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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 53)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 63)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Climate Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 69)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 136)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Journal of Climate Change and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorological Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 147)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Nīvār     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Weather     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

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International Journal of Biometeorology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.897
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1432-1254 - ISSN (Online) 0020-7128
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Correction to: A study on correlations between precipitation ETCCDI and
           airborne pollen/fungal spore parameters in the NE Iberian Peninsula

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      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Correction to: Heat stress morbidity among US military personnel: daily
           exposure and lagged response (1998–2019)

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      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Heat stress morbidity among US military personnel: Daily exposure and
           lagged response (1998–2019)

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      Abstract: Abstract Heat stress illnesses represent a rising public health threat; however, associations between environmental heat and observed adverse health outcomes across populations and geographies remain insufficiently elucidated to evaluate risk and develop prevention strategies. In particular, military-relevant large-scale studies of daily heat stress morbidity responses among physically active, working-age adults to various indices of heat have been limited. We evaluated daily means, maximums, minimums, and early morning measures of temperature, heat index, and wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) indices, assessing their association with 31,642 case-definition heat stroke and heat exhaustion encounters among active duty servicemembers diagnosed at 24 continental US installations from 1998 to 2019. We utilized anonymized encounter data consisting of hospitalizations, ambulatory (out-patient) visits, and reportable events to define heat stress illness cases and select the 24 installations with the highest case counts. We derived daily indices of heat from hourly-scale gridded climate data and applied a case-crossover study design incorporating distributed-lag, nonlinear models with 5 days of lag to estimate odds ratios at one-degree increments for each index of heat. All indices exhibited nonlinear odds ratios with short-term lag effects throughout observed temperature ranges. Responses were positive, monotonic, and exponential in nature, except for maximum daily WBGT, minimum daily temperature, temperature at 0600 h (local), and WBGT at 0600 h (local), which, while generally increasing, showed decreasing risk for the highest heat category days. The risk for a heat stress illness on a day with a maximum WBGT of 32.2 °C (90.0 °F) was 1.93 (95% CI, 1.82 – 2.05) times greater than on a day with a maximum WBGT of 28.6 °C (83.4 °F). The risk was 2.53 (2.36—2.71) times greater on days with a maximum heat index of 40.6 °C (105 °F) compared to 32.8 °C (91.0 °F). Our findings suggest that prevention efforts may benefit from including prior-day heat levels in risk assessments, from monitoring temperature and heat index in addition to WBGT, and by promoting control measures and awareness across all heat categories.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Influence of temperature on mortality in the French overseas regions: a
           pledge for adaptation to heat in tropical marine climates

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      Abstract: Context Tropical areas and small islands are identified as highly vulnerable to climate change, and already experiencing shifts in their temperature distribution. However, the knowledge on the health impacts of temperatures under tropical marine climate is limited. We explored the influence of temperature on mortality in four French overseas regions located in French Guiana, French West Indies, and in the Indian Ocean, between 2000 and 2015. Method Distributed lag non-linear generalized models linking temperature and mortality were developed in each area, and relative risks were combined through a meta-analysis. Models were used to estimate the fraction of mortality attributable to non-optimal temperatures. The role of humidity was also investigated. Results An increased risk of mortality was observed when the temperature deviated from median. Results were not modified when introducing humidity. Between 2000 and 2015, 979 deaths [confidence interval (CI) 95% 531:1359] were attributable to temperatures higher than the 90th percentile of the temperature distribution, and 442 [CI 95% 178:667] to temperature lower than the 10th percentile. Discussion Heat already has a large impact on mortality in the French overseas regions. Results suggest that adaptation to heat is relevant under tropical marine climate.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Measuring and modelling microclimatic air temperature in a historically
           degraded tropical forest

