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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 113 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 51)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access  
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 68)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Developments in Atmospheric Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access  
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 212)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Journal of Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Large Marine Ecosystems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorological Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 144)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Nīvār     Open Access  
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Revista Brasileira de Meteorologia     Open Access  
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access  
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal  
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access  
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Weather     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access  
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

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International Journal of Biometeorology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.897
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1432-1254 - ISSN (Online) 0020-7128
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2658 journals]
  • Wood anatomy and tree-ring stable isotopes indicate a recent decline in
           water-use efficiency in the desert tree Moringa peregrina

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      Abstract: Abstract The ability of desert plants to adapt to future climate changes and maximize their water-use efficiency will determine their survival. This study uses wood anatomy and δ13C and δ18O isotope analyses to investigate how Moringa peregrina trees in the Egyptian desert have responded to the environment over the last 10 years. Our results show that M. peregrina tree-ring widths (TRWs) have generally declined over the last decade, although individual series are characterized by high variability and low Rbars. Vessel lumen area percentages (VLA%) are low in wet years but increase significantly in dry years, such as the period 2017–2020. Stable δ13C isotope values decrease between 2010 (− 23.4‰) and 2020 (− 24.9‰), reflecting an unexpected response to an increase in drought conditions. The mean δ18O value (± standard error, SE) for the first ten rings of each tree from bark to pith (2020–2010) is 33.0 ‰ ± 0.85 with a range of 29.2–36.3‰, which indicates a common drought signal. The intrinsic water-use efficiency (iWUE) declines gradually with time, from 130.0 µmol mol−1 in 2010 to 119.4 µmol mol−1 in 2020. The intercellular carbon concentration (Ci) and Ci/Ca ratio increase over the same period, likely as a result of decreasing iWUE. The results show that M. peregrina trees seem to cool their leaves and the boundary air at the cost of saving water.
      PubDate: 2021-10-11
       
  • Crenobalneotherapy for low back pain: systematic review of clinical trials

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      Abstract: Abstract Crenobalneotherapy is a treatment commonly used in Europe and Middle East. It uses mineral water sometimes combined with different hydrotherapy techniques. Most patients treated in spa centers suffer from low back pain. The purpose of this work is to identify clinical trials on crenobalneotherapy for low back pain. Publication research was performed on Medline, Cochrane, and PEDRO databases. Clinical trials were analyzed for internal validity, external validity, quality of statistical analysis, and quality of collection of adverse events. We present the best level of evidence. Bibliographic research identified 21 clinical trials and the coauthors added 5 references. The 26 trials represent 2695 patients. Some have good methodological quality and allow considering crenobalneotherapy as a potential treatment for low back pain, even if the role of mineral water remains uncertain. The methodological quality of therapeutic trials should be improved. These trials should be analyzed in the future guidelines on low back pain.
      PubDate: 2021-10-09
       
  • The importance of body core temperature evaluation in balneotherapy

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      Abstract: Abstract It is not wrong to say that there are no application standards or best practices in balneotherapy considering traditional applications. There is not enough information about how changes in body temperature, duration, and frequency of exposure to heat affect therapeutic outcomes of balneotherapeutic applications. Body core temperature (BCT) is probably the best parameter for expressing the heat load of the body and can be used to describe the causal relationship between heat exposure and its effects. There are several reasons to take BCT changes into account; for example, it can be used for individualized treatment planning, defining the consequences of thermal effects, developing disease-specific approaches, avoiding adverse effects, and designing clinical trials. The reasons why BCT changes should be considered instead of conventional measures will be discussed while explaining the effects of balneotherapy in this article, along with a discussion of BCT measurement in balneotherapy practice.
      PubDate: 2021-10-08
       
  • Correction to: Environmental temperature and relative humidity differently
           affect the sperm characteristics in Brown Swiss and Belgian Blue bulls

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      PubDate: 2021-10-07
       
  • Effects of ambient temperature during the nestling stage on a stress
           indicator in nestling pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca

