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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 159)
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 150)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 71)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 62)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Economic Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Climate Change and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climate Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Oxford Open Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Meteorological Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nīvār     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  

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International Journal of Biometeorology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.897
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1432-1254 - ISSN (Online) 0020-7128
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Comparing the responses of grain fed feedlot cattle under moderate heat
           load and during subsequent recovery with those of feed restricted
           thermoneutral counterparts: plasma biochemistry

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      Abstract: Abstract Responses to heat stress in ruminants reflect the integration of local climatic conditions, environment/production system and the animal’s homeostatic and homeorhetic capacities. Thus, the goal of ameliorating heat stress requires experimental settings that, within limits, closely resemble the target production system and cohort. We investigated the blood biochemical changes of two sequential cohorts of twelve 518 ± 23 kg grain fed Black Angus steers. Each cohort consisted of two treatments of 6 head/group: a thermally challenged (TC) treatment and a feed restricted thermoneutral (FRTN) treatment. Both groups were housed in climate controlled rooms for 19 days, with the TC group experiencing three distinct periods: PreChallenge, Challenge and Recovery. PreChallenge and Recovery delivered thermoneutral conditions, while Challenge consisted of 7 days of moderate diurnal heat load. The FRTN group was maintained in thermoneutral conditions at all times. Both groups were then relocated to outdoor pens for a further 40 days to detect any enduring change to metabolism as a consequence of the treatments. We compared blood biochemical responses of the treatments and inferred likely metabolic changes. Relative to the FRTN group, the TC animals experienced limited supply of triglycerides, cholesterol and glutamine during moderate heat load, suggesting constraints to energy metabolism. Lower blood urea during Recovery and in outdoor pens implied a requirement to capture N rather than allow its excretion. Altered liver enzyme profiles indicated a higher level of hepatic stress in the TC group. By the completion of feedlot finishing, the groups were not separable on most measures.
      PubDate: 2022-08-14
       
  • Effects of climatic and cultivar changes on winter wheat phenology in
           central Lithuania

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      Abstract: Abstract It is essential to understand how climate change and varieties affect crop phenology and yields to adapt to future climate change. The aim of this study was to analyse the phenological development trends of three winter wheat cultivars (1990–2020) to identify the most critical meteorological-climatic factors influencing the development and yield of the cultivars and to investigate the heat requirements for each phenological phase to reveal the potential of the different cultivars to adapt to the warming climate. The observed dates of green-up, the beginning of stem elongation, and the grain development advanced significantly, but the timing of maturity changed insignificantly during the period of 1990–2020. The most marked change was related to the shortening of the period from sowing to green-up. The green-up dates were related to the mean temperature of the period after sowing. The occurrence of stem elongation and grain development dates were negatively correlated with the mean temperature in May. Significant correlations were found between temperature and duration from sowing to green-up and positive from stem elongation to grain development. The change of cultivar led to earlier green-up and grain development dates, but cultivar choise had no influence on sowing, stem elongation, and maturity dates from 1990 to 2020. The newer cultivar Skagen was more successful in exploiting increased thermal resources. The heat requirements remained almost unchanged during the vegetative development period, while the heat amount required during the reproductive period increased by about 15%. These findings demonstrate that the choice of crop cultivars with higher thermal requirements may be an appropriate adaptation mean to achieve higher yields in response to climate change, at least in the middle latitudes.
      PubDate: 2022-08-13
       
  • Multi-domain human-oriented approach to evaluate human comfort in outdoor
           environments

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      Abstract: Abstract Human comfort outdoors is widely investigated, but most studies explore the comfort domains singularly. This paper aimed to evaluate human comfort in parks, verifying the importance of using a multi-domain (simultaneously evaluating thermal, visual, acoustic, and air quality) and multi-disciplinary (combining environmental and social fields) approach. A walk through a pre-defined path from one park to another was repeated twice per day on four consecutive days in June, with three participants per walk. The two investigated parks are in central Italy and were chosen because they differ in their design and spatial characteristics. Environmental data were recorded with an innovative wearable device during the whole walk, and surveys were used to assess people’s perceptions of the parks. Despite observed differences in collected physical parameters, the survey’s responses were similar, and different comfort domains showed dependence on each other in the two parks. Logistic regression models were developed for each park, and they revealed that the qualitative information predicted the overall comfort level more accurately than the environmental data. In detail, the models based on environmental data resulted in R2 equal to 0.126 and 0.111 in Parks 1 and 2, respectively, whereas using the survey answers increased it up to 0.820 (Park 1) and 0.806 (Park 2). This study contributes to addressing the gap in multi-domain comfort studies outdoors and confirms the importance of using multi-disciplinary and multi-domain approaches for a complete comfort analysis, supporting holistic human-biometeorology-oriented models and forecasting opportunities that can promote improvements in urban environmental quality and liveability.
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
       