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      Abstract: Abstract Climate change is predicted to cause widespread disruptions to global biodiversity. Most climate models are at the macroscale, operating at a ~ 1 km resolution and predicting future temperatures at 1.5–2 m above ground level, making them unable to predict microclimates at the scale that many organisms experience temperature. We studied the effects of forest structure and vertical position on microclimatic air temperature within forest canopy in a historically degraded tropical forest in Sikundur, Northern Sumatra, Indonesia. We collected temperature measurements in fifteen plots over 20 months, alongside vegetation structure data from the same fifteen 25 × 25 m plots. We also performed airborne surveys using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to record canopy structure remotely, both over the plot locations and a wider area. We hypothesised that old-growth forest structure would moderate microclimatic air temperature. Our data showed that Sikundur is a thermally dynamic environment, with simultaneously recorded temperatures at different locations within the canopy varying by up to ~ 15 °C. Our models (R2 = 0.90 to 0.95) showed that temperature differences between data loggers at different sites were largely determined by variation in recording height and the amount of solar radiation reaching the topmost part of the canopy, although strong interactions between these abiotic factors and canopy structure shaped microclimate air temperature variation. The impacts of forest degradation have smaller relative influence on models of microclimatic air temperature than abiotic factors, but the loss of canopy density increases temperature. This may render areas of degraded tropical forests unsuitable for some forest-dwelling species with the advent of future climate change.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Individually experienced heat stress among elderly residents of an urban
           slum and rural village in India

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      Abstract: Abstract The elderly are one of the most vulnerable groups to heat-related illnesses and mortality. In tropical countries like India, where heat waves have increased in frequency and severity, few studies have focused on the level of stress experienced by the elderly. The study presented here included 130 elderly residents of Kolkata slums and 180 elderly residents of rural villages about 75 km south of Kolkata. It used miniature monitoring devices to continuously measure temperature, humidity, and heat index experienced during everyday activities over 24-h study periods, during hot summer months. In the Kolkata slum, construction materials and the urban heat island effect combined to create hotter indoor than outdoor conditions throughout the day, and particularly at night. As a result, elderly slum residents were 4.3 times more likely to experience dangerous heat index levels (≥ 45°C) compared to rural village elderly. In both locations, the median 24-h heat indexes of active elderly were up to 2°C higher than inactive/sedentary elderly (F = 25.479, p < 0.001). Among Kolkata slums residents, there were no significant gender differences in heat exposure during the day or night, but in the rural village, elderly women were 4 times more likely to experience dangerous heat index levels during the hottest times of the day compared to elderly men. Given the decline in thermoregulatory capacity associated with aging and the increasing severity of extreme summer heat in India, these results forecast a growing public health challenge that will require both scientific and government attention.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Effect of meteorological conditions on leisure walking: a time series
           analysis and the application of outdoor thermal comfort indexes

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      Abstract: Abstract Leisure walking is affected by meteorological conditions. However, it is still not clear what scales of meteorological conditions and thermal status affect the number of people who choose to leisure walk. Using a time series regression, this study examines the heat—leisure walking relationship by analyzing the effect of the seasons, weather, microclimate, and outdoor thermal comfort on walking count. Eight thermal indexes were selected to estimate the pedestrians’ thermal comfort, and their predictive capacities in walking count were evaluated. Particular consideration was given to identifying heat thresholds of walking that determined the tolerance range of pedestrian heat stress. Four years of hourly daytime walking counts and publicly available ASOS meteorological data at Seoul-lo 7017, a pedestrian bridge in Seoul, were used for the analysis. Our findings indicate that walking count is correlated with seasonal climatic variations, with the highest number of pedestrians observed in fall and the lowest in summer. Moreover, air temperature played a vital role, showing that a 5.0 °C rise in temperature was associated with a 1.34% rise in the square root of the walking count. Its impact becomes greater when combined with intense solar radiation and higher absolute humidity. The heat threshold for walking was between 23.8 °C and 26.2 °C. Empirical model indexes showed the highest predictive capacity in walking count at approximately 30.0%, which was followed by rational model indexes at 28.0%.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • A study on correlations between precipitation ETCCDI and airborne
           pollen/fungal spore parameters in the NE Iberian Peninsula