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      Abstract: Abstract Long-term and short-term changes in ambient temperature can cause stress in birds, leading to changes in the level of hematological parameters. The H:L ratio (heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio) is a hematological index that allows for the assessment of the stress induced by environmental changes, including weather conditions. In this paper, we examined the influence of temperatures and the sum of precipitation on the health of nestling pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) by using the H:L ratio reflecting the body’s response to stress. All examined temperature indicators influenced the H:L ratio, yet the average value of daily minimum temperature during the first 12 days of nestling life had the strongest influence, maximum temperature had the weakest effect, while precipitation had no significant influence. Our research indicates that even a small increase in temperature caused a stress reaction in nestling pied flycatchers, which was reflected by an increase in the H:L ratio. The increase in the stress index (H:L ratio) was probably a result of poor weather conditions (precipitation, low temperature), which prevented the adult birds from actively foraging and properly feeding the nestlings.
      PubDate: 2021-10-07
       
  • Modelling the effects of cold temperature during the reproductive stage on
           the yield of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

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      Abstract: Abstract During the reproductive stage, chilling temperatures and frost reduce the yield of chickpea and limit its adaptation. The adverse effects of chilling temperature and frost in terms of the threshold temperatures, impact of cold duration, and genotype-by-environment-by-management interactions are not well quantified. Crop growth models that predict flowering time and yield under diverse climates can identify combinations of cultivars and sowing time to reduce frost risk in target environments. The Agricultural Production Systems Simulator (APSIM-chickpea) model uses daily temperatures to model basic crop growth but does not include penalties for either frost damage or cold temperatures during flowering and podding stages. Regression analysis overcame this limitation of the model for chickpea crops grown at 95 locations in Australia using 70 years of historic data incorporating three cultivars and three sowing times (early, mid, and late). We modified model parameters to include the effect of soil water on thermal time calculations, which significantly improved the prediction of flowering time. Simulated data, and data from field experiments grown in Australia (2013 to 2019), showed robust predictions for flowering time (n = 29; R2 = 0.97), and grain yield (n = 22; R2 = 0.63–0.70). In addition, we identified threshold cold temperatures that significantly affected predicted yield, and combinations of locations, variety, and sowing time where the overlap between peak cold temperatures and peak flowering was minimal. Our results showed that frost and/or cold temperature–induced yield losses are a major limitation in some unexpected Australian locations, e.g., inland, subtropical latitudes in Queensland. Intermediate sowing maximise yield, as it avoids cold temperature, late heat, and drought stresses potentially limiting yield in early and late sowing respectively.
      PubDate: 2021-10-05
       
  • Comparison of outpatient and inpatient spa therapy in knee osteoarthritis

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      Abstract: Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common condition that impacts many people worldwide and involves weight-bearing joints, resulting in chronic pain. In this study, we aimed to compare the effectiveness of inpatient and outpatient physical therapy modalities and spa combination treatments on pain and functional status in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Seventy-four patients diagnosed with primary knee osteoarthritis were included in this study. The patients were randomized into two groups, inpatient (n = 37) and outpatient (n = 37) physical therapy. All patients received a physical therapy program (superficial heater + deep heater + transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation) for 2 weeks and spa therapy. All cases were evaluated clinically, laboratory, and radiographically. In order to evaluate pain and functional status, the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index (WOMAC), and Timed Up and Go (TUG) test were used before and after treatment. There was no significant difference between the two groups in the TUG test and WOMAC scores (p > 0.05). However, a significant difference was found in VAS scores in favor of the outpatient group (p < 0.05). As a result, although there was a significant improvement in pain scores in the outpatient group, multicenter studies with larger patient groups may provide more evidence.
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
       
  • The effects of desert dust storms, air pollution, and temperature on
           morbidity due to spontaneous abortions and toxemia of pregnancy: 5-year
           analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract Epidemiological studies have suggested an association between particulate air pollution, increased temperatures, and morbidity related to pregnancy outcomes. However, the roles of desert dust storms and climatological factors have not been fully addressed. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the association between desert dust storms, particulate matter with a diameter ≤10 μm (PM10), daily temperatures, and toxemia of pregnancy and spontaneous abortion in Gaziantep, South East Turkey. The study was conducted retrospectively at emergency department of two hospitals in Gaziantep city. Data from January 1, 2009, to March 31, 2014, were collected. Patients, who were diagnosed with toxemia of pregnancy and spontaneous abortion by radiological imaging modalities, were included in the study. Daily temperature ranges, mean temperature values, humidity, pressure, wind speed, daily PM10 levels, and records of dust storms were collected. A generalized additive regression model was designed to assess variable effects on toxemia of pregnancy and spontaneous abortion, while adjusting for possible confounding factors. Our findings demonstrated that presence of dust storms was positively associated with the toxemia of pregnancy both in outpatient admissions (OR=1.543 95% CI=1.186–2.009) and inpatient hospitalizations (OR=1.534; 95% CI=1.162–2.027). However, neither PM10 nor maximum temperature showed a marked association with spontaneous abortion or toxemia of pregnancy in our study population. Our findings suggest that desert dust storms may have an impact on the risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes such as toxemia of pregnancy. Health authorities should take necessary measures to protect pregnant women against detrimental effects of these storms.
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
       
