Subjects -> EARTH SCIENCES (Total: 771 journals)
    - EARTH SCIENCES (527 journals)
    - GEOLOGY (94 journals)
    - GEOPHYSICS (33 journals)
    - HYDROLOGY (29 journals)
    - OCEANOGRAPHY (88 journals)

EARTH SCIENCES (527 journals)            First | 1 2 3     

Showing 201 - 371 of 371 Journals sorted alphabetically
Hydrological Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 38)
ICES Journal of Marine Science: Journal du Conseil     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 149)
IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Magazine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
IEEE Journal of Oceanic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Indian Geotechnical Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Inland Waters     Hybrid Journal  
Innovative Infrastructure Solutions     Hybrid Journal  
Interdisciplinary Environmental Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Geology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Advanced Geosciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Advanced Remote Sensing and GIS     Open Access   (Followers: 50)
International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation     Open Access   (Followers: 36)
International Journal of Coal Geology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Earth Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
International Journal of Earthquake and Impact Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Energetic Materials     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Environment and Geoinformatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Geo-Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Geographical Information Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
International Journal of Geomechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Geosciences     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Geosynthetics and Ground Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Remote Sensing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 144)
International Journal of Remote Sensing Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 49)
International Journal of Soil, Sediment and Water     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Speleology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi National Journal of Earth Sciences     Open Access  
iScience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Island Arc     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Italian Journal of Geosciences     Open Access  
Izvestiya, Atmospheric and Oceanic Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Izvestiya, Physics of the Solid Earth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Jahresberichte und Mitteilungen des Oberrheinischen Geologischen Vereins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
JETP Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Earth Science & Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of African Earth Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Analytical and Numerical Methods in Mining Engineering     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Applied Volcanology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Arid Land     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Asian Earth Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Asian Earth Sciences : X     Open Access  
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 133)
Journal of Big History     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Coastal Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Coastal Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Contemporary Physics (Armenian Academy of Sciences)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Contemporary Water Resource & Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Earth Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Earth System Science     Open Access   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Earthquake and Tsunami     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Earthquake Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Environment and Earth Science     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Environmental & Engineering Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Geodesy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Geodesy and Geoinformation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Geodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Geography, Environment and Earth Science International     Open Access  
Journal of Geology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Geomorphology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Atmospheres     Partially Free   (Followers: 133)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Biogeosciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Earth Surface     Partially Free   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Oceans     Partially Free   (Followers: 60)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Planets     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 115)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Solid Earth     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 57)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Space Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 134)
Journal of Geophysics and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Geoscience Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Geoscience, Engineering, Environment, and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Geosciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Geosciences and Geomatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Geospatial Applications in Natural Resources     Open Access  
Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Geotechnical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Great Lakes Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Hydro-environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Hydrologic Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Journal of International Maritime Safety, Environmental Affairs, and Shipping     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Life and Earth Science     Open Access  
Journal of Marine Medical Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Marine Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Marine Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Marine Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Metamorphic Geology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Mining Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Mountain Science     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Natural Gas Geoscience     Open Access  
Journal of Ocean and Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Oceanology and Limnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Petroleum Exploration and Production Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Petroleum Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Petrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Plasma Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Population and Sustainability     Open Access  
Journal of Quaternary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Rock Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Sea Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Sedimentary Environments     Open Access  
Journal of Seismology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Spatial Information Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Structural Geology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Systematic Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Journal of the Geological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of the World Aquaculture Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Water and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 52)
Journal on Geoinformatics, Nepal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmiah Perikanan dan Kelautan / Scientific Journal of Fisheries and Marine     Open Access  
Kartografija i geoinformacije (Cartography and Geoinformation)     Open Access  
Lake and Reservoir Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Landslides     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Latin American Journal of Sedimentology and Basin Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Lethaia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Letters in Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Limnologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Limnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Lithology and Mineral Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Lithos     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Malaysian Journal of Geosciences     Open Access  
Marine and Freshwater Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Marine and Petroleum Geology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Marine Biology Research: New for 2005     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Marine Economics and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Marine Environmental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Marine Geodesy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Marine Geology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Marine Geophysical Researches     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Marine Georesources & Geotechnology     Hybrid Journal  
Marine Mammal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Marine Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Mathematical Geosciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mathematical Physics, Analysis and Geometry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Mediterranean Geoscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal  
Meteoritics & Planetary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Mineralium Deposita     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mineralogia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Mineralogy and Petrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Mineria y Geologia     Open Access  
Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration     Hybrid Journal  
Momona Ethiopian Journal of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Mongolian Geoscientist     Open Access  
Moscow University Geology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal  
Moscow University Physics Bulletin     Hybrid Journal  
Natural Hazards     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (NHESS)     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences Discssions     Open Access  
Natural Hazards Research     Open Access  
Natural Hazards Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Natural Resources & Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Natural Resources Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nature Geoscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 161)
Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie - Abhandlungen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Neues Jahrbuch für Mineralogie - Abhandlungen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Newsletters on Stratigraphy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics (NPG)     Open Access  
Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics Discussions     Open Access  
Ocean & Coastal Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Ocean Development & International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Ocean Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Ocean Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Ocean Modelling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Ocean Science (OS)     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ocean Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Open Geospatial Data, Software and Standards     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Journal of Earthquake Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Journal of Soil Science     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Ore and Energy Resource Geology     Open Access  
Ore Geology Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Organic Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Osterreichische Wasser- und Abfallwirtschaft     Hybrid Journal  
Paläontologische Zeitschrift     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Papers in Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal  
Permafrost and Periglacial Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Perspectives of Earth and Space Scientists i     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Petroleum Geoscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Petroleum Science     Open Access  
Petrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
PFG : Journal of Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Geoinformation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Photogrammetrie - Fernerkundung - Geoinformation     Full-text available via subscription  
Physical Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Physical Science International Journal     Open Access  
Physics of Life Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Physics of Metals and Metallography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Physics of Plasmas     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Physics of the Solid State     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)

