A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

              [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 50)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 63)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Climate Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 69)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 133)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Journal of Climate Change and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorological Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 145)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Nīvār     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Weather     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

              [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal of Biometeorology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.897
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1432-1254 - ISSN (Online) 0020-7128
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Impact of temperature changes between neighboring days on cardiovascular
           disease hospital admissions among suburban farmers in Qingyang, Northwest
           China

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Background No studies focused on impact of temperature changes between neighboring days (TCN) on cardiovascular disease (CVD) hospital admissions among suburban farmers although CVD has been the main cause to global mortality and disability especially in undeveloped and developing countries/areas. Method Daily data of CVD hospital admissions on suburban farmers and daily data of meteorology in Qingyang (China) were collected during 2011–2015. A distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) was applied to explore the exposure–response relations and lagged effects between TCN and CVD hospital admissions with stratified analyses by age and gender. Extreme low TCN effects and burden analysis were conducted. Results Based on 25,984 cases in Qingyang (China) during 2011–2015 among suburban farmers, we found that, first, nonlinear relationship was observed between TCN and CVD hospital admissions and adverse impact in negative TCN (temperature dropping between neighboring days) while protective effect in positive TCN (temperature rising between neighboring days) were discovered; third, during lag0–27, the cumulative relative risk (RR) for extreme low TCN (5th percentile, − 3.5 °C) and extreme high TCN (95th percentile, 3 °C) was 29.55 (95% CI 4.709–185.436) and 0.040 (95% CI 0.009–0.169), respectively; fourth, the age < 65 and females were more vulnerable to negative TCN than the age ≥ 65 and males among suburban farmers, respectively; last, moderate low TCN contributed the most fractions and numbers on CVD hospital admissions. Conclusions Among Qingyang suburban farmers in Northwest China, negative TCN should be paid more attention.
      PubDate: 2022-05-18
       
  • Acute physiological response to a normobaric hypoxic exposure: sex
           differences

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Although preliminary studies suggested sex-related differences in physiological responses to altitude/hypoxia, controlled studies from standardised exposures to normobaric hypoxia are largely lacking. Hence, the goals of this study were to provide information on cardiorespiratory responses to a 7-h normobaric hypoxia exposure and to explore potential differences between men and women. In this crossover study, a total of 15 men and 14 women were subjected to a 7-h exposure in normoxia (FiO2: 21%) and normobaric hypoxia (FiO2: 15%). Values of peripheral oxygen saturation, heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and respiratory gases were recorded every hour (8 time points), and oxygen saturation every 30 min (15 time points). Compared to normoxia, exposure to hypoxia significantly increased minute ventilation from baseline to hour 7 in males (+ 71%) and females (+ 40%), significantly greater in men (p < 0.05). A steeper decrease in peripheral oxygen saturation until 2.5 h in hypoxia was seen in females compared to males (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the ventilatory response to hypoxia was more pronounced in men compared to women. Moreover, during the first hours in hypoxia, peripheral oxygen saturation dropped more markedly in women than in men, likely due an initially lower and/or less efficient ventilatory response to moderate hypoxia. Those findings should be considered when performing interventions for therapy or prevention in normobaric hypoxia. Nevertheless, further large-scaled and well-controlled studies are needed.
      PubDate: 2022-05-18
       
  • The Association between Weather and Emergency Department Visitation for
           Diabetes in Roanoke, Virginia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Diabetes mellitus imposes a significant and increasing health burden on the US population. Our objective is to determine if weather is related to daily variations in emergency department (ED) visits for diabetes mellitus in Roanoke, Virginia. A time series of daily ED visits for diabetes mellitus at the Carilion Clinic in southwestern Virginia is associated with daily minimum temperature from 2010–2017. Associations between ED visits (through a 14-day lag period) and temperature are examined using generalized additive models and distributed lag nonlinear models. Heat and cold waves are identified at low and high thresholds, and ED visitation during these events is compared to prior control periods using a time-stratified case crossover approach. ED visits for diabetes exhibit a U-shaped relationship with temperature, with a higher relative risk (RR) during cold events (RR = 1.05) vs. warm events (RR = 1.02). When minimum temperatures are below freezing, ED visitation peaks starting 2 days afterward, with RRs approaching 1.04. The RR on warm days (minimum temperature > 10 °C) approaches 1.02 but peaks on the day of or the day following the elevated temperatures. Cold waves increase the odds of ED visits by up to 11% (p = 0.01), whereas heat waves exhibit no significant effect (p = 0.07). The increasing health burden linked to diabetes requires new research on environmental factors that might exacerbate related illness. When examined in the context of climate change impacts on local weather variations, these kinds of linkages between environment and disease can aid in facility staffing and public health messaging during extreme weather events.
      PubDate: 2022-05-18
       
