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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted by number of followers
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 201)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 182)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 72)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 64)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Economic Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Climate Change Research Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Climate Change and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Oxford Open Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Meteorological Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nīvār     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  

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Frontiers in Climate
Number of Followers: 5  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2624-9553
Published by Frontiers Media Homepage  [96 journals]
  • Analysing direct air capture for enabling negative emissions in Germany:
           an assessment of the resource requirements and costs of a potential
           rollout in 2045

    • Authors: Simon Block, Peter Viebahn, Christian Jungbluth
      Abstract: Direct air capture (DAC) combined with subsequent storage (DACCS) is discussed as one promising carbon dioxide removal option. The aim of this paper is to analyse and comparatively classify the resource consumption (land use, renewable energy and water) and costs of possible DAC implementation pathways for Germany. The paths are based on a selected, existing climate neutrality scenario that requires the removal of 20 Mt of carbon dioxide (CO2) per year by DACCS from 2045. The analysis focuses on the so-called “low-temperature” DAC process, which might be more advantageous for Germany than the “high-temperature” one. In four case studies, we examine potential sites in northern, central and southern Germany, thereby using the most suitable renewable energies for electricity and heat generation. We show that the deployment of DAC results in large-scale land use and high energy needs. The land use in the range of 167–353 km2 results mainly from the area required for renewable energy generation. The total electrical energy demand of 14.4 TWh per year, of which 46% is needed to operate heat pumps to supply the heat demand of the DAC process, corresponds to around 1.4% of Germany's envisaged electricity demand in 2045. 20 Mt of water are provided yearly, corresponding to 40% of the city of Cologne‘s water demand (1.1 million inhabitants). The capture of CO2 (DAC) incurs levelised costs of 125–138 EUR per tonne of CO2, whereby the provision of the required energy via photovoltaics in southern Germany represents the lowest value of the four case studies. This does not include the costs associated with balancing its volatility. Taking into account transporting the CO2 via pipeline to the port of Wilhelmshaven, followed by transporting and sequestering the CO2 in geological storage sites in the Norwegian North Sea (DACCS), the levelised costs increase to 161–176 EUR/tCO2. Due to the longer transport distances from southern and central Germany, a northern German site using wind turbines would be the most favourable.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26T00:00:00Z
       
  • Blurring societal acceptance by lack of knowledge—insights from a German
           coastal population study on blue carbon

    • Authors: Michael Fink, Beate Ratter
      Abstract: Within the context of climate change, coastal vegetated ecosystems have the capacity for long-term carbon storage. Blue carbon refers to such carbon trapped in the oceans and coastal shelf seas. These ecosystems are under anthropogenic pressure and, to help these ecosystems to thrive and realize their carbon storage potentials, interventions require acceptance from society, in general, and adjacent coastal communities, in particular. Through a random street survey along the German coasts in 2022, quantitative and qualitative data were collected from more than 200 participants. A questionnaire comprising 50 open and closed questions was designed to assess the status quo of German coastal residents’ norms and values concerning blue carbon ecosystems. Focus was put on nature conservation and climate change perceptions. The survey results reveal that most residents along the German coast valued nature conservation while idealizing nature that is seen as “untouched” by humans. Responses regarding active interventions to improve coastal ecosystem services were diverse. Blue carbon strategies are likely to operate within this area of tension. Most respondents were aware of climate change as a threat to their home region and were in favor of an increase in action against climate change there. The respondents were familiar with CO2 reduction and avoidance strategies. However, they were less aware of measures to remove atmospheric CO2 and the potential of storing CO2 in ecosystems beyond afforestation measures. Due to a lack of knowledge, no consolidated public opinions on blue carbon in coastal vegetated ecosystems could be identified, blurring societal acceptance of blue carbon strategies. While these ecosystems are particularly vulnerable to human disturbance, long-term carbon storage is essential for blue carbon. Therefore, the individual acceptance of interventions from people living in close proximity to intervention sites is key for sustained success. The present article concludes that there are possibilities to co-create knowledge and acceptance as prerequisites for blue carbon interventions to possibly become efficacious.
      PubDate: 2024-02-21T00:00:00Z
       