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      Abstract: Precipitation is one of the meteorological variables usually involved in the aerobiological studies, which presents a complex relationship with atmospheric levels of pollen and fungal spores and the temporal characteristics of their seasons. This complexity is due in a large part to rainfall’s twofold impact of having, prior to pollination, a positive influence on subsequent pollen production and of contributing, during pollination, to pollen removal from the air through a wash-out effect. To better explore this impact, we place particular emphasis on extreme rainfall by calculating the correlation between airborne pollen and fungal spore parameters and the precipitation indices that the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI) proposed for characterising climate extremes. Parameters for twenty-seven pollen and fungal spore taxa measured in six aerobiological stations in the NE Iberian Peninsula have been considered. We have distinguished between annual and winter ETCCDI in order to compare the correlations between extreme rainfall and airborne pollen concentrations and to avoid the wash-out effect as far as possible. Results show a positive influence from an increase in moderately extreme winter rainfall, specifically on subsequent pollen/fungal spore production: the percentage of all possible significant correlations is higher for winter than for annual rainfall. Furthermore, while annual rainfall in this region has nearly the same number of positive as negative correlations, the positive correlations for winter rainfall are more than twice that of the negative ones. The seasonal consideration on rainfall ETCCDI made with the aim to avoid the confounding overlapping of different rainfall impacts has led to more sharpened observations of its positive and negative effects on airborne pollen and fungal spore concentrations. Graphical abstract
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Evaluation of the therapeutic and the chemical effects of balneological
           treatment on clinical and laboratory parameters in knee osteoarthritis: a
           randomized, controlled, single-blinded trial

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      Abstract: Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the therapeutic and the chemical effects of balneological treatment (peloidotherapy + hydrotherapy), and its effects on serum levels of interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and insulin-like growth factor–1 (IGF-1) in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Sixty-four (64) knee OA patients were randomly divided into study and control groups. Balneological treatment, consisting of hydrotherapy, and peloidotherapy were given to both groups. Unlike the study group, in the control group, the peloid was applied over a stretch film cover, preventing any contact between the skin and peloid. Clinical outcome measures of the study were pain degree, patient’s and investigator’s global assessment on visual analog scale (VAS-pain, VAS-PGA, VAS-IGA), and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) (pain, stiffness, and physical function). Patients were evaluated at baseline, post-treatment (after 10th session), and 3 and 6 months after treatment. Blood samples were taken at baseline, post- treatment, and 6 months after treatment for analysis of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IGF-1 serum levels. When compared with the baseline, VAS measurements decreased significantly in almost all evaluation periods in both groups, and no difference was observed between the groups. In the study group, WOMAC scores showed significant improvement in all assessments. In the control group, pain and physical function subscores of WOMAC significantly decreased at post-treatment and 3 months after treatment. In group comparison, pain and stiffness subscores showed a significant difference in favor of the study group at 6 months after treatment. No clinically significant improvement was seen in levels of IL-1β and IGF-1 in both groups during the whole assessment period. Because of TNF-α kit failure, we could not evaluate the measurements. In conclusion, balneological treatment is an effective treatment option to improve the pain and functional capacity of patients with knee OA. The application of peloid by contact with the skin is superior in the long-term period, which means that in addition to the thermal effect, the chemical content of peloid can also contribute to the therapeutic effect.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Influence of weather conditions and projected climate change scenarios on
           the suitability of Vitis vinifera cv. Carignan in Rioja DOCa, Spain

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      Abstract: Abstract Grape development and its quality are highly dependent on soil and weather conditions. Under the progressive warming, which can affect the suitability of typical varieties grown in a given area, the knowledge of the vine response to changes in climate is essential to stablish strategies to maintain the viticulture sector. This research presents an analysis of phenology and grape composition of the Carignan cultivar, during a 13-year period, at two locations in Rioja DOCa. Based on the results obtained and the projected changes in climate under climate change scenarios (RC4.5 and RCP8.5), the response of this cultivar was evaluated. Differences in the phenological dates of up to 18, 29 and 40 days, for flowering, veraison and harvest, respectively, were observed between the warmest and the coolest years. An advance of up to 5, 8 and 11 days, respectively, for the mentioned stages, is projected under the RCP4.5 scenario by 2050, which could be near 1.5*times higher under the RCP8.5 scenario. These advances will be mainly driven by the temperatures recorded in the previous period. Grape acidity was mainly driven by water availability, in particular during ripening, which imply a slight projected reduction due to precipitation changes but not significant effect due to increasing temperatures. The phenolic composition could be positively affected by increasing temperatures and increasing water deficits, since this variety does not always reach a complete maturity at present. Thus, under the projected warming scenarios, the suitability of Carignan in Rioja DOCa was confirmed.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Thermal comfort conditions at microclimate scale and surface urban heat
           island in a tropical city: A study on João Pessoa city, Brazil