  • Seasonal variations on semen quality attributes in turkey and egg type
           chicken male breeders

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: A biological experiment was carried out in twenty-four adult healthy breeder males each in turkey (Beltsville small white) and egg type chicken (White Leghorn Babcock) in order to assess the seasonal influence on semen production and quality. The birds were maintained in individual cages under uniform husbandry conditions throughout the year. The birds were fed with breeder ration and water ad libitum was offered with a constant photoperiod of 14 h/day. Physical and biochemical characteristics of semen, serum hormones (testosterone and thyroxine), and antioxidant activity (catalase and lipid peroxidation) were evaluated throughout the year (January–December). Based on the THI calculations, the observations were classified under three different seasons, namely, winter (November–February), spring (March, April, and October), and summer (May–September). Semen physical parameters, sperm concentration, motility, live sperm percentage, and sperm plasma membrane integrity were superior during the winter season. In seminal plasma, biochemical parameters (phosphorus, ALT, ALP, AST, and uric acid) had a significant (P < 0.05) difference between seasons. There was a significant difference (P < 0.05) among serum hormones (testosterone and thyroxine) that were higher during the winter season. Significant variation was observed in catalase and lipid peroxidation antioxidant enzyme activities (seminal and blood plasma) in winter than in the other two seasons. Both the turkey and egg type chicken breeders exhibited superior seminal characteristics, sex hormone profile, and antioxidant enzyme activity during winter seasons.
      PubDate: 2022-05-14
       
  • Physiological mechanisms of the impact of heat during pregnancy and the
           clinical implications: review of the evidence from an expert group meeting
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Many populations experience high seasonal temperatures. Pregnant women are considered vulnerable to extreme heat because ambient heat exposure has been linked to pregnancy complications including preterm birth and low birthweight. The physiological mechanisms that underpin these associations are poorly understood. We reviewed the existing research evidence to clarify the mechanisms that lead to adverse pregnancy outcomes in order to inform public health actions. A multi-disciplinary expert group met to review the existing evidence base and formulate a consensus regarding the physiological mechanisms that mediate the effect of high ambient temperature on pregnancy. A literature search was conducted in advance of the meeting to identify existing hypotheses and develop a series of questions and themes for discussion. Numerous hypotheses have been generated based on animal models and limited observational studies. There is growing evidence that pregnant women are able to appropriately thermoregulate; however, when exposed to extreme heat, there are a number of processes that may occur which could harm the mother or fetus including a reduction in placental blood flow, dehydration, and an inflammatory response that may trigger preterm birth. There is a lack of substantial evidence regarding the processes that cause heat exposure to harm pregnant women. Research is urgently needed to identify what causes the adverse outcomes in pregnancy related to high ambient temperatures so that the impact of climate change on pregnant women can be mitigated.
      PubDate: 2022-05-12
       
  • Ambient temperature exposure and risk of outpatient visits for
           dermatologic diseases in Xinxiang, China: a time-series analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The effect of ambient temperature on dermatologic diseases has received widespread attention. Previous studies have shown that ambient temperature might affect specific dermatologic diseases, but results were inconsistent. This study aims to assess the short-term effect of ambient temperature on outpatient visits due to dermatologic diseases (DMs) in Xinxiang, China. Daily DMs outpatient visits, mean temperature, mean relative humidity, and air pollution data of Xinxiang were retrieved from January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2018. A distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM) was applied to analyze the effect of ambient temperature on DMs outpatients. We controlled several potential confounding factors such as the long-term trend, public holiday, day of the week, humidity, and air pollutants (NO2, PM2.5). Finally, two more stratification analysis was conducted by age and gender. A total of 164,270 outpatients of DMs were enrolled during our study, and the daily mean visits were 113. The estimated effect of temperature on DMs was nonlinear. Heat temperature would exacerbate outpatients of dermatologic diseases. With a reference median temperature (17 °C), the effect of temperature on DMs was most pronounced at lag0–14; exposure to heat (32 °C, 99th) was associated with 1.565 (95% CI: 1.266–1.934) increased risk of outpatients for DMs. Stratification analysis showed that citizens of young ages were susceptive to heat; both genders had a similar relationship between temperature and DMs risk. This study highlights that ambient temperature was associated with DMs outpatients; heat temperature might aggravate DMs risk. The health hazards of heat temperature required more attention, and more effective prevention measurements should be designed and implemented to curb global warming.
      PubDate: 2022-05-06
       