  • Struvite-phosphorus effects on greenhouse gas emissions and plant and soil
           

    • Authors: Diego Della Lunga, Kristofor R. Brye, Trenton L. Roberts, Jonathan Brye, Michelle Evans-White, Christopher G. Henry, Daniel J. Lessner, Chandler Arel
      Abstract: Phosphorus (P) fertilizers with low water solubility, like struvite (MgNH4PO4·6H2O), have been identified to possibly reduce nutrient losses in furrow-irrigated cropping systems. However, there is a lack of research on the impacts of P and nitrogen (N) fertilization on greenhouse gas [GHG; i.e., methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and carbon dioxide (CO2)] production in furrow-irrigated rice (Oryza sativa). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of electrochemically precipitated struvite (ECST), chemically precipitated struvite (CPST), triple superphosphate (TSP), diammonium phosphate (DAP), environmentally smart nitrogen (ESN), and an unamended control (CT) on GHG emissions, global warming potential (GWP), and plant and soil responses at the up-slope position of a furrow-irrigated rice field in east-central Arkansas. Seasonal CH4 and CO2 emissions did not differ (P> 0.05) among fertilizer treatments, while N2O emissions were greater (P = 0.02) from CT (i.e., 5.97 kg ha−1 season−1), which did not differ from ECST, and were lowest from ESN (1.50 kg ha−1 season−1), which did not differ from TSP, CPST, ECST, and DAP. Global warming potential was greatest (P < 0.05) from CT (1612 kg CO2 eq. ha−1 season−1), which did not differ from ECST, and was lowest from ESN (436 kg CO2 eq. ha−1 season−1), which did not differ from TSP, ECST, CPST, and DAP. The combination of numerically greater yield and lower N2O emissions from CPST and ESN suggested that slow-release fertilizers could constitute an effective mitigation tool to reduce GHG emissions, maintain production, and improve sustainability in furrow-irrigated rice systems.
      PubDate: 2024-02-15T00:00:00Z
       
  • The spatiotemporal domains of natural climate solutions research and
           strategies for implementation in the Pacific Northwest, USA

    • Authors: Oriana E. Chafe, Adrian P. Broz, Eric S. Levenson, Michael D. Farinacci, Riley O. Anderson, Lucas C. R. Silva
      Abstract: Natural climate solutions have been proposed as a way to mitigate climate change by removing CO2 and other greenhouse gases from the atmosphere and increasing carbon storage in ecosystems. The adoption of such practices is required at large spatial and temporal scales, which means that local implementation across different land use and conservation sectors must be coordinated at landscape and regional levels. Here, we describe the spatiotemporal domains of research in the field of climate solutions and, as a first approximation, we use the Pacific Northwest (PNW) of the United States as a model system to evaluate the potential for coordinated implementations. By combining estimates of soil organic carbon stocks and CO2 fluxes with projected changes in climate, we show how land use may be prioritized to improve carbon drawdown and permanence across multiple sectors at local to regional scales. Our consideration of geographical context acknowledges some of the ecological and social challenges of climate change mitigation efforts for the implementation of scalable solutions.
      PubDate: 2024-02-14T00:00:00Z
       
  • Future projections of hurricane intensity in the southeastern U.S.:
           sensitivity to different Pseudo-Global Warming methods

    • Authors: Patrick Olschewski, Harald Kunstmann
      Abstract: Tropical cyclones are prone to cause fatalities and damages reaching far into billions of US Dollars. There is evidence that these events could intensify under ongoing global warming, and accordingly disaster prevention and adaptation strategies are necessary. We apply Pseudo-Global Warming (PGW) as a computational cost-efficient alternative to conventional long-term modeling, enabling the assessment of historical events under future storylines. Not many studies specifically assess the sensitivity of PGW in the context of short-term extreme events in the United States. In an attempt to close this gap, this study explores the sensitivity of hurricane intensity to different PGW configurations, including a purely thermodynamic, a dynamic, and a more comprehensive modulation of initial and boundary conditions using the Weather and Research and Forecasting Model (WRF). The climate perturbations are calculated using two individual CMIP6 climate models with a relatively low and high temperature change and the CMIP6 ensemble mean, all under SSP5-8.5. WRF was set up in a two-way nesting framework using domains of 25 and 5 km spatial resolution. Results show that high uncertainties exist between the thermodynamic and dynamic approaches, whereas the deviations between the dynamic approach and the comprehensive variable modulation are low. Hurricanes modeled under the thermodynamic approach tend toward higher intensities, whereas the perturbation of wind under the dynamic approach may impose unwanted effects on cyclogenesis, for example due to increased vertical wind shear. The highest sensitivity, however, stems from the selected CMIP6 model. We conclude that PGW studies should thoroughly assess uncertainties imposed by the PGW scheme, similar to those imposed by model parameterizations. All simulation results suggest an increase in maximum wind speeds and precipitation for the high impact model and the ensemble mean. An unfolding of the inspected events in a warmer world could therefore exacerbate the impacts on nature and society.
      PubDate: 2024-02-13T00:00:00Z
       
