Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1478 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (700 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 115 of 115 Journals sorted alphabetically
ACSMs Health & Fitness Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Acta Facultatis Educationis Physicae Universitatis Comenianae     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Kinesiologiae Universitatis Tartuensis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ACTIVE : Journal of Physical Education, Sport, Health and Recreation     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ágora para la Educación Física y el Deporte     Open Access  
Al.Qadisiya journal for the Sciences of Physical Education     Open Access  
American Journal of Sexuality Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Applied Sport Science     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Arab Journal of Nutrition and Exercise     Open Access  
Arquivos em Movimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arrancada     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Baltic Journal of Sport and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
BMC Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
Child and Adolescent Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Childhood Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Comparative Exercise Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Cultura, Ciencia y Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
eJRIEPS : Ejournal de la recherche sur l'intervention en éducation physique et sport     Open Access  
Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Éthique & Santé     Full-text available via subscription  
Fat Studies : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Body Weight and Society     Partially Free   (Followers: 2)
Food Science and Human Wellness     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Sports and Active Living     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gelanggang Pendidikan Jasmani Indonesia     Open Access  
German Journal of Exercise and Sport Research : Sportwissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Geron     Full-text available via subscription  
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Marketing Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Health Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Home Healthcare Now     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Human Movement Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indonesia Performance Journal     Open Access  
International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 54)
International Journal of Athletic Therapy & Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 92)
International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-Being     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
International Journal of Spa and Wellness     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Sport, Exercise & Training Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Isokinetics and Exercise Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of American College Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Athlete Development and Experience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Bioenergetics and Biomembranes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Exercise & Organ Cross Talk     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Human Sport and Exercise     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Motor Learning and Development     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Physical Activity and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Physical Activity and Hormones     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Physical Activity Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Physical Education and Human Movement     Open Access  
Journal of Physical Education and Sport Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Physical Education Health and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Science in Sport and Exercise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Sport and Health Science     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Sport Sciences and Fitness     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Kinesiology : International Journal of Fundamental and Applied Kinesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Kinesiology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Malaysian Journal of Movement, Health & Exercise     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Médecine & Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription  
Mental Health and Physical Activity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
MHSalud : Movimiento Humano y Salud     Open Access  
Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Obesity Research & Clinical Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Obesity Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Obesity Science & Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Obesity Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pain Management in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
PALAESTRA : Adapted Sport, Physical Education, and Recreational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Physical Activity and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical Education & Sport Pedagogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology of Sport and Exercise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Quality in Sport     Open Access  
Race and Yoga     Open Access  
RBNE - Revista Brasileira de Nutrição Esportiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBONE - Revista Brasileira de Obesidade, Nutrição e Emagrecimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBPFEX - Revista Brasileira de Prescrição e Fisiologia do Exercício     Open Access  
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Retos : Nuevas Tendencias en Educación Física, Deportes y Recreación     Open Access  
Revista Andaluza de Medicina del Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Brasileira de Atividade Física & Saúde     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Cineantropometria & Desempenho Humano     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Internacional de Medicina y Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte : International Journal of Medicine and Science of Physical Activity and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue phénEPS / PHEnex Journal     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
SIPATAHOENAN : South-East Asian Journal for Youth, Sports & Health Education     Open Access  
Spor Bilimleri Dergisi / Hacettepe Journal of Sport Sciences     Open Access  
Sport and Fitness Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Sport Science and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sport Sciences for Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
SPORTIVE : Journal Of Physical Education, Sport and Recreation     Open Access  
Sports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sports Biomechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Strength & Conditioning Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Timisoara Physical Education and Rehabilitation Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Turkish Journal of Sport and Exercise     Open Access  
Yoga Mimamsa     Open Access   (Followers: 2)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.572
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 24  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1124-4909 - ISSN (Online) 1590-1262
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • When refeeding is not enough: severe and prolonged pancytopenia in an
           adolescent with anorexia nervosa

