Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 116 of 116 Journals sorted alphabetically
ACSMs Health & Fitness Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Acta Facultatis Educationis Physicae Universitatis Comenianae     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Kinesiologiae Universitatis Tartuensis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ACTIVE : Journal of Physical Education, Sport, Health and Recreation     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ágora para la Educación Física y el Deporte     Open Access  
Al.Qadisiya journal for the Sciences of Physical Education     Open Access  
American Journal of Sexuality Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Applied Sport Science     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Arab Journal of Nutrition and Exercise     Open Access  
Arquivos em Movimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arrancada     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Baltic Journal of Sport and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
BMC Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
Child and Adolescent Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Childhood Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Comparative Exercise Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Cultura, Ciencia y Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
eJRIEPS : Ejournal de la recherche sur l'intervention en éducation physique et sport     Open Access  
Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Éthique & Santé     Full-text available via subscription  
Fat Studies : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Body Weight and Society     Partially Free   (Followers: 2)
Food Science and Human Wellness     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Sports and Active Living     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gelanggang Pendidikan Jasmani Indonesia     Open Access  
German Journal of Exercise and Sport Research : Sportwissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Geron     Full-text available via subscription  
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Marketing Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Health Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Home Healthcare Now     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Human Movement Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indonesia Performance Journal     Open Access  
International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 54)
International Journal of Athletic Therapy & Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 93)
International Journal of Obesity Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-Being     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
International Journal of Spa and Wellness     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Sport, Exercise & Training Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Isokinetics and Exercise Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of American College Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Athlete Development and Experience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Bioenergetics and Biomembranes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Exercise & Organ Cross Talk     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Human Sport and Exercise     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Motor Learning and Development     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Physical Activity and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Physical Activity and Hormones     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Physical Activity Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Physical Education and Human Movement     Open Access  
Journal of Physical Education and Sport Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Physical Education Health and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Science in Sport and Exercise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Sport and Health Science     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Sport Sciences and Fitness     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Kinesiology : International Journal of Fundamental and Applied Kinesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Kinesiology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Malaysian Journal of Movement, Health & Exercise     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Médecine & Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription  
Mental Health and Physical Activity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
MHSalud : Movimiento Humano y Salud     Open Access  
Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Obesity Research & Clinical Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Obesity Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Obesity Science & Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Obesity Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pain Management in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
PALAESTRA : Adapted Sport, Physical Education, and Recreational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Physical Activity and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical Education & Sport Pedagogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology of Sport and Exercise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Quality in Sport     Open Access  
Race and Yoga     Open Access  
RBNE - Revista Brasileira de Nutrição Esportiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBONE - Revista Brasileira de Obesidade, Nutrição e Emagrecimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBPFEX - Revista Brasileira de Prescrição e Fisiologia do Exercício     Open Access  
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Retos : Nuevas Tendencias en Educación Física, Deportes y Recreación     Open Access  
Revista Andaluza de Medicina del Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Brasileira de Atividade Física & Saúde     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Cineantropometria & Desempenho Humano     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Internacional de Medicina y Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte : International Journal of Medicine and Science of Physical Activity and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue phénEPS / PHEnex Journal     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
SIPATAHOENAN : South-East Asian Journal for Youth, Sports & Health Education     Open Access  
Spor Bilimleri Dergisi / Hacettepe Journal of Sport Sciences     Open Access  
Sport and Fitness Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Sport Science and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sport Sciences for Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
SPORTIVE : Journal Of Physical Education, Sport and Recreation     Open Access  
Sports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sports Biomechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Strength & Conditioning Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Timisoara Physical Education and Rehabilitation Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Turkish Journal of Sport and Exercise     Open Access  
Yoga Mimamsa     Open Access   (Followers: 3)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Health Education Journal
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.439
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0017-8969 - ISSN (Online) 1748-8176
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • Effects of a sexuality education programme on young people’s STI/HIV
           knowledge, attitudes and risk behaviour in Northeast Nigeria

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      Authors: Wamanyi Yohanna, Olaoluwa Samson Agbaje, Osmond Chukwuemeka Ene, Perpetua Chinyere Ofili, Prince Iheanachor Christian Umoke
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:The high prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among Nigerian young people has been linked to poor knowledge, attitudes and risk behaviour. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a sexuality education programme (SEP) in improving adolescents’ STI/HIV knowledge and attitudes and reducing risk behaviour.Design:A quasi-experimental pre–post study was conducted. The experimental group (n = 189) and comparison group (n = 195) comprised senior secondary school students. Data were collected via a validated self-report questionnaire. A paired t-test, an independent t-test and a one-way between-group analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) were used to analyse the data.Setting:Three hundred eighty-four young people aged 15–20 years at low and high risk for STI/HIV infection participated in the SEP in a school setting in Northeast Nigeria.Results:There were significant post-intervention improvements in students’ knowledge, attitudes and practices in the experimental group (p 
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-12-02T06:03:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221139815
       
  • Participatory architecture workshops with asylum seekers and local people:
           Experiences from the Crossing Cultures project in Southern Italy

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      Authors: Federica Calissano, Sandra Denicke-Polcher, Domenico Giacco, Corinna Haenschel
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Participatory architecture can promote dialogue across cultures while working together to create physical outputs. A team of academics with a background in architecture, psychology and health sciences evaluated a participatory architecture workshop in Southern Italy as part of the Crossing Cultures project. The goal was to explore participants’ experiences and perceived benefits. In the context of situated learning, the workshop brought together architecture students, local citizens and asylum seekers, who by working together and learning from each other formed a community of practice (CoP).Objective:The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of members of the CoP, their beliefs about the benefits of the project and ways to improve it.Setting:Data collection took place in 2019 during a participatory architecture workshop in Belmonte, Italy.Method:Twenty-five asylum seekers, locals and students took part in in-depth interviews, which were later subjected to thematic analysis.Results:Participants reported experiences relating to ‘living together’, ‘working together’, ‘making home’, ‘making locals comfortable to be involved’ and ‘understanding and respecting differences’. Perceived benefits were ‘creating a space for connection’, ‘revitalising local communities’, ‘promoting development of towns’, ‘broadening horizons’, ‘gaining or practising skills’, ‘having your ideas heard’ and ‘creating lasting things’.Conclusion:Findings suggest that creating a CoP not only fulfils individual goals but also addresses common concerns. Participatory architecture workshops in an area with high immigration can create connections between asylum seekers and local people, and promote intercultural dialogue while helping to reactivate an economically and socially deprived area.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-12-01T10:39:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221139819
       
