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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted by number of followers
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 201)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 182)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 72)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 64)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Economic Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Climate Change Research Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Climate Change and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Oxford Open Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Meteorological Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nīvār     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  

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Journal Cover
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.543
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 31  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1436-5065 - ISSN (Online) 0177-7971
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Analysis of flux footprints in fragmented, heterogeneous croplands

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      Abstract: Abstract An accurate quantification of fluxes from heterogeneous sites and further bifurcation into contributing homogeneous fluxes is an active field of research. Among such sites, fragmented croplands with varying surface roughness characteristics pose formidable challenges for footprint analysis. We conducted two flux monitoring experiments in fragmented croplands characterized by two dissimilar surfaces with objectives to: (i) evaluate the performance of two analytical footprint models in heterogeneous canopy considering aggregated roughness parameters and (ii) analyze the contribution of fluxes from individual surfaces under changing wind speed. A set of three eddy covariance (EC) towers (one each capturing the homogenous fluxes from individual surfaces and a third, high tower capturing the heterogeneous mixed fluxes) was used for method validation. High-quality EC fluxes that fulfill stationarity and internal turbulence tests were analyzed considering daytime, unstable conditions. In the first experiment, source area contribution from a surface is gradually reduced by progressive cut, and its effect on high-tower flux measurements is analyzed. Two footprint models (Kormann and Meixner ‘KM’; analytical solution to Lagrangian model ‘FFP’) with modified surface roughness parameters were applied under changing source area contributions. FFP model has consistently over predicted the footprints (RMSEFFP = 0.31 m−1, PBIASFFP = 19.00), whereas KM model prediction was gradually changed from over prediction to under prediction towards higher upwind distances (RMSEKM = 0.02 m−1, PBIASKM = 8.50). Sensitivity analysis revealed that the models are more sensitive to turbulent conditions than surface characteristics. This motivated to conduct the second experiment, where the fractional contribution of individual surfaces (α and β) to the heterogeneous fluxes measured by the high tower (T3) was estimated using the principle of superposition (FT3 = α FT1 + β FT2). Results showed that α and β are dynamic during daylight hours and strongly depend on mean wind speed (U) and friction velocity (u*). The contribution of fluxes from adjoining fields [1 − (α + β)] is significant beyond 80% isopleth. Our findings provide guidelines for future analysis of fluxes in heterogeneous, fragmented croplands.
      PubDate: 2024-02-15
       
  • A new approach to air mass characterization over the Indian region using
           INSAT-3DR sounder data

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper presents a first-time satellite-based air mass analysis over the Indian region using Indian National SATellite System (INSAT)-3DR sounder data. The Indian region is characterized by circulations and air mass fronts which have an influential role in deciding the synoptic weather. Usually, air mass analysis is carried out using radiosonde and atmospheric model-based reanalysis data. Both these datasets have intrinsic limitations due to sparse observations and other error sources. The present study is carried out using meteorologically significant satellite-derived 850 hPa level mixing ratio, optical depth, and equivalent potential temperature. The study elicits relative movements and mixing of different air masses during different seasons over the Indian region. The air mass features are well represented by mixing ratio and optical depth compared to potential temperature. The study brings forth prominent interacting air masses and their relative abundance during different seasons. The statistical analysis of air masses during different seasons at 850 hPa estimates the average values of physical attributes concerning different air masses. From the case analysis of air masses, at 850 hPa, a dry pool of mixing ratio is observed during the pre-monsoon (April–May) months. The analysis suggests that the reason for the formation of dry pool over Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea is frequent anticyclonic formation during the period. The present study limelights the potential of satellite-derived mixing ratio profiles to understand the weather features associated with air mass interactions over the Indian region.
      PubDate: 2024-02-13
       
  • Associating daily meteorological variables of a local climate using DCCA,
           sample entropy, Lévy-index and Hurst–Kolmogorov exponents: a case study
           