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      Abstract: Abstract A 15-year-old female patient with anorexia nervosa presented an unusually prolonged and severe episode of pancytopenia with severe thrombopenia and severe leucopenia. Despite effective refeeding, active specialized interventions were necessary. Upon admission, the patient presented with severe and symptomatic thrombopenia, severe neutropenia and gelatinous marrow transformation. In addition to refeeding, active interventions such as platelet transfusion and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor were successful to manage the patient’s complications. The etiological search for pancytopenia was negative. The patient’s prolonged starvation was probably a key factor. Medical history, clinical presentation, evolution, and biological data including bone marrow aspiration results are presented. Management of cytopenia and of their complications in a context of severe starvation is discussed in regard of existing literature. A simple monitoring attitude may prove insufficient in cases of severe pancytopenia in anorexia nervosa. Level of evidence V, descriptive study.
      PubDate: 2022-09-22
       
  • One year of COVID-19 pandemic on patients with eating disorders, healthy
           sisters, and community women: evidence of psychological vulnerabilities

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      Abstract: Purpose The COVID-19 pandemic has been a psychological burden worldwide, especially for individuals with eating disorders (EDs). In addition, the healthy sisters of patients with EDs are known to present specific psychological vulnerabilities. This study evaluates differences between the general population, patients with EDs, and their healthy sisters. Method A group of 233 participants (91 patients with EDs, 57 of their healthy sisters and 85 community women) was enrolled in an online survey on general and specific psychopathology 1 year after the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. The survey examined associations between posttraumatic symptoms and depression, anxiety, obsessive–compulsiveness, interpersonal sensitivity, and eating-related concerns. Results Clinically relevant scores for posttraumatic disorders were found in patients with EDs. Healthy sisters scored similarly to patients for avoidance. Regression analysis showed specific associations between interpersonal sensitivity and posttraumatic symptomatology in patients and healthy sisters, but not in community women. Conclusion The psychological burden in patients with EDs is clinically relevant and linked to interpersonal sensitivity, obsessive–compulsiveness, and global symptom severity. Differences between patients, healthy sisters, and community women are discussed regarding vulnerability factors for EDs. Level of evidence Level III: evidence obtained from well-designed cohort or case–control analytic studies.
      PubDate: 2022-09-20
       
  • Characterizing alcohol-related disordered eating behaviors in adults with
           binge eating

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      Abstract: Purpose Alcohol-related disordered eating behaviors (ADEBs; i.e., engagement in dietary restriction or excessive exercise before or after drinking alcohol to avoid weight gain) are associated with negative psychosocial and medical consequences. Previous research has primarily studied ADEBs among community samples. Individuals with clinically significant binge eating may also engage in ADEBs given high rates of alcohol use and inappropriate weight-control behaviors. The current study aimed to characterize the prevalence and psychological correlates (i.e., weight and shape concerns, alcohol consumption, binge eating frequency) of ADEBs among individuals with clinically significant binge eating. Methods Participants were 166 treatment-seeking individuals who engaged in once weekly binge eating over the past three months. Participants completed a clinical interview to assess eating disorder symptoms and self-report measures of alcohol consumption patterns and ADEBs engagement. Results Over one-fourth of participants endorsed at least one ADEBs in the past three months. Participants who endorsed ADEBs reported greater alcohol consumption than participants who drank alcohol but did not endorse ADEBs, after controlling for eating disorder diagnosis. Greater frequency of ADEBs was related to higher weight and shape concerns among individuals who endorsed ADEBs in the past three months. Presence of ADEBs and ADEBs frequency were not related to binge eating frequency. Conclusion Results suggest that clinicians treating individuals with binge eating who drink alcohol should screen for ADEBs and assess how ADEBs may contribute to an individual’s eating pathology. Future research should assess the temporal relationship between alcohol use and ADEBs engagement, and study ADEBs in BN-spectrum samples. Level of evidence Level V, descriptive studies.
      PubDate: 2022-09-19
       
  • Research in eating disorders: the misunderstanding of supposing serious
           mental illnesses as a niche specialty