  • Achieving weight loss through a community-based, telewellness programme: A
           randomised controlled trial

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      Authors: Desiree R Backman, Neal D Kohatsu, Andrew J Padovani, Crystie Dao, Dominique Ritley, Julia E Fleuret, Camlyn R McCracken
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:To (1) determine the weight-reducing effect of the Koa Family Program (KFP), a community-based, telewellness obesity intervention and (2) examine the impact of the KFP on improving weight-related health indicators.Design:Randomised controlled trial.Setting:Community-based in Sacramento, California, USA.Methods:Seventy women with overweight or obesity (25 ⩽ BMI 
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-11-30T01:43:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221139234
       
  • A qualitative evaluation of remote training to develop a fitness
           surveillance system

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      Authors: Cate A Egan, Christopher B Merica, David R Paul, Laura Bond, Seth Rose, Andrew Martin, Chantal Vella
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:In the USA, 18% of school-aged young people are classified as obese, and rural populations appear to be particularly at risk. Achieving high levels of fitness reduces the risk of obesity and underlying health conditions. To better understand youth obesity trends and fitness levels, annual fitness testing ([FT], that is, surveillance) in schools has been recommended. Although many K–12 schools conduct FT, surveillance programmes that compile unified standardised test results are rare.Design:Qualitative design.Setting:Physical education teachers from 11 schools (n = 13; n = 4 men) participated in remote training about conducting FitnessGram FT.Methods:Data included two semi-structured interviews per teacher on experiences with distance fitness training, implementing FitnessGram, and data entry for annual surveillance.Results:Inductive analysis using axial and open coding identified four themes: (1) barriers prior to study, (2) study training, (3) implementation challenges and suggestions and (4) teacher feedback. Teachers had an interest in FT but lacked the recommended training and equipment needed to implement it annually.Conclusion:Teachers believed the training they received (as part of this study) prepared them to collect reliable and valid data, and that FT had benefits for their students and programmes. Every teacher expressed interest in reporting annual surveillance data. Efforts to train teachers for FT through virtual professional development may be a viable means of establishing a unified surveillance system.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-11-25T11:01:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221139198
       
  • Recipes for Success: Lessons learned from the implementation of a food
           skills and nutrition education workshop with Gaelic athletic players on
           the Island of Ireland (IOI)

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      Authors: Roisin Lydon, Amanda McCloat, Elaine Mooney, Eileen Kelly-Blakeney
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:To evaluate the effectiveness of a practical food skills and nutrition education workshop and investigate the attitudes towards, and knowledge of, nutrition among young amateur Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) players.Design and method:A quantitative study using a pre-/post-intervention study design assessed nutritional knowledge, food preparation skills, cooking skills confidence, attitudes towards nutrition, and future diet and food practices among GAA players (n = 336) across the Island of Ireland who took part in a practical food skills and nutrition education workshop.Findings:The workshop was effective in improving culinary knowledge, skills and confidence. Post-session, in comparison with men, women were ‘definitely’ more confident in preparing the dish they cooked during the session (p ⩽ .05) and in using a cooker to prepare a meal or snack (p ⩽ .05). While nutrition knowledge improved for many participants, women knew ‘a lot’ more about the quantity of each type of food they needed to consume (p = .013) and portion sizes (p = .003). Most participants indicated that in the future, they were likely to try out other recipes (94%, n = 310), more likely to prepare a meal themselves (93%, n = 307) and make healthier food choices (92%, n = 304).Originality:Results indicate the benefits of an integrated nutrition education and food skills workshop in improving players’ knowledge of nutrition and increasing confidence in relation to food preparation and cooking. As gender differences were found across a range of key knowledge and confidence outcomes, future food and nutrition education programmes may need to be tailored to take account of this.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-11-25T10:55:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221136838
       
  • Usability of an mHealth application in India for type 2 diabetes mellitus

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      Authors: Rekha Goswami, Shelby L. Garner, Carol Elizabeth George
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Mobile health (mHealth) technologies are a rapidly evolving field in India and are increasingly being used to address noncommunicable diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, few studies have addressed user perceptions of T2DM mHealth applications (apps) in India. The purpose of this study was to determine the usability and compare results of an mHealth app designed to improve T2DM health literacy among specific populations in India.Design:Comparative survey design.Setting:Bengaluru, India.Method:A descriptive comparative design was used. The mHealth App Usability Questionnaire (MAUQ) was used to research the usability of the T2DM mHealth app. Participants (N = 95) were recruited via email and WhatsApp. They were first asked to use the mHealth app and then complete a usability questionnaire.Results:Participants in the study were mainly single (86.3%), women (95.8%), aged 18–28 years (89.5%), with some college education (63.8%), unemployed (90.5%), living in an urban area (76.8%) and not previously diagnosed with T2DM (93.6%). Mean responses (1 = disagree; 7 = agree) ranged from 5.89 (SD, 1.48) to 6.22 (SD, 1.42) favouring the app’s usability. Users recommended incorporating more knowledge and information into the app as an idea for improvement. Results showed that there was no significant difference in scores by age, gender, marital status, employment or previous diagnosis rates and responses to the questions.Conclusion:As a result of these findings, we can use the same interface and layout as that used on the mHealth app with more confidence when creating other health education apps. The data revealed areas for improvement in future apps, such as adding more information, additional questions and more language options. Informed by these findings, we may create health literacy apps that are better suited for the user with greater ease of use.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-11-24T05:59:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221138483
       