  • Effects of precipitation seasonal distribution on net ecosystem CO2
           exchange over an alpine meadow in the southeastern Tibetan Plateau

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: s Ecosystem carbon balance might be affected by the variability of seasonal distribution of precipitation under global climate change. Using the eddy covariance (EC) technique, long-term observations of ecosystem net CO2 exchange (NEE) were acquired over Lijiang alpine meadow in the southeastern Tibetan Plateau from January 2014 to August 2019. During the wet season (from June to October), Lijiang meadow functioned as a carbon sink (− 37.6 ± 22.5 g C m−2 month−1), while in dry season, the meadow varied between a weak carbon source and sink with an average monthly NEE of − 3.9 ± 11.9 g C m−2 month−1. Monthly CO2 fluxes were mainly controlled by air temperature and soil water content. A large annual variation of CO2 uptake was observed. The annual NEE was − 140.3 g C m−2 year−1 in 2014 while − 247.0 g C m−2 year−1 in 2016. Correspondingly, the precipitation in wet season accounted 90% of annual precipitation in 2014 and 74% of that in 2016 despite the annual precipitation was larger than 1200 mm in both years. More precipitation in dry season can lead to longer period of net CO2 uptake, while more precipitation concentrated in wet season depressed the meadow’s light response through the decrease of the magnitude of light-saturated net CO2 exchange (NEEsat) at the onset and the end of growing season.
      PubDate: 2022-05-06
       
  • Interaction of aerosol with meteorological parameters and its effect on
           the cash crop in the Vidarbha region of Maharashtra, India

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Regional weather variability depends on various meteorological variables such as temperature and rainfall. The current research focuses on the variability and trends in annual aerosol optical depth (AOD), temperature (T), and rainfall (RF) in 11 Vidarbha districts. The annual trend analysis of AOD, T, and R is determined using the non-parametric Sen slope and Mann–Kendall (MK) test at a 5% significant level from 1980 to 2019. Annual T and AOD indicate a substantial increase in this study, whereas rainfall shows a non-significant trend (MK, test) over the study period. According to Sen’s slope trends, the relatively high rainfall area (Chandrapur = 1.273 and Garchiroli = 4.06) got positive trends, but Gondia and Bhandara districts have negative (Sen’s slope =  − 2.79 and − 2.56) trends. The moderate rainfall areas are showing a less negative Sen slope (Wardha =  − 0.21, Washim =  − 1.13 and Yavatmal =  − 2.75), whereas Nagpur districts’ Sen’s slope shows a positive value (Sens’s slope = 0.72). The assured rainfall area districts show Sen’s slope trends are positive (Akola = 0.45, Amravati = 1.17 and Buldana = 0.42). Sen’s slope trend indicates rising rainfall, whereas negative trends indicate decreasing rainfall in the time series. This study has also looked at the effect of RF, AOD, and T on the last two decades’ cash crop production (2000–2019) for Vidarbha districts. The relationship between rainfall departure (DRF) and cash crop yield has also been highlighted. Five cash crops, such as cotton (Ct), total cereals (TCrl), total oilseeds (TOsd), total pulses (TPS), and sugarcane (Sc), are selected for the present study.
      PubDate: 2022-05-04
       
  • Dependence of maize yield on hydrothermal factors in various agro-climatic
           zones of the Rostov region of Russia in the context of climate change

