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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 113 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 51)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access  
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 68)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Developments in Atmospheric Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access  
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 212)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Journal of Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Large Marine Ecosystems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorological Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 144)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Nīvār     Open Access  
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Revista Brasileira de Meteorologia     Open Access  
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access  
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal  
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access  
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Weather     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access  
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

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Meteorologische Zeitschrift
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.605
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0941-2948 - ISSN (Online) 1610-1227
Published by Schweizerbart Science Publishers Homepage  [18 journals]
  • Multivariate analysis and regionalization of climate variability and
           trends in Germany from 1951–2010

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      Abstract: Multivariate analysis and regionalization of climate variability and trends in Germany from 1951–2010Uebachs, Annika; Trömel, Silke; Kapala, Alice; Simmer, Clemens
      Meteorologische Zeitschrift, (2021), p. 297 - 314AbstractMost statements on climate and climate change are made on the basis of single climate parameters or individual sites analyzed independently. Since climate rather consists of many variables including their covariability, we introduce a multi-index approach and apply it for an assessment of climate change over Germany, over the past 50–60 years based on in total 47 climate indices.In a first step we delineate climate regions characterized by similar temporal behaviors of seasonal and annual climate indices using a principal component analysis (PCA) in S mode with Varimax-rotation based on the correlation matrix of the detrended indices time series. The PCA is applied to the four seasons separately but also to the indices describing the entire year. Three to five climate regions are detected, representing distinct geographical regions and roughly dividing the country in a northern, middle and southern part. The number of regions varies with seasons and considered indices. As expected, the inclusion of indices representing extreme events increases the number of detected climate regions. The mean values and trends of spatially-weighted average time series of the single indices for the detected regions provide a first comprehensive characterization of the regional climate and its change.In a second step the regional climate variability and change are analyzed via regional multi-indices. Multi-indices constitute synthetic time-series of a group of well-correlated single indices, which are clustered by applying the PCA in P‑mode to the weighted regional time series of the indices. Depending on season and region, 8–10 multi-indices are found, which can be related to typical weather situations. Several significant trends on a 95 percent significance level are detected in the weighted time series of the multi-indices and indicate a change of climate particularly for the summer season. Generally, the trends suggest a change to more sunny, warm and dry summer weather with less cloudiness and lower relative humidity, a larger anticyclonic influence, longer dry periods, less snow in spring and higher minimum temperatures.
      PubDate: Fri, 06 Aug 2021 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Measurements of spatial variability of sub-micron particle number
           concentrations perpendicular to a main road in a built‑up area

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      Abstract: Measurements of spatial variability of sub-micron particle number concentrations perpendicular to a main road in a built‑up areaFritz, Sabine; Schubert, Sebastian; Schneider, Christoph
      Meteorologische Zeitschrift, (2021), p. 315 - 331AbstractA six-week field study was conducted to determine spatial and temporal variability of sub-micron (diameter range 10–1000 nm) particles perpendicular to a main road in the city of Berlin, Germany. Measurements were carried out on 17 days with overall 72 runs along a 250 m almost untraveled footpath. Particle number concentration (PNC) as well as the share of local sources were analyzed in relation to the distance to the road, wind speed and wind direction. This study aims to detect patterns of PNC dispersal along the footpath with increasing distance from the road in a built-up urban environment and to identify impact factors. In the majority of cases, results can be expressed well in terms of an exponential decrease of PNC with increasing distance from the road. Traffic flow along the main road has a substantial impact on concentration levels. About 30 % of the PNC at the roadside and 15 % at a distance greater than 100 m can be attributed to traffic. Variations in background concentrations, however, contribute the largest share to concentration levels.
      PubDate: Fri, 06 Aug 2021 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Analysis and numerical simulation of a waterspout at the Hong Kong
           International Airport