  First | 1 2 3     

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
ICES Journal of Marine Science: Journal du Conseil
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.591
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 53  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1054-3139 - ISSN (Online) 1095-9289
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [419 journals]
  • Seaweed ecosystems may not mitigate CO2 emissions

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      Authors: Gallagher J; Shelamoff V, Layton C, et al.
      Pages: 585 - 592
      Abstract: AbstractGlobal seaweed carbon sequestration estimates are currently taken as the fraction of the net primary production (NPP) exported to the deep ocean. However, this perspective does not account for CO2 from the consumption of external subsidies. Here, we clarify: (i) the role of export relative to seaweed net ecosystem production (NEP) for a closed system and one more likely open to subsidies; (ii) the importance of subsidies by compiling published estimates of NEP from seaweed-dominated ecosystems; and (iii) discuss their impact on the global seaweed net carbon balance and other sequestration constraints as a mitigation service. Examples of seaweed NEP (n = 18) were sparse and variable. Nevertheless, the average NEP (−4.0 mmol C m–2 d–1 SE ± 12.2) suggested that seaweed ecosystems are a C source, becoming increasingly heterotrophic as their export is consumed. Critically, mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions was mixed relative to their replacement or baseline states, and where CO2 is supplied independently of organic metabolism and atmospheric exchange, we caution a sole reliance on NEP or NPP. This will ensure a more accurate seaweed mitigation assessment, one that does exceed their capacity and is effective within a compliance and carbon trading scheme.
      PubDate: Wed, 09 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsac011
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Responses to unexpected events; folk-rock-blues anthems; memes and other
           non-genetically inherited traits

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      Authors: DeMartini E; Browman H.
      Pages: 593 - 599
      Abstract: AbstractWhat follows is a look back over a long and productive career and avocation in a field that I love, but one that has also been struck occasionally by personal tragedy, including the loss of my father at an early age, the unexpected death of my beloved wife and life partner in 2010, and a stroke in 2020 that has left me partially disabled. But impactful events can be serendipitous in prompting productive research. The lesson learned by such experiences is that opportunities—and the self-imposed responsibilities—to make positive contributions to the world, and to thereby honor the memories of those lost, continue beyond such events. The lessons I have learned along the way should inspire others at the start of and during their own personal life trajectories, particularly in developing the ability to recognize and appreciate opportunities for mentorship and to inspire emerging scholars and junior researchers to both respond to such opportunities to be mentored and subsequently to be mentors themselves. Everyone, especially students and junior scientists, in particular those who will become resource managers, should realize that they are links in a chain—an important one connecting the past and the future! My goal herein is to use my story to advise students and young scientists, and remind my older colleagues, of the importance of keeping this perspective as they go forward. I have tried to weave this message together with justification for motivation.
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsac022
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Narrowing the gap between marine spatial planning aspirations and
           realities

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      Authors: Zuercher R; Motzer N, Magris R, et al.
      Pages: 600 - 608
      Abstract: AbstractMany coastal nations have embraced marine spatial planning (MSP) as a solution to maintaining ecological integrity of marine environments, while ensuring continued provisioning of economic, social, and cultural benefits. However, evidence supporting the idea that plans achieve—or are likely to achieve—these goals is limited. One gap in our understanding stems from questions surrounding the metrics against which MSP success is measured. Evaluation can be based on explicitly stated objectives, or might include metrics corresponding to broad social–ecological goals. This paper compares aspirational MSP goals gleaned from a literature review to the objectives extracted from 50+ finalized and implemented plans to better understand: (1) how well these two groupings align, and (2) in what ways any misalignment may shape MSP evaluation. Findings show that plans prioritize the environment, economy, and governance, while often excluding objectives related to cultural heritage, human well-being, Indigenous rights, human safety, and climate change. Social and cultural objectives have become more prevalent over time, yet overall stated objectives remain distinct from theorized MSP goals. As international efforts aim to expand MSP, narrowing the gap between how it is perceived and how its outcomes are evaluated is critical to better understanding what it is likely to achieve.
      PubDate: Mon, 21 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsac009
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Quantitative uncertainty estimation in biophysical models of fish larval
           connectivity in the Florida Keys

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      Authors: Chaput R; Sochala P, Miron P, et al.
      Pages: 609 - 632
      Abstract: AbstractThe impacts of seven uncertain biological parameters on simulated larval connectivity in the Florida Keys are investigated using Polynomial chaos surrogates. These parameters describe biological traits and behaviours—such as mortality, swimming abilities, and orientation—and modulate larval settlement as well as dispersal forecasts. However, these parameters are poorly constrained by observations and vary naturally between individual larvae. The present investigation characterizes these input uncertainties with probability density functions informed by previous studies of Abudefduf saxatilis. The parametric domain is sampled via ensemble calculations, then a polynomial-based surrogate is built to explicitly approximate the dependence of the model outputs on the uncertain model inputs, which enables a robust statistical analysis of uncertainties. This approach allows the computation of probabilistic dispersal kernels that are further analyzed to understand the impact of the parameter uncertainties. We find that the biological input parameters influence the connectivity differently depending on dispersal distance and release location. The global sensitivity analysis shows that the interactions between detection distance threshold, orientation ontogeny, and orientation accuracy, are the dominant contributors to the uncertainty in settlement abundance in the Florida Keys. Uncertainties in swimming speed and mortality, on the other hand, seem to contribute little to dispersal uncertainty.
      PubDate: Wed, 02 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsac021
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Vulnerability of marine resources affected by a small-scale tropical
           shrimp fishery in Northeast Brazil