  • University peer health coaches’ perceptions of learning and applying
           motivational interviewing

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      Authors: Janaina Lima Fogaca, Saemi Lee, Courtney Joseph, Dawn E Clifford, Natalie Papini, Jonathan S Lee
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Peer-led health coaching is a realistic and sustainable way to support health behaviour change on university campuses. Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an effective framework to guide behaviour change conversations in peer health coaching sessions. However, research on the perceptions of peer coaches who provide health coaching using MI is scarce.Objective:The aims of this study were to examine (1) university peer health coaches’ experiences as peer educators after participating in the training and implementation of MI; and (2) university peer health coaches’ supervision experiences as they learn to use MI for health coaching.Design:Cross-sectional in-depth qualitative study using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA).Setting:Peer health coaching programme in a mid-sized southwestern US university.Method:Five peer health coaches were interviewed about their training, implementation and supervision of using MI in a university health coaching programme. IPA was used to analyse the findings.Results:We identified four main themes: (1) learning MI, (2) using MI, (3) challenges of time and availability and (4) supervision and peer support. Results illustrated the developmental processes peer health coaches perceive as they develop their MI skills. Individual and group supervision supported MI growth and development while also building a sense of community.Conclusion:Apart from challenges in learning and using MI, supervision was an important factor that helped peer health coaches develop. Future research should investigate training methods and supervision strategies to improve the quality of peer health coach programmes.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-11-11T12:03:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221137311
       
  • Out-of-school health education for adolescents: Exploring the impact of a
           hospital visit

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      Authors: Hakan Bayırlı, Sevgi Coşkun Keskin, Yusuf Keskin
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:Adolescence is a critical phase of life, involving both risks and opportunities. Preventive health services in this phase contribute to the development of adolescents’ models for adulthood. The current study aimed to illuminate adolescents’ experiences regarding health education through a patient visit in a hospital, which provides a more informal learning environment than classroom instruction.Design:Qualitative one group experimental design.Setting:Participants were 16 high school students of a medium-level socio-economic status in Turkey, some of whom smoked cigarettes.Method:We visited patients in the pulmonology inpatient unit with the students. Data were collected through interviews, video recordings and field notes. Data were analyses using content analysis in which coding schemes are developed directly from the textual data to focus in on students’ health beliefs.Results:Findings revealed that the students who interacted face-to-face with patients and listened to their reflections on their illness and life experienced changes in their health beliefs. The visit provided moral support for the patients as well.Conclusion:Results indicate that such hospital patient visits offer significant opportunities for health education.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T11:58:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221136005
       
  • Peer leaders in reproductive health: A job that ended up much more

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      Authors: Ainat Koren, Coutney Marchburn
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Adolescents’ unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections have a significant impact on the individuals themselves and on society. Peer leaders are students trained to become role models and leaders who promote positive behaviour change in their schools and community. A few studies have examined the effects of taking the role of peer leaders on the teenagers themselves including the long-term benefits. The aim of this study was to enhance understanding of the peer leader experience as it relates to peer leaders themselves and to explore the lasting impact of their experience.Design:The study used an exploratory qualitative design.Setting:Included peer leaders were employed by a non-profit organisation working with Southeastern Massachusetts communities with a high teenage pregnancy rate.Methods:Qualitative research included individual semi-structured interviews with 18 past and present peer leaders. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were coded and analysed for common themes.Results:Being a peer leader was a life-changing experience. The benefits varied from learning reproductive health content to developing life skills, friendships and long-lasting career-related skills. Being a member of a peer leader group provided an instant support group and a new circle of friends as well as a purpose. It also removed peer leaders from health risk behaviours. Their experience assisting others in need was rewarding as well as being a confidence builder. Through community service, the peer leaders changed their perceptions about and towards the needs of the people residing in their community.Conclusion:This study demonstrated the value of incorporating peer leaders in sexual and reproductive health programmes. The peer leader programme examined was not only instrumental in providing education in sexual health but it also created change in the lives of the peer leaders themselves, their families and communities.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-10-26T06:32:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221131879
       
  • Paediatric manikins and school nurses as Basic Life Support coordinators:
           A useful strategy for schools'

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      Authors: Martín Otero-Agra, Luz Rey-Fernández, David Pacheco-Rodríguez, Felipe Fernández-Méndez, Roberto Barcala-Furelos, Robert Greif
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To evaluate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills performance and retention in schoolchildren aged 8 to 12 years following instruction by their teachers and with the guidance of a school nurse using paediatric manikins.Design:Descriptive simulation trial.Method:A school nurse provided support to six schoolteachers as they taught a modified 40-minute CPR course. Pupils were shown an out-of-hospital cardiac-arrest recognition video followed by a CPR simulation using paediatric manikins. 117 schoolchildren aged 8 to 12 years received the training. Both the schoolchildren and teachers completed a survey before and afterwards. Children completed an out-of-hospital cardiac-arrest recognition test and a 1-minute CPR test 1 week later.Results:After training, schoolchildren increased their self-efficacy as rescuers (8 ± 2 vs 10 ± 2; p 
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-10-25T09:40:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221133238
       
  • Promoting healthy eating: The intervening role of health and
           nutrition-related claims in food advertisements