  • Spatial and interdecadal differences in climatic suitability for winter
           wheat in China from 1985 to 2014

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      Abstract: Abstract  The evident climate jump after 2000 in China may have greatly influenced the production of winter wheat, which is one of the nation’s major grain crops. To evaluate the impacts of climate change on winter wheat production and identify the climatic factors primarily responsible, we used daily meteorological data from 2244 stations and integrated indicators to examine the decadal changes in the potential plantable zone (PPZ), growth periods, and climatic suitability for winter wheat in China from 1985 to 1999 and from 2000 to 2014. The results showed the following: (1) The PPZ has decreased by approximately 9%, and the main reason may be the increased frequency of extreme cold events in northern China from 2000 to 2014. (2) In most of the PPZ, the suitable sowing date has been delayed, the potential maturity date has advanced, and total days during the potential growing season have significantly decreased because of the increasing temperature. (3) The suitable area and optimal area of winter wheat have significantly decreased by 9% and 13%, respectively. The changes in climatic suitability are affected by both temperature and radiation in the north, whereas the impact is more from precipitation in the south. The climate may be changing in a direction unsuitable for winter wheat. As global warming and climate extremes intensify in the future, winter wheat production may become more challenging, and adequate measures should be adopted to guarantee reliable and high yields.
      PubDate: 2022-08-06
       
  • Molecular epidemiology on seasonal variation of yellow mosaic disease
           incidence in blackgram (Vigna mungo L. Hepper) with its vector Bemisia
           tabaci

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      Abstract: Abstract The yellow mosaic disease (YMD) of blackgram caused by Mungbean yellow mosaic virus has emerged as a serious threat to grain legume production, especially in Southeastern Asia. Seasonal incidence of YMD with its vector population was assessed in three different agroclimatic zones of Tamil Nadu in India for three consecutive cropping seasons namely, Rabi 2018 (October–December), Summer 2019 (March–May), and Kharif 2019 (June–August) at three different time intervals viz., 20, 40, and 60 days after sowing (DAS). For all three seasons, disease incidence and whitefly count were recorded for a resistant and susceptible variety of blackgram in fields without any vector control intervention. The highest disease incidence (87%) was observed in the Panpozhi location during the summer season followed by Vamban and Coimbatore locations. The whitefly count was made through both visual count and yellow sticky traps. The whitefly population was highest at 20 DAS and decreased with the increasing age of crop for all the three locations assessed. Molecular epidemiology was analyzed by determining latent infection of mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) using molecular diagnosis. Latent infection was found to be well pronounced in the Coimbatore location during the Kharif season, where the crop was asymptomatic in both the resistant and susceptible varieties for all the three time periods assessed. The latent infection of MYMV observed in Coimbatore and Vamban ranged from 16.6 to 83.3% in both resistant and susceptible varieties for all three seasons. In Panpozhi, the latent infection of MYMV ranged from 16.6 to 66.6% for the susceptible variety (CO-5) for all three seasons observed. However, in the Panpozhi location, the resistant variety (VBN-8) failed to record any latent infection.
      PubDate: 2022-08-05
       
  • A new causative heat supply for exertional heat stroke on runners in cold
           air