  • On-farm assessment of eucalypt yield gaps — a case study for the
           producing areas of the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil

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      Abstract: Abstract The concept of yield gaps provides a basis for identifying the main sources of production losses, caused by water or management deficiencies, which may help foresters and forest companies to better plan and make decisions in their areas. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify the magnitude and the major causes of yield gaps of eucalypts, being this the most planted forest genus in Brazil, in different producing regions of the state of Minas Gerais that has the largest planted area. To these ends, potential (Yp) and attainable (Ya) yields were simulated using the agroecological zone model (AEZ-FAO) adapted and calibrated for Brazilian eucalypt clones. Actual yield (Yr) data were obtained from 22 sites located in the state of Minas Gerais from 2009 to 2016, considering an average forest rotation of 6.7 years and plantings occurring between 2002 and 2010. From this, the total yield gap (YGtot), yield gap by water deficit (YGwd), and yield gap by sub-optimal management (YGman) were determined. The YGwd ranged from 37 to 69 m3 ha−1 year−1 across the 22 sites assessed, with an average value of 55 m3 ha−1 year−1. On the other hand, the YGman ranged from zero (optimal management) to 31 m3 ha−1 year−1. The eucalypt yield gap in commercial areas of Minas Gerais state was mainly caused by water deficit, which represented 77% of the total yield gap. On the other hand, the deficiencies in forest management accounted for 23% of the total yield gap.
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
       
  • The powdery mildew disease of rubber (Oidium heveae) is jointly controlled
           by the winter temperature and host phenology

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      Abstract: Abstract Rubber powdery mildew disease (Oidium heveae) is a serious threat to natural rubber production (Hevea brasiliensis) in some rubber developing regions of the world. Both phenological- and meteorological-related factors have been reported influencing the powdery mildew disease. However, few studies have investigated the effects of both phenological- and meteorological-related factors on the disease. The objective of this study is to quantify the contributions of phenological- and meteorological-related factors to affect the disease. We used the partial least squares (PLS) regression method to comprehensively quantify the effects of thirty-five phenological related factors and six meteorological factors on the infection level of powdery mildew of rubber trees over 9-year records (2003–2011). The relative contributions of significant factors were further investigated by the variation partition analysis. We found that the most influential variables were the mean temperature during winter and the duration of leaf development to maturation which explained 32 and 26% of the variations in the infection level. We found the controlling role of winter mean temperature, for the first time, on the infection level of powdery mildew. The controlling role of winter temperature may have directly increase the infection level when winter temperature is high and indirectly increase the infection level through prolonging the duration of leaf development to maturation, although the duration itself had smaller influences. We detected a warming trend of the winter temperatures from 2003 to 2011, which indicates that the infection level of powdery mildew will be increased if the winter warming continues.
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
       
  • North African dust intrusions and increased risk of respiratory diseases
           in Southern Portugal

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      Abstract: Abstract The study of dust intrusions in Portugal is still a subject on which little investigation has been made, especially in terms of their effects. Thus, this work aims to achieve two goals: firstly, to characterize the dust intrusions in the study area; and secondly, to evaluate the possible statistical association between the dust intrusion days and hospital admissions due to respiratory diseases. Dust intrusions in Portugal are prevalent during the summer season. During this season, the dust plumes tend to cover broader areas than in the other seasons and they have origin in the North African countries. In the study area for the period between 2005 and 2015, the relative risk of urgent hospitalizations due to respiratory diseases was 12.6% higher during dust intrusion days. In order to obtain this statistical association, a Distributed Lag Nonlinear Model was developed. With this work, we expect to help the development of further studies regarding North African dust intrusions in Portugal, more precisely their effects on human health.
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
       