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      Abstract: Purpose Eating disorders (EDs) are mental illnesses with severe consequences and high mortality rates. Notwithstanding, EDs are considered a niche specialty making it often difficult for researchers to publish in high-impact journals. Subsequently, research on EDs receives less funding than other fields of psychiatry potentially slowing treatment progress. This study aimed to compare research vitality between EDs and schizophrenia focusing on: number and type of publications; top-cited articles; geographical distribution of top-ten publishing countries; journal distribution of scientific production as measured by bibliometric analysis; funded research and collaborations. Methods We used the Scopus database, then we adopted the Bibliometrix R-package software with the web interface app Biblioshiny. We included in the analyses 1,916 papers on EDs and 6491 on schizophrenia. Results The ED field published three times less than schizophrenia in top-ranking journals – with letters and notes particularly lacking—notwithstanding a comparable number of papers published per author. Only 50% of top-cited articles focused on EDs and a smaller pool of journals available for ED research (i.e., Zones 1 and 2 according to Bradford's law) emerged; journals publishing on EDs showed an overall lower rank compared to the schizophrenia field. Schizophrenia research was more geographically distributed and more funded; in contrast, a comparable collaboration index was found between the fields. Conclusion These data show that research on EDs is currently marginalized and top-rank journals are seldom achievable by researchers in EDs. Such difficulties in research dissemination entail potentially serious repercussions on clinical advancements. Level of evidence Level V: opinions of respected authorities, based on descriptive studies, narrative reviews, clinical experience, or reports of expert committees.
      PubDate: 2022-09-09
       
  • “Bulking and cutting” among a national sample of Canadian
           adolescents and young adults

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      Abstract: Purpose First, to characterize the prevalence and incidence of “bulk” and “cut” cycles among Canadian adolescents and young adults. Second, to determine the associations between bulk and cut cycle engagement and drive for muscularity and eating disorder and muscle dysmorphia psychopathology. Methods Data were from the Canadian Study of Adolescent Health Behaviors (2021; N = 2762), a national study of Canadian adolescents and young adults aged 16–30 years (M = 22.9, SD = 3.9). Prevalence and mean incidence of bulk and cut cycles in both the past 12 months and 30 days were estimated. Modified Poisson regressions were estimated to determine the associations between bulk and cut cycle engagement and levels of drive for muscularity and eating disorder and muscle dysmorphia psychopathology. Results The sample comprised of 53.5% women, 38.4% men, and 8.1% transgender/gender non-conforming (TGNC) individuals. Nearly half (48.9%) of men and one in five women (21.2%) and TGNC (21.9%) participants reported bulk and cut cycles in the past 12 months. TGNC participants and women reported a greater mean number of bulk and cut cycles completed compared to men. Engagement in bulk and cut cycles was associated with stronger drive for muscularity across the sample, and more severe eating disorder and muscle dysmorphia psychopathology among men and women. Conclusion Findings underscore the common incidence and accompanying psychopathology of bulk and cut cycles among a community sample of adolescents and young adults in Canada, indicating the need for future research, as well as clinical and public health efforts. Level of evidence Level V, cross-sectional descriptive study.
      PubDate: 2022-09-09
       
  • Translation and validation of the Chinese version of the orthorexia
           nervosa assessment questionnaires among college students

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      Abstract: Purpose The main objective of the study was to translate, validate, and compare the Chinese ORTO scales (ORTO-15 and ORTO-R). The secondary objective was to assess factors that may be related with risk of orthorexia nervosa (ON). Methods Two cross-sectional surveys were conducted on March-to-June 2021 for ORTO-15 and April 2022 for ORTO-R. ORTO questionnaires were translated into Chinese using the forward–backward–forward method. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA), discriminant validity and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were used to examine the construct validity of the questionnaires. The internal consistency was assessed using the Cronbach alpha coefficient and the test–retest reliability. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to explore potential factors related with ON scores. Results Totally, 1289 and 1084 eligible participants were included for assessment of ORTO-15 and ORTO-R, with the mean age of 20.9 ± 2.0 years and 21.0 ± 2.3 years. The internal consistency of Chinese ORTO-15 scale and ORTO-R scale were both satisfactory (α = 0.79, ICC = 0.79; α = 0.77, ICC = 0.82). However, all ORTO-15 models showed a poor fit using CFA whereas the ORTO-R was characterized by acceptable goodness-of-fit. Multivariate linear regression indicated that physical activities and mental disorders were positively associated with ON risk assessed by both ORTO-R and ORTO-15. Conclusion The Chinese ORTO-R scale was a more reliable tool to screen for ON tendencies than the Chinese version of ORTO-15. Mental disorders and physical activities might be associated with the increased ON risk. Level of evidence Level V (descriptive cross-sectional study).
      PubDate: 2022-09-07
       
