Subjects -> EARTH SCIENCES (Total: 771 journals)
    - EARTH SCIENCES (527 journals)
    - GEOLOGY (94 journals)
    - GEOPHYSICS (33 journals)
    - HYDROLOGY (29 journals)
    - OCEANOGRAPHY (88 journals)

EARTH SCIENCES (527 journals)                  1 2 3 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 371 Journals sorted alphabetically
ACS Earth and Space Chemistry     Free   (Followers: 6)
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access  
Acta Geochimica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Acta Geodaetica et Geophysica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Acta Geológica Lilloana     Open Access  
Acta Geophysica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Acta Geotechnica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in High Energy Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Limnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances In Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Aquatic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
AGU Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Algological Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
All Earth     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Alpine Botany     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
AMBIO     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Anales del Instituto de la Patagonia     Open Access  
Andean geology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Annales Henri Poincaré     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Geophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Annals of GIS     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
Annual Review of Marine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Anthropocene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Anuário do Instituto de Geociências     Open Access  
Applied Clay Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Applied Computing and Geosciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Applied Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Applied Geomatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Applied Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Applied Ocean Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Applied Petrochemical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Arctic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
arktos : The Journal of Arctic Geosciences     Hybrid Journal  
Artificial Intelligence in Geosciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Artificial Satellites     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Asian Journal of Earth Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Asian Journal of Physical and Chemical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Review of Environmental and Earth Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Atlantic Geology : Journal of the Atlantic Geoscience Society / Atlantic Geology : revue de la Société Géoscientifique de l'Atlantique     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric and Climate Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
Australian Journal of Earth Sciences: An International Geoscience Journal of the Geological Society of Australia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Austrian Journal of Earth Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AWWA Water Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bonorowo Wetlands     Open Access  
Boreas: An International Journal of Quaternary Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Brill Research Perspectives in Map History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Earthquake Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Bulletin of Geosciences     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Bulletin of the Lebedev Physics Institute     Hybrid Journal  
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Bulletin of Volcanology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Canadian Mineralogist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Canadian Water Resources Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Carbonates and Evaporites     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
CATENA     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Chemical Geology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Chinese Geographical Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Ciencia del suelo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencias Espaciales     Open Access  
Climate and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Coastal Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Cogent Geoscience     Open Access  
Communications Earth & Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comptes Rendus : Geoscience     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Computational Geosciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Computational Mathematics and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Computers and Geotechnics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Continental Shelf Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Contributions to Plasma Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Coral Reefs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Cretaceous Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Depositional Record     Open Access  
Développement durable et territoires     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Diatom Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Doklady Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
E&S Engineering and Science     Open Access  
E3S Web of Conferences     Open Access  
Earth and Planetary Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Earth and Planetary Science Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 148)
Earth and Space Science     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Earth Interactions     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Earth Science Malaysia     Open Access  
Earth Science Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Earth Sciences Pakistan     Open Access  
Earth Sciences Research Journal     Open Access  
Earth Surface Dynamics (ESurf)     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Earth Surface Dynamics Discussions (ESurfD)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Earth Surface Processes and Landforms     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Earth System Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Earth System Dynamics Discussions     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Earth's Future     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Earth, Planets and Space     Open Access   (Followers: 78)
Earthquake Engineering and Engineering Vibration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Earthquake Research Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Earthquake Spectra     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Ecohydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Ecological Questions     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Electromagnetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Energy Efficiency     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Energy Exploration & Exploitation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Energy Geoscience     Open Access  
Environmental Earth Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Environmental Geology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Environmental Geosciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Environmental Geotechnics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Environmental Processes : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Erwerbs-Obstbau     Hybrid Journal  
Estuaries and Coasts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Estudios Geográficos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Mineralogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
European Journal of Remote Sensing     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Exploration Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Facies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
FIGEMPA : Investigación y Desarrollo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Física de la Tierra     Open Access  
Folia Musei rerum naturalium Bohemiae occidentalis. Geologica et Paleobiologica     Open Access  
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Frontiers in Earth Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Frontiers in Soil Science     Open Access  
Frontiers of Earth Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Fundamental and Applied Limnology / Archiv für Hydrobiologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
GEM - International Journal on Geomathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Geo-Marine Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Geoacta     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
GeoArabia     Hybrid Journal  
Geobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Geocarto International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Geochemical Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Geochemistry : Exploration, Environment, Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Geochronology (GChron)     Open Access  
Geochronometria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geoderma Regional : The International Journal for Regional Soil Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Geodynamics & Tectonophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Geoenvironmental Disasters     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Geofluids     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Geoforum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Geography and Natural Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
GeoHealth     Open Access  
Geoheritage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Geoinformatics & Geostatistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Geologia USP : Série Científica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geological Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Geological Magazine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Geology Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Geology, Geophysics and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Geomagnetism and Aeronomy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Geomatics, Natural Hazards and Risk     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Geomechanics and Geophysics for Geo-Energy and Geo-Resources     Hybrid Journal  
Geomechanics for Energy and the Environment     Full-text available via subscription  
GEOmedia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geomorphology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Geophysical & Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Geophysical Journal International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Geophysical Prospecting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Georisk: Assessment and Management of Risk for Engineered Systems and Geohazards     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Geoscience Canada : Journal of the Geological Association of Canada / Geoscience Canada : journal de l'Association Géologique du Canada     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Geoscience Communication     Open Access  
Geoscience Data Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Geoscience Frontiers     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Geoscience Letters     Open Access  
Geosciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Geosciences Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems Discussions     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geoscientific Model Development     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Geoscientific Model Development Discussions     Open Access  
Geostandards and Geoanalytical Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Geosystem Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Geosystems and Geoenvironment     Open Access  
Geotectonic Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Geotectonics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Glass Physics and Chemistry     Hybrid Journal  
Global and Planetary Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Global Biogeochemical Cycles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Gondwana Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
GPS Solutions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Grassland Science     Hybrid Journal  
Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Groundwater     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Groundwater for Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Helgoland Marine Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
History of Geo- and Space Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hydrobiologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Hydrogeology Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)