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      Abstract: Analysis and numerical simulation of a waterspout at the Hong Kong International AirportChan, P.W.; Hon, K.K.; Robinson, P.; Kosiba, K.; Wurman, J.; Li, Q.S.
      Meteorologische Zeitschrift, (2021), p. 333 - 348AbstractThe wind field of a waterspout that occurred near the Hong Kong International Airport was documented using dual-Doppler analysis from a dense network of Doppler Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems operated at the airport, and nearby surface weather station observations. The dual-Doppler winds are used in tandem with surface observations to analyze the wind structure of the waterspout. The performance of a numerical weather prediction system simulating the windshift line and the associated vortices is compared to the observations. The waterspout and the other vortices formed along a windshift line (convergence between the arriving northeast monsoon and background westerly/sea breeze) and were rather weak, with the surface wind gusting to about 10 m/s. However, the dense network of meteorological sensors at the airport provided unprecedented surface sampling of these vortices. The numerical model captured the convergence line and the vortices reasonably well and may provide earlier alerting to the aviation weather forecasters about the possible occurrence of small waterspout-type vortices near the airport, which may have implications to aviation safety.
      PubDate: Fri, 06 Aug 2021 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Impact of urban imperviousness on boundary layer meteorology and air
           chemistry on a regional scale

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      Abstract: Impact of urban imperviousness on boundary layer meteorology and air chemistry on a regional scaleFallmann, Joachim; Barra, Marc; Kumar, Vinod; Tost, Holger
      Meteorologische Zeitschrift, (2021), p. 349 - 367AbstractIt has been long understood that land cover change from natural to impervious modifies the surface energy balance and hence the dynamical properties of the overlying atmosphere. The urban heat island is manifested in the formation of an urban boundary layer with distinct thermodynamic features that in turn govern transport processes of air pollutants. While many studies already demonstrated the benefits of urban canopy models (UCM) for atmospheric modelling, work on the impact on urban air chemistry is scarce. This study uses the state-of-the-art coupled chemistry-climate modelling system MECO(n) to assess the impact of the COSMO UCM TERRA_URB on the dynamics and gas phase chemistry in the boundary layer of the urban agglomeration Rhine-Main in Germany. Comparing the model results to ground observations and satellite and ground based remote sensing data, we found that the UCM experiment reduces the bias in temperature at the surface and throughout the boundary layer. This is true for ground level NO2 and ozone distribution as well. The application of MECO(n) for urban planning purposes is discussed by designing case studies representing two projected scenarios in future urban planning – densification of central urban areas and urban sprawl. Averaged over the core urban region and 10‑days during a heat wave period in July 2018, model results indicate a warming of 0.7 K in surface temperature and 0.2 K in air temperature per 10 % increase in impervious surface area fraction. Within this period, a 50 % total increase of imperviousness accounts for a 3 K and 1 K spatially averaged warming respectively. This change in thermodynamic features results in a decrease of surface NO2 concentration by 10–20 % through increased turbulent mixing in areas with highest impervious fraction and highest emissions. In the evening and nighttime however, increased densification in the urban centre results in amplified canyon blocking, which in turn results in average increase in near surface NO2 concentrations of about 10 %, compared to the status quo. This work intends to analyse regional scale features of surface-atmosphere interactions in an urban boundary layer and can be seen as preparatory work for higher resolution street scale models.
      PubDate: Fri, 06 Aug 2021 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Smartmet nowcast – Rapidly updating nowcasting system at
           Finnish Meteorological Institute

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      Abstract: Smartmet nowcast – Rapidly updating nowcasting system at Finnish Meteorological InstituteHieta, Leila; Partio, Mikko; Laine, Marko; Tuomola, Marja-Liisa; Hohti, Harri; Perttula, Tuuli; Gregow, Erik; Ylhäisi, Jussi S.
      Meteorologische Zeitschrift, (2021), p. 369 - 377AbstractRapidly updating nowcasting system, Smartmet nowcast, has been developed at Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) to operationally produce accurate and timely short range forecasts and a detailed description of the present weather to the end-users. The system produces an hourly-updated seamless 10‑day forecast over the Scandinavian forecast domain by combining several information sources, which are 1) radar-based FMI‑PPN nowcast 2) Rapidly-updating high-resolution numerical weather prediction (NWP) MetCoOp nowcast (MNWC) forecast 3) 10‑day operational forecast. The combination of the parallel information sources is done using an optical-flow based image morphing method, which provides visually seamless forecasts for each forecast variable. Prior to this combination, each of these individual forecast sources are postprocessed in a multitude of ways. To MNWC model analysis and forecast fields of temperature, relative humidity and wind speed, a simple bias correction scheme based on recent forecast error information is applied whereas ensemble nowcasts from FMI‑PPN are non-uniformly weighted using the non- member as the baseline. The Smartmet nowcasting system improves the quality of short range forecasts, reduces the delay of forecast production and frees the time of on-duty forecaster to other responsibilities.
      PubDate: Fri, 06 Aug 2021 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Physical limits of wind energy within the atmosphere and its use as
           renewable energy: From the theoretical basis to practical implications