  • The future of high-quality Ceylon tea seems bleak in the face of climate
           change

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      Abstract: Abstract Understanding the interactive effects and relationships between biochemical elements of tea leaves and the related factors, particularly climatic, cultivar, and geographic, is key for high-quality Ceylon tea production. The objectives of this study were to (1) investigate the effects of season × cultivar × agro-ecological regions (AERs) on the four tested biochemicals in fresh tea leaves, total polyphenol content (TPC), free sugar, protein, and theanine; (2) determine the relationships between, and develop a model to estimate, the biochemicals and their related factors; and (3) project the potential concentrations and distributions of four tested biochemicals in tea leaves with respect to the current and future climate. This study primarily uses inferential statistics via the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS), cross-validation using R software, and the inverse distance weighting (IDW) approach in ArcGIS. The results demonstrate that the season, cultivar (Ceylon tea cultivars of TRI 2025 and TRI 4053), and AER and their interactions on biochemicals have significant effects (p < 0.05). The models derived in the regression analysis demonstrate the strong relationships between the independent variables and the biochemicals, with multiple correlation coefficients (R) around 0.8 and coefficient of determination (R2) around 0.6. The low standard deviation of error of prediction (SDEP < 0.1) and the high correlation coefficient of leave-one-out cross-validation (Q2) for all four biochemicals ranged from 0.56 to 0.61, which signifies the predictive ability of the models. The future projections show a considerable increase in the thresholds of all tested biochemicals. The distribution category with ‘very high’ concentrations of TPC and theanine is predicted to increase in the future by averages of 10% and 14%, respectively, while reducing the classes of protein and free sugar by 14% and 12%, respectively. Overall, the changing concentrations of the thresholds of relevant biochemicals and their distribution will negatively affect the final quality of tea, and these variations indicate that climate change has started to diminish Ceylon tea quality.
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
       
  • Evolving heat waves characteristics challenge heat warning systems and
           prevention plans

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper analyses how recent trends in heat waves impact heat warning systems. We performed a retrospective analysis of the challenges faced by the French heat prevention plan since 2004. We described trends based on the environmental and health data collected each summer by the French heat warning system and prevention plan. Major evolutions of the system were tracked based on the evaluations organized each autumn with the stakeholders of the prevention plan. Excess deaths numbering 8000 were observed during heat waves between 2004 and 2019, 71% of these between 2015 and 2019. We observed major changes in the characteristics, frequency and the geographical spread of heat waves since 2015. Feedbacks led to several updates of the warning system such as the extension of the surveillance period. They also revealed that risk perception remained limited among the population and the stakeholders. The sharp increase in the number of heat warnings issued per year since 2015 challenges the acceptability of the heat warnings. Recent heat waves without historical equivalent interfere with the development of evidence-based prevention strategies. The growing public health impacts heat waves emphasize the urgent need to act to adapt the population, at different levels of intervention, from individual comportments to structural modifications. A specific attention should be given to increase the resources allocated to the evaluation and the management of heat-related risks, especially considering the needs to catch with the rapid rhythm of the changing climate.
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
       
  • A systematic review of the effects of temperature and precipitation on
           pollen concentrations and season timing, and implications for human health
           

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      Abstract: Abstract Climate and weather directly impact plant phenology, affecting airborne pollen. The objective of this systematic review is to examine the impacts of meteorological variables on airborne pollen concentrations and pollen season timing. Using PRISMA methodology, we reviewed literature that assessed whether there was a relationship between local temperature and precipitation and measured airborne pollen. The search strategy included terms related to pollen, trends or measurements, and season timing. For inclusion, studies must have conducted a correlation analysis of at least 5 years of airborne pollen data to local meteorological data and report quantitative results. Data from peer-reviewed articles were extracted on the correlations between seven pollen indicators (main pollen season start date, end date, peak date, and length, annual pollen integral, average daily pollen concentration, and peak pollen concentration), and two meteorological variables (temperature and precipitation). Ninety-three articles were included in the analysis out of 9,679 articles screened. Overall, warmer temperatures correlated with earlier and longer pollen seasons and higher pollen concentrations. Precipitation had varying effects on pollen concentration and pollen season timing indicators. Increased precipitation may have a short-term effect causing low pollen concentrations potentially due to “wash out” effect. Long-term effects of precipitation varied for trees and weeds and had a positive correlation with grass pollen levels. With increases in temperature due to climate change, pollen seasons for some taxa in some regions may start earlier, last longer, and be more intense, which may be associated with adverse health impacts, as pollen exposure has well-known health effects in sensitized individuals.
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
       