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      Abstract: Surface urban heat islands (SUHIs) are one of the most studied phenomena in urban climates because they generate problems for the well-being of the urban population. This study analyzed the thermal comfort conditions at microclimate scale and SUHI for João Pessoa city, Brazil. Micrometeorological data (temperature and air humidity data) collected at 10 stations in 2011 and 2018 were used to calculate Thom’s discomfort index (TDI) for João Pessoa city. Satellite images from Landsat 5/TM for 1991, 2006, and 2010 and Landsat 8/OLI for 2018 were used for land use and land cover classification and to identify SUHI. The obtained results highlighted that the SUHI area in João Pessoa city was 26 km2 and that almost half of the heat island area was concentrated in the Geisel, Aeroclube, Valentina, Distrito Industrial, Cristo Redentor, and Mangabeira neighborhoods. Regarding the micrometeorological data, higher values were obtained for 2018 in the dry periods (summer) and during the day. Based on the results, a considerable increase in discomfort during the daytime was observed in urbanized areas of the city from 2010 − 2018 due to the increase in the average temperature in João Pessoa between 1991 and 2018. Graphic abstract
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Climate change and Australia’s primary industries: factors hampering an
           effective and coordinated response

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      Abstract: Abstract Australia’s primary production sector operates in one of the world’s most variable climates with future climate change posing a challenge to its ongoing sustainability. Recognising this, Australia has invested in understanding climate change risks to primary production with a substantial amount of research produced. Recently, focus on this research space has broadened, with interests from the financial sector and expanded scopes of works from government and industry. These expanded needs require sector- and country-wide assessments to assist with the implementation of climate strategies. We considered the applicability of the current research body for these needs by reviewing 188 peer-reviewed studies that considered the quantitative impacts of climate change on Australia’s primary industries. Our broad review includes cropping, livestock, horticulture, forestry and fisheries and biosecurity threats. This is the first such review for Australia, and no other similar country-wide review was found. We reviewed the studies through three lenses, industry diversity, geographic coverage and study comparability. Our results show that all three areas are lacking for sector- and country-wide assessments. Industry diversity was skewed towards cropping and biosecurity threats (64% of all studies) with wheat in particular a major focus (25% of all studies). Geographic coverage at a state level appeared to be evenly distributed across the country; however, when considered in conjunction with industry focus, gaps emerged. Study comparability was found to be very limited due to the use of different historical baseline periods and different impact models. We make several recommendations to assist with future research directions, being (1) co-development of a standard set of method guidelines for impact assessments, (2) filling industry and geographic knowledge gaps, and (3) improving transparency in study method descriptions. Uptake of these recommendations will improve study application and transparency enabling and enhancing responses to climate change in Australia’s primary industries.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Influence of Mediterranean climate and lunar calendar on milk production
           in Lacaune breed ewes

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      Abstract: Abstract Environmental factors affect daily milk production in dairy animals. The aim of this study was to quantify the effects of environmental factors, specifically mean temperature (°C), relative humidity (%), temperature–humidity index (THI), solar radiation (°), pluvial precipitation (mm) and lunar calendar (full moon, waxing quarter, waning quarter, new moon), on milk production (kg/d). The analysis was based on 96,195 morning and evening milking records documented on 109 consecutive days, from 869 Lacaune ewes. Ewes were housed in groups of 174 individuals. The analysis was performed in two independent procedures, a Pearson correlation analysis and a multivariate analysis of the ewe’s interrelationships, which was based on the total variance estimate and a Varimax-rotated factorial analysis. Milk yield (kg/d) was significantly (p < 0.05) negatively correlated with mean temperature (-0.24), relative humidity (-0.16), THI (-0.24), and radiation (-0.18), which suggests that the higher these environmental factors, the lower the milk yield. Lunar calendar had a significant (p < 0.01) effect on milk production yield; specifically, yields were higher on the full moon and new moon (2.25 ± 0.05 kg/day) than they were on the crescent or waning moon (2.17 ± 0.05 kg/day). In conclusion, ewes that had been exposed to higher mean temperature, relative humidity, THI and solar radiation had the lowest milk yield, and milk yields are highest on full and new moons. The results of this work may be helpful in making predictions for milk production in Lacaune ewes in the Mediterranean region throughout the year.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Evaluation of environmental and physiological indicators in lactating
           dairy cows exposed to heat stress