  • The impact of COVID-19 on Black women who binge-eat: a qualitative study

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      Abstract: Background Although studies have traced the impact of COVID-19 on those with eating disorders, little is known about the specific impact of the pandemic on Black American women who report disordered eating behaviors and are at risk for eating disorders. Thus, the purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on Black women who binge-eat. Methods We recruited a purposive sample during the first wave of COVID-19 from the southeastern United States. Participants identified as Black women, reported binge-eating episodes in the last 28 days, and agreed to participate in a semi-structured interview. Prior to the interview, participants were administered a socio-demographic survey and the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed independently using qualitative content analysis and open coding to identify relevant codes and themes. Results On average, participants (N = 20) were 43.05 ± 16.2 years of age and reported 5.6 ± 5.7 binge-eating episodes in the last 28 days. We identified six themes to describe participants' experiences managing their eating behavior during COVID-19: (1) food as a coping strategy; (2) lack of control around food; (3) increased time in a triggering environment (e.g., being at home with an easy availability of food); (4) lack of structure and routine; (5) challenges with limited food availability; and (6) positive impact of the pandemic. Conclusion In this study, Black women reported challenges managing their eating behavior during COVID-19. Results could inform the development and tailoring of treatments for Black women reporting disordered eating behaviors. Level of Evidence Level V, qualitative interviews.
      PubDate: 2022-09-04
       
  • Early echocardiographic evaluation of children admitted to the emergency
           department for anorexia nervosa during the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Abstract: Purpose Anorexia nervosa (AN) is the most frequent eating disorder (ED), whose cardiac complications may have life-threatening consequences for both the physical and psychological health of affected children. In this study, we reported and analysed the echocardiographic anomalies found in pediatric patients diagnosed with AN. Methods We reported the demographic and clinical characteristics of children aged 8 to 18 years, who were diagnosed with AN and underwent a complete cardiological evaluation at the Emergency Department of the Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, IRCCS, Rome between the 1st January 2021 and the 30th June 2021. Furthermore, we compared the patients according to the presence of pericardial effusion and a BMI (body mass index) cut-off 14.5 kg/m2. Results Forty-nine patients were included in the study. The mean age was 15.1 years. Most patients were female (89.8%). The mean length of hospitalization was 18 days. The mean BMI at admission was 14.8 kg/m2, with a median weight loss of 9 kg in the last year. Eleven patients (22.4%) presented with cardiovascular signs or symptoms at admission. Most patients had pericardial effusion on heart ultrasound, with a mean thickness of 6 mm (SD ± 4). The LV (left ventricle) thickness over age was significantly higher in patients with pericardial effusion, with a Z score of −2.0 vs −1.4 (p = 0.014). The administration of psychiatric drugs was significantly more frequent in patients with a lower BMI (37.5% vs 12%, p = 0.038). Conclusion Our study suggests that a non-urgent baseline echocardiographic evaluation with focus on left-ventricular wall thickness and mass in children with anorexia nervosa is advisable. Level III Evidence obtained from cohort or case-control analytic studies.
      PubDate: 2022-09-02
       
  • The influence of partner appearance in the assessment of a person with
           obesity: an experimental study

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      Abstract: Purpose This study analyzes whether knowing that a male with obesity has a romantic relationship with a normal weight woman improves impressions about him. Methods An online experiment was conducted with a sample of 3024 adult participants (1828 women and 1196 men) with a mean age of 36.11 (SD = 13.49). Each participant was shown two photographs: one of a male target with obesity and one of his female partner (who had either normal weight or obesity depending on the condition). The respondents’ sex was added as a fixed factor into the analyses. Physical attractiveness was rated using an item with a scale ranging from 0 to 100. Competence, warmth, and morality were measured using a 17-item adjective list. Results The target was assessed as more attractive when he had a partner with normal weight (F(1, 3009) = 4.85, p = .028, \(\eta^{2}\)  = .002), and was also given higher scores for competence (F(1, 3009) = 4.93, p = .026, \(\eta^{2}\)  = .002), warmth (F(1, 3009) = 4.32, p = .038, \(\eta^{2}\)  = .001), and morality (F(1, 3009) = 11.16, p = .001, \(\eta^{2}\)  = .004). There was a significant interaction between partner weight and the respondents’ sex for physical attractiveness, as the difference between the scores in each condition was only significant for women. Conclusion It is possible that women perceived that the male target who had a normal weight partner had a higher status or some hidden quality besides his physical appearance, and thus rated him as more attractive. Level of evidence Level I, experimental study.
      PubDate: 2022-08-30
       