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      Authors: Lira A; Le Loc'h F, Andrade H, et al.
      Pages: 633 - 647
      Abstract: AbstractTropical fisheries tend to be multispecies and require management approaches adapted to high diversity but scarce and poorly informative data. Productivity and Susceptibility Analysis-PSA is particularly useful where catch or biological data are incomplete, aggregated across species or insufficient for quantitative stock assessment. We applied PSA to estimate vulnerability and potential risk to target and non-target species caught by the small-scale shrimp fishery in northeast Brazil, adapting the method to regional conditions and incorporating an assessment of uncertainties caused by its subjective choices. Our findings suggest that non-target species can be more vulnerable than target ones. Bagre marinus, Pseudobatos percellens, Micropogonias furnieri, Hypanus guttatus, Macrodon ancylodon, Polydactylus virginicus, Rhizoprionodon porosus, Cynoscion virescens, Larimus breviceps, and Menticirrhus americanus, were the top 10 species potentially at risk due to their low productivity (long lifespans, low spawning), high capture rates of juveniles and overlap of feeding and breeding grounds with fishing areas. Most species (76%) maintained the same risk category (low, moderate, or high) regardless of the score weighting or productivity and susceptibility attribute boundaries applied. Overall, the target species are not currently the main ones threatened, but bycatch such as elasmobranchs, catfishes and Scianidae should be prioritized for assessment and data collection.
      PubDate: Thu, 10 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsac004
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Aerial detection of beached marine plastic using a novel, hyperspectral
           short-wave infrared (SWIR) camera

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      Authors: Cocking J; Narayanaswamy B, Waluda C, et al.
      Pages: 648 - 660
      Abstract: AbstractPlastic pollution in the marine environment is a pervasive, global problem that threatens wildlife and human health. Routine monitoring is required to determine pollution hotspots, focus clean-up efforts, and assess the efficacy of legislation implemented to reduce environmental contamination. The shoreline represents an accessible area, relative to open water, from which to monitor this. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) offer a low-cost platform for remote sensing that operates below cloud coverage, which can interfere with satellite imagery. Detection of plastic using visible light is limited however, and results may be improved by using short-wave infrared (SWIR) imagery to collect chemical information. Within the commercial recycling industry, plastic items are sorted successfully based on their composition using SWIR instrumentation that measures the chemical spectra of waste items under controlled illumination. Here, proof of concept is established for aerial detection of domestic and shoreline-harvested plastic items on a beach under natural sunlight with a lightweight (800 g), hyperspectral SWIR camera deployed at an altitude of ∼ 5 m over ∼ 30-m transects. The results of spectral correlation mapping to compare imagery spectra to polyethylene and polypropylene reference spectra demonstrate that these two polymers can be successfully detected with this novel method.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsac006
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Potential effects of management options on marine recreational fisheries
           – the example of the western Baltic cod fishery

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      Authors: Haase K; Weltersbach M, Lewin W, et al.
      Pages: 661 - 676
      Abstract: AbstractGlobally, marine recreational fishing is a popular activity that contributes substantially to fishing mortality for some stocks and therefore should be considered in stock assessments and fisheries management. Using the example of the German western Baltic Sea recreational cod fishery, this study examines the effects of the first-time introduction of a bag limit on a previously largely unregulated marine recreational fishery. Furthermore, the study simulates and compares effects of different bag limits, seasonal closures, minimum length, and harvest slot limits to inform scientists, stakeholders, and managers about alternative management strategies and their potential effects on the fishery. After the first-time introduction of the bag limit, recreational removals decreased more than expected and the fishing participation slightly declined. The simulations showed that management measures adapted to the fishing methods reduced recreational removals but with different effects on cod length distributions and angler welfare. A combination of a high bag limit, seasonal closure and size/slot limits were most suitable for limiting cod removals with minimal impacts on angler welfare. This study demonstrates that recreational fisheries management measures need to be evaluated considering fishing methods and angler preferences before their implementation to avoid unexpected biological, social, and economic consequences.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsac012
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Identifying species complexes based on spatial and temporal clustering
           from joint dynamic species distribution models

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      Authors: Omori K; Thorson J, Bartolino V.
      Pages: 677 - 688
      Abstract: AbstractData-limited species are often grouped into a species complex to simplify management. Commonalities between species that may indicate if species can be adequately managed as a complex include the following: shared habitat utilization (e.g., overlapping fine-scale spatial distribution), synchrony in abundance trends, consistent fishing pressure or gear susceptibility, or life history parameters resulting in similar productivity. Using non-target rockfish species in the Gulf of Alaska as a case study, we estimate spatial and temporal similarities among species to develop species complexes using the vector autoregressive spatio-temporal (VAST) model, which is a joint dynamic species distribution model. Species groupings are identified using Ward's hierarchical cluster analysis based on spatial and temporal species correlations. We then compare the spatial and temporal groupings with cluster analysis groupings that use exploitation and life history characteristics data. Based on the results, we conclude that there are some rockfish species that consistently group together, but the arrangement and number of clusters differ slightly depending on the data used. Developing species complexes for fisheries management requires a variety of analytical approaches including species distribution models and cluster analyses, and these can be applied across the full extent of available data sources.
      PubDate: Thu, 17 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsac015
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Re-thinking the “ecological envelope” of Eastern Baltic cod (Gadus
           