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      Abstract: Abstract This study aimed to better understand environmental heat stress and physiological heat strain indicators in lactating dairy cows. Sixteen heat stress indicators were derived using microenvironmental parameters that were measured at the surrounding of cows and at usual fixed locations in the barn by using handheld and fixed subarea sensors, respectively. Twenty high-producing Holstein–Friesian dairy cows (> 30.0 kg/day) from an intensive dairy farm were chosen to measure respiration rate (RR), vaginal temperature (VT), and body surface temperature of forehead (FT), eye (ET), and muzzle (MT). Our results show that microenvironments measured by the handheld sensor were slightly warmer and drier than those measured by the fixed subarea sensor; however, their derived heat stress indicators correlated equally well with physiological indicators. Interestingly, ambient temperature (Ta) had the highest correlations with physiological indicators and the best classification performance in recognizing actual heat strain state. Using segmented mixed models, the determined Ta thresholds for maximum FT, mean FT, RR, maximum ET, mean ET, VT, mean MT, and maximum MT were 24.1 °C, 24.2 °C, 24.4 °C, 24.6 °C, 24.6 °C, 25.3 °C, 25.4 °C, and 25.4 °C, respectively. Thus, we concluded that the fixed subarea sensor is a reliable tool for measuring cows’ microenvironments; Ta is an appropriate heat stress indicator; FT, RR, and ET are good early heat strain indicators. The results of this study could be helpful for dairy practitioners in a similar intensive setting to detect and respond to heat strain with more appropriate indicators.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Characterizing plant trait(s) for improved heat tolerance in field pea
           (Pisum sativum L.) under subtropical climate

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      Abstract: Abstract Field pea is highly sensitive to climatic vagaries, particularly high-temperature stress. The crop often experiences terminal heat stress in tropical climates indicating the need for the development of heat-tolerant cultivars. Characterization and identification of stress-adaptive plant traits are pre-requisites for breeding stress-tolerant/adaptive cultivar(s). In the study, a panel of 150 diverse field pea genotypes was tested under three different temperature environments (i.e., normal sowing time or non-heat stress environment (NSTE), 15 days after normal sowing time or heat stress environment-I (LSHTE-I), and 30 days after normal sowing time or heat stress environment-II (LSHTE-II)) to verify the effect of high-temperature environment, genotype, and genotype × environment interaction on different plant traits and to elucidate their significance in heat stress adaptation/tolerance. The delayed sowing had exposed field pea crops to high temperatures during flowering stage by + 3.5 °C and + 8.1 °C in the LSHTE-I and LSHTE-II, respectively. Likewise, the maximum ambient temperature during the grain-filling period was + 3.3 °C and + 6.1 °C higher in the LSHTE-I and LSHTE-II over the NSTE. The grain yield loss with heat stress was 25.8 ± 2.2% in LSHTE-I, and 59.3 ± 1.5% in LSHTE-II compared to the NSTE. Exposure of crops to a high-temperature environment during the flowering stage had a higher impact on grain yield than the heat stress at the grain filling period. Results suggested that the reduced sink capacity (pod set (pod plant−1), seed set (seed pod−1)) was the primary cause of yield loss under the heat stress environments, while, under the NSTE, yield potential was mostly attributed to the source capacity (plant biomass). The high-temperature stress resulted in forced maturity as revealed by shrinkage in crop period (5–11%) and reproductive period (15–36%), prominently in long-duration genotypes. The failure of pod set in the upper nodes and higher ovule abortion (7–16%) was noticed under the high-temperature environments, particularly in the LSHTE-II. Multivariate analysis results revealed seed set, pods plant−1, last pod bearing node, and plant biomass as a critical yield determinant under the heat stress. The GGE biplot suggested that the genotypes G-112, G-114, and G-33 had higher potential to sustain yield coupled with higher stability across the environments and, thus, could serve as a source for breeding heat-tolerant high yielding cultivars.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Estimating the seasonally varying effect of meteorological factors on the
           district-level incidence of acute watery diarrhea among under-five
           children of Iran, 2014–2018: a Bayesian hierarchical spatiotemporal
           model