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      Abstract: Abstract The dysregulation in heat balance, the main cause of exertional heat stroke, occurs not only in midsummer but also in the cold season. Possible causes of this are a reduction in convection and evaporation due to tailwinds and an acceleration of radiant heat inflow. Although the amount of radiant heat that reaches the surface can be estimated, the actual amount of heat that flows into the body cannot be specified yet. This paper made an experimental attempt at this. A device is made up of a temperature controllable heat sink and heat flow detector, which keeps the surface temperature constant and has a heat exchange coefficient comparable to that of the human body surface. The output of this device (total heat exchange) was divided into radiant heat exchange and other heat exchange using a standard radiant heat calibrator, Leslie cube. A phenomenon, in which a wet surface while the surface temperature was low absorbed larger heat than that of the dry surface, was found. And authors named this “hidden heat inflow”. As a result of multiple regression analyses, both radiant heat exchange and other heat exchanges are closely related to the surface temperature, and the maximum difference in total heat exchange during the experiment reached 200 kcal/m2/h. It has been suggested that this phenomenon may also occur on the surface of human skin. One of the causes of this “hidden heat inflow” is considered to be the decrease in evaporative cooling due to the decrease in surface temperature. However, this alone cannot explain all of the phenomena, so water vapor aggregation may also be involved. A “hidden heat inflow” as a sufficient heat source for exertional heat stroke or collapse during a marathon race on a cold day was evidenced experimentally.
      PubDate: 2022-08-03
       
  • Role of Azadirachta indica (Neem) and Polyalthia longifolia (Asopalav)
           trees for improving outdoor thermal environment in unorganized urban
           settings

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      Abstract: Abstract This study assesses the effect of native trees in improving the outdoor thermal environment of an educational institute located in the semi-arid city of Ahmedabad, India. The study area was modelled using ENVI-met and validated against the field measurements. Physical properties of 8 species (55 samples) found in the city were collected. Azadirachta indica (Neem) and Polyalthia longifolia (Asopalav) are among the top 10 species found in the city. The campus has limited space availability and green cover, hence adding more trees is not possible. Hence, two separate scenarios of only those two species were developed by replacing the existing trees. The reduction in air temperature, mean radiant temperature and physiological equivalent temperature (PET) against existing scenario by Asopalav trees at a non-shaded site was found to be up to 1.0 °C, 2.2 °C and 2.0 °C whereas by Neem trees was found to be up to 1.1 °C, 2.3 °C and 2.1 °C. This similarity was likely due to their similar crown widths. The attenuation of direct short-wave radiation by Neem trees was more due to higher Leaf Area Density (LAD). Trees with higher LAD and wider crowns are found to be more useful in improving the outdoor thermal environment in dense urban settings with space constraints.
      PubDate: 2022-08-02
       
  • Exposure to solar UV radiation of Polish teenagers after the first
           COVID-19 lockdown in March–April 2020

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      Abstract: Abstract In Poland, schools were closed from March to June 2020 due to the COVID-19 epidemic. During the lockdown (March–April), everyone was advised to stay at home. From May, students were allowed to spend time outdoors. We examine their exposure to solar UV radiation during the period of virtual learning at schools (May–June), vacations (July–August) and the first month of typical learning (September). Primary and high school students aged 12–18 completed a questionnaire on the details of their outdoor activities and the weather at the exposure site. A total of 146 anonymous questionnaires were registered for the study. The survey responses provided input to a radiative transfer model to estimate erythemal and vitamin D doses obtained by teenagers during outdoor activities. The results from 48% of the questionnaires indicated that students’ exposure exceeded 1 minimal erythema dose (MED) during the day. Corresponding doses of sun-synthesized vitamin D, in excess of 1000 international units (IU) and 2000 IU, were found in 77% and 66% of the surveys, respectively. Only 12% of the teenagers declared that they use sunscreen. The overexposure (> 1 MED) increased with age. It was found in 72% and 26% of surveys among the students aged 17–18 and 12–14, respectively. Teenagers seem to have tried to compensate for the lack of sunlight during the lockdown by engaging in outdoor activities permitted since May. While those activities could have improved their vitamin D levels, they also put them at a higher risk of developing erythema.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Is higher ambient temperature associated with acute appendicitis
           hospitalizations' A case-crossover study in Tongling, China