        1 2 3 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Anthropocene Review
Journal Prestige (SJR): 3.341
Citation Impact (citeScore): 7
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2053-0196 - ISSN (Online) 2053-020X
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Communication of solar geoengineering science: Forms, examples, and
           explanation of skewing

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jesse L Reynolds
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      Although a judicious use of solar radiation modification (SRM, or solar geoengineering) appears able to reduce climate change, SRM would create risks of its own. How results and conclusions are conveyed is important. This article describes nine cases in which scientific articles and their official press releases communicate results inaccurately: by inappropriately comparing SRM with a reference world of non-elevated greenhouse gas concentrations; focusing on the residual climatic anomalies that SRM would not entirely eliminate; generalizing a predictably harmful assumed implementation regime to all possible SRM; or reporting conclusions that the paper does not substantiate. Notably, each of these cases unduly amplifies SRM’s apparent risks and limitations. Collectively they may skew SRM communication and cause negative impacts on scientific assessments, news reporting, and policy discussions. The article suggests explanations for why SRM scientists and their official communicators sometimes inaccurately convey their results as well as how they and others should respond.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T04:35:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196221095569
       
  • Between fragility and resilience: Ambivalent images of nature in popular
           documentaries with David Attenborough

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      Authors: Evi Zemanek
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      Nature documentaries often present contradictory images of, on the one hand, a fragile nature that is threatened or already destroyed by humans and, on the other hand, a resilient nature that indifferently survives the human species. Similar ambivalences characterize the public discourse on “nature” in the Anthropocene. From the perspective of cultural and media studies, this essay attempts to disentangle the incoherencies in popular imaginaries of nature by exploring the challenges of narrating and picturing the two opposite qualities of vulnerability and resilience. Tracing the conceptual evolution of documentaries presented by David Attenborough between 1979 and 2020 and their gradual increase in environmentalist rhetoric, I show how different visual motifs undergo a recoding (resilient/fragile) and relate it to paradigm shifts in ecology, earth system science, and environmental protection principles. With an interest in the historical development of multimedia discourses on resilience and vulnerability, I focus on the relationship between visual and verbal representation as well as on the interplay of semantic and aesthetic aspects, while reflecting on whether the observed ambivalences are intentional and how they might influence the perception of the documentaries. This essay is a contribution to Transmedia Ecocriticism and thus situates itself in the Environmental Humanities.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T11:21:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196221093477
       
  • Energy transitions in the shadow of a dictator: Decarbonizing
           neoliberalism and lithium extraction in Chile

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      Authors: Donald V Kingsbury
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      The global economy’s neoliberal era began in 1973 with a military coup in Chile lead by General Augusto Pinochet. Though the country returned to civilian rule in 1990, the dictatorship continues to determine much of Chile’s political economy, especially in extractive sectors, a legacy that also carries consequences for decarbonization in the 21st century. As the latest stage of globalization, contemporary energy transitions offer an opportunity to examine the kind of global and local extractivisms established in the context of the dictatorship in Chile – an order that also accelerated the environmental impacts of the Anthropocene. Just as the Anthropocene is less a geological age defined by human activity as much as the compounding consequences of a relatively small segment of humanity, so too is neoliberalism traceable to specific people, histories, and institutions. This article traces these elements as Chile rewrites Pinochet’s constitution to highlight hopes and challenges of energy transitions as political, social, and ecological processes.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T06:21:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196221087790
       
  • Rights of nature, human species identity, and political thought in the
           anthropocene