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      Abstract: Physical limits of wind energy within the atmosphere and its use as renewable energy: From the theoretical basis to practical implicationsKleidon, Axel
      Meteorologische Zeitschrift, (2021), p. 203 - 225AbstractHow much wind energy does the atmosphere generate, and how much of it can at best be used as renewable energy? This review aims to give physically-based answers to both questions, providing first-order estimates and sensitivities that are consistent with those obtained from numerical simulation models. The first part describes how thermodynamics determines how much wind energy the atmosphere is physically capable of generating at large scales from the solar radiative forcing. The work done to generate and maintain large-scale atmospheric motion can be seen as the consequence of an atmospheric heat engine, which is driven by the difference in solar radiative heating between the tropics and the poles. The resulting motion transports heat, which depletes this differential solar heating and the associated, large-scale temperature difference, which drives this energy conversion in the first place. This interaction between the thermodynamic driver (temperature difference) and the resulting dynamics (heat transport) is critical for determining the maximum power that can be generated. It leads to a maximum in the global mean generation rate of kinetic energy of about 1.7 W m−2 and matches rates inferred from observations of about 2.1–2.5 W m−2 very well. This represents less than 1 % of the total absorbed solar radiation that is converted into kinetic energy. Although it would seem that the atmosphere is extremely inefficient in generating motion, thermodynamics shows that the atmosphere works as hard as it can to generate the energy contained in the winds. The second part focuses on the limits of converting the kinetic energy of the atmosphere into renewable energy. Considering the momentum balance of the lower atmosphere shows that at large-scales, only a fraction of about 26 % of the kinetic energy can at most be converted to renewable energy, consistent with insights from climate model simulations. This yields a typical resource potential in the order of 0.5 W m−2 per surface area in the global mean. The apparent discrepancy with much higher yields of single wind turbines and small wind farms can be explained by the spatial scale of about 100 km at which kinetic energy near the surface is being dissipated and replenished. I close with a discussion of how these insights are compatible to established meteorological concepts, inform practical applications for wind resource estimations, and, more generally, how such physical concepts, particularly limits regarding energy conversion, can set the basis for doing climate science in a simple, analytical, and transparent way.
      PubDate: Thu, 08 Jul 2021 00:00:00 +000
       
  • A numerical study on the effects of natural ventilation on summer
           nighttime indoor temperatures in an urban area

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      Abstract: A numerical study on the effects of natural ventilation on summer nighttime indoor temperatures in an urban areaGross, Günter
      Meteorologische Zeitschrift, (2021), p. 227 - 236AbstractNatural ventilation is a simple and efficient method for nighttime passive cooling of buildings to improve residents’ comfort and reduce air conditioning. The effectiveness of ventilative cooling depends on the number and arrangement of the openings and local wind and temperature difference between indoor and outdoor. However, natural ventilation works only if cool air is available in the surrounding of a building and when this cool air finds a way to infiltrate indoors. In this paper, numerical models are used to simulate the penetration depths of cool air from the rural countryside into a residential area and to estimate the local cooling potential for an indoor environment of buildings. The results demonstrate that the country breeze is an important process to transport cool air during the night, but, due to the limitations in strength and depth, it is only efficient in the first 100–200 m of the outskirts. Based on numerical experiments for a standard room with two windows, an empirical relation was derived to estimate indoor cooling depending on local wind speed and local temperature difference. This relation was used to calculate individual nighttime room temperatures of all buildings in a residential area. It was found that indoor temperature follows the ambient temperature with a delay and cooling is only half as great as outside the building. In addition, the models are used to demonstrate the cooling effect of the country breeze by calculating for a decade the number of days in the summer months when nocturnal minimum room temperatures are below a given threshold.
      PubDate: Thu, 08 Jul 2021 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Dual-polarimetric radar estimators of liquid water content over Germany