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      Abstract: Abstract The nonlinear scaling of meteorological processes is an issue of much interest. The objectives of the present work were (a) to investigate cross-correlations between pairs of meteorological time series using different resolutions and (b) to explore the long-range cross-correlations through different scaling exponents. We used 13 years of daily records of rainfall, relative humidity, cloudiness and vapor pressure ranging from January 1st 1996 to December 31st 2009. Data sets were compiled from Veguita agro-meteorological station at Granma province, Cuba. Detrended cross-correlation analysis, multiscale sample entropy, Lévy-stable laws and Hurst–Kolmogorov dynamics were the main methodological and theoretical tools. The detrended cross-correlation coefficient showed significant cross-correlation between rainfall, relative humidity, cloudiness and actual vapor pressure at all investigated time scales. The individual Hurst exponents were in the range 0.62 ≤ H ≤ 0.72 which is consistent with long-range correlated patterns. Bivariate Hurst exponents (Hxy) were larger than the average exponents of the separate processes (Hx and Hy, respectively). The Hurst–Kolmogorov exponents estimated from the climacograms were in the range 0.6 ≤ H ≤ 0.7 (0.603 ≤ β ≤ 0.798) consistent with the values estimated from detrended fluctuation analysis. Each pair of meteorological variables fitted reasonably well bistable distributions with approximately the same Lévy index (α ≅ 0.736). Hurst–Kolmogorov and infinite variance processes are important drivers of the atmospheric dynamics which can explain the persistence of extreme events (droughts) usually observed in the studied region. The multivariate multiscale sample entropy method and multivariate stable distributions could be valuable candidates for describing daily atmospheric processes.
      PubDate: 2024-02-12
       
  • Synoptic and cloud-scale aspects related to an extreme rainfall event that
           occurred in April 2019 in the city of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

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      Abstract: Abstract The development, rate, and duration of extreme rainfall events over a region depend on the coexistence and strength of multiple atmospheric physical conditions. Then, understanding the synoptic and cloud-scale aspects is a continuous, crucial integrated task between universities and operational centers aiming for early warning and risk management. This study first evaluates the large-scale atmospheric circulation, instability behavior, and moisture parameters before and after the start of rainfall. It also investigates the dynamic triggering for an extreme rainfall event in Rio de Janeiro between April 08th and 09th, 2019. Secondly, this study intended to examine the microphysics cloud aspects using data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-16). From monthly records and the 99th percentile of accumulated daily rainfall, it was possible to highlight the spatial rainfall dependence on seasonal and topography with higher rainfall values recorded in the south portion of the city of Rio de Janeiro. From the large-scale synoptic aspects, concomitant circulations related to upper, middle, and lower atmospheric levels creating a dynamic vertical structure favorable to convective development were verified over southeastern Brazil. The thermodynamic parameters showed different characteristics before and after rainfall started, suggesting multi-parameters' importance as so-called "instability ingredients" for evaluating the atmospheric potential for clouds and rainfall development. The velocity divergence in upper atmospheric levels was a determinant dynamic forcing for deep convection evolution. Lastly, regarding the wind circulations, northwest winds before precipitation and a change in wind direction were related to the region's frontal systems passage. The cloud microphysics aspects showed that the channel differences approach showed that monitoring top cloud glaciation, vertical development, and particle size are indicators of heavy rainfall when the cloud top offering considerable vertical growth was a helpful tool to identify regions with huge potential to develop heavy rain.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17
       
  • Multi-scale numerical simulations of the synoptic environment, Diablo
           windstorm, and wildfire formation mechanisms for the Tubbs Fire (2017)

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      Abstract: Abstract The Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model was used to simulate the downscale evolving atmospheric dynamical processes conducive to the intensification and propagation of the Tubbs Fire (2017). This wildfire impacted Napa and Sonoma Counties, California, spreading quickly and erratically through complex mountainous terrain due in large part to downslope Diablo Winds. The Tubbs Fire spread over 36,000 acres and destroyed 5,636 structures, killing 22. The simulations and supporting observations during the pre-Diablo Wind period indicate a well-defined inverted surface trough in Northern California’s Central Valley, along with a strong amplifying trough in the mid-troposphere and attendant cold frontogenesis over the Sierra Nevada. Mid-upper tropospheric jet streak flow, along with simulated and observed soundings from Reno, Nevada, indicate a mid-upper tropospheric jet indirect, exit-region descending, secondary circulation in conjunction with lower mid-tropospheric cold air advection caused by the southwestward low-level jet under the upper level jet’s entrance region. These adjustments enabled the organization of a deepening and ascending inversion over the Sierra Nevada, as well as a self-induced wave critical layer between 850 and 700 hPa prior to Diablo Wind formation. As the organizing jet streak departed, the discontinuously stratified atmosphere over the Sierra Nevada and coastal mountains in Northern California provided a favorable environment for mountain wave amplification. Intensifying leeside sinking motion coupled with wave steepening resulted in strong downslope winds in Northern California. Upward propagating mountain waves are present coinciding with the steepening of the isentropic surfaces consistent with the resonant interaction of nonlinear gravity waves. The model also simulated the development of a hydraulic jump in the lower troposphere on the lee side of the mountain range during Diablo Wind development. The simulation and observations indicate that the favorable environment for Diablo Winds resulted from the baroclinic jet-front system propagating over the Sierra Nevada when it produced a highly discontinuously stratified atmosphere favorable for nonlinear mountain wave amplification. However, the main surge of momentum down the leeside is only indirectly coupled with the jet streak’s exit region, being the result of cold frontogenesis, which allows for vertically differential cold air advection and its attendant discontinuously stratified vertical atmospheric structure.
      PubDate: 2024-01-03
       