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      Abstract: Abstract Existing studies suggested that ambient temperature may affect the attack of acute appendicitis. However, the identification of the quantitative effect and vulnerable populations are still unknown. The purposes of this study were to quantify the impact of daily mean temperature on the hospitalization of acute appendicitis and clarify vulnerable groups, further guide targeted prevention of acute appendicitis in Tongling. Daily data of cases and meteorological factors were collected in Tongling, China, during 2015–2019. Time stratified case-crossover design and conditional logistic regression model were used to evaluate the odds ratio (OR) of ambient temperature on hospitalizations for acute appendicitis. Stratified analyses were performed by sex, age, and marital status. The odds ratio (OR) of hospitalizations for acute appendicitis increased by 1.6% for per 1 ℃ rise in mean temperature at lag3[OR = 1.016, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.004–1.028]. In addition, our results suggest it is in the women that increased ambient temperature is more likely to contribute to acute appendicitis hospitalizations; we also found that the married are more susceptible to acute appendicitis hospitalizations due to increased ambient temperature than the unmarried; people in the 21–40 years old are more sensitive to ambient temperature than other age groups. The significant results of the differences between the subgroups indicate that the differences between the groups are all statistically significant. The elevated ambient temperatures increased the risk of hospitalizations for acute appendicitis. The females, married people, and patients aged 21–40 years old were more susceptible to ambient temperature. These findings suggest that more attention should be paid to the impact of high ambient temperature on acute appendicitis in the future.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Diurnal variation in rectal and cutaneous temperatures of horses housed
           under different management conditions

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      Abstract: Abstract Thermoregulation is an important mechanism to ensure thermal homeostasis. In horses, different housing conditions could influence this mechanism by exposing animals to different microclimates. The circadian rhythm of body temperature is well known. For this reason, we wanted to investigate the daily rhythm of cutaneous (jugular, shoulder, inner thigh and croup) temperature in comparison to rectal temperature in athletic horses kept under two different housing conditions. Ten clinically healthy Italian Saddle horses were divided into two equal groups: the first group was housed in individual boxes, and the second group was kept in paddocks. In all horses, rectal and cutaneous temperature measurements were performed every 4 h for 48 consecutive hours during different seasons (spring, summer, autumn and winter), respectively, by means of digital and infrared thermometers. Ambient temperature, relative humidity and ventilation were recorded simultaneously. A general linear model (GLM) was applied to the recorded temperature values displaying a significant effect of season, time of day, site of recording and housing condition (p < 0.001). No statistical differences were found between the two days of monitoring (p = 0.49). A trigonometric statistical model (single cosinor method) was applied to investigate the circadian rhythm of rectal and cutaneous temperatures in the two different groups. Our results showed circadian rhythmicity of rectal temperature during all seasons and in both groups. Cutaneous temperature shows daily rhythmicity that was different in the various regions and was influenced by housing conditions and seasons. Application of GLM also showed a statistically significant effect of season and site of recording (p < 0.0001) on all circadian parameters and of management condition on amplitude and robustness (p < 0.0001). No statistical differences between the two days of monitoring were observed (p = 0.68). These findings are probably due to the animals’ thermoregulatory mechanisms ensuring heat exchange between the body and the environment, and that was influenced by the microclimate. In particular, the microclimate influenced the thermodispersion disrupting the daily rhythmicity of some body regions, in horses kept in boxes. Only the temperate climatic conditions observed in summer guarantee the expression of the daily rhythmicity of all body surfaces in both management conditions. These results contribute to the knowledge of the mechanisms of homeostasis and control of body temperature in the athletic horse kept in different housing conditions, with a chronophysiological interpretation that completes the proper management of thermal well-being in horses.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Individually experienced heat index in a coastal Southeastern US city
           among an occupationally exposed population