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      Authors: Svedäng H; Savchuk O, Villnäs A, et al.
      Pages: 689 - 708
      Abstract: AbstractHypoxia is presently seen as the principal driver behind the decline of the former dominating Eastern Baltic cod stock (EBC; Gadus morhua). It has been proposed that both worsening conditions for reproduction and lower individual growth, condition, and survival are linked to hypoxia. Here, we elucidate the ecological envelope of EBC in terms of salinity stratification, oxygen content, and benthic animal biomasses, and how it has affected EBC productivity over time. The spawning conditions started deteriorating in the Gotland Deep in the 1950s due to oxygen depletion. In contrast, in the Bornholm Basin, hydrographic conditions have remained unchanged over the last 60 years. Indeed, the current extent of both well-oxygenated areas and the frequency of hypoxia events do not differ substantially from periods with high EBC productivity in the 1970s–1980s. Furthermore, oxygenated and therefore potentially suitable feeding areas are abundant in all parts of the Baltic Sea, and our novel analysis provides no evidence of a reduction in benthic food sources for EBC over the last 30 years. We find that while reproduction failure is intricately linked to hydrographic dynamics, a relationship between the spread of hypoxia and the decline in EBC productivity during the last decades cannot be substantiated.
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsac017
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Carrying capacity of Saccharina latissima cultivation in a Dutch coastal
           bay: a modelling assessment

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      Authors: Jiang L; Blommaert L, Jansen H, et al.
      Pages: 709 - 721
      Abstract: AbstractKelp cultivation receives increasing interest for its high-value products and ecological services, especially in Europe and North America. Before industrial kelp farming in marine ecosystems continue to scale up, evaluation of the site-wide production relative to ecological carrying capacity (CC) of the identified system is essential. For this purpose, a mechanistic kelp model was developed and applied for hypothetical numerical experiments of expanding the farming area in a Dutch coastal bay (the Eastern Scheldt), where cultivation of Saccharina latissima (sugar kelp) is emerging. The kelp model was implemented within a three-dimensional hydrodynamic–biogeochemical model to account for the environmental interactions. The model captured the seasonal growth dynamics of S. latissima, as well as its carbon and nitrogen contents measured at the Eastern Scheldt pilot sites. The model results suggest that expanding the kelp farming area to ∼1–30% of the bay (representing ∼3.4–75 kt harvest dry weight in the 350-km2 bay) had the potential to weaken the spring bloom, and thereby affected the coexisting shellfish culture in the bay. Competition between S. latissima and phytoplankton mostly occurred in late spring for nutrients (dissolved inorganic nitrogen). The ecological CC should be weighed according to these negative impacts. However, the production CC was not reached even when farming ∼30% of the Eastern Scheldt, i.e. harvesting totally 75 kt dry mass, given that the simulated overall S. latissima production kept increasing with the farming activity. Our modelling approach can be applied to other systems for S. latissima cultivation and assist in assessing CC and environmental impacts.
      PubDate: Thu, 24 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsac023
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Contribution of marine zooplankton time series to the United Nations
           Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development

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      Authors: Pitois S; Yebra L, Browman H.
      Pages: 722 - 726
      Abstract: AbstractZooplankton play a central role in marine trophic webs, influencing both biogeochemistry and productivity of the oceans. Changes in their communities are important indicators of overall ecosystem health and global change impacts. With increasing exploitation and pressures on the marine environment, there is a growing need for high-resolution monitoring of marine zooplankton to provide detailed information about seasonal to decadal changes at local, regional, and global scales. This crucial knowledge is gathered mainly through long-term time series, which are key to characterizing and forecasting changes in marine zooplankton assemblages. In this Introduction, and through the articles included in this Themed Article Set, we bring together new insights, issuing from data time series, into zooplankton population dynamics. We also take up the application of such time series to the understanding of global change impacts on marine ecosystems and in providing advice on sustainable management of marine ecosystem resources and services. We highlight the importance of maintaining and supporting long-term marine zooplankton time series as key contributors to the development and advancement of the United Nations’ Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development Goal 13-Climate action and Goal 14-Life below water.
      PubDate: Tue, 29 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsac048
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Seasonality and interannual variability of copepods in the Western English
           Channel, Celtic Sea, Bay of Biscay, and Cantabrian Sea with a special
           emphasis to Calanus helgolandicus and Acartia clausi

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      Authors: Valdés L; López-Urrutia A, Beaugrand G, et al.
      Pages: 727 - 740
      Abstract: AbstractA total of five mesozooplankton time series data sets were assembled to compare the seasonal and interannual patterns of abundance of calanoid copepods in the Western English Channel (Station L4), Celtic Sea, Bay of Biscay (Continuous Plankton Recorder), and the Cantabrian Sea (RADIALES time series, Santander, St-4 and St-6) from January 1992 to December 1999. A strong seasonal component in taxonomic composition was detected at the locations considered. There was also a strong latitudinal effect on diversity at each location, southernmost locations being more diverse. The seasonal dynamics and year-to-year variability of two copepod species: Calanus helgolandicus and Acartia clausi were studied in detail. A latitudinal pattern in the seasonal cycles of both copepod species was observed. The peaks of both occur earlier in spring in the warmer southern region and move northwards, consistent with the temperature regimes at each location, supporting the broad concept that species occupy a thermal niche in time as well as in space. There was a strong degree of interannual variability between sites and between species. No clear trends, but some coherent events among data sets, reveal a regional response to environmental forcing factors. Correlations suggest possible connections with environmental indices like the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Gulf Stream North Wall index. There was a positive correlation between the NAO and the abundance of C. helgolandicus at station L4 off Plymouth; however, the relationship in the Celtic Sea and Bay of Biscay was opposite to that expected based on previous results. Despite the differences in the sampling techniques used within each dataset, the results are comparable and coherent in terms of taxonomic composition and the seasonal and interannual patterns detected.
      PubDate: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsac052
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Calanus finmarchicus basin scale life history traits and role in community
           carbon turnover during spring

