exposure.MethodsIn this cross-sectional study at 10 US surface mine sites, traditional mixed effects, Poisson regression, and boosted regression tree (BRT) models were run on the number of reported work-related injuries in the last year. The LOAEL of noise on injuries was identified by estimating the percent increase in work-related injuries at different thresholds of noise exposure using a counterfactual estimator through the BRT model. A population attributable fraction (PAF) was quantified with this counterfactual estimator to predict reductions in injuries at the LOAEL.ResultsAmong 18 predictors of work-related injuries, mine site, perceived job safety, age, and sleepiness were the most important predictors. Occupational noise exposure was the seventh most important predictor. The LOAEL of noise for work-related injuries was a full-shift exposure of 88 dBA. Exposure ≥88 dBA was attributed to 20.3% (95% CI: 11.2%, 29.3%) of reported work-related injuries in the last year among the participants.ConclusionsThis study further supports hypotheses of a dose–response relationship between occupational noise exposure and work-related injuries, and suggests that exposures ≥88 dBA may increase injury risk in mining.
      PubDate: Fri, 02 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annweh/wxac059
      Issue No: Vol. 66, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • Challenges in the Implementation of the Rajasthan Pneumoconiosis Policy

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      Pages: 1162 - 1172
      Abstract: AbstractObjectives“Silicosis” is a leading cause of occupational morbidity globally. In Rajasthan, India silicosis has been recognized as an epidemic, resulting in the development of a new pneumoconiosis policy in 2019. This study was conducted to provide an overview of the policy implementation regarding the detection, prevention, and control of silicosis.MethodsA qualitative study was carried out in the Jodhpur district of Western Rajasthan in which stakeholders were interviewed. Themes were identified regarding prevention, detection, diagnosis, and certification, and organized by stakeholder role. Data were retrieved from the Silicosis Grant Disbursement Portal of the Government of Rajasthan to present an overview of the existing system for detection, prevention, and control of silicosis and to determine the delays in various aspects.ResultsA total of 35 stakeholders were interviewed. There was low awareness regarding the prevention, detection, diagnosis, and rehabilitation of silicosis amongst multiple stakeholders. There is a need for robust enforcement in mining units regarding silicosis prevention and screening. Unregistered mining activities and migration of mineworkers are major challenges in the detection of silicosis cases. Misdiagnosis and low notification rates prevent workers from accessing resources. There are myriad reasons for delays in workers receiving diagnosis and benefits, which have systemic roots but can be uprooted through rigorous implementation of the legislative provisions.ConclusionThere are several well-established pieces of legislation to protect the rights of mineworkers; however, there are gaps in the effective implementation of various provisions that require immediate attention to address the challenges faced during the prevention, detection, diagnosis, and rehabilitation of workers with silicosis.
      PubDate: Fri, 09 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annweh/wxac057
      Issue No: Vol. 66, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • Measuring Short-Term Exposures to H2O2 Among Exposed Workers; A
           Feasibility Study

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      Pages: 1173 - 1186
      Abstract: AbstractHydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a strong oxidizing agent often used in hair coloring and as a component in disinfecting and bleaching processes. Exposures to H2O2 generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can cause significant airway irritation and inflammation. Even though workers have reported symptoms associated with sensitivity and irritation from acute exposures below the H2O2 occupational exposure levels (OELs), a lack of sensitive analytical methods for measuring airborne concentrations currently prevents evaluating low or peak H2O2 exposures. To fill these gaps, we propose two different sensitive approaches: (i) luminol chemiluminescence (CL) to specifically measure H2O2; and (ii) photonic sensor method based on the ferrous-xylenol orange assay to evaluate total oxidative potential (OP), a measure of ROS in sampled air. We chose two exposure scenarios: hairdressers preparing and applying hair color to clients (both in simulated and field environments) and workers operating disinfecting cycles at a bottling company. Hair coloring took about 1 h for each client, and the application of the coloring product generated the highest H2O2 concentrations. OP values were highly correlated with H2O2 concentrations (CL measurement) and allowed peak measurements as low as 6 µg m-3 of H2O2 concentrations. The bottling company used a disinfectant containing H2O2, acetic acid and peracetic acid (PAA) in an enclosed process. The photonic sensor was immediately saturated. The CL results showed that the process operator had the highest exposures during a 15-min cycle. There is still a need to develop these direct reading methods for operating in the field, but we believe that in the future an OEL for OP could protect workers from developing airway irritation and inflammation by reducing exposures to oxidizing chemicals.
      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annweh/wxac060
      Issue No: Vol. 66, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • Assessment of Physical Work Demands of Home Care Workers in Norway: An
           Observational Study Using Wearable Sensor Technology