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      Abstract: Abstract Recent studies have characterized individually experienced temperatures or individually experienced heat indices, including new exposure metrics that capture dimensions of exposure intensity, frequency, and duration. Yet, few studies have examined the personal thermal exposure in underrepresented groups, like outdoor workers, and even fewer have assessed corresponding changes in physiologic heat strain. The objective of this paper is to examine a cohort of occupationally exposed grounds and public safety workers (n = 25) to characterize their heat exposure and resulting heat strain. In addition, a secondary aim of this work is to compare individually heat index exposure (IHIE) across exposure metrics, fixed-site in situ weather stations, and raster-derived urban heat island (UHI) measurements in Charleston, SC, a humid coastal climate in the Southeastern USA. A Bland–Altman (BA) analysis was used to assess the level of agreement between the personal IHIE measurements and weather-station heat index (HI) and Urban Heat Island (UHI) measurements. Linear mixed-effect models were used to determine the association between individual risk factors and in situ weather station measurements significantly associated with IHIE measurements. Multivariable stepwise Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to identify the individual and workplace factors associated with time to heat strain in workers. We also examined the non-linear association between heat strain and exposure metrics using generalized additive models. We found significant heterogeneity in IHIE measurements across participants. We observed that time to heat strain was positively associated with a higher IHIE, older age, being male, and among Caucasian workers. Important nonlinear associations between heat strain occurrence and the intensity, frequency, and duration of personal heat metrics were observed. Lastly, our analysis found that IHIE measures were significantly similar for weather station HI, although differences were more pronounced for temperature and relative humidity measurements. Conversely, our IHIE findings were much lower than raster-derived UHI measurements. Real-time monitoring can offer important insights about unfolding temperature-health trends and emerging behaviors during thermal extreme events, which have significant potential to provide situational awareness.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Comparison of the efficacies of peloid therapy and paraffin treatment
           given as an adjuncts to exercise therapy in patients with hallux rigidus:
           a randomized, uncontrolled, prospective study

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      Abstract: Abstract Although it is thought that peloid and paraffin treatments may have positive effect on pain, functional status, and quality of life in patients with hallux rigidus (HR), there are no comprehensive and comparative studies with a high level of evidence. We aimed to compare peloid and paraffin treatments in symptomatic hallux rigidus patients. A total of 113 patients diagnosed with HR between May 2019 and June 2021 were included in the study. After exclusion criteria, the remaining 90 patients were randomly divided into two groups: the peloid therapy group (peloid therapy + home exercise) and the paraffin therapy group (paraffin therapy + home exercise). Peloid and paraffin treatments were applied for 2 weeks (5 days a week for a total of 10 sessions). Patients were evaluated before treatment, at the end of treatment, and one month after treatment. The groups were compared in terms of pain, functional status, quality of life, and joint range of motion. In the final analysis, 40 patients in each treatment group were compared. Statistically significant improvements were achieved for all parameters at the end of treatment and at follow-up, and the treatments were found to be highly effective. As a result of the comparison, the methods were not found to be superior to each other. The present study is the first randomized study comparing peloid therapy and paraffin therapy given as an adjuncts to exercise therapy. Exercise therapy plus peloid and exercise therapy plus paraffin treatments seem to have similar effects on HR; however, controlled trials are necessary for confirmation of our results.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Heat stress in Africa under high intensity climate change

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      Abstract: Abstract Extreme weather events are major causes of loss of life and damage infrastructure worldwide. High temperatures cause heat stress on humans, livestock, crops and infrastructure. Heat stress exposure is projected to increase with ongoing climate change. Extremes of temperature are common in Africa and infrastructure is often incapable of providing adequate cooling. We show how easily accessible cooling technology, such as evaporative coolers, prevent heat stress in historic timescales but are unsuitable as a solution under climate change. As temperatures increase, powered cooling, such as air conditioning, is necessary to prevent overheating. This will, in turn, increase demand on already stretched infrastructure. We use high temporal resolution climate model data to estimate the demand for cooling according to two metrics, firstly the apparent temperature and secondly the discomfort index. For each grid cell we calculate the heat stress value and the amount of cooling required to turn a heat stress event into a non heat stress event. We show the increase in demand for cooling in Africa is non uniform and that equatorial countries are exposed to higher heat stress than higher latitude countries. We further show that evaporative coolers are less effective in tropical regions than in the extra tropics. Finally, we show that neither low nor high efficiency coolers are sufficient to return Africa to current levels of heat stress under climate change.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Improving the applicability of the thermo-physiological human simulator by
           correcting its local set point skin temperatures

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      Abstract: Abstract The thermo-physiological human simulator has been used in many regions for estimating thermal behavior of the locals. The applicability of the human simulator to populations from different regions is, however, questioned due to its lack of consideration for the ethnic diversities in thermoregulation. This study checked the potential of improving the applicability of the Newton human simulator, one of the most popular simulators, by correcting its local set point skin temperatures according to the target population (Chinese as an example). First, new set point skin temperatures were obtained by conducting tests with 101 Chinese under a thermal neutral condition. Then, simulator tests using the original and new set point skin temperatures were conducted separately for evaluating thermal responses of the Chinese under non-neutral conditions. The evaluated skin and core temperatures by the simulators were compared with those measured from the real human tests. It demonstrated that the evaluated skin temperatures are positively related with the set point skin temperatures of the simulator. Adjusting set point skin temperatures according to the Chinese improved the prediction performance of the local skin temperatures, with the root-mean-square-deviation being reduced for over 50% of the body segments. The proposed idea of correcting local set point skin temperatures would contribute to evaluating the thermal interaction between human body and its surroundings with a higher accuracy.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Climate change and physical activity: ambient temperature and urban trail
           use in Texas