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      Authors: Po-Lin Pan, Manu Bhandari, Juan Meng
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Factors contributing to the obesity epidemic have powerful effects on people who are frequently exposed to the extensive advertisement of unhealthy foods. This study aimed to examine how consumers’ attitudes towards health and nutrition-related (HNR) claims in food advertisements affected their healthy food choice (HFC) and how online searching for nutrition information (OSNI) about food products mediated the impact of obesity knowledge on HFC.Method:An online survey was conducted using Amazon Mechanical Turk. A total of 897 participants were recruited, with 484 women and 380 men. A moderated mediation analysis using PROCESS was conducted.Results:OSNI was found to mediate the impact of obesity knowledge on HFC. The extent to which consumers’ obesity knowledge influenced their HFC depended on consumers’ attitudes towards HNR claims in food advertisements. The direct effect of consumers’ obesity knowledge on their HFC was moderated by their attitudes towards HNR claims in food advertisements.Conclusion:Both theoretical and practical insights into the dynamic effects on HFC were identified in response to the use of HNR claims in food advertisements as a persuasive strategy for promoting healthy eating. Healthcare professionals and health educators working to address obesity issues should craft more useful online health and nutrition information for consumers who are considering eating healthier foods. In addition, more helpful HNR claims in food advertisements should be developed so as to promote healthy food products, especially for consumers with limited obesity knowledge.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-10-20T09:21:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221132210
       
  • Evaluation of a peer support intervention to improve the breakfast habits
           of Japanese college students

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      Authors: Chiho Okabe, Akira Sai, Taro Yamauchi
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:This study investigated the impact of a peer support intervention on the breakfast habits of university students in Japan. Both breakfast frequency and breakfast composition were assessed.Design:The study adopted a combination of convergent and intervention designs and used a mixed-methods approach.Setting:College-based peer-support intervention taking place in Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan.Method:Questionnaires on demographic characteristics and breakfast habits were administered to participants (n = 27) before the online workshop, immediately afterwards, and at 3 and 6 months after the peer support intervention, coupled with a 4-week breakfast status report. Semi-structured interviews were then conducted with 17 participants to gain a more detailed understanding of the impact of the intervention.Results:Quantitative results showed that immediately after the intervention, breakfast intake frequency and breakfast composition improved significantly; however, post-intervention, there was a difference in persistence between frequency and composition. In the qualitative element of the study, ‘peer stimulation’ and ‘coercion’ were identified as drivers of the changes identified. In addition, ‘changes in awareness and behaviour’ and ‘realisation of the need for breakfast’ were noted by participants.Conclusion:Peer support interventions can improve the breakfast habits of university students. A follow-up intervention within 6 months for breakfast frequency and within 3 months for breakfast composition following the intervention may help sustain the observed beneficial effects.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-10-20T09:17:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221131891
       
  • A training programme for community pharmacists to support people living
           with severe and persistent mental illness: Intervention mapping in the
           context of a pandemic

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      Authors: Sara S McMillan, Sarira El-Den, Claire L O’Reilly, Helena Roennfeldt, Theo Theodorus, Justin Chapman, Kylie Bailey, Keith Crump, Jack C Collins, Ricki Ng, Victoria Stewart, Amanda J Wheeler
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:The Bridging the Gap Between Physical and Mental Illness in Community Pharmacy (PharMIbridge) randomised controlled trial (RCT) aims to test the effectiveness of a pharmacist-led support service in improving medication adherence, and the physical and mental health of people living with severe and persistent mental illness compared to a standard medication review service.Method:Using the six-step intervention mapping (IM) framework, this paper describes the development and content of the PharMIbridge pharmacist training programme, an integral part of the RCT implementation, and continuous adaptations made to the process to keep pace with the evolving severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic in Australia. A Training Working Group comprising health educators, practitioners, mental health consumers and researchers, refined the programme objectives and assisted with developing content and troubleshooting issues related to training delivery for pharmacists randomised to the RCT intervention arm.Results:A 2-day training programme was developed, which included Mental Health First Aid, simulated patient role-plays, and four pre-recorded modules using lectures, demonstration case vignettes, role-play activities and discussion. The programme, co-facilitated by project team members and mentors (pharmacist and consumer educators), aims to enhance pharmacists’ mental health literacy, skills and confidence and empower them to engage with this vulnerable population using a strengths-based approach. Pre- and post-training questionnaires and interviews will be used to evaluate the impact of the PharMIbridge training programme.Conclusion:The systematic stepwise method provided by the IM framework highlights the solution-focused approach adopted by the project team and characteristics including adaptability and resilience which enabled training development and implementation across four Australian regions during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-10-18T11:01:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221130461
       
  • Infodemics in Mexico: A look at the Animal Político and Verificado
           fact-checking platforms

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      Authors: Julio C Aguila Sánchez, Pamela Pereyra-Zamora
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The COVID-19 crisis has been a fertile ground for misinformation due to several factors such as the uncertainty typical of crises, the hasty handling of information, the virality provided by social networks and the scarce resources that average citizens have to discern between what is true and what is false in the health information they consume.Objective:In this context, this article aims to characterise the COVID-19 hoaxes registered on the Mexican fact-checking platforms Animal Político and Verificado during 2020 and 2021.Method and design:The method used in this study was predominantly quantitative and took the form of content analysis. This method was applied to hoaxes registered on these two fact-checking sites.Results:The primary type of hoax encountered was one of deception, followed by decontextualisation, exaggeration and joking. Disinformation circulates mainly in social media, in various formats that make the false seem more credible. We found that public figures and the media contribute to the spread of health hoaxes. However, they do not contain hate speech as has been the case in other contexts informed by xenophobic and racist agenda.Conclusion:The disinformation on COVID-19 registered on the Mexican fact-checking platforms Animal Político and Verificado during 2020 and 2021 is characterised by a marked concern to question the role of vaccination in confronting and controlling the pandemic. In this way, denialist, conspiracy and anti-vaccine ideas have come to permeate public debate.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-10-11T08:49:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221130462
       
  • Lessons learned from a gender-specific educational programme supporting
           young women with experience of domestic abuse