  • Prevention of high body mass index and eating disorders: a systematic
           review and meta-analysis

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      Abstract: Background Eating disorders (EDs) and high body mass index (BMI) are two important public health issues with significant health and cost impacts. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to establish whether interventions are effective in preventing both issues. Methods Electronic databases were searched up to 10 May 2021. Studies were included if they were randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials that evaluated a preventive intervention (regardless of its aim to prevent ED, high BMI or both) and reported both EDs and BMI-related outcomes. Both narrative synthesis and meta-analysis were used to synthesise the results. Publication bias was also investigated. Results Fifty-four studies were included for analysis. The primary aim of the studies was ED prevention (n = 23), high BMI prevention (n = 21) and both ED and high BMI prevention (n = 10). Meta-analysis results indicated that preventive interventions had a significant effect on several ED outcomes including dieting, shape and weight concerns, body dissatisfaction, negative affect, eating disorder symptoms and internalization, with effect sizes ranging from – 0.16 (95% CI – 0.27, – 0.06) to – 0.61 (95% CI – 0.29, – 0.04). Despite several studies that demonstrated positive impacts on BMI, there was no significant effect on BMI-related measures in the meta-analysis. The risk of publication bias was low for the majority of the pooled effect results. Conclusion Preventive interventions were effective for either high BMI or EDs. However, there is limited evidence to show that current preventive interventions were effective in reducing both outcomes. Further research is necessary to explore the risk factors that are shared by these weight-related disorders as well as effective prevention interventions. Level of evidence Level I: systematic review.
      PubDate: 2022-08-27
       
  • Psychopathology predicts mental but not physical bariatric surgery outcome
           at 3-year follow-up: a network analysis study

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      Abstract: Purpose This study aimed to explore the psychopathological variables that may predict bariatric surgery outcomes after 3 years. Methods One hundred ninety-six candidates for bariatric surgery completed self-report questionnaires to assess eating attitudes, eating disorder (ED)-related psychopathology, affective symptoms, interpersonal and psycho-social functioning. One-hundred patients repeated this assessment 3 years after bariatric surgery. A network analysis was run including the pre-surgical measurements in the network. A composite score derived from the combination of the most central network nodes, as well as clinical and socio-demographical variables, was included in a multivariate regression analysis with weight loss, ED psychopathology and psycho-social functioning as outcomes. Results Depression, stress, and shape concerns were the most central network nodes. The composite network score predicted higher ED psychopathology and worse psycho-social functioning at 3-year follow-up, but not weight loss. Higher age, restricting type of bariatric surgery and higher pre-operative BMI were further predictors of reduced weight loss and greater ED psychopathology. Conclusions Affective symptoms and shape concern play a central role in the psychopathology of candidates to bariatric surgery and predict post-surgery ED psychopathology and psycho-social functioning. These variables may allow to identify patients with higher pre-operative risk and in need of further psycho-social interventions. Level of evidence III, evidence obtained from well-designed cohort study.
      PubDate: 2022-08-27
       
  • Association of energy adjusts nutrient-rich foods on mental health among
           obese and overweight women: a cross-sectional study

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      Abstract: Purpose Mental health and obesity have a bilateral relationship with each other. No study has been done on the association between mental health and the ENRF9.3 index so far. Therefore, for the first time, the present study investigated the relationship between the ENRF9.3 index and mental health in overweight and obese women. Methods In the current cross-sectional study, 124 overweight and obese women were selected. Food intakes in the last year were collected with 147 items semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Then, the ENRF9.3 index score was calculated for all individuals. Mental health was assessed with 21-item Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS) questionnaire. Results In the present study, the total DASS score was marginally significant (P = 0.05), however, after the adjustment, it became insignificant (P > 0.05). After adjusting confounders stress also became significant (P = 0.04). No significant relationship was observed between depression and anxiety, even after adjustment (P > 0.05). Conclusion The present study showed that a nutritious diet is not associated with overall mental health score, among subgroups of the DASS total score. The relationship was seen only for the stress subgroup. Level of evidence Level III: Evidence obtained from cohort or case-control analytic studies.
      PubDate: 2022-08-26
       