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      Abstract: Abstract Individuals in the USA are insufficiently active, increasing their chronic disease risk. Extreme temperatures may reduce physical activity due to thermal discomfort. Cooler climate studies have suggested climate change may have a net positive effect on physical activity, yet research gaps remain for warmer climates and within-day physical activity patterns. We determined the association between ambient temperatures (contemporary and projected) and urban trail use in a humid subtropical climate. At a trail in Austin, TX, five electronic counters recorded hourly pedestrian and cyclist counts in 2019. Weather data were acquired from World Weather Online. Generalized additive models estimated the association between temperature and trail counts. We then combined the estimated exposure–response relation with weather projections from climate models for intermediate (RCP4.5) and high (RCP8.5) emissions scenarios by NASA NEX-GDDP. From summer to autumn to spring to winter, hourly trail counts shifted from bimodal (mid-morning and early-evening peaks) to one mid-day peak. Pedestrians were more likely to use the trail between 7 and 27 °C (45–81°F) with peak use at 17 °C (63°F) and cyclists between 15 and 33 °C (59–91°F) with peak use at 27 °C (81°F) than at temperature extremes. A net decrease in trail use was estimated by 2041–2060 (RCP4.5: pedestrians =  − 4.5%, cyclists =  − 1.1%; RCP8.5: pedestrians =  − 6.6%, cyclists =  − 1.6%) and 2081–2100 (RCP4.5: pedestrians =  − 7.5%, cyclists =  − 1.9%; RCP8.5: pedestrians =  − 16%, cyclists =  − 4.5%). Results suggest climate change may reduce trail use. We recommend interventions for thermal comfort at settings for physical activity.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Characterization of thermo-physiological, hematological, and molecular
           changes in response to seasonal variations in two tropically adapted
           native cattle breeds of Bos indicus lineage in hot arid ambience of Thar
           Desert

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      Abstract: Abstract The selection of climate resilient animal is necessary to secure the future of sustainable animal production. The present investigation therefore was an effort to unravel answers to the adaptation at physiological, hematological, and molecular levels in cows of hot arid region that helps them to survive harsh environment, to continue production and reproduction. This investigation was carried out in indicine cows over a period of one year, encompassing four seasons, wherein physiological data of 50 animals, hematological data of 15 animals, and gene expression profile of 5 animals from each of Sahiwal and Kankrej breeds per season was generated. In total, 5600 physiological observations, 1344 hematological observations, and 480 molecular samples were processed. The meteorological data revealed a high diurnal variation of temperature across seasons, with THI exceeding 80 during the months of summer and hot-humid seasons, indicating significant heat stress (HS). The physiological parameters showed an increasing trend with the incremental THI, with significantly (p < 0.05) higher values of rectal temperature (RT), respiration rate (RR), pulse rate (PR), and body surface temperature (BST) at ventral (VT), lateral (LT), dorsal (DT), and frontal (FT), in both breeds recorded during HS. The hematological pictures also revealed significant (p < 0.05) seasonal perturbations in erythrocytic and leucocytic parameters. Moreover, the molecular response was driven by a significant (p < 0.05) upregulation of all the key HSPs, HSP70, HSP90, HSP60, and HSP40, except HSP27 during the hotter months of summer and hot-humid seasons. The expression of HSF1, an important transcriptional regulator of  HSP70 was also significantly (p < 0.05) upregulated during summer season in both breeds. All the molecular chaperones revealed a significant upregulation during the summer season, followed by a decreasing trend by hot-humid season. The study indicated a well-developed thermotolerance mechanism in animals of both breeds, with Kankrej cows exhibiting better thermotolerance compared to Sahiwal cows.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • The effect of climate change on malaria transmission in the southeast of
           Iran