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Trends in mean monthly temperature and precipitation during the growing season and their effects on the maize yield were analyzed at the Zimovnikovsky (Zim) and Rostov (Ros) state variety plots (SVPs), located in different agro-climatic zones of the Rostov region. For these two SVPs, in the period of 1975–2019, the Mann–Kendall test showed a statistically significant increase (p < 0.05) in mean temperature (0.70 and 0.52 °C/decade) and a trend of decreased total precipitation (− 14.81 and − 10.40 mm/decade) during the maize growing season. The dependence of the maize yield on hydrothermal factors was estimated for the period of 2011–2019 using the Pearson correlation coefficient (p < 0.05). The mean temperature in September at Zim negatively (r =  − 0.78), and in June at Ros positively (r = 0.77) correlated with yield, which explained, according to the value of the coefficient of determination (R2), up to 60.7% and 58.7%, respectively, of the interannual variability of the maize yield. The precipitation in July at the Zim and Ros positively correlated (r = 0.75 and r = 0.71) with yield and explained up to 55.9% and 50.6%, respectively, of the interannual variability of the maize yield. The total amount of precipitation during the growing season at Zim was the dominant factor, explaining up to 75.7% of the interannual variability of maize yield. The continuation of the observed climatic trends during the growing season could lead in the next decade to both a decrease in the maize yield by an average of 0.25 t/ha at Zim and an increase in the maize yield by an average of 0.42 t/ha at Ros.
      PubDate: 2022-05-03
       
  • Correction to: A comparison of herbarium and citizen science phenology
           datasets for detecting response of flowering time to climate change in
           Denmark

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2022-05-01
       
  • Reconstruction of April temperatures in Kyoto, Japan, since the fifteenth
           century using the floral phenology of herbaceous peony and rabbit-ear iris
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract We reconstructed April mean temperatures in Kyoto since the fifteenth century by investigating historical documents such as diaries and chronicles and compiling phenological data series of the full bloom date for herbaceous peony. In order to fill gaps in phenological data series, we used the full bloom date of rabbit-ear iris, an herbaceous plant that flowers at about the same time of the year as an herbaceous peony. We obtained floral phenological data covering a total of 278 years. Calibration using modern temperature data showed herbaceous peony phenology to be the preferred data source for April temperature estimation. Variations in the reconstructed April temperatures in Kyoto were synchronous with changes in the solar cycle. In particular, April temperatures were about 2 ℃ lower than at present around the ends of the Spoerer and Maunder grand solar minima, from 1550 to 1590 and from 1690 to 1730, respectively. In addition, the reconstructed April temperatures suggested a time lag in the climate response to solar activity changes that was about 10 years longer than the previously estimated lags in the responses of wintertime and March temperatures. However, further research is needed to accurately quantify this time lag.
      PubDate: 2022-05-01
       
  • Coffee pest severity by agrometeorological models in subtropical climate

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract This study aimed to estimate the number of generations and cycle duration of the southern red mite, coffee berry borer, and coffee leaf miner using the thermal index to assist in controlling these main coffee pests in the state of Paraná, Brazil. The data of maximum and minimum air temperature (°C) and precipitation (mm) of all municipalities in the state from 1984 to 2018 were collected from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Prediction of Worldwide Energy Resources (NASA/POWER). The reference evapotranspiration was estimated using the (Camargo Campinas IAC Boletim 116:9, 1971) method and the water balance was calculated using the method of ( Thornthwaite C, Mather J (1955) The water balance publications in climatology, 8 (1). DIT, Laboratory of climatology, Centerton, NJ, USA). The basal temperature of each pest minus the average temperature of the years was used to calculate the degrees-day, the duration of the pest cycle, and the number of generations per year. The influence of altitude on the development of coffee pests was measured using the Pearson correlation. The thermal index is able to estimate the damage caused by coffee pests in the state of Pará, Brazil. Coffee pests show greater severity in the north of Paraná, in the regions with the highest temperatures. It is the same region that concentrates most of the coffee production of the state. The results of the life cycle and number of generations were interpolated for the entire state using the kriging method. Coffee pests showed the highest severity in the north region of the state of Paraná, more specifically in the Northwest, North Central, and West Central mesoregions. These regions have concentrated most of the state’s coffee production. Mesoregions with the highest coffee production in the state showed higher susceptibility to coffee pests. Altitude showed a high correlation (r > 0.6) with the cycle variability and number of generations of coffee pests. The average cycles of the coffee berry borer, coffee leaf miner, and southern red mite are 24.13 (± 8.34), 45.64 (± 18.61), and 21.51 (± 3.51) days, respectively. The average annual generation was 16.67 (± 4.77), 9.02 (± 2.75), and 17.32 (± 2.63) generations, for the coffee berry borer, the coffee red mite, and the southern red mite, respectively.
      PubDate: 2022-05-01
       