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      Pages: 1187 - 1198
      Abstract: AbstractObjectivesHigh physical work demands are believed to be partly responsible for the high sickness absence among home care workers, but no studies have assessed their physical work demands using precise device-based measurements. Hence, the objective of this observational study was to assess physical work demands in home care, using wearable sensors.MethodsFrom six home care units in a large municipality in Norway, 114 of 195 eligible home care workers filled in a questionnaire, a diary about work hours, and wore five accelerometers, and a heart rate sensor for up to six consecutive workdays.ResultsOn average, the homecare workers spent 50% of the working hours sitting, 25.2% standing, 11.4% moving, 8.3% walking fast, 1.9% walking slow, 1.2% stair-climbing, 0.3% cycling, and 0.05% running. We found the following exposures to demanding postures: arm-elevation in an upright body position ≥30° was 36.7%, ≥60° was 4.1%, and ≥90°was 0.5%; forward trunk inclination in an upright body position ≥30° was 9.9%, ≥60° was 4%, and ≥90° was 1%; and for kneeling it was 0.8%. We found the average cardiovascular load (%heart rate reserve) during work to be 28%. There was considerable individual variation in these physical exposures at work.ConclusionsThis study presents precise information on various physical work demands of home care workers in Norway. Home care workers spent on average half the workday sitting and the remaining time in various occupational physical activities. Presently, few device-based exposure limits have been proposed for acceptable amounts of occupational physical exposures, but the level of arm-elevation, forward trunk inclination, and the considerable variation of physical workloads among home care workers, indicate that preventive measures should be taken.
      PubDate: Fri, 12 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annweh/wxac052
      Issue No: Vol. 66, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • The Use of Time Flow Analysis to Describe Changes in Physical Ergonomic
           Work Behaviours Following a Cluster-Randomized Controlled Participatory
           Ergonomic Intervention

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      Pages: 1199 - 1209
      Abstract: AbstractAimEvaluations of participatory ergonomic interventions are often challenging as these types of interventions are tailored to the context and need of the workplace in which they are implemented. We aimed to describe how time flow analysis can be used to describe changes in work behaviours following a participatory ergonomic intervention.MethodThis study was based on data from a two-arm cluster-randomized controlled trial with 29 childcare institutions and 116 workers (intervention: n = 60, control: n = 56). Physical behaviours at work were technically measured at baseline and 4-month follow-up. Physical behaviours were expressed in terms of relative work time spent forward bending of the back ≥30°, kneeling, active (i.e. walking, stair climbing and running) and sedentary. Average time flow from baseline to follow-up were calculated for both groups to investigate if work time was allocated differently at follow-up.ResultsA total of 116 workers (60 in the intervention and 56 in the control group) had valid accelerometer at baseline and follow-up. The largest group difference in time flowing from baseline to follow-up was observed for forward bending of the back and time spent kneeling. Compared to the control, the intervention group had less time flowing from forward bending of the back to kneeling (intervention: +11 min day, control: +16 min day) and more time flowing from kneeling to sedentary behaviours (intervention: +15 min day, control: +10 min day).ConclusionThe results of this study showed that time flow analysis can be used to reveal changes in work time-use following a participatory ergonomic intervention. For example, the analysis revealed that the intervention group had replaced more work time spent kneeling with sedentary behaviours compared to the control group. This type of information on group differences in time reallocations would not have been possible to obtain by comparing group differences in work time-use following the intervention, supporting the usefulness of time flow analysis as a tool to evaluate complex, context-specific interventions.
      PubDate: Wed, 17 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annweh/wxac058
      Issue No: Vol. 66, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • Caution on Using Tetrahydrofuran for Processing Crystalline Silica Samples
           From Engineered Stone for XRD Analysis