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      Abstract: Abstract Malaria is a vector-borne disease, likely to be affected by climate change. In this study, general circulation model (GCM)-based scenarios were used for projecting future climate patterns and malaria incidence by artificial neural networks (ANN) in Zahedan district, Iran. Daily malaria incidence data of Zahedan district from 2000 to 2019 were inquired. The gamma test was used to select the appropriate combination of parameters for nonlinear modeling. The future climate pattern projections were obtained from HadGEM2-ES. The output was downscaled using LARS-WG stochastic weather generator under two Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP2.6 and RCP8.5) scenarios. The effect of climate change on malaria transmission for 2021–2060 was simulated by ANN. The designed model indicated that the future climate in Zahedan district will be warmer, more humid, and with more precipitation. Assessment of the potential impact of climate change on the incidence of malaria by ANN showed the number of malaria cases in Zahedan under both scenarios (RCP2.6 and RCP 8.5). It should be noted that due to the lack of daily malaria data before 2013, monthly data from 2000 were used only for initial analysis; and in preprocessing and simulation analyses, the daily malaria data from 2013 to 2019 were used. Therefore, if proper interventions are not implemented, malaria will continue to be a health issue in this region.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Climate sensitivity of seasonal radial growth in young stands of Mexican
           conifers

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      Abstract: Abstract Alteration of forest by climate change and human activities modify the growth response of trees to temperature and moisture. Growth trends of young forests with even-aged stands recruited recently when the climate became warmer and drier are not well known. We analyze the radial growth response of young conifer trees (37–63 years old) to climatic parameters and drought stress employing Pearson correlations and the Vaganov-Shashkin Lite (VS-Lite) model. This study uses tree rings of six species of conifer trees (Pinus teocote, Pinus pseudostrobus, Pinus pinceana, Pinus montezumae, Pinus ayacahuite, and Taxodium mucronatum) collected from young forests with diverse growth conditions in northern and central Mexico. Seasonal ring growth and earlywood width (EW) were modeled as a function of temperature and soil moisture using the VS-Lite model. Wet and cool conditions in the previous winter and current spring enhance ring growth and EW production, mainly in sensitive species from dry sites (P. teocote, P. pseudostrobus, P. pinceana, and P. montezumae), whereas the growth of species from mesic sites (P. ayacahuite and T. mucronatum) shows little responsiveness to soil moisture. In P. ayacahuite and T. mucronatum, latewood growth is enhanced by warm summer conditions. The VS-Lite model shows that low soil moisture during April and May constrains growth in the four sensitive species, particularly in P. pinceana, the species dominant in the most xeric sites. Assessing seasonal ring growth and combining its response to climate with process-based growth models could complement xylogenesis data. Such framework should be widely applied, given the predicted warming and its impact on young forests.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Effects of precipitation seasonal distribution on net ecosystem CO2
           exchange over an alpine meadow in the southeastern Tibetan Plateau

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      Abstract: Abstracts Ecosystem carbon balance might be affected by the variability of seasonal distribution of precipitation under global climate change. Using the eddy covariance (EC) technique, long-term observations of ecosystem net CO2 exchange (NEE) were acquired over Lijiang alpine meadow in the southeastern Tibetan Plateau from January 2014 to August 2019. During the wet season (from June to October), Lijiang meadow functioned as a carbon sink (− 37.6 ± 22.5 g C m−2 month−1), while in dry season, the meadow varied between a weak carbon source and sink with an average monthly NEE of − 3.9 ± 11.9 g C m−2 month−1. Monthly CO2 fluxes were mainly controlled by air temperature and soil water content. A large annual variation of CO2 uptake was observed. The annual NEE was − 140.3 g C m−2 year−1 in 2014 while − 247.0 g C m−2 year−1 in 2016. Correspondingly, the precipitation in wet season accounted 90% of annual precipitation in 2014 and 74% of that in 2016 despite the annual precipitation was larger than 1200 mm in both years. More precipitation in dry season can lead to longer period of net CO2 uptake, while more precipitation concentrated in wet season depressed the meadow’s light response through the decrease of the magnitude of light-saturated net CO2 exchange (NEEsat) at the onset and the end of growing season.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Correction to: The association between weather and emergency department
           visitation for diabetes in Roanoke, Virginia

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      PubDate: 2022-07-12
       
 
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