  • Implications of variable environments on phenology of apple
           (Malus × domestica Borkh.) in Northwestern Himalayan region

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Apple phenology is greatly influenced by temperature. For quality apple production in the orchards, knowledge of the real timing of phenological stages is essential for scientific management decisions. In the Kashmir region, the year 2017 had a normal weather phenomenon, whereas the year 2018 had an erratic weather phenomenon wherein unusually high temperatures prevailed in the winter months and may be a clear sign of climate change effect. Due to this higher temperature in winter months of the year 2018 before bud break, earliness of phenological stages happened as compared to the year 2017, viz. silver tip stage by 5.67 days, green tip stage by 6.61 days, pink bud stage by 10.09 days, initial bloom by 10.43 days, full bloom by 9.70 days, and petal fall by 8.00 days. The flowering duration was overall recorded 2.43 days more in 2018 as compared to that in 2017. Due to the earliness of phenological stages in 2018, all twenty-five cultivars of the apple remained at high risk of spring frost and scientific apple orchard interventions were badly hit as growers were surprised and unprepared. The information generated will be very useful for growers, students, researchers, policy makers, and all the concerned stakeholders to understand how apple phenology responds to normal and extreme erratic weather conditions and may happen more frequently in the future due to climate change.
      PubDate: 2022-05-01
       
  • Impact of low-intensity heat events on mortality and morbidity in regions
           with hot, humid summers: a scoping literature review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The objective of this study is to determine the impacts of low-intensity heat on human health in regions with hot, humid summers. Current literature has highlighted an increase in mortality and morbidity rates during significant heat events. While the impacts on high-intensity events are established, the impacts on low-intensity events, particularly in regions with hot, humid summers, are less clear. A scoping review was conducted searching three databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science) using key terms based on the inclusion criteria. We included papers that investigated the direct human health impacts of low-intensity heat events (single day or heatwaves) in regions with hot, humid summers in middle- and high-income countries. We excluded papers written in languages other than English. Of the 600 publications identified, 33 met the inclusion criteria. Findings suggest that low-intensity heatwaves can increase all-cause non-accidental, cardiovascular-, respiratory- and diabetes-related mortality, in regions experiencing hot, humid summers. Impacts of low-intensity heatwaves on morbidity are less clear, with research predominantly focusing on hospitalisation rates with a range of outcomes. Few studies investigating the impact of low-intensity heat events on emergency department presentations and ambulance dispatches were found. However, the data from a limited number of studies suggest that both of these outcome measures increase during low-intensity heat events. Low-intensity heat events may increase mortality. There is insufficient evidence of a causal effect of low-intensity heat events on increasing morbidity for a firm conclusion. Further research on the impact of low-intensity heat on morbidity and mortality using consistent parameters is warranted.
      PubDate: 2022-05-01
       
  • Increasing trees and high-albedo surfaces decreases heat impacts and
           mortality in Los Angeles, CA

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract There is a pressing need for strategies to prevent the heat-health impacts of climate change. Cooling urban areas through adding trees and vegetation and increasing solar reflectance of roofs and pavements with higher albedo surface materials are recommended strategies for mitigating the urban heat island. We quantified how various tree cover and albedo scenarios would impact heat-related mortality, temperature, humidity, and oppressive air masses in Los Angeles, California, and quantified the number of years that climate change–induced warming could be delayed in Los Angeles if interventions were implemented. Using synoptic climatology, we used meteorological data for historical summer heat waves, classifying days into discrete air mass types. We analyzed those data against historical mortality data to determine excess heat-related mortality. We then used the Weather Research and Forecasting model to explore the effects that tree cover and albedo scenarios would have, correlating the resultant meteorological data with standardized mortality data algorithms to quantify potential reductions in mortality. We found that roughly one in four lives currently lost during heat waves could be saved. We also found that climate change–induced warming could be delayed approximately 40–70 years under business-as-usual and moderate mitigation scenarios, respectively.
      PubDate: 2022-05-01
       