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      Authors: Seth Epstein
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      While much has been written about the efforts in multiple jurisdictions to recognize nature and natural features as rightsholders, there has been relatively little research into the relationship of these Rights of Nature developments to the Anthropocene. This article uses historian Dipesh Chakrabarty’s argument for the adoption of a human species identity in the Anthropocene as a jumping off point to analyze how legal rights for nature, such as those enacted in the Ecuador and New Zealand, can help address what Chakrabarty identifies as the challenges the Anthropocene presents to contemporary political thought. These pressing challenges include how to politicize relations between humans and non-humans, extend justice and the sphere of human morality to non-humans, cope with human limitations on our abilities to represent non-humans, and to initiate a withdrawal from a human-dominated world that is a common though uneven legacy of imperialism, capitalism, and globalization. The article argues that by providing responses to these challenges, Rights of Nature laws may also further the development of a human species identity. However, it also qualifies this conclusion in several important regards. First, the more expansive of these protections, embracing all of nature within political boundaries and relying on a remedial approach to justice and broad notions of representation in fact may hinder the adoption of the kind of species identity for which Chakrabarty has called. Second, as a cosmopolitan identity, this identity may be inhibited by continued circumscription of Rights of Nature by notions of state sovereignty.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T06:16:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196221078929
       
  • Prospective technology assessment in the Anthropocene: A transition toward
           a culture of sustainability

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      Authors: Martin Möller, Rainer Grießhammer
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      In the Anthropocene, humankind has become a quasi-geological force. Both the rapid development as well as the depth of intervention of new technologies result in far-reaching and irreversible anthropogenic changes in the Earth’s natural system. However, early and development-accompanying evaluation of technologies are not yet common sense. Against this background, this review article aims to compile the current state of knowledge with regard to the early sustainability assessment of technologies and to classify this status quo with respect to the key challenges of the Anthropocene. To that end, the paper initially outlines major existing definitions and framings of the term of sustainability. Key milestones, concepts and instruments with regard to the development of sustainability assessment and technology assessment (TA) methodologies are also presented. Based on this overview, the energy sector is used as an example to discuss how mirroring ongoing transformation processes can contribute to the further development of the TA framework in order to ensure an agile, goal-oriented, and future-proof assessment system.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T06:41:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196221095700
       
  • Is our planet doubly alive' Gaia, globalization, and the
           Anthropocene’s planetary superorganisms

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      Authors: Boris Shoshitaishvili
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      The theory of the superorganism—that there exist composite forms of life organized at scales above the multicellular organism—has been part of scientific discourse and speculation since the late 1800s. Over the last century theories of the superorganism have grown in scope from designating the local insect colony as emergently alive to positing a global entity enveloping the entire planetary surface. The planetary version of superorganism theory has developed in two different forms, the ecological form of Gaia theory and the sociological form of globalized humankind, with the possible implication that the surface of our single planet is now occupied by two distinct planetary superorganisms. In this article, I summarize the parallel histories of this speculative biological-planetary concept, propose a theory about the relationship of the two coexisting planetary superorganisms, and reflect on how this theory recasts the global environmental challenges of the Anthropocene. I conclude with a note about simplistic or totalizing superorganism assertions.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T11:30:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196221087789
       
  • Who is the Anthropos in the Anthropocene'

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      Authors: Jason Martin Wirth
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      This is a series of three interwoven philosophical reflections on the identity of the anthropos in the Anthropocene. Who is this anthropos' I argue that it does not indict humanity as such but rather a certain way of being human. Moreover, this mode of being human does not extend to all human beings, but rather only to a fortunate few who disproportionately benefit from fossil capital. I respond to this crisis by considering philosophical and, for want of a better word, spiritual, resources in indigenous traditions as well as Zen.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T11:02:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196221088879
       
  • The record of sedimentary spheroidal carbonaceous particles (SCPs) in
           Beppu Bay, southern Japan, compared to historical trends of industrial
           activity and atmospheric pollution: Further evidence for SCPs as a marker
           for Anthropocene industrialization

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      Authors: Jun Inoue, Natsuko Takenaka, Takamoto Okudaira, Michinobu Kuwae
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      Spheroidal carbonaceous particles (SCPs) are carbonaceous fly ash particles produced solely from industrial fossil fuel combustion. SCPs in sediments can be an indicator of past industrialization. We examined the sedimentary SCP record in Beppu Bay, southern Japan, and compared this record to historical trends of industrial activity and monitoring data for atmospheric pollutions in the region. Beppu Bay has varved sediments in the absence of bioturbation, providing an ideal situation for SCP study. Our results show that the temporal variation of SCP deposition is consistent with the trends of industrial activity and the temporal variation of status of atmospheric pollution. We conclude that undisturbed sediments such as Beppu Bay sediments have SCP records that adequately represent historical trends of industrial activity and atmospheric pollution in detail. These findings support that SCPs are a potential marker for the Anthropocene, characterized by industrialization.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-12T10:32:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196221076577
       
  • Who’s gonna use this' Acceptance prediction of emerging technologies
           with Cognitive-Affective Mapping and transdisciplinary considerations in
           the Anthropocene