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      Authors: Jónasdóttir S; Naustvoll L, Teglhus F, et al.
      Pages: 785 - 802
      Abstract: AbstractThe copepod Calanus finmarchicus was investigated in four Subpolar Basins, Labrador, Irminger, Iceland, and Norwegian Seas, during spring, covering the time of ascent, grazing, and initiation of reproduction in the area. Lipid content, spawning activity, and stage composition and vital rates, such as egg and faecal pellet production were measured and linked to environmental parameters. Specific egg- and faecal pellet production rates varied with diatom biomass and were negatively correlated with temperature. Comparison of the various biological indicators revealed different life history traits C. finmarchicus has adopted in the different basins. In Labrador Sea, the females have invested in large eggs compared to the remaining basins. Labrador and Irminger Sea C. finmarchicus invest in size that we propose to be adaptation to cope with warmer overwintering habitats resulting in larger potential lipid storage capacity, while the Iceland and Norwegian Sea females can invest their remaining lipid storage in spring to fuel lipid-driven egg production. Grazing pressure on the phytoplankton community was estimated and compared between copepod and two dominating groups of protozooplankton; ciliates and heterotrophic dinoflagellates. Despite approximately the same biomass in the upper 100 m, the grazing impact of the protozoan grazers was an order of magnitude higher than the C. finmarchicus dominated mesozooplankton. This illustrates the importance to also include the smallest grazers when studying the spring bloom in high latitude marine ecosystems if the fate of the primary production should be fully understood.
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsac013
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Surface aggregations of Calanus finmarchicus during the polar night

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      Authors: Espinasse B; Daase M, Halvorsen E, et al.
      Pages: 803 - 814
      Abstract: AbstractWhile marine ecosystems in polar areas were thought to be mostly inactive during the polar night, recent observations in the Arctic highlight that dynamic biological interactions occur across all trophic levels. One particularly interesting observation made repeatedly is the occurrence of Calanus finmarchicus, a key species at the base of the food web, in the upper part of the water column in early January. This contrasts with the confirmed life cycle of this copepod, which predicts descent to overwintering depths in autumn and ascent at the end of the winter. Here, we compiled 6 years of data from the polar night to explore this unusual behaviour and to investigate the underlying mechanisms that may cause these surface aggregations. Highest abundance of C. finmarchicus in surface waters was closely related to Polar Surface Water in the vicinity of the sea ice edge. A total of six hypotheses are assessed to explain this distribution pattern, which includes passive transport and active behaviour as a way to improve survival chances or food access. In the context of climate change and sea ice decrease, the presence of lipid-rich copepods in cold surface waters could be a key parameter in driving the spatial distributions of top predators in the Arctic.
      PubDate: Wed, 16 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsac030
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Publisher's note: Inter-annual and decadal variability of Calanus
           finmarchicus and C. hyperboreus in Subarctic waters north of Iceland
           1990–2020

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      Pages: 829 - 829
      Abstract: Please note that the article “Inter-annual and decadal variability of Calanus finmarchicus and C. hyperboreus in Subarctic waters north of Iceland 1990–2020,” https://doi.org/10.1093/icesjms/fsab218, was originally intended to appear in this location.
      PubDate: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsac068
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Shifts in neritic copepod communities off the Basque coast (southeastern
           Bay of Biscay) between 1998 and 2015

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      Authors: Iriarte A; Villate F, Uriarte I, et al.
      Pages: 830 - 843
      Abstract: AbstractThe interannual variations in absolute and relative densities of copepods from the neritic waters of the southeastern Bay of Biscay and their relationship to climate teleconnections and local environmental factors were assessed using time series for the 1998–2015 period. Opposite patterns of variation of the absolute densities of spring Acartia clausi and Centropages typicusspecies vs. summer/autumn species, mainly Oncaea media, but also Ditrichocorycaeus anglicus, Oithona nana, Temora stylifera, and Oithona plumifera were detected. This type of opposite patterns were also observed between the relative densities of the spring A. clausi and summer Paracalanus parvus species. These opposite density patterns were positively correlated to all seasons North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), spring East Atlantic pattern (EA), summer and autumn water temperature and summer chlorophyll a. They were negatively correlated to summer EA pattern, the winter and spring Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and water temperature, and the upwelling index of all seasons. In these patterns of copepod variation two regime shifts were detected, one in 2008 towards an increase in the spring species and the other one in 2014–2015 towards an increase of summer species. This latter regime shift coincides in time with the abrupt community shifts predicted in the literature for 2014.
      PubDate: Sat, 22 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsab265
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Copepod habitat suitability estimates vary among oxygen metrics in
           Chesapeake Bay

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      Authors: Pierson J; Testa J, Roman M, et al.
      Pages: 855 - 867
      Abstract: AbstractSeasonal deoxygenation in coastal and estuarine systems leads to decreased available habitat for many planktonic organisms. However, the volume of available habitat can be defined in different ways, depending on the oxygen metrics employed. Here, we used monitoring data for water quality to estimate the seasonal and inter-annual variability in habitat for the copepod Acartia tonsa in Chesapeake Bay, defined using three different oxygen metrics: a concentration-based (2 mg l−1) definition of hypoxia, and two partial pressure-based definitions corresponding to limiting oxygen demand (Pcrit), and the minimum requirement for respiration (Pleth). We examined spatial and temporal trends in the oxygen habitat, and compared habitat estimates to zooplankton abundance and distribution and in relation to hydrologically wet, average, and dry years. Pcrit predicted the largest volume of unsuitable deoxygenated habitat over space and time, and dry conditions were associated with a decreased extent of deoxygenated habitat compared to average and wet conditions. No clear relationship between copepod abundance and habitat availability was observed, but the position of peak abundance of A. tonsa correlated to the extent of deoxygenated habitat using Pcrit. Species-specific metrics to describe oxygen habitat may be more useful in understanding the non-lethal impacts of deoxygenation.
      PubDate: Thu, 17 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsac019
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Shifting seasonal timing of peak abundance of two invading ctenophore
           populations in the Black Sea during the period 1991–2017