  • Perceived influence of wearable fitness trackers on eating disorder
           symptoms in a clinical transdiagnostic binge eating and restrictive eating
           sample

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      Abstract: Abstract Wearable fitness trackers are an increasingly popular tool for measuring physical activity (PA) due their accuracy and momentary data collection abilities. Despite the benefits of using wearable fitness trackers, there is limited research in the eating disorder (ED) field using wearable fitness trackers to measure PA in the context of EDs. Wearable fitness trackers are often underused in ED research because there is limited knowledge about whether wearable fitness trackers negatively or positively impact PA engagement and ED symptoms in individuals with EDs. The current study aimed to assess the perceived impact wearable fitness trackers have on PA engagement and ED symptoms over a 12-week CBT treatment for 30 individuals with binge eating and restrictive eating that presented to treatment engaging or not engaging in maladaptive exercise. Participants in the maladaptive exercise group (n = 17) and non-maladaptive exercise group (n = 13) wore a fitness tracker for 12 weeks and completed questionnaires assessing participants’ perceptions of the fitness trackers’ influence on ED symptoms and PA engagement throughout treatment. Results demonstrated a small percentage of individuals perceived the fitness tracker influenced ED behaviors or PA engagement, and there were mixed results on whether participants positively or negatively perceived the fitness tracker influenced them to engage in ED behaviors or PA engagement. Although preliminary, these results demonstrate the need to continue using objective measurements of PA via wearable fitness trackers to further our understanding of the positive and negative effects of fitness trackers on clinical ED samples. Level of Evidence: Level 1, randomized controlled trial.
      PubDate: 2022-08-25
       
  • Ketogenic diet and ketamine infusion treatment to target chronic
           persistent eating disorder psychopathology in anorexia nervosa: a pilot
           study

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      Abstract: Purpose Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe psychiatric disorder, and shape and weight concerns are often chronic despite weight normalization. No specific treatments exist for those preoccupations that interfere with recovery and trigger relapse. A case study using a ketogenic diet followed by ketamine infusions led to sustained remission in one patient with chronic AN. Here we conducted an open-label trial to test whether this response could be replicated. Methods Five adults weight recovered from AN but with persistent eating disorder thoughts and behaviors adopted a therapeutic ketogenic diet (TKD) aimed at maintaining weight. After sustaining nutritional ketosis, participants received six ketamine infusions and were followed over 6 months. Results All participants completed the study protocol without significant adverse effects. Two participants maintained TKD for 8 weeks prior to ketamine infusions due to good behavioral response and remained on TKD. Three participants received TKD for 4 weeks prior to and during ketamine, then tapered off after the final infusion. The group showed significant improvements on the Clinical Impairment Assessment (p = 0.008), Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDEQ) Global score (p = 0.006), EDEQ-Eating Concerns (p = 0.005), EDEQ-Shape Concerns (p = 0.016), EDEQ-Weight Concerns (p = 0.032), Eating Disorders Recovery Questionnaire (EDRQ) Acceptance of Self and Body (0.027) and EDRQ-Social and Emotional Connection (p = 0.001). Weight remained stable, except for one participant who relapsed 4 months after treatment and off TKD. Conclusion This novel treatment appears to be safe and effective for adults with chronic AN-related psychopathology. The results from this open trial support that there are specific neurobiological underpinnings of AN that can be normalized using TKD and ketamine. Level of evidence Level IV, multiple time series with intervention
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
       
  • Relationship of depression, impulsivity, distress intolerance and coping
           styles with maladaptive eating patterns in bariatric candidates

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      Abstract: Purpose The study aimed to investigate the problematic eating patterns and understand their relationship to psychological constructs, including stress intolerance, coping mechanisms and impulsivity, and psychiatric symptoms among bariatric surgery candidates. Methods The bariatric candidates were evaluated by psychiatric interview and standard scales assessing maladaptive eating behaviors (Eating Attitudes Test (EAT), Bulimia Investigatory Test-Edinburgh (BITE), Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ)), depression (Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)), psychiatric symptoms (Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI)), and psychological constructs (Distress Intolerance Index (DSI), Coping Styles Scale (CSS), UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale(UPPS)). Results More than half (57.8%) had maladaptive eating behaviors, and 23.6% had binge-eating behavior. Depression and anxiety predicted EAT, BITE, and DEBQ emotional and external eating sub-scale scores; distress intolerance, helpless coping style, and impulsivity predicted maladaptive eating behaviors in bariatric candidates. Conclusion Maladaptive eating patterns play an essential role in the failure to lose weight and regain weight and are predicted by depression, anxiety, and psychological constructs in this study. Evaluation of pathological trait characteristics besides discrete psychiatric syndromes should be recommended in the pre-operation process to plan relevant interventions in the long-term management of weight. Level of evidence Level III, evidence obtained from well-designed cohort analytic studies.
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
       