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      Authors: Sabrina Livanec, Michael Stumpf, Lisa Reuter, Julius Fenn, Andrea Kiesel
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      In the Anthropocene, mankind is facing enormous challenges. Science and technology obviously have an essential role to play in addressing these challenges but have to be supplemented by the collaboration of different actors from the scientific and non-scientific community. Possibly beneficial technologies can only unfold their full potential if they are socially accepted. Participation and transdisciplinarity are key concepts in this regard. The need for methods fostering collaborative knowledge production and reverse communication from the public to the scientific community is accordingly high. In this article, we propose to apply Cognitive-Affective Mapping (CAM) to predict psychological acceptance of novel research fields and potentially resulting technologies. As an example, we use life-like materials systems. CAM enables acceptance prediction at an early stage—already for basic research when prototypes are not yet available. The method bridges the gap between qualitative and quantitative research traditions. Its product—Cognitive-Affective Maps (CAMs)—is a vivid visual tool. In perspective, CAM-based technology acceptance assessment can be conceived as a participatory, transdisciplinary practice.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-03T11:36:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196221078924
       
  • Views from nowhere, somewhere and everywhere else: The tragedy of the
           horizon in the early Anthropocene

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      Authors: Bob Frame, Nicholas A Cradock-Henry
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      The ability to anticipate, plan for and adapt to the changes of the early Anthropocene is limited by human behaviour, political inertia, and short-termism. This ‘tragedy of the horizon’ is explored through three specific lenses on early Anthropocene futures. We begin with the dominant scientific evidence: mathematical and probabilistic modelling synthesised into increasingly rigorous and sophisticated scenarios for assessing policy options and broadening societal understanding. We then draw on the set of values, institutions, laws, and symbols through which people imagine their social whole in what Sheila Jasanoff describes as sociotechnical imaginaries. We also draw on institutional epistemologies as reflected in two global assessment initiatives: the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which has been described as a ‘view from nowhere’, and the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, a ‘view from everywhere’, though analysis has concluded that both organisations merely offer ‘views from somewhere’. We then present examples of other early Anthropocene imaginaries from writers, activists, and philosophers. The arc through these suggests both common themes and broad variation in underlying assumptions and world views. We argue that, especially in a post-truth world, a much richer form of (re)visioning the future is required in a project that must span far beyond the biophysical and include the full breadth of the social sciences and humanities. Without the inclusion of multiple underlying, competing, and creative long-term perspectives, society in general, and research in particular, may not adequately illuminate the complex possible future trajectories.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T09:10:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196211059199
       
  • Dune(s): Fiction, history, and science on the Oregon coast

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      Authors: Joana Gaspar de Freitas
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      What connects the sci-fi book Dune with coastal dunes and geoengineering' The answer lies in humans and their world-making activities. This paper proposes an innovative approach to coastal dunes as hybrid environments by analyzing the dunes stabilization programs developed on the US Pacific Coast. It looks into the shifting sands of the Oregon coast and how they influenced Frank Herbert to write his novel, why local communities and federal authorities were interested in fixing the moving dunes and how these works ended up having unexpected consequences. It explores how human features acting as forcing mechanisms on beach-dune systems caused changes that turned into controlling influences in their own right, creating new environments and concerns. The paper ends with a reflection on how fiction and the history of dunes can be used to critically think about the anthropocentric hubris of building futures by geoengineering the planet for environmental repair.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2021-12-31T05:39:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196211056814
       
  • Toward productive complicity: Applying ‘traditional ecological
           knowledge’ in environmental science

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      Authors: Benedict E Singleton, Maris Boyd Gillette, Anders Burman, Carina Green
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      Culture and tradition have long been the domains of social science, particularly social/cultural anthropology and various forms of heritage studies. However, many environmental scientists whose research addresses environmental management, conservation, and restoration are also interested in traditional ecological knowledge, indigenous and local knowledge, and local environmental knowledge (hereafter TEK), not least because policymakers and international institutions promote the incorporation of TEK in environmental work. In this article, we examine TEK usage in peer-reviewed articles by environmental scientists published in 2020. This snapshot of environmental science scholarship includes both critical discussions of how to incorporate TEK in research and management and efforts to do so for various scholarly and applied purposes. Drawing on anthropological discussions of culture, we identify two related patterns within this literature: a tendency toward essentialism and a tendency to minimize power relationships. We argue that scientists whose work reflects these trends might productively engage with knowledge from the scientific fields that study culture and tradition. We suggest productive complicity as a reflexive mode of partnering, and a set of questions that facilitate natural scientists adopting this approach: What and/or who is this TEK for' Who and what will benefit from this TEK deployment' How is compensation/credit shared' Does this work give back and/or forward to all those involved'
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2021-12-11T09:20:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196211057026
       