  • Correction: Role of radiation and canopy model in predicting heat waves
           using WRF over the city of Bhubaneswar, Odisha

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      PubDate: 2023-12-30
       
  • Numerical study of the precipitation diurnal variation and its
           

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      Abstract: Abstract Based on hourly rain gauge observation, cloud amount, and radiative fluxes data from the Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) and ECMWF Reanalysis v5 (ERA5) dataset, the precipitation process during the Meiyu period in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River in 2020 was simulated in WRF to reveal the influence of cloud radiative heating process on the diurnal variation of precipitation using multiple cloud microphysical schemes. The statistical evaluation of three microphysical parameterization schemes shows that the two-moment scheme WDM6 is more reasonable than the other two schemes in simulating the precipitation distribution, central intensity, and cloud characteristic distribution. There are significant bimodal characteristics in the diurnal variation of precipitation during the Meiyu period by analyzing the observation data. The numerical experiment accurately simulated the time and magnitude of the early morning peak in the heavy rain area but failed to reproduce the peak in the late afternoon, resulting in a false weak rainfall accumulation. The comparison of simulation results with the observed cloud macroscale and microscale characteristics revealed that the reason for the deviation of precipitation simulation was closely related to the inaccurate description of cloud microphysical quantities. The lack of ice phase cloud droplets led to excessively strong radiative heating rate at 200–500 hPa, resulting in anomalous warming in the mid-upper troposphere. Meanwhile, the cold advection at 850 hPa led to anomalous cooling in the lower troposphere, increasing atmospheric stability and further inhibiting the development of the afternoon thermal convection process.
      PubDate: 2023-11-30
      DOI: 10.1007/s00703-023-01000-0
       
  • Arctic–midlatitude–tropics interactions in January 2020: linkages to
           precipitation extremes over Indian region

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      Abstract: Abstract The prolonged positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and associated quasi-stationary equivalent barotropic Euro-Atlantic blocking high (EABH) and the Siberian high (SH) existed during January 2020. The presence of the persistent quasi-stationary barotropic high resulted in higher (lower) than normal surface temperatures in most parts of northern (southern) Eurasia. The large-scale analysis suggests the detouring of the mid-latitudinal westerlies from EABH and the formation of the west–east trough from East Atlantic to Northwest Pacific across North Africa, the Middle East, North India and China. The convergence of the moisture and positive convection anomalies along the region of the trough is perceived from the analysis. In the backdrop of this large-scale circulation anomalies, higher than normal precipitation was received in most of the central and north Indian regions with thunderstorms/hailstorm events. The variations in the AO index (AOI) and EABH were found to be in concurrence with the precipitation anomalies over the Indian region. The detailed analysis of a selected thunderstorm/hailstorm case suggests that the lowering of the 0 °C isotherm due to the intrusion of mid-latitudinal westerlies and the development of atmospheric instability with moisture supply from the adjacent seas facilitated the occurrence of the thunderstorms/Hailstorm events during January 2020.
      PubDate: 2023-11-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s00703-023-00998-7
       