  • Effect of heat stress mitigations on physiological, behavioural, and
           hormonal responses of Buffalo calves

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract This study assessed the effect of heat stress mitigations on the physiological, behavioural, and hormonal responses of buffalo during the hot summer season. Twenty Murrah buffalo male calves were distributed randomly into controlled (C, n = 10) and treatment groups (T, n = 10). The buffalo calves in the C group were housed in the existing shed (10–12-ft height and 10-ft width). Buffalo calves of the T group were allocated in the modified shed: 15-ft height and 20-ft width along with time-controlled pressure mist with fans and rubber mats on the floor. Fans were running all days. The cool water was misted on calves at the rate of 1 min in 5 min, from 11:00 to 18:00 h. The water misting system was installed below the roof, but at 3.5 m above the floor. The calves’ body weight, rectal temperature, infrared temperature of the eye, blood samples, respiration rate, and pulse rate were recorded fortnightly for two consecutive months. In one-way ANOVA, rectal temperature, eye temperature, cortisol level, and afternoon’s respiration and pulse rate were higher in the calves of C group than that of T group (P < 0.05). Conversely, eating and resting time (min/day) and triiodothyronine were lower in the calves of C group than that of T group (P < 0.05). Therefore, an increase in shed’s height and width, using rubber mats on the floor, and cool water misting to buffaloes during the hot summer seasons positively influence their physiological, hormonal, and behavioural responses.
      PubDate: 2022-05-01
       
  • Health management of patients with COVID-19: is there a room for
           hydrotherapeutic approaches'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract With highly variable types of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) symptoms in both severity and duration, there is today an important need for early, individualized, and multidisciplinary strategies of rehabilitation. Some patients present persistent affections of the respiratory function, digestive system, cardiovascular function, locomotor system, mental health, sleep, nervous system, immune system, taste, smell, metabolism, inflammation, and skin. In this context, we highlight here that hydrothermal centers should be considered today as medically and economically relevant alternatives to face the urgent need for interventions among COVID-19 patients. We raise the potential benefits of hydrotherapy programs already existing which combine alternative medicine with respiratory care, physical activity, nutritional advice, psychological support, and physiotherapy, in relaxing environments and under medical supervision. Beyond the virtues of thermal waters, many studies reported medical benefits of natural mineral waters through compressing, buoyancy, resistance, temperature changes, hydrostatic pressure, inhalations, or drinking. Thermal institutions might offer individualized follow-up helping to unclog hospitals while ensuring the continuity of health care for the different clinical manifestations of COVID-19 in both post-acute and chronic COVID-19 patients. Our present review underlines the need to further explore the medical effectiveness, clinical and territorial feasibility, and medico-economic impacts of the implementation of post-COVID-19 patient management in hydrotherapeutic establishments.
      PubDate: 2022-05-01
       
  • Optimizing sowing window, cultivar choice, and plant density to boost
           maize yield under RCP8.5 climate scenario of CMIP5

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The impacts of climate change and possible adaptations to food security are a global concern and need greater focus in arid and semi-arid regions. It includes scenario of Coupled Model Intercomparison Phase 5 (CMIP-RCP8.5). For this purpose, two DSSAT maize models (CSM-CERES and CSM-IXIM) were calibrated and tested with two different maize cultivars namely Single Cross 10 (SC10) and Three Way Cross 324 (TW24) using a dataset of three growing seasons in Nile Delta. SC10 is a long-growing cultivar that is resistant to abiotic stresses, whereas TW24 is short and sensitive to such harsh conditions. The calibrated models were then employed to predict maize yield in baseline (1981–2010) and under future time slices (2030s, 2050s, and 2080s) using three Global Climate Models (GCMs) under CMIP5-RCP8.5 scenario. In addition, the use of various adaptation options as shifting planting date, increasing sowing density, and genotypes was included in crop models. Simulation analysis showed that, averaged over three GCMs and two crop models, the yield of late maturity cultivar (SC10) decreased by 4.1, 17.2, and 55.9% for the three time slices of 2030s, 2050s, and 2080s, respectively, compared to baseline yield (1981–2010). Such reduction increased with early maturity cultivar (TW24), recording 12.4, 40.6, and 71.3% for near (2030s), mid (2050s), and late century (2080s) respectively relative to baseline yield. The most suitable adaptation options included choosing a stress-resistant genotype, changing the planting date to plus or minus 30 days from baseline planting date, and raising the sowing density to 9 m−2 plants. These insights could minimize the potential reduction of climate change-induced yields by 39% by late century.
      PubDate: 2022-05-01
       