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      Authors: Vereshchaka A; Shatravin A, Lunina A, et al.
      Pages: 954 - 962
      Abstract: AbstractFactors affecting zooplankton dynamics, especially in shelf-sea ecosystems such as the Black Sea influenced by eutrophication, overfishing, climate variability, and biological invaders, merit special attention for successful development and management. We used coherence functions (phase angle) to analyze time series (918 samples collected every 10 days) of the two invading ctenophores Mnemiopsis leidyi and Beroe ovata and mesoplankton (seven species) in 1991–2017. We observed a constant behavior of focal mesoplankton taxa (no shift of phase angle along the time axis) against such environmental benchmarks as surface temperature and surface chlorophyll concentration. Conversely, development of the ctenophore populations progressively accelerated (phase angle decreased) against both mesoplankton and environmental benchmarks. Mnemiopsis was leading this racing and followed by Beroe: (i) in 1991–1998 (before the Beroe invasion) peaks of Mnemiopsis were lagging by ∼1½ months temperature peaks; (ii) in 1998–2002 (Beroe appeared) Mnemiopsis peaks were shifting earlier in time and (iii) in 2002–2008 they became leading Beroe peaks by ∼1½ months; (iv) in 2009–2013, Beroe peaks were also shifting earlier in time, and (v) in 2013–2017, Beroe has shifted by ∼1½ months and became nearly in-phase with Mnemiopsis. Our results provide a deeper insight into adaptive strategies of invading ctenophores and enable prognoses of ctenophore blooms.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsac018
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Investigations into the relationship between domoic acid and copepods in
           Scottish waters

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      Authors: Cook K; Lacaze J, Machairopoulou M, et al.
      Pages: 963 - 973
      Abstract: AbstractThis study investigated impacts of the algal toxin domoic acid (DA) on copepods in Scottish waters. Inspection of seasonal patterns revealed that several common copepods (Acartia spp. Dana, 1846, Calanus spp. Leach, 1816, Centropages spp. Krøyer, 1849, Pseudocalanus spp. Boeck, 1872, and Temora longicornis (Müller O.F., 1785)) regularly coexist with potentially toxic species from the diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia H. Peragallo in H. Peragallo and M Peragallo, 1900. A short field study investigating the DA content of Calanus spp. at the Scottish Coastal Observatory site at Stonehaven recorded DA during every sampling event. The highest DA levels were associated with a July bloom (∼135000 cells L−1) of Pseudo-nitzschia cf. plurisecta Orive & Pérez-Aicua 2013. Several studies have previously investigated effects of ingested DA on copepods but information on effects of dissolved DA is lacking, therefore, simple exposure experiments were carried out to measure mortality of copepod species at ecologically relevant concentrations of dissolved DA. The highest concentrations tested (≥ 50 ng DA mL−1) decreased survival in Temora longicornis only; survival of other copepod species was unaffected. However, T. longicornis feeding on non-toxic algae in the presence of dissolved DA did not accumulate DA in their tissue. This study provides evidence of the potential for Calanus spp. to act as vectors for DA to higher trophic levels in Scottish waters.
      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsab263
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Drivers of variation in crustacean zooplankton production rates differ
           across regions off the west coast of Vancouver Island and in the subarctic
           NE Pacific

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      Authors: Venello T; Sastri A, Suchy K, et al.
      Pages: 741 - 760
      Abstract: AbstractThe subarctic NE Pacific is comprised of several oceanographic regimes, in which regional variability in sea surface temperature (SST), satellite chlorophyll a, and crustacean zooplankton biomass influence the production rates of crustacean zooplankton. Traditional methods for estimating zooplankton production rates are labour/time intensive and restricted to select copepod species. A practical field alternative is the ‘chitobiase method’, which yields community-level biomass production rates (BPR) analogous to traditional moulting rate methods. BPR was measured along the west coast of Vancouver Island and in the subarctic NE Pacific during 2005, 2009–2011, and 2015–2018. Generalized additive modelling identified SST and the developing crustacean zooplankton biomass as key drivers of BPR variability. BPR varied positively with the proportion of developing copepod biomass relative to that of non-copepod crustacean zooplankton biomass. Our analysis indicates that BPR variation is associated with zooplankton community composition, but that high zooplankton biomass is not necessarily predictive of high BPR. Specifically, higher BPR is associated with a higher relative biomass of large-bodied, cold-water indicator species, and a lower biomass of non-copepod crustaceans.
      PubDate: Sat, 27 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsab236
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Effects of a marine heatwave on adult body length of three numerically
           dominant krill species in the California Current Ecosystem

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      Authors: Killeen H; Dorman J, Sydeman W, et al.
      Pages: 761 - 774
      Abstract: AbstractKrill are an abundant and globally distributed forage taxon in marine ecosystems, including the California Current Ecosystem (CCE). The role of krill in trophodynamics depends on both abundance and size (biomass), but the impact of extreme climate events on krill body size is poorly understood. Using samples collected from 2011 to 2018, we tested the hypotheses that adult body length of three krill species (Euphausia pacifica, Thysanoessa spinifera, and Nematoscelis difficilis) declined during the 2014–2016 Northeast Pacific marine heatwave/El Niño event due to elevated seawater temperatures, reduced upwelling, and low primary productivity. Hierarchical mixed-effects modelling showed that mean length of adult E. pacifica and T. spinifera declined and N. difficilis length increased during 2015. These trends differed by sex and reverted to a pre-heatwave state in 2016. Temperature, upwelling, and food availability (chlorophyll-a content) did not explain decreased length in 2015, but environmental drivers of length varied regionally and by sex across all years. This study documents the impact of a major marine heatwave (MHW) on adult krill length in one of the world's major upwelling systems and indicates how pelagic ecosystems may respond to increasingly frequent MHWs.
      PubDate: Wed, 10 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsab215
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Drivers of variability of Calanus finmarchicus in the Gulf of Maine: roles
           of internal production and external exchange