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      Pages: 1210 - 1214
      Abstract: AbstractWe conducted laboratory experiments to investigate a suspected effect of tetrahydrofuran (THF) on quantifying crystalline silica in samples collected from working with engineered stone when THF is used to process samples prior to the X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Two groups of samples from grinding either engineered stone or granite were simultaneously taken from a laboratory testing system, with one group of samples using THF for processing and another group using muffle furnace for ashing. For each stone type, we also tested four levels of respirable dust loading on the samples by varying the grinding time from 1 to 8 min. Statistical analysis of the experimental results on crystalline silica contents of the two groups of samples showed that the difference between the two methods was not significant (P ≥ 0.05) for the granite at all four levels of respirable dust loading and for the engineered stone at the two levels of respirable dust loading greater than 0.5 mg. However, the crystalline silica content from using THF processing was significantly lower (P = 0.001) than that from using muffle furnace ashing for engineered stone when the respirable dust loading levels were less than 0.5 mg. For the engineered stone dust samples with grinding times of 1 and 2 min, the average respirable dust loading was about 0.19 and 0.34 mg, respectively; while the crystalline silica content from using THF processing was 30.9 and 21.5% lower than that from using muffle furnace ashing, respectively. Since most full-shift samples from field assessments in this industry are expected to have respirable dust loading less than 0.5 mg, muffle furnace or radio frequency plasma ashing should be specified as the preferred sample processing method instead of the THF processing method for quantification of crystalline silica when engineered stone is expected to present to avoid artificially reduced silica content values, which are likely caused by the reactions between THF and the resins in engineered stone.
      PubDate: Tue, 06 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annweh/wxac063
      Issue No: Vol. 66, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • Application of an Environmental Monitoring to Assess the Practices and
           Control the Risk of Occupational Exposure to Cyclophosphamide in Two Sites
           of a French Comprehensive Cancer Center

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      Pages: 1215 - 1223
      Abstract: AbstractObjectivesThe risk of chronic exposure to antineoplastic agents in hospitals, mainly by skin contact with contaminated surfaces, is well established. The aim of this study was to assess indirectly the risk of occupational exposure to antineoplastics drugs at two hospitals by using an environmental monitoring, and to suggest ways of improving the exposure to healthcare workers.MethodsAn observational study of care practices on both sites was carried out. A wipe sampling campaign was then designed to study environmental contamination throughout the chemotherapy process: receipt, storage, compounding, transport, administration, and elimination areas. Samples were analyzed by a validated LC-MS/MS method allowing trace quantification of cyclophosphamide. A guidance ‘safe value’ of 0.10 ng/cm2 was considered.ResultsA total of 293 samples were analyzed, of which 58% were found to be positive. In the compounding units, the drug vials were contaminated before [range = (non-quantifiable [NQ]-0.71) ng/cm2] and after cleaning procedure [(NQ-0.62) ng/cm2], particularly when the flip-off lid was removed during cleaning. The contamination found on manual preparations was operator-dependent: [non-detectable (ND)-3.51] ng/cm2 on infusion bag surfaces; (780.61–24 698.98) ng/cm2 on medication ports. In the case of automated preparations, the average contamination was higher on infusion bag surfaces [(2.43–36.86) ng/cm2] and lower on medication ports [(0.43–7.65) ng/cm2] than manual preparations. Contamination of the analytical control area was also highlighted. In the daily care unit, the contamination was located near the infusion area (armchairs, infusion stands, floor, and patient toilets), and varied somewhat between the two sites, especially on the floor with (0.46–27.32) compared to (ND-0.18) ng/cm2. We did not detect contamination on the transport boxes, on the door handles or in the disposal areas.ConclusionsThe variability of contamination observed between the two sites can be explained in part by the difference in routine practices, especially training of the staff, and cleaning procedures. Findings were communicated to healthcare workers, and news interventions were implemented based on wipe sampling results. This study demonstrated a method for routine environmental monitoring and worker education as a strategy to reduce occupational exposure.
      PubDate: Sat, 21 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annweh/wxac035
      Issue No: Vol. 66, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • Workplace Violence Against Female Health Managers in the Male-Dominated
           Construction Industry

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      Pages: 1224 - 1230
      Abstract: AbstractObjectivesThe purpose of this study is to investigate health managers’ exposure to workplace violence (WPV) at construction sites and to review the statistical characteristics of experts in the safety and health fields using a gender-based analysis.MethodsA preliminary survey of health managers at construction sites was conducted from March to April 2020 via the Health Managers Council in Construction Industry online community (https://band.us/band/62438722). Available national statistical data of safety and health personnel were reviewed.ResultsA total of 85 health managers (13 men, 72 women) responded to a preliminary survey. Health managers reported little physical violence (5.9%), while inappropriate work orders (83.5%) and sexual harassment (52.9%) were high, and health managers’ experience of sexual harassment was significantly higher among women than men (P < 0.01). The professional safety and health field in Korea have a large gender gap, with few women. In particular, the proportion of women in the safety field was lower than in the health field.ConclusionsYoung female health managers in the male-dominated construction industry are more vulnerable to WPV, including sexual harassment. To reduce the risk of WPV exposure and gender discrimination among female health managers, it is necessary to increase regular employment and provide more practical WPV prevention education for all construction employees.
      PubDate: Mon, 25 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annweh/wxac025
      Issue No: Vol. 66, No. 9 (2022)
       
 
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