  • Light pollution: A review of the scientific literature

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      Authors: Jesús Rodrigo-Comino, Stephan Seeling, Manuel K. Seeger, Johannes B. Ries
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      Light pollution is the consequence of elevated lighting emitted by human-made artefacts to the lower atmosphere. Recently, there have been major advances in the assessment and mitigation of light pollution impacts on humans and the natural ecosystems. Severe negative impacts of light pollution have been highlighted while very few mitigation measures have been implemented. People (scientists, policymakers or stakeholders) interested in light pollution may not have a holistic perspective of the problem, and also there is a need for incorporating social and natural dimensions. Therefore, the main goal of this paper is to review the literature on light pollution using ISI Web of Science by paying attention to the (i) type of publication, year and journal; (ii) impacts on specific elements; (iii) location and (iv) methods used. Our results indicated that the elevated number of papers come from a diverse range of disciplines, methods, places and scales. It is clear that light pollution is getting enough attention from the scientific community but decisions on the implementation of mitigation measures are left with the stakeholders, ordinary inhabitants, policymakers and politicians. Nevertheless, light pollution is having impacts on the health of humans and the natural ecosystem as perceived by experts and inhabitants having divergent perspectives. Thus, light pollution is multifaceted but difficult to be faced, mitigated and not holistically understood. This review paper groups the total impacts of light pollution on the Earth presents some contradictory results, summarises mitigation measures, and provides specific future research directions.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2021-11-19T06:14:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196211051209
       
  • The open subject and translations from nature: Answers to the Anthropocene
           in contemporary poetry (Gennadij Ajgi, Les Murray, Christian Lehnert)

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      Authors: Henrieke Stahl (Trier)
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      With the help of the concepts ‘aura’ and ‘autopoiesis’, the relationship between poetry and natural phenomena can be defined as a ‘translation from nature’. Gennadij Ajgi translates his auratic manner of perceiving into poetry. For him, the poem becomes an epistemic medium transcending the sensory perception of nature for a hidden, spiritual level. Les Murray, conversely, demonstrates an autopoietic understanding of nature: The poet himself becomes the medium of the living being. Christian Lehnert takes up impulses from both orientations. He combines the opposing concepts so that they correspond to the hierarchical levels of his religious and metaphysical vision of the world. The three authors all aim to alter the attitude of humans towards nature through their ‘translation from nature into poetry’ so that humankind will open itself towards nature and raise it from an object which can be instrumentalised to an autonomous subject on equal footing with humanity itself.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2021-11-01T04:28:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196211038659
       
  • The Anthropocene and ecological awareness in Poland: The post-socialist
           view

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      Authors: Justyna Chodkowska-Miszczuk, Krzysztof Rogatka, Aleksandra Lewandowska
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      Dynamic and unrestrained socio-economic development is upsetting the balance of nature’s mechanisms, causing a climate stalemate, or even climate destabilisation. After the Second World War a new political system – real socialism – was enforced on Poland. It brought about changes of a social, cultural, economic and environmental nature. Its immanent feature was the application of top-down decisions that did not take into account environmental components. There was also little ecological awareness within Polish society at that time. The transformations of the 1990s resulted not only in the liberalisation of the Polish economy, but also in the permeation of new trends oriented towards pro-environmental activities. The aim of the article is to find an answer to the question: How is ecological awareness currently shaped in the context of Anthropocene in Poland during the transition from a socialist economy to a capitalist economic system'
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2021-10-16T09:02:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196211051205
       
  • The technical non-reproducibility of the Earth system: Scale, Biosphere 2,
           and T.C. Boyle’s Terranauts

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      Authors: Philip Hüpkes, Gabriele Dürbeck
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      The Anthropocene concept draws on a technologically mediated macroscale, allegedly all-encompassing perspective on the interconnectedness of planetary, social and cultural systems. It is thus part of a genealogy traceable to systems thinking and cybernetic imaginaries of planetary-scale controllability; but at the same time, it relies on a techno-scientific infrastructure that is part of the accumulation of technical entities which Peter Haff calls “technosphere.” This oscillation between technology as a means of control and as an autonomous system that is inaccessible to sensual experience constitutes a theoretical challenge. Responding to this challenge, we combine Haff’s “technosphere” theory with a focus on the aspect of scale and the environmental character of technology. We discuss the Biosphere 2 experiment and its literary reflection in T.C. Boyle’s novel The Terranauts (2016) as an example of an attempted lower-scale technological reproduction of the Earth system. We show that the experiment suggests that technology has to be conceived as both scale variant (its functions differ across scales) and independent from its scale (as always already constituted by its respective environment).
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2021-10-08T02:24:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196211048935
       
  • Bio-inspired life-like motile materials systems: Changing the boundaries
           between living and technical systems in the Anthropocene

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      Authors: Thomas Speck, Simon Poppinga, Olga Speck, Falk Tauber
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      A current trend observed in the Anthropocene is the search for bioinspired solutions. Since it became possible to change the quality of the boundary between living and technical systems, more and more life-like technical products have been developed in recent years. Using five plant-inspired developments of motile technical systems for architecture and soft-robotics, we show how the boundary between living and technical systems undulates, shifts, perforates, blurs, or dissolves with increasing life-likeness. We discuss what causes theses changes in the boundary and how this contributes to the overall aim to achieve higher resilience, robustness, and improved esthetics of plant-inspired products. Inspiration from living systems that make efficient and economic use of materials and energy and are fully recyclable after “service time” may additionally contribute to sustainable material use, one of the major challenges in the Anthropocene.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2021-09-23T09:55:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196211039275
       
  • European colonization and the emergence of novel fire regimes in southeast
           Australia