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      Authors: Ji R; Runge J, Davis C, et al.
      Pages: 775 - 784
      Abstract: AbstractThe lipid-rich calanoid copepod, Calanus finmarchicus, plays a critical role in the Gulf of Maine pelagic food web. Despite numerous studies over the last several decades, a clear picture of variability patterns and links with key environmental drivers remains elusive. This study applies model-based scaling and sensitivity analyses to a regional plankton dataset collected over the last four decades (1977–2017). The focus is to describe the gulf-wide spatio-temporal patterns across three major basins, and to assess the relative roles of internal population dynamics and external exchanges. For the spring stock, there is strong synchrony of interannual variability among three basins. This variability is largely driven by internal population dynamics rather than external exchanges, and the internal population dynamics are more sensitive to the change of top-down mortality regime than the bottom-up forcings. For the fall stock, the synchrony among basins weakens, and the variability is influenced by both internal mortality and external dilution loss. There appears to be no direct connection between the spring stock with either the preceding or subsequent fall stock, suggesting seasonal or sub-seasonal scales of population variability and associated drivers. The results highlight seasonally varying drivers responsible for population variability, including previously less recognized top-down control.
      PubDate: Fri, 13 Aug 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsab147
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Environmental effects on Calanus finmarchicus abundance and depth
           distribution in the Barents Sea

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      Authors: Kvile K; Prokopchuk I, Stige L, et al.
      Pages: 815 - 828
      Abstract: AbstractThe vertical migrations performed by zooplankton at daily and seasonal scales are important for marine ecosystem dynamics and biogeochemical cycles. We analysed associations between seasonal variation in abundance and depth distribution of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus and temperature and predation pressure from visual (capelin and herring) and non-visual (ctenophores) predators, using data from a > 30-year survey in the southwestern Barents Sea. Calanus finmarchicus abundances were significantly reduced in upper waters with increased capelin biomass, possibly due to a combination of predation mortality and active avoidance of the upper layer. The weighted mean depth of Calanus finmarchicus tended to become shallower, and abundances in deeper layers lower, with a high probability of ctenophore occurrence, possibly due to a predation effect at depth. Temperature influenced the seasonal timing of Calanus finmarchicus, but appeared less important for depth distribution. This study illustrates how climate-driven changes in the physical and biological environment can influence the seasonal and vertical distribution of zooplankton, which has major implications for the flow of energy and nutrients in marine ecosystems.
      PubDate: Wed, 18 Aug 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsab133
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Environmental drivers of a decline in a coastal zooplankton community

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      Authors: Wells S; Bresnan E, Cook K, et al.
      Pages: 844 - 854
      Abstract: AbstractMajor changes in North Atlantic zooplankton communities in recent decades have been linked to climate change but the roles of environmental drivers are often complex. High temporal resolution data is required to disentangle the natural seasonal drivers from additional sources of variability in highly heterogeneous marine systems. Here, physical and plankton abundance data spanning 2003–2017 from a weekly long-term monitoring site on the west coast of Scotland were used to investigate the cause of an increasing decline to approximately -80± 5% in annual average total zooplankton abundance from 2011 to 2017. Generalized additive mixed models (GAMMs), with an autoregressive correlation structure, were used to examine seasonal and inter-annual trends in zooplankton abundance and their relationship with environmental variables. Substantial declines were detected across all dominant taxa, with ∼ 30–70% of the declines in abundance explained by a concurrent negative trend in salinity, alongside the seasonal cycle, with the additional significance of food availability found for some taxa. Temperature was found to drive seasonal variation but not the long-term trends in the zooplankton community. The reduction in salinity had the largest effect on several important taxa. Salinity changes could partly be explained by locally higher freshwater run-off driven by precipitation as well as potential links to changes in offshore water masses. The results highlight that changes in salinity, caused by either freshwater input (expected from climate predictions) or fresher offshore water masses, may adversely impact coastal zooplankton communities and the predators that depend on them.
      PubDate: Fri, 10 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsab177
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Bycatch data from ichthyoplankton surveys reveal long-term trends in
           gelatinous zooplankton in the Norwegian and Barents Seas

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      Authors: Yaragina N; Stige L, Langangen Ø, et al.
      Pages: 868 - 881
      Abstract: ABSTRACTGelatinous zooplankton play important roles as consumers in marine food webs, but the spatial and temporal dynamics of them are difficult to quantify because their fragility makes accurate sampling by traditional gears challenging. As a result, accurately quantified long-term data series targeting this group are scarce. To shed light on the dynamics of three groups of gelatinous zooplankton (medusae, ctenophores, and chaetognaths), we present and analyse time-series on frequency of occurrence and a relative index of abundance for each group recorded as bycatch in ichthyoplankton surveys. The time-series represent two areas (southwestern Barents Sea and northeastern Norwegian Sea), two seasons (spring and summer), and a 35-years period (1959–1993). Results suggest that occurrences of medusae and ctenophores increased from spring to summer in ocean shelf areas, whereas chaetognaths were ubiquitous in both seasons with highest abundance in oceanic areas. Spring occurrences correlated positively with summer occurrences for medusae and chaetognaths but not ctenophores, implying longest prediction horizon for the two first groups. The occurrence of medusae, but not ctenophores and chaetognaths, was consistently higher in warm than cold years. These results suggest that the occurrence and potentially the role of medusae in this arcto-boreal environment is most profound in warm periods.
      PubDate: Fri, 12 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsab225
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Temporal fluctuations in zooplankton size, abundance, and taxonomic
           composition since 1995 in the North Western Mediterranean Sea