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      Abstract: Abstract Under-five years old acute watery diarrhea (U5AWD) accounts for most diarrheal diseases’ burden, but little is known about the adjusted effect of meteorological and socioeconomic determinants. A dataset containing the seasonal numbers of U5AWD cases at the district level of Iran is collected through MOHME. Accordingly, the district-level standardized incidence ratio and Moran’s I values are calculated to detect the significant clusters of U5AWD over sixteen seasons from 2014 to 2018. Additionally, the author tested twelve Bayesian hierarchical models in order to determine which one was the most accurate at forecasting seasonal number of incidents. Iran features a number of U5AWD hotspots, particularly in the southeast. An extended spatiotemporal model with seasonally varying coefficients and space–time interaction outperformed other models, and so became the paper’s proposal in modeling U5AWD. Temperature demonstrated a global positive connection with seasonal U5AWD in districts (IRR: 1.0497; 95% CrI: 1.0254–1.0748), owing to its varying effects during the winter ((IRR: 1.0877; 95% CrI: 1.0408–1.1375) and fall (IRR: 1.0866; 95% CrI: 1.0405–1.1357) seasons. Also, elevation (IRR: 0.9997; 95% CrI: 0.9996–0.9998), piped drinking water (IRR: 0.9948; 95% CrI: 0.9933–0.9964), public sewerage network (IRR: 0.9965; 95% CrI: 0.9938–0.9992), years of schooling (IRR: 0.9649; 95% CrI: 0.944–0.9862), infrastructure-to-household size ratio (IRR: 0.9903; 95% CrI: 0.986–0.9946), wealth index (IRR: 0.9502; 95% CrI: 0.9231–0.9781), and urbanization (IRR: 0.9919; 95% CrI: 0.9893–0.9944) of districts were negatively associated with seasonal U5AWD incidence. Strategically, developing geoinformation alarm systems based on meteorological data might help predict U5AWD high-risk areas. The study also anticipates increased rates of U5AWD in districts with poor sanitation and socioeconomic level. Therefore, governments should take appropriate preventative actions in these sectors.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Determination of thermal sensation levels for Koreans based on perceived
           temperature and climate chamber experiments with hot and humid settings

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      Abstract: Abstract People perceive thermal sensation differently despite the same temperature value of thermal comfort index depending on various factors such as climate, culture, and physiological characteristics. The use of the thermal comfort index without optimization may lead to biases in assessment of thermal stress and sensation. This study aims to derive the perceived temperature (PT) ranges of thermal sensation levels related to heat stress for Koreans. The experiments were designed using a controlled environmental chamber to derive the PT ranges and were performed with subjects who are residents of Seoul, South Korea. The experiments were carried out in the summers of 2017 and 2018, and the thermal sensation votes were surveyed from 19 subjects whose mean age, height, weight, and body mass index were 22.5 years, 171 cm, 72 kg, and 23 kg⋅m−2, respectively. The derived PT ranges for Koreans led to a better performance than the reference PT ranges for Germans based on the results of validation. The thresholds of ‘Warm,’ ‘Hot,’ and ‘Very hot’ thermal sensation classes for Koreans were 28 °C, 36 °C, and 43 °C, respectively: higher than those for Germans. The results indicate that Koreans may have higher heat resistance or lower heat sensitivity than Germans.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Complex associations of weather conditions with reproductive performance
           in urban population of a common waterbird