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      Authors: Matthew Adesanya Adeleye, Simon Edward Connor, Simon Graeme Haberle, Annika Herbert, Josephine Brown
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      The rapid increase in severe wildfires in many parts of the world, especially in temperate systems, requires urgent attention to reduce fires’ catastrophic impacts on human lives, livelihoods, health and economy. Of particular concern is southeast Australia, which harbours one of the most flammable vegetation types on Earth. While previous studies suggest climate and European activities drove changes in southeast Australian fire regimes in the last 200 years, no study has quantitatively tested the relative roles of these drivers. Here, we use a Generalized Linear Modelling to identify the major driver(s) of fire regime change in the southeast Australian mainland during and prior to European colonization. We use multiple charcoal and pollen records across the region and quantitatively compare fire history to records of climate and vegetation change. Results show low levels of biomass burned before colonization, when landscapes where under Indigenous management, even under variable climates. Biomass burned increased markedly due to vegetation/land-use change after colonization and a major decline in regional precipitation about 100 years later. We conclude that Indigenous-maintained open vegetation minimized the amount of biomass burned prior to colonization, while European-suppression of Indigenous land management has amplified biomass accumulation and fuel connectivity in southeast Australian forests since colonization. While climate change remains a major challenge for fire mitigation, implementation of a management approach similar to the pre-colonial period is suggested to ameliorate the risk of future catastrophic fires in the region.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2021-09-20T10:18:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196211044630
       
  • Siliceous algae response to the “Great Acceleration” of the mid-20th
           century in Crawford Lake (Ontario, Canada): A potential candidate for the
           Anthropocene GSSP

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      Authors: Cale AC Gushulak, Matthew Marshall, Brian F Cumming, Brendan Llew-Williams, R Timothy Patterson, Francine MG McCarthy
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      Diatom and chrysophyte assemblages from varved sediments of meromictic Crawford Lake, Ontario record major environmental changes resulting from spatially broadening anthropogenic environmental stressors related to the “Great Acceleration” in the mid-20th century. Biannual assessment of diatom and chrysophyte assemblages over the last ~200 years allowed for rate of change analysis between adjacent samples that increased substantially during the mid-20th century, concurrent with significant generalized additive model trends. Changes in diatom and chrysophyte assemblages were likely driven by multiple anthropogenic stressors including local forestry harvesting, agriculture, and milling activities, acidic deposition from regional industrial processes, and anthropogenic climate warming. Novel siliceous algal assemblages now exist in Crawford Lake, likely related to the complexities of the above mentioned local and regional stressors. The major assemblage changes at the proposed base of the Anthropocene Epoch detected in this study support the laminated sequence from Crawford Lake as a strong potential candidate for the Anthropocene GSSP.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2021-09-18T09:21:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196211046036
       
  • Net national metabolism as a fine-scale metric of energetic biophysical
           size in an industrialised country

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      Authors: Fredrik A. A. Eriksson, Anne Owen, Yadvinder Malhi
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      The biophysical magnitude of global human economic activity is arguably the defining feature and challenge of the Anthropocene, leading to multiple environmental consequences. Quantifying this magnitude at sufficient resolution remains a challenge. We define and present the first detailed district-level analysis of Net National Metabolism (NNM) – a social metabolism energy metric – for an industrialised country (the United Kingdom), using data on household energy alongside household expenditure survey data and energy intensity figures for product categories. The total UK NNM is estimated as 7.56 EJ year−1 (3650 W per capita), 44% of which stems from energy embodied in products and services consumed by households. This is comparable with the metabolism of the UK biosphere (approximately 6.95 EJ year−1). Of the final energy embodied in consumption of goods and services, 46% is dependent on domestic policy decisions and 54% is dependent on policy decisions with/in key trading partners. We demonstrate the applicability of this metric by exploring the relationship between NNM and social deprivation in the UK.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2021-08-25T09:29:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196211038658
       
  • An initial study of the dynamic influences and interactions upon levels of
           sustainability at the global spatial scale

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      Authors: Jason Phillips
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      This paper conducts an initial determination and evaluation of the fundamental dynamic influences and interactions upon indicated levels and nature of sustainability occurring, at the global spatial scale over the specified period of 2006–2016. This is achieved by the first full application of the Sustainability Dynamics Framework (SDF) to the results of the Sustainable Society Index (SSI). The results indicate that obtained S-values are potentially influenced primarily by a triumvirate of influencing factors – Population Growth, GDP and Greenhouse Gases. A cumulative analysis of indicator categories indicated that Environmental Wellbeing was the dominant influencing category upon obtained S-values for the period 2008–2014, and Anthropospheric Wellbeing was the dominant influence in 2006 and 2016. The analysis concludes that the triumvirate has potentially caused fundamental breaches and dynamic impacts and feedbacks upon the global environment-human relationship and system. Unless the triumvirate is managed and mitigated urgently, then there is a potential realistic risk of unsustainability occurring.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2021-08-10T10:00:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196211035805
       