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      Authors: Louise Warwick-Booth, Susan Coan
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Domestic abuse is a public health issue, and increasing evidence suggests that young women are more likely to suffer than older women, yet limited evidence exists in England about educational and intervention programmes for young women at risk.Study’s objectives:To evaluate a gender-specific (women-only) programme aimed at educating young women aged 13–25 years about abuse and staying safe in one English city.Setting:A third sector (charitable) organisation, aiming to improve women’s health in one English city delivered the programme over a 3-year period, funded by the Big Lottery Fund. Young women received both peer and one-to-one support, to educationally inform them, develop their skills and improve their capabilities in responding to abuse.Method:This qualitative evaluation captured the perspectives of young women accessing the programme (n = 33), exploring the positive difference that it made to their lives. We also captured the views of internal stakeholders in 2018 (n = 2), then followed up in 2020 (n = 3), and external stakeholders referring young women to the programme (n = 8).Results:The programme met its aims. Self-reported changes in young women’s lives included increased knowledge about staying safe and being happier. Some young women gained or retained custody of their children, and others exited harmful relationships. Young women identified a range of mechanisms of success including a non-judgemental approach from workers, peer support and a trusted space in which to meet and learn. The programme increased young women’s skills to stay safe while improving their mental wellbeing.Conclusion:The programme worked well for young women who accessed it. However, it could not reach all those in need, was only funded in the short-term and tended to individualise the responsibility for staying safe. Further research is needed in other community-based educational programmes to provide evidence of their effectiveness as well as transferrable models for workers in other contexts.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-10-03T09:17:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221129110
       
  • Interpersonal and structural healthcare barriers among transgender women:
           Healthcare curriculum needs

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      Authors: Laura Calleros, Roberta E Emetu, Stacy Missari
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Transgender women encounter various barriers to healthcare access and use. Together, these contribute to under-utilisation, delay or avoidance of the healthcare system. This in-depth qualitative phenomenological study aimed to explore perceptions, interactions and experiences with medical and healthcare systems, and identify suggestions for improving healthcare access and utilisation among transgender women.Design/Setting:Fifteen (N = 15) transgender women in Los Angeles County participated in semi-structured telephone interviews.Method:Participants were recruited through emails sent to LGBTQ+ serving institutions, health centres and college campuses. The interview guide covered demographic information, experiences within medical and healthcare setting, interactions and perceptions within clinical settings, and concerns about barriers to healthcare access and utilisation.Results:Healthcare experiences were shaped by interpersonal and structural factors. Four themes were identified: (1) lack of trained and knowledgeable healthcare providers, (2) limitations in healthcare access such as cost and hormone replacement therapy access, (3) implicit bias regarding being misgendered and stereotyped, and (4) explicit bias such as denial of services, inability adding preferred personal information to medical health records, and various aspects of discrimination.Conclusion:Access to knowledgeable healthcare providers was cited as a priority area needing the most attention. Curricula and modules that address social, medical and clinical issues specific to transgender women were suggested for use in the training and continuing education of healthcare professionals. In addition to needs related to patient–provider contact, this paper highlights the broader regulatory and political changes needed to improve the health of transgender women.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-10-03T09:14:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221128639
       
  • Message frames in health warnings and plain packaging. What effects do
           they have on non-smokers'

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      Authors: Carlos Gantiva, Nicolás Correal-Grijalba, Laura Murcia-Vaca
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:The key to controlling tobacco use lies in preventing new smokers. Graphic health warnings and plain packaging are policy interventions to discourage cigarette consumption. This study examined the effect of the warning message frame (gain vs loss) and cigarette packaging (branded vs plain) in non-smokers.Methods:Young adult non-smokers aged 18–22 years (n = 282) were recruited online and randomised to one of four experimental conditions, in a 2 (Package, plain vs branded) × 2 (Frame, gain vs loss) between-subjects experimental design. Each participant was exposed to four images of cigarette packs. After observing each image, participants reported the perceived message effectiveness, perceived risks (or benefit) of smoking (or not), decision not to smoke, and attention to image.Results:Separate two-way analyses of covariance (ANCOVAs) that examined the main effects of frame and package were used for each measure. A loss-framed warning was perceived as more effective, increased risk perception, enhanced awareness of the health benefits of not smoking, produced less desire to smoke, and strengthened the decision not to smoke. Plain packaging had no significant effect on any of the outcomes. No significant differences were found in visual attention.Conclusions:The results suggest that loss-framed warnings were more effective in preventing non-smokers from starting, compared with gain-framed warnings. Plain packaging did not seem to enhance the effect of health warnings in our sample of non-smokers.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-10-03T09:11:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221128489
       
  • Physician perspectives on benefits in patient care from UNC-Project Malawi

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      Authors: Yi Yang, Charles B Chen, Sue Tolleson-Rinehart
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The growth of academic medical centres associated with international programmes has raised questions about the benefits and harms of medical experiences abroad for medical trainees and patients. Few studies explore the potential benefits to the institution or country that send these individuals.Objective:This pilot qualitative study explores the benefits medical professionals perceive they bring back to the USA from their global health experiences abroad.Methods:Medical staff who participated in University of North Carolina (UNC)–Project Malawi and who could meet for an in-person interview from October 2016 – March 2017 were recruited. Interviews were guided by an a priori semi-structured questionnaire. Each interview was transcribed and analysed by three reviewers.Results:A total of 8 out of 13 (62%) eligible potential respondents were interviewed. Participants perceived UNC-Project Malawi to benefit themselves, partnership institutions, and patients in Malawi, North Carolina, and throughout the world. After returning to UNC, participants recalled specific instances of increased diagnostic confidence (2/8) influenced by their experiences abroad. In addition, by partnering in research, participants felt that certain concepts were advanced including the syndromic management of symptomatic patients with sexually transmitted infections (1/8), the use of antiretroviral therapy to treat and prevent HIV transmission (2/8), and malaria vaccine development (1/8).Conclusion:Participants perceived that their global health experience either influenced their thought processes concerning the medical management of patients in the USA or resulted in a better understanding of research relevant to the global standard of care for specific diseases. International academic medical centre partnerships can offer rich settings for career skills development and a unique platform for collaborating on the management of clinical diseases that affect patients globally. These benefits can be maximised by establishing bi-directional curriculum goals and defining shared research agendas.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-09-30T09:04:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221128914
       