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      Abstract: Dual-polarimetric radar estimators of liquid water content over GermanyReimann, Lucas; Simmer, Clemens; Trömel, Silke
      Meteorologische Zeitschrift, (2021), p. 237 - 249AbstractWhile the assimilation of dual-polarimetric radar observations in weather forecast models is promising especially for short-term forecasts of precipitation, the direct assimilation of polarimetric variables is still challenging because of the rather rudimentary appreciation of particle size and shape distributions by the models. Thus, current studies recede to assimilating model state variables derived from dual-polarimetric observables, such as hydrometeor mixing ratios. This study evaluates, improves and adapts estimators for liquid water content for their application to observations of the polarimetric C‑band radar network of the German national meteorological service as a first step towards their assimilation in the ICON model. T‑matrix simulations are used to derive polarimetric observables from a large data set of drop size distributions (DSDs) observed over Germany. Existing estimators based on reflectivity (Z), differential reflectivity (ZDR), specific attenuation (A) and specific differential phase (KDP) applied to this data set yield mostly unsatisfactory results and motivated the search for and development of improved estimators. The latter much better approximate the simulated data, and also mostly outperform the existing estimators when applied to real radar observations over Germany, although by a smaller degree. The new KDP-based estimator could only outperform existing algorithms, when KDP for azimuth-range intervals with negative KDPs were replaced by a Z-based KDP estimation. Further potential radar observation deficiencies in determining Z, ZDR, A and KDP motivated the development of a potentially more stable hybrid estimator based on the new LWC(Z,ZDR), LWC(A) and LWC(KDP) estimators. This hybrid estimator outperforms both the adapted and existing LWC estimators in terms of the correlation coefficient.
      PubDate: Thu, 08 Jul 2021 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Variation of leading-edge-erosion relevant precipitation parameters with
           location and weather type

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      Abstract: Variation of leading-edge-erosion relevant precipitation parameters with location and weather typeTilg, Anna-Maria; Hagen, Martin; Vejen, Flemming; Hasager, Charlotte Bay
      Meteorologische Zeitschrift, (2021), p. 251 - 269AbstractPrecipitation is a key driver of leading-edge erosion of wind turbine blades, which leads to a loss in annual energy production and high cost for repair of wind turbines. Precipitation type, drop size and their frequency are relevant parameters, but not easily available. Reflectivity-Rain Rate (Z‑R) relationships as well as annual sums of rainfall amount and rainfall kinetic energy potentially could be used to estimate leading-edge erosion. Although Z‑R relationships and amounts are known for several places, their spatial variation and dependence on weather types is unknown in the North Sea and Baltic Sea area. We analysed time series of multiple disdrometers located on the coast of the North Sea and Baltic Sea to characterize the variation and weather-type dependence of the Z‑R relationship, precipitation type, rainfall amount and kinetic energy.The Z‑R relationship as indication for the mean drop-size distribution showed small variations within different locations, but had a large variability for specific, but rare weather types. Only the precipitation types snow and hail showed some tendencies of weather-type dependence. Rainfall amount and rainfall kinetic energy were higher for stations in the eastern part of the North Sea compared to the western part and the Baltic Sea. Highest values were related to advection from the West. Overall, variations with location and weather type were found. These results will need to be considered in leading-edge erosion modelling and site assessment.
      PubDate: Thu, 08 Jul 2021 00:00:00 +000
       
  • On the importance of a viscous surface layer to describe the lower
           boundary condition for temperature

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      Abstract: On the importance of a viscous surface layer to describe the lower boundary condition for temperatureGross, Günter
      Meteorologische Zeitschrift, (2021), p. 271 - 278AbstractA viscous sublayer was introduced into a PBL model in order to specify the lower boundary condition for temperature. The simulated results have been compared against available observations. However, for such a comparison, some of the variables and parameters that are necessary are not known but can be deduced from observed data. In this way, surface temperature and thermal diffusivity of the soil, representative for the four-day period studied here, have been estimated from measured data. An optimized relation for the thickness of the viscous sublayer δ$\delta$ was found that includes the diurnal variation of the properties of the air flow. Including this approach in the model, simulated temperatures in the ground at different levels as well as temperature in the atmosphere agree very well with the observations. The applicability for a wider range of wind speeds was demonstrated by calculating daily maximum temperatures Tmax$T_{\text{max}}$. An analysis of long-term observations for the summer season at different operational weather stations consistently show a distinct maximum of Tmax$T_{\text{max}}$ for a 10‑m wind between 2–3 m/s, which can be explained by the interaction between the molecular transport of heat within the viscous sublayer of thickness δ$\delta$ and the turbulent heat flux.
      PubDate: Thu, 08 Jul 2021 00:00:00 +000
       
 
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