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      Abstract: Abstract Weather conditions are recognized as one of key determinants of animal reproductive performance; however, the effect of weather on breeding success can be modulated by different features of breeding habitat. Constantly expanding urban areas cause significant changes in land cover and environmental conditions, but whether and how urban landscape mitigates weather impact on animal fitness remains little explored. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between weather parameters and reproductive performance in a reed-nesting waterbird species, the Eurasian coot Fulica atra. For this purpose, we performed a long-term monitoring of an urban coot population from central Poland, collecting data for over 400 breeding events. The results indicated that temperature may have contrasting effects on coot reproductive output at different stages of chick-rearing period (positive at early chick-rearing and negative at late chick-rearing). Also, contrary to our expectation, we found a positive relationship between mean daily precipitation in early chick-rearing period and reproductive output in our study population. Our study constitutes one of few examples showing how weather may affect fitness in urban wildlife and provides evidence for high complexity of associations between weather conditions and animal reproductive performance.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Evaluation of the benefit of thermal spa therapy in plaque psoriasis: the
           PSOTHERMES randomized clinical trial

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      Abstract: Abstract Spa therapy is considered an add-on treatment for psoriasis, but without any objective evaluation in the absence of randomized trials. This multicenter, open-label, randomized trial compared immediate spa therapy versus a control group having usual treatments until study assessments at 4.5 months. Spa therapy was proposed in five French spa resorts with standardized programs. Inclusion criteria were adults with plaque psoriasis, Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) > 10, and stable medical treatment in the last 6 months. The main objective was DLQI ≤ 10 at 4.5 months after inclusion. VQ-Dermato and EQ5D-3L also assessed quality of life (QoL), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) stress, and visual analogue scales (VAS) pain and pruritus. Between January 2015 and November 2018, 128 patients were randomized to either immediate spa therapy (64) (within 34 days, median) or usual treatments (61) until assessment at 4.5 months. Most were first-time spa users (71.2%). Mean DLQI and Psoriasis Area and Severity Index at inclusion were 16.7 and 10.5, respectively. Immediate spa therapy patients achieved the primary objective for 66.1% [95% CI 52.6% > 77.9%] vs 41.4% [95% CI 28.6% > 55.1%] control group patients (p = 0.007). VQ-Dermato scores and pruritus VAS significantly improved. Outcomes at 12-month follow-up of the immediate spa therapy group showed persistent improvement of DLQI, VQ-Dermato, and pruritus. This randomized controlled trial demonstrated that a cure of spa therapy improves QoL and alleviates certain symptoms of psoriasis, in short and long terms. This justifies its integration in the therapeutic strategies for psoriasis. Trial registration number: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02098213.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Impact of temperature changes between neighboring days on cardiovascular
           disease hospital admissions among suburban farmers in Qingyang, Northwest
           China

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      Abstract: Background No studies focused on impact of temperature changes between neighboring days (TCN) on cardiovascular disease (CVD) hospital admissions among suburban farmers although CVD has been the main cause to global mortality and disability especially in undeveloped and developing countries/areas. Method Daily data of CVD hospital admissions on suburban farmers and daily data of meteorology in Qingyang (China) were collected during 2011–2015. A distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) was applied to explore the exposure–response relations and lagged effects between TCN and CVD hospital admissions with stratified analyses by age and gender. Extreme low TCN effects and burden analysis were conducted. Results Based on 25,984 cases in Qingyang (China) during 2011–2015 among suburban farmers, we found that, first, nonlinear relationship was observed between TCN and CVD hospital admissions and adverse impact in negative TCN (temperature dropping between neighboring days) while protective effect in positive TCN (temperature rising between neighboring days) were discovered; third, during lag0–27, the cumulative relative risk (RR) for extreme low TCN (5th percentile, − 3.5 °C) and extreme high TCN (95th percentile, 3 °C) was 29.55 (95% CI 4.709–185.436) and 0.040 (95% CI 0.009–0.169), respectively; fourth, the age < 65 and females were more vulnerable to negative TCN than the age ≥ 65 and males among suburban farmers, respectively; last, moderate low TCN contributed the most fractions and numbers on CVD hospital admissions. Conclusions Among Qingyang suburban farmers in Northwest China, negative TCN should be paid more attention.
      PubDate: 2022-05-18
       
 
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