  • Prediction and forecast of surface wind using ML tree-based algorithms

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      Abstract: Abstract This study focuses on the importance of reliable surface wind forecasts for various sectors, particularly energy production. Traditional numerical weather prediction models are facing limitations and increasing complexity, leading to the development of machine learning models as alternatives or supplements. The research consists of two stages. In the first stage, the ERA5 database is used to evaluate the long-term performance of different combinations of features and two tree-based algorithms for predicting surface wind characteristics (speed and direction) in Cairo. The XGBoost algorithm slightly outperforms the Random Forest algorithm, especially when combined with appropriate feature selection. Even three years after the training period, the results remain very good, with an RMSE of 0.59 m/s, rRMSE of 17%, and R2 of 0.84. The second stage assesses the multivariate approach's ability to forecast wind speed evolution at different time horizons (1–12 h) during a week characterized by significant wind dynamics. The forecasts demonstrate excellent agreement with observations at a 1-h time horizon, with an RMSE of 0.35 m/s, rRMSE of 7.6%, and R2 of 0.98, surpassing or comparable to other literature results. However, as the time lag increases, the RMSE (0.86, 1.14, and 1.51 m/s for 3, 6, and 12 h, respectively) and rRMSE (18.7%, 24.8%, and 32.9% for 3, 6, and 12 h, respectively) also increase, while R2 decreases (0.86, 0.79, and 0.60). Furthermore, the wind variations' amplitude is underestimated. To address this bias, a simple correction method is proposed.
      PubDate: 2023-11-20
      DOI: 10.1007/s00703-023-00999-6
       
  • Role of radiation and canopy model in predicting heat waves using WRF over
           the city of Bhubaneswar, Odisha

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      Abstract: Abstract The heat waves (HW) are more frequent with upsurge intensity and spread in the recent warming era over Bhubaneswar, the capital city of Odisha state in India. The city has experienced HW more than four events per year and reported casualties are higher during the recent era as compared to the past century. In addition, the HW caused ecosystem mortality and affected significantly the agriculture and water resource sectors. The city notably grows with urban areas in recent decades, thus, in this study, we explored the potential role of various radiation and urban canopy model schemes with different initial conditions (48, 24, and 12 h lead time) to assess the predictability of HW over Bhubaneswar using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. A large number of simulations were carried out with three nested domains at a resolution of 4.5, 1.5, and 0.5 km for the three HW events. The model forecasts have been validated against the Indian Monsoon Data Assimilation and Analysis. The WRF model satisfactorily predicted the spatial distributions and timing of an HW with the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) radiation and Single-Layer Urban Canopy Model (UCM) urban schemes over the Bhubaneswar urban region 2 days in advance. However, the performance of radiation and urban canopy model schemes varies from event to event. The composite of statistical errors and skill score analysis confirm that the CAM radiation scheme and UCM urban scheme performed well. Overall, CAM and UCM have around 30% and 20% lower percentages of errors, respectively. This study emphasizes the behavior of various radiation and urban canopy model schemes in predicting HW, specifically in the urban agglomeration of Bhubaneswar.
      PubDate: 2023-11-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s00703-023-00994-x
       
  • Feasibility of forecasting convective rain by diagnosing intracloud
           lightning jumps

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      Abstract: Abstract This study conducted a comparison of the data quality of Earth Networks (EN) and Taiwan Power Company’s Total Lightning Detection System (TLDS) and evaluated the feasibility of using intracloud (IC) lightning to issue convective rain warnings. The results indicate uncertainties in the TLDS positioning of IC lightning. When forecasting convective rain on the basis of IC lightning jumps using EN data, the mean prefigurance and postagreement scores were 0.8 and 0.67, respectively, which were more favourable than the respective TLDS scores of 0.65 and 0.47. In regions with high TLDS positioning uncertainties, the use of EN data increased the number of prefigurance and postagreement hits in each analysis zone and raised the prefigurance and postagreement scores to 0.3 and 0.5, respectively. This indicates that analyses using EN data can reduce the risk of missed convective rain warnings when diagnosing IC jumps and can reduce the false alarm rate. In this study, IC jumps preceded convective rains by a maximum of 27.5–39.3 min on average in all analysis zones across Taiwan. The results suggest that diagnosing IC jumps to forecast convective rain is feasible, but until the uncertainties in the positioning of IC lightning using TLDSs have been remedied, EN data are the more suitable diagnostic choice.
      PubDate: 2023-11-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s00703-023-00997-8
       
  • Variability in episodic precipitation concentration in the Asian megacity
           of Dhaka, Bangladesh