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      Authors: Feuilloley G; Fromentin J, Saraux C, et al.
      Pages: 882 - 900
      Abstract: AbstractIn the Gulf of Lions, small pelagic fish have shown reduced body size and body condition after 2007 that would result from changes in zooplankton community. We therefore examined zooplankton density, body size, and taxonomic composition at the closest long-term monitoring station (1995–2019): the coastal Point-B. To cover a broader spectrum of zooplankton community, samples obtained from two nets, the WP2 (200 µm mesh size) and the Regent (690 µm), were analysed with the imaging Zooscan method. One important result was the high stability through time of the zooplankton community. No long-term monotonous trends in density, size, and taxonomic composition were detected. Interannual variations in zooplankton size and density were not significantly correlated to any environmental variable, suggesting the possible importance of biotic interactions. Still, an increase in temperature was followed by a sharp decrease of zooplankton density in 2015, after which only gelatinous groups recovered. No change in the zooplankton community was detected around 2007 to support bottom-up control on small pelagic fish. Whether this derives from different local processes between the Gulf of Lions and the Ligurian Sea cannot be excluded, highlighting the need for simultaneous monitoring of different ecosystem compartments to fully understand the impact of climate change.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsab190
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Plankton monitoring in the Northwest Atlantic: a comparison of zooplankton
           abundance estimates from vertical net tows and Continuous Plankton
           Recorder sampling on the Scotian and Newfoundland shelves, 1999–2015

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      Authors: Head E; Johnson C, Pepin P, et al.
      Pages: 901 - 916
      Abstract: AbstractAssessment of zooplankton abundance, distribution, community composition, and temporal variability is critical to understanding the effects of climate variability and change on lower trophic level production and availability for consumption by larger consumers. Zooplankton sampling is performed across the Canadian continental shelf system by Fisheries and Oceans Canada's Atlantic Zone Monitoring Programme (AZMP). Sampling includes semi-monthly to monthly collection of zooplankton using vertical net tows (VNTs) deployed from near-bottom to surface at stations on the central Scotian Shelf (Stn 2, 150 m depth) and Newfoundland Shelf (Stn 27, 175 m depth), and by Continuous Plankton Recorders (CPRs) in the near-surface layers along routes over the Scotian and Newfoundland shelves (0–10 m depth). Here, we compare abundance metrics for 11 copepod taxa collected using both gear types in both regions between 1999 and 2015. Seasonal cycles of VNT and CPR abundance were similar for near-surface residents. VNT: CPR abundance ratios varied year-round for vertical migrants, as ontogenetic migrants shifted their vertical distribution, and as diel migrants changed their migratory behaviour. For some taxa, differences in annual average VNT: CPR abundance ratios between regions suggest differences in vertical distribution, while for others differences in inter-annual variability for VNT and CPR abundances suggest differences in the dynamics of the near- and sub-surface components of the populations.
      PubDate: Sat, 30 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsab208
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Linking zooplankton time series to the fossil record

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      Authors: Jonkers L; Meilland J, Rillo M, et al.
      Pages: 917 - 924
      Abstract: AbstractMarine zooplankton time series are crucial to understand the dynamics of pelagic ecosystems. However, most observational time series are only a few decades long, which limits our understanding of long-term zooplankton dynamics, renders attribution of observed trends to global change ambiguous, and hampers prediction of future response to environmental change. Planktonic foraminifera are calcifying marine zooplankton that have the unique potential to substantially extend our view on plankton dynamics because their skeletal remains are preserved for millions of years in deep-sea sediments. Thus, linking sedimentary and modern time series offers great potential to study zooplankton dynamics across time scales not accessible by direct observations. However, this link is rarely made and the potential of planktonic foraminifera for advancing our understanding of zooplankton dynamics remains underexploited. This underutilization of this potential to bridge time scales is mainly because of the lack of collaboration between biologists, who have mostly focused on other (zoo)plankton, and micropalaeontologists, who have focussed too narrowly on fossil foraminifera. With this food for thought article, we aim to highlight the unique potential of planktonic foraminifera to bridge the gap between biology and geology. We strongly believe that such collaboration has large benefits to both scientific communities.
      PubDate: Wed, 07 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsab123
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Optimising sampling frequency for monitoring heterotrophic protists in a
           marine ecosystem

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      Authors: Lehtiniemi M; Fileman E, Hällfors H, et al.
      Pages: 925 - 936
      Abstract: AbstractHeterotrophic protists are essential components of the marine ecosystem, yet they are often excluded from monitoring programmes. With limited resources, monitoring strategies need to be optimised considering both scientific knowledge and available resources. In doing so, it is crucial to understand how sampling frequency affects the value of the data. We analysed 11 years of weekly heterotrophic protist time-series data from Station L4 in the Western English Channel to explore how different sampling intervals impact data quality. In the L4 dataset, comprising 55 protist taxa, the reduction of sampling frequency from weekly to four times a year at specific seasons decreased the number of taxa encountered by 38% for ciliates and 29% for heterotrophic dinoflagellates while the mean annual biomass or its mean variation were not affected. Furthermore, when samples were taken only four times a year, biomass peaks of the ten most important taxa were often missed. The primary motivator for this study was furthering the development of the heterotrophic protist monitoring in temperate and subarctic marine areas, e.g. the Baltic Sea. Based on our findings, we give recommendations on sampling frequency to optimise the value of heterotrophic protist monitoring.
      PubDate: Tue, 20 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsab132
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 3 (2021)
       
 
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