  • Craving for carbs: food craving and disordered eating in low-carb dieters
           and its association with intermittent fasting

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      Abstract: Abstract Studies point to positive outcomes in a diet with reduction of carbohydrates and that the associated practice of intermittent fasting (IF) might increase weight loss. Although dieting might be related to disordered eating, little evidence is available about the role of restrictive carbohydrates diets on disordered eating. This study aimed to explore if doing low-carb (LC) diets was related to disordered eating and if IF would increase these symptoms. The sample comprised university students (n = 682), with a mean age of 22 years old and average BMI of 23.6 kg/m2 (SD = 4.3). Twenty-seven percent (n = 188) of respondents reported doing LC diet in the last three months. Of those, 31% (n = 58) reported doing LC diet combined with periods of IF. Mean scores were compared using parametric tests, and effects size and correlations between variables were calculated. Dieters showed higher levels of binge eating, food cravings, cognitive restraint, cognitive restraint toward carbohydrates when compared to non-dieters. The association of LC and IF was related to an increase in disordered eating, especially binge eating and food cravings, specifically ‘Lack of control’, ‘Thoughts or preoccupation with food,’ and ‘Guilt from cravings and/or for giving in to them’. These results provide evidence that restrictive carbohydrate diets and IF may increase cognitive restraint and, consequently, food cravings. Level III: Evidence obtained from cohort or case-control analytic studies.
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
       
  • The relationship between low-carbohydrate diet score, dietary insulin
           index and load with obesity in healthy adults

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      Abstract: Purpose Carbohydrate intake and insulinemic potential of diet are suggested to be correlated with the development of different chronic diseases. Considering the limited research on obesity, this study aimed to investigate the association of dietary insulin index (DII), dietary insulin load (DIL), and low-carbohydrate diet score (LCDS) with body weight and obesity in healthy adults. Methods In this cross-sectional study, DII, DIL, and LCDS were calculated using relevant formulas based on dietary intakes obtained by a valid 168-item food frequency questionnaire, in 393 otherwise healthy adults of either normal-weight, overweight, or obese. Results Individuals in the highest tertile of DIL and DII had respectively 73% (OR: 0.27, 95% CI 0.08–0.94, p = 0.049) and 50% (OR: 0.5, 95% CI 0.26–0.96, p = 0.038) lower odds of being overweight compared to the lowest tertile, after adjusting the effects of age, sex, and dietary energy intake. Participants in the highest tertile of DIL had 92% greater odds of being obese compared to the lowest tertile, but this association did not remain significant after adjusting the effect of energy intake. Individuals in the highest tertile of LCDS had about 2 times odds of being overweight compared with those in the lowest tertile (OR: 2.04, 95% CI 1.04–4.01, p = 0.049). There was no relationship between being obese and tertiles of LCDS. Conclusion Higher dietary carbohydrate intake and insulinemic potential of diet could not be considered independent dietary risk factors for overweight or obesity. Level of evidence Level III: evidence obtained from an observational study.
      PubDate: 2022-08-22
       
  • Childhood sexual abuse and food addiction severity in a clinical sample of
           individuals with overweight or obesity