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      Abstract: Abstract Changes in episodic and extreme rainfall events are the prime concern for waterlogging issues in major Asian cities such as Dhaka, Bangladesh. The present study analyzed the characteristics of episodic and non-episodic rainfall and their trend over the 1976–2015 period in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The study used the daily rainfall data of the Dhaka meteorological station of Bangladesh to estimate episodic and non-episodic rainfall events, seasonal and annual precipitation concentrations. The Mann-Kendal Test and Sen’s slope were used to calculate rainfall trends over the study period. Results indicate that the monsoon rainfall has increased, whereas the annual rainfall has decreased. Results suggest that seasonal daily average and total rainfall have decreased, except for monsoon, which is insignificant. However, the number of post-monsoon rainfall days is increasing. In addition, the number of episodes and episodic rainfall has increased during the monsoon and post-monsoon, although these are not statistically significant. Episodic rainfall has a strong positive relationship with extreme rainfall events, although the number of extreme rainfall events has decreased. The study noticed substantial irregularities in precipitation concentration during the winter and post-monsoon periods, while the monsoon has an almost uniform precipitation concentration. This research found that episodic rainfall had inter-annual variability before the 2000s, whereas decadal variability was detected in recent decades. This study could help policymakers better understand the characteristics of rainfall patterns and their contribution to waterlogging in similar areas of Bangladesh and elsewhere.
      PubDate: 2023-11-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s00703-023-00995-w
       
  • Origin and maintenance of upper tropospheric inversion over the northern
           Indian Ocean during boreal winter of 2018

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      Abstract: Abstract Radiosonde observations over the Indian Ocean on board ORV Sagar Kanya showed the presence of a sharp thermal inversion layer in the upper troposphere during the onward leg of the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB) ship cruise in winter 2018 (12° N–2° S, 75° E; 16–24 January 2018). This temperature inversion layer having a thickness of ~ 300 m, referred to as upper tropospheric inversion (UTI) observed near 15 km altitude at 12° N showed a gradual descent towards the equator reaching about 13 km altitude at 2° S. Daily radiosonde observations at a nearby island station Minicoy (8.27° N, 73.05° E) revealed similar UTI structure for about 20 days during the period 5–24 January 2018, indicating that the UTI features observed during the cruise period were temporal in nature. The persistent inversion layer which is situated on the top of a ~ 2 km thick moist layer is characterised by a large vertical gradient in potential temperature, high wind speed, large wind shear and minimum in ozone mixing ratio. The mean magnitude of UTI (~ 1.5 K) and its persistence (life time) is found to be much higher than the temperature inversions reported elsewhere in boreal winter season. Analysis of background meteorological parameters and estimated radiative heating profiles indicates that the presence of the moist layer solemnly could not produce the observed magnitude of thermal inversion. From further analysis, we conjecture that the observed UTI with higher magnitude is a result of the combined influence of radiative cooling due to the tropical moist air and the overlaying warm subtropical air by means of Rossby wave intrusion from the extra-tropics.
      PubDate: 2023-11-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s00703-023-00996-9
       
  • On the nature of drag coefficient over a tropical coastal station

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      Abstract: Abstract The turbulent flow over a coastal region is investigated to study the drag coefficient ( \(C_D\) ) behavior during on-shore and off-shore winds. The analysis of turbulent data over 2 years is carried out to examine the dependence of \(C_D\) on mean wind speed ( \(\overline{U}\) ) and stability parameter ( \(\zeta\) ). The drag coefficient is found to show a parabolic dependence with wind speed for on-shore flows and a slightly linear trend for off-shore flows for neutral and weakly unstable cases. Only for strongly unstable and stable cases ( \(\zeta >0\) ), high values of \(C_D\) are observed for low wind speed ( \(\overline{U}<2\text {ms}^{-1}\) ). The likely cause for high values of \(C_D\) during low wind speed is attributed to an increase in turbulent intensity caused due to the presence of coherent structures. On further analysis of \(C_D\) with \(\zeta\) , it is found that under stable conditions ( \(\zeta >0\) ), \(C_D\) shows a systematic decrease with increasing \(\zeta\) . On the contrary, for unstable cases ( \(\zeta <0\) ), the values of \(C_D\) peaks around \(\zeta \approx -0.13\) , before decreasing with increasing \(-\zeta\) .
      PubDate: 2023-10-30
      DOI: 10.1007/s00703-023-00993-y
       
  • The impact of carbon dioxide removal on temperature parameters over West
           Africa