  • Industrial workwear for hot workplace environments: thermal management
           attributes

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      Abstract: Abstract Personal protective clothing (PPC) is critical for worker safety and wellbeing from both protection and thermal management perspectives, particularly as PPC typically covers more than 90% of the body. Research of PPC in low-risk categories such as mining, oil, gas, and construction and their thermal management attributes is limited, although these industries represent a significant proportion of the industrial workforce, work across a broad range of major industries, and frequently work in hot and/or humid thermal environments. This study evaluated and characterized the thermal management attributes of a selection of commercial low-level risk PPC ensembles currently used around the world as well as a civilian/corporate wear ensemble, using a sweating thermal manikin. The results demonstrate that there are substantially poorer thermal attributes for the PPC ensembles. Predicted Heat Strain Index (PHS) results for hot conditions reveal significantly lower duration limited exposure (DLE) and considerably greater body water loss for the wearers of PPC. Opportunities to substantially reduce PPC material mass and improve construction for these low-level risk categories in order to enhance thermal management performance are identified. Relationships between the thermal attributes of PPC and civilian clothing, and their garment construction, fit, and material characteristics are identified, providing new and important knowledge for current performance and direction for development of new improved PPC. This study provides researchers, developers, and garment designers with valuable insights for future improvement of PPC to create improved PPC for industrial workwear worn in hot environments.
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
       
  • Developing of a model to predict lying behavior of dairy cows on
           silvopastoral system during the winter season

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      Abstract: Abstract Lying behavior is an important indicator of the cows’ welfare and health. In this study, we evaluate the effect of the physical environment on dairy cows’ behaviors raised on a silvopastoral system through a predictive model. There was a difference (p<0.01) in soil surface temperature (SST) and black globe-humidity index (BGHI) between the shaded and sunny areas of the silvopastoral system. The BGHI was the variable most important to classify the cows’ decision to seek shaded or sunny areas, while the soil surface temperature affected the choice for the area to perform the lying behaviors. In order to understand the influence of these parameters on cows’ lying behavior, we developed another predictive model relating the SST and BGHI with cows lying at shaded and sunny areas. There was significance (p<0.01) for all model parameters. The odds of cows lying increased by approximately 2% with each degree of SST. In contrast, the probability of the cows lying in the shaded areas was 35% less than in sunny areas. The model developed in this study was efficient in identifying changes in the behavior of dairy cows in relation to physical environment. The BGHI influenced the areas used by cows to performing their standing behavior, while the areas used for lying behavior were influenced by the SST.
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
       
  • Clinical efficacy of medical hydrology: an umbrella review

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      Abstract: Abstract The aim of this research was to summarize available scientific evidence on the efficacy of medical hydrology for the management of any health condition. The search was conducted on 26th March 2021, in the following databases: Medline (via PubMed), EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar. All relevant literature reviews investigating the clinical efficacy of interventions characterized by the use of natural mineral waters and muds were included. The quality of studies was assessed with the “AMSTAR 2” tool. After article screening, 49 reviews were included in this work. Overall, retrieved scientific evidence suggests that spa therapy is beneficial for patients affected by some specific musculoskeletal conditions, with improvements potentially lasting up to 9 months. Moreover, balneotherapy can be an integrative support for the management of chronic venous insufficiency and some inflammatory skin diseases like psoriasis. The role of spa therapy in rehabilitation appears relevant as well. More limited, although interesting evidence exists for inhalation and hydropinic therapies. Globally, retrieved evidence suggests that, besides individual wellbeing, medical hydrology can be useful for public health. In particular, higher-quality studies seem to support the integrative use of spa-related interventions for conditions like osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia, low back pain of rheumatic origin, and chronic venous insufficiency. However, the body of evidence has some limitations and further clinical trials should be designed for each relevant application to consolidate and expand acquired knowledge.
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
       