  • Pedagogical models: Can they make a difference to girls’ in-class
           physical activity'

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      Authors: María Oliveros, Javier Fernandez-Rio
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Research has shown the positive connections between physical activity and health, and physical education has been shown to influence the motivation to participate in physical activities. Student-centred pedagogical models encouraging active learning may be capable of bringing about changes in girls’ physical activity.Objective:The aim of the study was to investigate whether a hybrid pedagogical model could make a difference to adolescent girls’ in-class physical activity levels.Design, setting and method:Sixty-six students aged 13–17 years participated in the study from two Year 9 and two Year 11 classes in three different high schools. All classes experienced the same 12-session hybrid sports education-tactical games learning unit. To objectively measure students’ physical activity, participants wore accelerometers.Results and conclusion:The overall results showed that students spent 39.74% of the class in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), but girls showed statistically significantly lower scores. While in the role of judge/referee (27.34% of the class), students showed significantly higher levels of sedentary physical activity. Finally, year 11 students showed higher MVPA than Year 9 students. In conclusion, hybrid pedagogical models, per se, may not help girls achieve MVPA scores similar to those of boys. Teachers need to identify the barriers and make necessary changes to achieve this goal. Some ideas for doing so are discussed in the paper.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-09-29T06:15:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221128641
       
  • Farm-to-School programmes, benefits, health outcomes and barriers: A
           structured literature review

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      Authors: Sachin K Mishra, Aditya R Khanal, William J Collins
      First page: 781
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:A common refrain in public health and medicine concerns the rapidly rising incidence of obesity and metabolic-like syndromes over the last two decades. A plethora of data suggests there are many roots to the issue and what to do about it. The rise of childhood obesity and the growing incidence of adult endocrine diseases like type 2 diabetes mellitus in paediatric populations are the most concerning. One of the solutions that aims to tackle health and food justice issues is the Farm-to-School programme (FTSP), which helps bring local fruit and vegetables (FVs) to schools and associated nutrition-related programmes. In the USA, a significant expansion of FTSPs has happened since the early 2000s. Numerous economic, social and nutritional benefits of these programmes have been documented, and various methodologies have been used to elucidate the benefits and barriers.Method:This paper reviews the multifaceted strengths of FTSPs including health, institutional and farm-related benefits. The paper also discusses federal- and state-level environment and the obstacles to FTSP implementation.Conclusion:FTSPs offer a comprehensive way to strengthen childhood nutrition education and stimulate local communities economically and socially. FTSPs increase the purchase of locally produced food items, resulting in higher incomes for small farmers. FTSPs have also increased community engagement and new opportunities for farming businesses. In sum, FTSPs can be considered a boon for local schools, producers, communities and better health outcomes for school-age children. Teaching children about food literacy could prove beneficial for supporting their self-efficacy regarding foods and encouraging lifetime healthy dietary behaviours.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T11:00:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221119290
       
  • Improving infection prevention behaviours in schools: Feasibility study to
           measure the impact of educational resources

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      Authors: Emily Cooper, Gina Chen, Sarah Godsell, Neville Q Verlander, Amy Thacker, Charlotte V Eley, Alicia Demirjian
      First page: 793
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Evidence indicates that tailored educational resources such as e-Bug in schools can improve students’ knowledge of infection prevention. This study aimed to (1) understand the feasibility of using soap use data as a proxy for measuring student handwashing behaviours and (2) refine a study method that could be implemented by local authorities and schools to assess impact as a result of the implementation of e-Bug.Design:A stepped-wedge design was employed, and 10 primary schools were randomly assigned to groups where teachers were trained to use e-Bug, either in July 2019 (early intervention group) or in January 2020 (late intervention group). Pre/post student knowledge-retention questionnaire data and soap use measurements were collected from all schools before and after the early group teachers used e-Bug. The sample included 16 soap use measures, 561 students in the early group and 601 students in the late group. Statistical analysis involved single/multivariable mixed-effects linear and logistic regression.Setting:A local authority in England.Results:In 15–18 questions, there was a significant relationship between training and students answering questions about microbes, hand/respiratory hygiene and antibiotic use/resistance correctly (degree of change varied). There was not enough power to comment on the relationship between the intervention and soap use.Conclusion:This study informs the feasibility of cluster, randomised, controlled trials in educational settings to measure the impact of educational resources. It can be used to inform future studies and highlights the need to ensure adequate sample size to estimate soap use and improve the measurement accuracy of data collection tools.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-08-30T12:46:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221119933
       
  • A qualitative evaluation of a campus wide COVID-19 health education
           campaign: Intent, impact, and ideas for the future

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      Authors: Michelle Teti, Ifeolu David, Tyler W Myroniuk, Enid Schatz
      First page: 807
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the diseases it causes remain a public health threat. Data describing health education campaigns for COVID-19 on university and college campuses are lacking, however.Purpose:This study explored college students’ experiences of a USA campus COVID-19 campaign encouraging masking, social distancing and handwashing.Methods:We conducted in-depth interviews with 33 demographically diverse students. Questions focused on students’ experiences during COVID-19, actions and beliefs, and reactions to the university’s COVID-19 prevention campaign. Thematic analysis was used to evaluate responses to the campaign and identify suggestions for future interventions.Results:Students identified three areas of concern – lack of enforcement for nonadherence, inequities and inconsistencies in messaging and failure to connect messages to students’ daily experiences – as problematic. Participants also said the campaign did not address their primary COVID-19 concerns, outlining four thematic content areas needing more attention – learning in quarantine, missing the ‘college experience’, difficult social relationships and chaos and uncertainty.Discussion:COVID-19 prevention campaigns on campus may be best served by a holistic ecological model engaging with needed forms of support on multiple levels.Conclusion:Health education and promotion campaigns that speak to individual, relational, community and policy aspects of disease such as COVID-19 are more promising than campaigns that promote single prevention actions.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-08-30T12:48:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221122917
       