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      Abstract: Abstract Removal of atmospheric carbon dioxide is being considered a suitable option for reducing the recent global rise in atmospheric temperature. The impact of the removal on some climate parameters—near-surface air temperature (TAS), maximum near-surface air temperature (TASMAX), minimum near-surface air temperature (TASMIN) and surface temperature (TS) over West Africa was assessed in this paper. We used CNRM-ESM1-C1 model simulation output consisting of 1%yr−1 CO2 removal from the atmosphere which was compared with CRU observational dataset. Four climatological periods 1990–2019 (reference period), 2040–2069, 2070–2099 and 2100–2129 were considered, and hence the impacts levels in each of the two West African regions, Sahel and Guinea, were estimated in each period with respect to the reference period. The comparison with CRU demonstrated that CNRM-ESM1-C1 model captured temperature variations within major locations in Mauritania, Mali, Niger, Burkina Faso and Senegal with an indication of an underestimation of temperature at locations above 18° N. The value of each parameter was projected to decrease progressively the periods and much impacts were also projected in the last period for the two regions. Time of retreat to 2 °C reduction target is projected a decade before the year 2100 and will occur earlier with greater impact in the Guinea region than in Sahel region. The root mean square deviation of each ensemble member was found at RMSD < 0.5 with respect to the model ensemble mean per parameter, although RMSD > 0.5 was found with GFDL-ESM4 model for TAS and TS.
      PubDate: 2023-10-27
      DOI: 10.1007/s00703-023-00992-z
       
  • Evaluation of the FY-3E microwave temperature sounding data assimilation
           on forecasting Typhoon Chanthu (2021)

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      Abstract: Abstract Fengyun-3E is the first early-morning-orbit polar-orbiting satellite launched by China, which carries the third generation of Microwave Temperature Sounder (MWTS-3). This instrument has 17 channels and it can provide rich atmospheric temperature observation information at different altitudes. To explore the application value of the MWTS-3 data in assimilation, we selected Typhoon Chanthu in 2021 in this study to evaluate the effect of the MWTS-3 data assimilation on the forecasts of typhoons affecting China. The results show that the simultaneous assimilation of the conventional data and MWTS-3 data can effectively correct the westward error of the typhoon track forecasted by the experiments without assimilation and well predict the track of Typhoon Chanthu along the east coast of China and its stay on the ocean area east of Shanghai. Therefore, the characteristics of the heavy rainfall caused by the typhoon only affecting Shanghai and northeastern Zhejiang are also well reproduced. Compared with the conventional data assimilation, the assimilation of the Fengyun-3E MWTS-3 data provides a more noticeable improvement in the typhoon intensity forecasts, thus allowing better forecasts of the spiral rain belt of the typhoon. The results of the rolling test also proved that MWTS-3 data assimilation has a stable improvement effect on typhoon track forecasts and the forecast skill of precipitation heavier than 5 mm.
      PubDate: 2023-10-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s00703-023-00989-8
       
  • Long-term spatio-temporal analysis and trends of precipitation over
           semi-arid region of Rajasthan

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      Abstract: Abstract Assessing the spatial and temporal variability of climate data is one of the basic requirements for solving water and water management problems. This study performed a comprehensive data quality test, a precipitation concentration index (PCI), Sen’s slope, Mann–Kendall (MK) trend test, and an analysis of the symptoms of drought using rainfall anomaly index (RAI) and standardized precipitation index (SPI). The standard homogeneity test (SNHT), Pettitt test, Buishand range test, and von Neumann scale were used for homogeneity analysis, and most tehsils (administrative boundary) showed the same weather character. PCI annual estimates show high local and temporary variability or irregularity in rainfall distribution. MK tests showed a marked increase in the tendency to high temperatures; however, the trend of annual and extreme rain events was not significant for most of the stations. The extreme dry conditions in 101 years (IMD) were found at Sujangarh. Analysis of size statistics and the trend of rainfall anomaly indices and spatial variability of climate data are important in the integration of water resource planning and management decisions. Rajasthan is an agricultural state in India, the monsoon rainfall largely controls the production of crops, and the proper implementation of regional agro-water management and rainwater harvesting can contribute significantly to agricultural potential. This study paves the way for further exploration of inter-regional hydrological modeling to sustain livelihoods. The mean yearly precipitation has shown a minimal non-significant positive pattern over the dryland ecosystem. Amazingly, 3 year running average has shown a cyclic example of mean yearly precipitation under the changing climatic conditions and in dry and wet conditions at different time scales. The western, northern, and southern parts of the dryland ecosystem have encountered wetter conditions (significant at 95% certainty level), while north-eastern, eastern, and south-eastern regions have seen expanded drier circumstances. Overall, most of the areas are suffering from hyperarid conditions, which needs extreme water management for a below normal-to-normal arid cropping.
      PubDate: 2023-09-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s00703-023-00991-0
       