  • Taming Gaia 2.0: Earth system law in the ruptured Anthropocene

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      Authors: Rakhyun E Kim
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      If the Anthropocene is a rupture in planetary history, what does it mean for international environmental law' When the Earth System crosses irreversible tipping points and begins a forceful, nonlinear transformation into a hostile state which I call the ruptured Anthropocene, the concept of protecting the global environment from humans would lose its meaning. Not only the dichotomy between humans and nature becomes irrelevant, but the environment itself will no longer exist as an object for protection. I argue that, for international environmental law to stay relevant in the ruptured Anthropocene, it needs to shift away from its traditional focus on restoring the planetary past, and instead play an active role in the making of planetary futures. Its new purpose will need to be active planetary stewardship, whereby humans add self-awareness for deliberate self-regulation of the Earth System. Such an attempt at ‘taming’ the so-called Gaia 2.0 will, however, create winners and losers, and the new form of law will have to address fundamental questions of justice on a planetary scale. Building on the concept of earth system law emerging in the earth system governance literature, I draw the contours of international environmental law 2.0 for the ruptured Anthropocene and discuss the challenges of instituting active planetary stewardship.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-06T09:23:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196211026721
       
  • ERRATUM to “climate-driven losses to Indigenous and local knowledge and
           cultural heritage”

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      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2021-06-25T09:50:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196211027260
       
  • Antarctica’s Gateways and Gatekeepers: Polar scenarios in a
           polarising Anthropocene

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      Authors: Bob Frame, Yelena Yermakova, Patrick Flamm, Germana Nicklin, Gabriel De Paula, Renuka Badhe, Francisco Tuñez
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      As the short to medium-term social and economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic dominate world issues, longer-term environmental and geopolitical concerns remain of great concern. However, the appetite for tackling complex transdisciplinary anthropogenic change processes may be receding rather than accelerating. In this essay, we propose that Antarctica, the continent of peace and science, a place that assumes a role as the global imaginary Other, where short- and long-term horizons co-exist, is a site where signs of global regeneration in the Anthropocene should be clear. To provoke discussion, we imagine two scenarios set in the five Gateway Cities of Antarctica to 2050. In the ‘Gatekeepers’ scenario, there is a fragmented global order with minimal unregulated behaviour based on narrowly defined national interests; in the ‘Gateways’ scenario, values-based partnerships generate novel institutional arrangements. By contrasting these polar opposites as a performative act, we highlight the need for future-making at the interface between science and policy.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2021-06-21T06:31:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196211026341
       
  • Plant-inspired damage control – An inspiration for sustainable
           solutions in the Anthropocene

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      Authors: Olga Speck, Max Langer, Max D Mylo
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      The proclamation of the Anthropocene occurred simultaneously with consideration of the contribution of biomimetic products towards a more sustainable future. One major challenge is the purposeful handling of consumer goods in order to save resources and avoid waste. This can be achieved by damage control. In recent years, damage control exerted by plants has turned out to be a treasure trove of functional principles that can be transferred to technical systems. Plants prevent damage to themselves through the formation of gradient transitions by means of geometrical characteristics and biomechanical properties. Furthermore, they can respond structurally and mechanically to withstand higher stresses without damage. Damage management in plants includes the self-repair of wounds and the formation of abscission zones, the latter ensuring the controlled disintegration of biological materials systems. Plant-inspired solutions of damage control can contribute to Sustainable Development Goal 12 ‘responsible consumption and production patterns’ through the efficient use of resources and the reduction of waste generation.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2021-05-28T08:53:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196211018489
       
  • Rethinking time in response to the Anthropocene: From timescales to
           timescapes

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      Authors: Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      Since the coinage of the term Anthropocene, scholarly debates have been dominated by critics of the reference to anthropos, the abstract undifferentiated global subject of the new geological epoch. Many humanities scholars objected that this aggregated whole obfuscates inequalities and responsibilities. While the prefix ‘Anthropos’ has been the target of sharp criticisms, the suffix ‘cene’ remained unchallenged. This paper questions the relevance of the chronological timeline divided up into a sequence of epochs differentiated in terms of scales. I argue that the discourse about the ‘great acceleration’ pointing to a clash of tempos relies on the chronological framework. The single uniform timeline covering all events from the origin of the universe to the birth of individual people tends to conceal the variety of timelines whose interplay determines the climate. I suggest that the current ecological crisis calls for a radical revision of our notion of time which is based on the western metaphysics where human subjects reign supreme over nature and the earth. This crisis invites us to adopt a polychronic view, assuming a variety of heterogeneous temporal trajectories. The first section presents the thesis of ‘the great acceleration’ as a grand narrative based on on the western modern framework. The second section disentangles the prerequisites of the construction of this universal timeline: the assumption of a view from nowhere that makes all times commensurable. In the third section I venture the metaphor of timescape as an alternative to the usual timescales of the universal chronology. This notion seems more appropriate to understand the ecological crisis as resulting from conflicting temporalities. The final section tests the timescaping approach on the cases of two technologies that are considered as candidate markers of the onset of the Anthropocene: nuclear technology and plastics.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2021-04-16T08:49:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196211006888
       