  • Flexibility in human sexuality education during a pandemic

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      Authors: Amanda J Blaisdell
      First page: 823
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:As a result of the SARS-COVID-2 pandemic, many students had to leave highly interactive face-to-face learning environments in classrooms and join online learning environments. By autumn 2020, some large numbers of US institutions had opted for face-to-face, hybrid and fully online teaching formats. For many of them, the challenge lay in developing teaching models that enabled parties to experience success, particularly in the field of human sexuality education, which can be effective in either format, online or face-to-face. This study explored students’ perspectives regarding a differentiated proficiency-based online education model for delivery in two course formats: modified face-to-face and fully online.Design:Mid-course and end-of-course surveys were conducted to examine students’ experiences and perspectives regarding course structure. Survey questions were coded using self-determination theory constructs.Setting:Surveys were completed in the Canvas Learning Management System at the mid-point and end of each course. Participation was voluntary, and surveys were completed asynchronously outside of the classroom.Results:Students were overwhelmingly appreciative of the support for autonomy provided in both formats, but each cohort had unique criteria for success. The face-to-face cohort evaluated the course in terms of relatedness and competence. The winter online cohort evaluated the course based on perceived competence.Conclusion:Students were overwhelmingly supportive of course policies designed to increase flexibility and scaffold learning so long as the burden was minimal and they recognised the benefit. Students were ambivalent regarding the due dates of assignments, appreciating flexibility but recognising their role as extrinsic motivators.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-09-09T06:17:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221123135
       
  • Adolescent self-efficacy mediates the relationship between perceived
           parenting practices and fruit and vegetable consumption in the FLASHE
           study

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      Authors: Marietta Orlowski, Sumayyah Shermadou, Miryoung Lee, Amanda Hinson-Enslin, Ramzi W Nahhas
      First page: 835
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:In the USA, few adolescents meet the national recommendations for fruit and vegetable consumption (FVC). This study examined the associations between two perceived food parenting practice scales (Promote and Ensure FVC Intake) and adolescent FVC, and assessed whether these associations were mediated by adolescent self-efficacy.Design:The study took the form of a secondary data analysis of publicly available data from the Family Life, Activity, Sun, Health, and Eating Study (FLASHE), a cross-sectional, Internet-based study administered by the US National Cancer Institute (NCI) between April and October 2014.Methods:Data from 1,354 parent–adolescent dyads were analysed. The PROCESS macro was used to conduct mediation analyses to estimate the indirect effect (IE) of each parenting practice on FVC through adolescent self-efficacy, adjusted for parental and adolescent characteristics. In addition, we examined whether adolescent age, gender, race/ethnicity or weight status moderated the mediation model.Results:The IEs were each statistically significant (Promote FV Intake: IE = 0.063, 95% bootstrap confidence interval [CI] = 0.046, 0.080; Ensure FV Intake: IE = 0.014, 95% bootstrap CI = 0.004, 0.024; p 
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-09-26T06:41:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221125637
       
  • Feasibility and acceptability of paramedic-initiated health education for
           rural-dwelling older people

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      Authors: Tegwyn E McManamny, Leanne Boyd, Jade Sheen, Judy A Lowthian
      First page: 848
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background:In rural and regional areas, older Australians have poorer health outcomes and higher rates of potentially preventable hospital admissions than their metropolitan counterparts. Paramedics may be uniquely placed to improve health outcomes of rural-dwelling older adults through involvement in primary and preventive healthcare, health promotion and health education. However, the feasibility and acceptability of this remains unexplored.Aim:To investigate the utility, feasibility and acceptability of paramedic involvement in health education initiatives aimed at rural-dwelling older people.Methods:Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with key stakeholders between July and September 2021. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and reflexive thematic analysis was undertaken.Findings:Participants (older people and their carers, n = 3; health service representatives, n = 4; and ambulance service representatives, n = 3) linked acceptability to the position of trust and visibility paramedics held within the community. The coverage provided by ambulance services in rural and regional areas, and the enhanced skills and collaborative relationships that rural paramedics develop, were seen as enabling factors to expanded roles.Conclusion:Key stakeholders’ perspectives on the role of paramedics in health education for rural-dwelling older people highlighted the trust placed in paramedics. Meeting identified needs without competing with established health initiatives was seen as important with respect to paramedic engagement in broader primary health care opportunities.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-09-28T11:12:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221125622
       
  • Completing a soundscape questionnaire reduces the psychological distance
           of sound and hearing

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      Authors: David Welch, Komal Rana, Ravi Reddy
      First page: 862
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:People are often resistant to hearing-health education messages such as those aimed at the prevention of noise-induced hearing loss. This resistance may be due to psychological distance: the perceived relevance of hearing and awareness of sound to daily life. The soundscape is the internal, perceptual, experience of a sound environment. The objective of this study was to explore people’s thought processes when completing a questionnaire designed to assess the soundscape and, in particular, to investigate whether the experience reduced psychological distance of sound and their hearing.Design:Semi-structured interviews and qualitative data analysis.Setting:Questionnaires were completed on personal phones in any environment participants wished. Interviews were conducted via online video connection.Method:A soundscape questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of adult volunteers who were then interviewed about the experience of completing it, and how doing so had influenced their views of sound and their hearing.Results:Themes in three main areas were identified: the questions, which were found to be challenging but interesting; the soundscape, and the insights of participants about their own soundscape experience; and participants’ new awareness of sound and their own hearing.Conclusion:The findings provide interesting feedback about the meaning of responses to the questionnaire and on how people thought while using it. Furthermore, the findings imply that bringing the soundscape to a person’s conscious awareness may successfully reduce psychological distance for them about their hearing and may, therefore, be a useful preliminary to hearing-health education interventions.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-09-26T06:42:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221127782
       