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      Abstract: Purpose A higher risk of food addiction (FA) in individuals reporting childhood sexual abuse (CSA) has been well demonstrated with community samples, but studies including clinical samples failed to replicate this relation. This study examined, among individuals presenting eating and weight disorders, the risk of FA for those reporting CSA while considering the severity of CSA and other types of traumas. Methods Participants (N = 187) completed a DSM-5 diagnosis assessment and questionnaires on LimeSurvey evaluating FA, interpersonal traumas, depressive level, body esteem, dieting/weight preoccupations, and body mass index (BMI). Logistic regressions were used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) of FA using interpersonal traumas as risk factors, and t tests were used to compare individuals with FA and CSA and those with FA without CSA. Results Of all interpersonal traumas, CSA was associated with the highest risk of FA, with ORs of 1.73 (p = 0.094) and 2.07 (p = 0.034). The relationship with the abuser, the type of sexual abuse and the number of abuses were significant or marginally significant risk factors, with ORs ranging from 1.26 to 1.50. Finally, no significant difference was found between FA with CSA and FA without CSA. Conclusion Using a clinical sample, this study showed a higher risk of FA in individuals reporting CSA and provided evidence that the relationship with the abuser, the type of sexual abuse, and the number of abuses are relevant factors. Additionally, in individuals with FA, the presence or absence of CSA did not influence depressive level, body esteem, dieting/weight preoccupations, or BMI. Level of evidence Level V, cross-sectional, descriptive study.
      PubDate: 2022-08-22
       
  • Monitoring and treating hypoglycemia during meal-based rapid nutritional
           rehabilitation in patients with extreme anorexia nervosa

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      Abstract: Purpose Hypoglycemia, a complication of prolonged starvation, can be life-threatening and is presumed to contribute to the high mortality of anorexia nervosa. Furthermore, early refeeding in severe anorexia nervosa can precipitate paradoxical post-prandial hypoglycemia. Few studies have analyzed the course of hypoglycemia during nutritional rehabilitation in patients with extremely low-weight anorexia nervosa. No standard practice guidelines exist and recommended strategies for managing hypoglycemia (i.e., nasogastric feeds, high-fat diets) have limitations. Methods This cohort study assessed prevalence and correlates of hypoglycemia in 34 individuals with very low body mass index (BMI < 14.5 kg/m2) anorexia nervosa treated in an intensive eating disorders program with an exclusively meal-based rapid weight gain nutritional protocol. Hypoglycemia was monitored with frequent point of care (POC) glucose testing and treated with oral snacks and continuous slow intravenous 5% dextrose in 0.45% saline (IV D5 1/2 NS) infusion. Results POC hypoglycemia was detected in 50% of patients with highest prevalence noted on the day of admission. Hypoglycemia resolved during the first week of hospitalization in most cases and was generally asymptomatic. Seven patients (20.6%) experienced at least one episode of severe hypoglycemia with POC glucose < 50 mg/dl. Lower admission BMI was associated with higher likelihood of developing hypoglycemia and longer duration of hypoglycemia. Conclusion Meal-based management of hypoglycemia supplemented by continuous IV D5 1/2 NS appears a viable alternative to alternate strategies such as enteral tube feeding. We discuss recommendations for hypoglycemia monitoring during nutritional rehabilitation and directions for future research. Level of evidence Level III, retrospective cohort study.
      PubDate: 2022-08-22
       
  • Development and validation of a scale for the tendency to exercise in
           response to mood, eating, and body image cues: the Reactive Exercise Scale
           (RES)

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      Abstract: Purpose Earlier work on engaging in physical exercise when experiencing negative affect demonstrated robust associations with eating disorder (ED) behaviors and attitudes; however, measurement of the behavior was primitive, relying on one yes/no question that cannot capture much variability. We report on the development of a self-report measure, the Reactive Exercise Scale (RES), that disentangles the tendency to engage in exercise in response to negative mood cues from the tendency to engage in exercise in response to eating and body image cues, which themselves may be associated with negative mood. The measure also assesses exercising in response to positive mood cues. Methods Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) guided item and factor selection. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) in an independent sample tested a 3-factor solution—exercising in response to negative mood cues, eating and body image cues, and positive mood cues. Correlations with exercise attitudes, eating disorder and body image attitudes, mood, and personality were used to evaluate construct validity. Results Results supported the 3-factor structure and indicated that exercising in response to negative mood cues may not uniquely relate to most aspects of ED psychopathology when accounting for eating and body image cues, which themselves are associated with negative mood. Conclusion The RES captures the tendency to exercise in response to negative mood, positive mood, and eating and body image cues. Together, these constructs allow researchers to examine the unique relations of negative mood cued exercise with ED constructs, while accounting for appearance-related motives for which exercise may also be used. Level of evidence Level III: evidence obtained from well-designed cohort or case–control analytic studies.
      PubDate: 2022-08-16
       
 
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