  • Climate-driven losses to Indigenous and local knowledge and cultural
           heritage

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      Authors: Jasmine Pearson, Guy Jackson, Karen E McNamara
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      Anthropogenic climate change is leading to widespread losses around the world. While the focus of research over the last decade has largely been on economic or tangible losses, researchers have begun to shift their focus to understanding the non-economic or intangible dimensions of loss more deeply. Loss of life, biodiversity and social cohesion are some of the losses that are beginning to be explored, along with Indigenous and local knowledge (ILK) and cultural heritage. These latter two form the basis of this systematic review of 100 studies to take stock of what we know about climate-driven losses to ILK and cultural heritage, how such losses manifest and how they are overcome, revealing gaps in our knowledge and carving a path for future research.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2021-04-15T09:32:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196211005482
       
  • Food security among dryland pastoralists and agropastoralists: The
           climate, land-use change, and population dynamics nexus

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      Authors: Ilan Stavi, Joana Roque de Pinho, Anastasia K Paschalidou, Susana B Adamo, Kathleen Galvin, Alex de Sherbinin, Trevor Even, Clare Heaviside, Kees van der Geest
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      During the last decades, pastoralist, and agropastoralist populations of the world’s drylands have become exceedingly vulnerable to regional and global changes. Specifically, exacerbated stressors imposed on these populations have adversely affected their food security status, causing humanitarian emergencies and catastrophes. Of these stressors, climate variability and change, land-use and management practices, and dynamics of human demography are of a special importance. These factors affect all four pillars of food security, namely, food availability, access to food, food utilization, and food stability. The objective of this study was to critically review relevant literature to assess the complex web of interrelations and feedbacks that affect these factors. The increasing pressures on the world’s drylands necessitate a comprehensive analysis to advise policy makers regarding the complexity and linkages among factors, and to improve global action. The acquired insights may be the basis for alleviating food insecurity of vulnerable dryland populations.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2021-04-07T06:07:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196211007512
       
  • Bodies of the Anthropocene: On the interactive plasticity of earth systems
           and biological organisms

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      Authors: Maurizio Meloni, Rachael Wakefield-Rann, Becky Mansfield
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      The Anthropocene literature has brought attention to the plasticity and porosity of Earth systems under the dramatic impact of human activities. Moving across scales of analysis, this paper focuses attention on anthropogenic effects at the micro-scale of genomic regulation, neuronal functioning and cellular activity. Building on expanding dialogues at the interface of Anthropocene science, biogeography, microbiology and ecotoxicology, we mobilize epigenetic findings to show increasing evidence of anthropogenic changes in plants, animals and human bodies. Treating human-induced changes at the macro-global and micro-biological scales as part of an intertwined process has implications for how these problems are conceptualised and addressed. While we are sceptics about major geo-bio-social syntheses, we believe that agile social-scientific tools can facilitate interaction across disciplines without denying unevenness, and differences. If rightly contextualized in broad anthropological and social science frameworks, biosocial work on epigenetics offers a compelling avenue to make detectable the ‘slow violence’ of everyday pollution, racism, inequalities and the disproportionate impact of the Anthropocene on the poor and vulnerable. Consolidating work at the Anthropocene/biology interface has potential to offer a richer and more complete picture of the present crisis at the macro and micro-scale alike.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2021-04-07T06:04:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20530196211001517
       
  • The implications of the recently recognized mid-20th century shift in the
           Earth system

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      Authors: Chris Turney, Chris Fogwill
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      Satellite observations offering detailed records of global environmental change are only available from 1979. Emerging studies combining high-quality instrumental and natural observations highlight that the Earth system experienced a substantial shift across the mid-20th century, one that appears to have taken place before the Great Acceleration of human activities from the 1950s. These new results have far-reaching implications for understanding ice-ocean-atmospheric interactions in the Anthropocene and highlight the urgent need for drastic cuts in carbon emissions to limit the impact of future warming.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2021-02-24T10:54:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2053019621995526
       
  • A digital contract for restoration of the Earth System mediated by a
           Planetary Boundary Exchange Unit

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      Authors: Orfeu Bertolami, Frederico Francisco
      Abstract: The Anthropocene Review, Ahead of Print.
      In this paper, we propose a new governance paradigm for managing the Earth System based on a digital contract inspired on blockchain technology. This proposal allows for a radical decentralisation of the procedures of controlling, maintaining and restoring ecosystems by a set of networks willing to engage in improving the operational conditions of local ecosystems so to contribute to an optimal functioning of the Earth System. These procedures are aimed to improve local Planetary Boundary parameters so that they approach the optimal Holocene reference values, the so-called Safe Operating Space, via a reciprocal validation process and an exchange unit that internalises the state of the Earth System.
      Citation: The Anthropocene Review
      PubDate: 2021-01-25T06:59:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2053019620987270
       
 
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