  • How prepared are people for their future' Findings from the
           Preparedness for the Future survey

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      Authors: Daren K. Heyland, J. Paige Pope, Xuran Jiang, Andrew G. Day
      First page: 875
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:People are living longer than ever before. Many arrive at a later stage of life in poor health and with inadequate financial and social resources. The purpose of this paper is to describe people’s general state of preparedness for their future as older persons, identify specific attitudes towards ageing and key characteristics that portend a lesser degree of preparedness, and identify the issues that need greater emphasis.Design:Cross-sectional survey.Setting:502 adult participants enlisted on an online polling panel in Canada.Methods:Demographics, attitudes towards the future self and ageing and the responses to the ‘Preparedness for the Future Questionnaire’ (Prep-FQ) were analysed. Descriptive statistics were used to highlight overall and domain scores (possible score 0–100). Regression models were used to link key demographic characteristics and attitudes to a lower Prep FQ score.Results:The average age of participants was 54.1 years old (range 30–91). The majority (97%) felt it was important to think about themselves as an older person, yet less than 25% of people regularly spent time thinking about what it would be like for them as an older person. The average score on the Prep FQ was 61.6 (range 25–99). Items with the lowest scores were related to advance serious illness planning (medical care, funeral and legacy planning). Factors associated with a higher Prep FQ score included being female, having more education, thinking about when they are older and feeling positive about themselves as an older person.Conclusion:Helping people think and plan ahead more for healthy ageing may help some people move forward with confidence in creating a long, high-quality life and high-quality death. Helping ‘at-risk’ people plan for serious illness in advance is a high-priority target for improving people’s general state of preparedness for the future.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-09-28T11:16:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221128485
       
  • Does virtual versus in-person e-cigarette education have a differential
           impact'

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      Authors: Shivani Mathur Gaiha, Amelia Warnock, Shelby Kile, Kennon Brake, Clementino Vong do Rosario, Gabriela R Oates, Bonnie Halpern-Felsher, Susan Chu Walley
      First page: 891
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background:E-cigarette prevention education aims to mitigate adolescent e-cigarette use. Such education is increasingly delivered through virtual/video-based teaching platforms (e.g. Zoom, Google Classrooms). However, there is little evidence about the effectiveness of virtual e-cigarette education compared to in-person education on adolescents’ knowledge about e-cigarettes, perceived addictiveness and intent to try e-cigarettes, cigarettes, and marijuana.Objective:To evaluate the effectiveness of virtual e-cigarette education compared to in-person education on student knowledge and perceived addictiveness of e-cigarettes and intent to try e-cigarettes.Design, Setting and Method:We conducted a pre- and post-education evaluation among 10 middle and high school students in the Greater Birmingham area, Alabama, who were non-randomly assigned to receive either virtual (n = 745) or in-person e-cigarette education (n = 286) (mean age: 14.36 years). The study used a 25-minute educational presentation about the health effects of e-cigarettes, the risks of second- and third-hand smoke, the addictive nature of nicotine, and marketing strategies of e-cigarette companies. Participants completed a 10-minute self-administered survey immediately before and after the presentation.Results and conclusion:Except for certain e-cigarette knowledge-related items, our study shows that both virtual and in-person education had similar effects on improving knowledge about e-cigarettes, increasing perceived addictiveness and reducing intent to try e-cigarettes, cigarettes and marijuana among participants. Virtual education may be applied where in-person education is not feasible (e.g. in rural communities).
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-08-30T12:45:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221119287
       
  • Monitoring student education and confidence in LGBTQ+ health in UK medical
           schools

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      Authors: Callum Phillips, Lucia Lazzereschi, Michael Griksaitis
      First page: 901
      Abstract: Health Education Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:We sought to evaluate and describe UK medical students’ experiences of education in LGBTQ+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer) health and their confidence in approaching these consultations and identify any perceived gaps in medical school curricula. We also sought to examine whether individual identity affected medical students’ clinical practice.Method:A 19-question questionnaire collecting quantitative and qualitative responses was sent to all medical students in the UK.Results:A total of 307 students completed the questionnaire; 36% (n = 184) reported no dedicated teaching on LGBTQ+ health issues/inequalities and 88% (n = 267) reported no LGBTQ+-specific communication skills training. Respondents found it more challenging to discuss LGBTQ+ health issues with patients compared to performing clinical examinations on LGBTQ+ patients. In the clinical environment, students were more likely to ask about sexual orientation, gender identity and pronouns within the context of sexual health over psychiatric, surgical and medical consultations. Measured via a Likert-type scale from 0 to 100, students felt LGBTQ+ health teaching should be given higher importance within the curriculum (74/100) than their medical school currently placed on it (13/100). Ninety-five percent of students stated that they needed further education on LGBTQ+ health.Conclusion:Findings suggest that at a national level, UK medical students do not feel well equipped to deal with LGBTQ+ health issues, and despite students’ recognition of the importance of this topic, this is not matched by curricular provision. Students report having difficulty discussing LGBTQ+ health issues and performing examinations on LGBTQ+ patients. Further training on LGBTQ+ health and actions to increase student confidence could help improve LGBTQ+ patient outcomes and improve the relationship between patients and clinicians. Students should be consulted in the re-development of relevant curricula.
      Citation: Health Education Journal
      PubDate: 2022-08-27T09:25:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00178969221120394
       
 
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