  • Forecasting the seasonal dynamics of Trichoplusia ni (Lep.: Noctuidae) on
           three Brassica crops through neural networks

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni Hübner (Lep.: Noctuidae), is a destructive pest of Brassica crops. Their larvae defoliate plants, leading to reduced crop yield. Understanding and modeling pest seasonal dynamics is central to management programs because it allows one to set up sampling and control efforts. This study aimed to train, with field-collected data, artificial neural networks (ANN) for T. ni forecasting on Brassica crops. ANNs were used due to their suitability to fit complex models with multiple predictors. Three weather variables (air temperature, rainfall, and relative humidity lagged at different intervals from the day of pest assessment) and three host plants (broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower) along with another plant-related variable (days after transplanting) were used as input variables to build ANNs with different topologies. Two outputs (T. ni eggs or larvae) were tested to verify which one would yield more precise models. ANNs forecasting T. ni eggs performed better, based on Pearson’s correlation (rv) of observed with fitted values. The winning ANN (rv = 0.706) had weather data lagged by 15 days, 2 neurons in the hidden layer, hyperbolic tangent as the activation function, and resilient propagation as the learning algorithm. Broccoli and cauliflower were the hosts with major contributions for T. ni occurrence. Rainfall was the primary environmental predictor and affected T. ni negatively. Therefore, the winning ANN may be used to forecast T. ni egg densities 15 days in advance, allowing for timely management of this pest.
      PubDate: 2022-05-01
       
  • Life history traits of Mystus vittatus in the Ganges River, Bangladesh:
           recommendation for its sustainable management considering climate change

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Freshwater catfishes are regarded primarily as a source of food and sport, so they are highly valuable economically. We comprehensively studied life history features of Mystus vittatus, including sex ratio (SR), population structure, growth pattern, condition, form factor (a3.0), sexual maturity (Lm), spawning season, fecundity, mortality (i.e., total mortality (Z), natural-mortality (MW), and fishing mortality (F)), optimum catchable length (Lopt), length at first capture (Lc), and environmental factors (temperature and rainfall) with management policies from the Ganges River during July 2017 to June 2018. SR (1:1.48) differed noticeably from the expected 1:1 ratio (p < 0.05). Total length (TL) ranged from 6.80–16.00 cm for males and 6.53–18.80 cm for females. The growth was negative allometric for both sexes. Fulton’s condition factor was the best one and mean relative weight showed no significant difference from 100 for both sexes that indicates balanced population. Lm was 9.60, 9.70, and 8.80 cm based on the gonadosomatic index (GSI), logistic, and maximum length (Lmax), respectively. Spawning season was April to September and the peak was May to July. Fecundity varied from 5942 to 49,852 (mean ± SD, 11,898 ± 5028) and a positively correlated with TL and BW. Z was 1.80 year−1, Mw was 0.97 year−1, and F was 0.83 year−1. Lopt was 11.14 cm (TL) and Lc was ~ 8.47 cm (TL). Temperature and rainfall both were significantly related with GSI and suitable range of temperature and rainfall for spawning of M. vittatus was 28–34 °C and 200–390 mm, respectively. Long data series pointed that average air temperature was increasing and rainfall was decreasing. By considering all of the above parameters, we can take the proper management actions for M. vittatus and other freshwater catfishes on the Indian sub-continent, to ensure long-term self-sustainability and sustainable harvest for the benefit of fishers and communities.
      PubDate: 2022-05-01
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.200.25.51
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-