  • Towards understanding Cameraria ohridella (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae)
           development: effects of microhabitat variability in naturally growing
           horse-chestnut tree canopy

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      Abstract: Abstract Dwelling intensity of horse-chestnut miner (Cameraria ohridella) larvae in various leaves insolation and temperature was measured to determine whether this pest’s development follows a predictable pattern or depends more on local microenvironment conditions. Mines growing on leaves of mature host plants (Aesculus hippocastanum L.) in their natural conditions were photographed for two consecutive generations of the pest and in two separated vegetation periods. Apart from meteorological data obtained from the nearest station, the temperature of intact and mined parts of sun-exposed and shaded leaf blades was measured at various daytimes throughout the experiment. Obtained sets of digital data were analysed and combined to model mine area growth as a function of degree-days sum by adopting of Verhulst logistic equation. We showed the predictive potential of our model based on experimental data, and it may be useful in the scheduling of pest control measures in natural conditions. Our analyses also revealed that despite significant differences in microenvironment conditions depending on mines’ insolation, the horse-chestnut miner larvae could partially compensate for them and complete their development at similar endpoints expressed as the cumulative sum of degree-days. We conclude that computer-aided analysis of photographic documentation of leaf-miner larval growth followed by mathematical modelling offers a noninvasive, reliable, and inexpensive alternative for monitoring local leaf-miners populations.
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
       
  • Seasonal variations in water flux compositions controlled by leaf
           development: isotopic insights at the canopy–atmosphere interface

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      Abstract: Abstract Water-stable isotopes provide a valuable tool for tracing plant-water interactions, particularly evapotranspiration (ET) partitioning and leaf water dynamics at the plant-atmosphere interface. However, process-based investigations of plant/leaf development and the associated isotopic dynamics of water fluxes involving isotope enrichment at plant-atmosphere interfaces at the ecosystem scale remain challenging. In this study, in situ isotopic measurements and tracer-aided models were used to study the dynamic interactions between vegetation growth and the isotopic dynamics of water fluxes (ET, soil evaporation, and transpiration) involving isotope enrichment in canopy leaves in a multispecies grassland ecosystem. The day-to-day variations in the isotopic compositions of ET flux were mainly controlled by plant growth, which could be explained by the significant logarithmic relationship determined between the leaf area index and transpiration fraction. Leaf development promoted a significant increase in the isotopic composition of ET and led to a slight decrease in the isotopic composition of water in canopy leaves. The transpiration (evaporation) isoflux acted to increase (decrease) the δ18O of water vapor, and the total isoflux impacts depended on the seasonal tradeoffs between transpiration and evaporation. The isotopic evidence in ET fluxes demonstrates the biotic controls on day-to-day variations in water/energy flux partitioning through transpiration activity. This study emphasizes that stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen are effective tools for quantitative evaluations of the hydrological component partitioning of ecosystems and plant-climate interactions.
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
       
  • A scoping review on climate change and tuberculosis

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      Abstract: Abstract Climate change is a global public health challenge. The changes in climatic factors affect the pattern and burden of tuberculosis, which is a worldwide public health problem affecting low and middle-income countries. However, the evidence related to the impact of climate change on tuberculosis is few and far between. This study is a scoping review following a five-stage version of Arksey and O’Malley’s method. We searched the literature using the keywords and their combination in Google scholar, and PubMed. Climate change affects tuberculosis through diverse pathways: changes in climatic factors like temperature, humidity, and precipitation influence host response through alterations in vitamin D distribution, ultraviolet radiation, malnutrition, and other risk factors. The rise in extreme climatic events induces population displacement resulting in a greater number of vulnerable and risk populations of tuberculosis. It creates a conducive environment of tuberculosis transmission and development of active tuberculosis and disrupts tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment services. Therefore, it stands to reasons that climate change affects tuberculosis, particularly in highly vulnerable countries and areas. However, further studies and novel methodologies are required to address such a complex relationship and better understand the occurrence of tuberculosis attributable to climate change.
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
       
 
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