  • Trivariate risk analysis of meteorological drought in Iran under climate
           change scenarios

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      Abstract: Abstract The aim of this study is to analyze the trivariate risk of meteorological drought using copula functions under climate change scenarios in Iran. For this purpose, SPI-12 is calculated for the historical and future periods and the drought characteristics [severity (S)–duration (D) and magnitude (M)] are extracted and the trend analysis of drought characteristics is performed using Mann–Kendall trend test. Then, trivariate risk analysis of drought variables is performed for historical and future periods. The results of the trend test indicate that the precipitation trend decreased mostly in the northwest and west regions of Iran, while these changes in the future period will be observed in the central regions. According to the results, no significant trend in precipitation and drought characteristics will be observed in the future compared to the historical period. Trivariate risk analysis for the given values of (D = 6, S > 40, M = 2) and (D = 12, S > 40, M = 2) shows that for the given values of severity and duration, increasing duration from D = 6 to D = 12 months, decreases the probability of drought occurrence and return period. Therefore, the conditional risk will increase in Iran under future climate change scenarios.
      PubDate: 2023-09-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s00703-023-00988-9
       
  • Future photovoltaic solar power resources in Zambia: a CORDEX-CORE
           multi-model synthesis

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      Abstract: Abstract The exploration of renewable energy such as wind and solar radiation has the potential of reducing reliance on fossil fuels, thus cutting emissions of carbon dioxide, particulate matter, and several other greenhouse gasses. However, recent findings indicate that wind speed across Zambia is very slow, it is increasing but remains unlikely to support large commercial wind farms. In this study, we explore the future impacts of climate change on solar photovoltaic resources. To do this, we examine the new high-resolution (25 km) Coordinated Regional Climate Downscaling Experiment—CORDEX-CORE simulations for the African domain, using two different emission scenarios until 2100. At an annual scale, results indicate a weak but steady decrease in PVRes of around 0.02 W/m2 per annum under RCP2.6 and about 0.005 W/m2 per annum under RCP8.5. Results further show that at an average of ~ 237 ± 3.3 W/m2 and 212 ± 2.5 W/m2, respectively, RCP2.6 comes along with 12 ± 3% more PVRes than RCP8.5. Thus RCP2.6, a greener and climate-friendly pathway, points towards a higher renewable energy potential across Zambia compared to the business-as-usual pathway.
      PubDate: 2023-09-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s00703-023-00990-1
       
  • Role of ocean–atmosphere interactions on contrasting characteristics of
           two cyclones over the Arabian Sea

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      Abstract: Abstract The role of ocean–atmosphere interaction in modulating the track and intensity of two cyclonic storms, Nisarga and Nanauk, which originated from almost similar locations in June in the Arabian Sea with completely different tracks, is investigated in this study. Sea surface temperature (SST), steering flow, relative vorticity, latent heat flux (LHF), specific humidity, vertical wind shear (VWS), outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), convective available potential energy (CAPE), and Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) phases are analyzed to elucidate the causes of contrasting characteristics of these two cyclones. During the progression and intensification of the storm Nanauk, SST decreased drastically (magnitude of ~ 4 °C), while VWS anomaly is found to be increased (~ 8 ms−1), followed by entrainment of dry air leading to a decrease in upward LHF anomaly (~ 3.5 to 4 J m−2) hindering further moisture supply. Moreover, just before the storm initiation, the CAPE anomaly was around − 800 to − 1000 J kg–1 and the MJO condition was also unfavorable for the continuous intensification of the cyclone. All these factors contributed to the quick dissipation of cyclone Nanauk. However, high SST (~ 31 °C) along with other favorable atmospheric conditions contrary to cyclone Nanauk provided a conducive environment for Nisarga to intensify and prevail. A high-pressure anticyclonic circulation at the eastern side of Nisarga over Indian land dragged the storm north-eastwards across the Maharashtra coast. The convective phase of MJO (magnitude > 1) along with the strong lower tropospheric westerly wind at the west side of the convective system also helped cyclone Nisarga to propagate eastward.
      PubDate: 2023-08-31
      DOI: 10.1007/s00703-023-00987-w
       
 
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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted by number of followers
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 201)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 182)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 72)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 64)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Economic Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Climate Change Research Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Climate Change and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Oxford Open Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Meteorological Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nīvār     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  

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School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
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Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
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