  • Modeling coastal inundation for adaptation to climate change at local
           scale: the case of Marche Region (central Italy)

    • Authors: Agnese Baldoni, Lorenzo Melito, Francesco Marini, Gaia Galassi, Patrizia Giacomin, Giorgio Filomena, Natalino Barbizzi, Carlo Lorenzoni, Maurizio Brocchini
      Abstract: Climate change is raising sea level rise and storminess effects on coastal systems, affecting the morphology of coastlines and impacting coastal communities and ecosystems. It is essential to gain information at an adequate scale to identify effective adaptation measures. This is of major importance in areas combining high vulnerability to climate change with high socio-economic development, like the Northern Adriatic coastal area. To this aim, in this work two different approaches have been applied to investigate inland penetration of sea water along the Marche Region: (a) a simple “bathtub” method applied to the entire Marche coastline, to highlight areas likely prone to intense inundation; (b) a more accurate numerical model applied to two test sites, to gain detailed knowledge of inundation perimeters. Both approaches have been applied with forcing conditions provided by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the Copernicus Climate Change Service through the RCP8.5 emission scenario projected to 2070. Results showed that a 100-year return period sea storm would cause the inundation of beaches and infrastructures located along the coast, as well as affecting harbor facilities and urban areas. Information obtained with the model has been integrated in the Regional Plan for Adaptation to climate change to define specific adaptation measures.
      PubDate: 2024-02-08T00:00:00Z
       
  • Blue carbon, red states, and Paris Agreement Article 6

    • Authors: Adam D. Orford
      Abstract: Coastal U.S. states, including many that have opposed proactive U.S. climate policies, are contemplating entrance into the supply side of the international carbon credit markets by, among other things, hosting revenue-generating blue carbon projects on their submerged lands. The voluntary carbon credit markets already facilitate private investment in such activities, and the emerging Paris Agreement Article 6 framework is poised to generate investment interest at the national level as well. Reviewing these trends, this Perspective questions whether this is good climate, environmental, and social policy, and advises further oversight and accountability.
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T00:00:00Z
       
  • Toward a transformative climate change adaptation from local to global
           perspective—A transdisciplinary challenge by Kyoto Climate Change
           Adaptation Center

    • Authors: Masako Ichihara, Yoshinori Nakagawa, Reiichiro Ishii, Tatsuyoshi Saijo, Tetsuzo Yasunari
      Abstract: Policies for climate change adaptation differ from those for climate change mitigation, both of which share the common aim of maintaining a sustainable climate system that enables humankind to survive while enjoying wellbeing. Considering the variability in regional conditions, they must be diverse throughout the policymaking process, with the participation of multiple stakeholders, to place the livelihood of residents as the central issue. Simultaneously, these regional diversities must also be realized in a manner consistent with the global goal of climate change mitigation. To that end, comprehensive and transformative adaptation measures are essential, rather than responding to imminent issues on an ad-hoc basis. As the literature shows, a transdisciplinary approach involving researchers across different fields and multiple non-academic sectors can fill the gaps in transformative adaptation. Still, it has yet to be implemented because of the lack of experience of this issue. Here, we present key findings that affect the generation of synergies and tradeoffs among issues through our novel transdisciplinary approach in Kyoto, Japan, via a series of Future Design workshops in agriculture in collaboration with local farmers, regional policymakers, and researchers with diverse backgrounds. These results provide a direction for future research to secure a methodological foundation that will facilitate the sustainability of these efforts.
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T00:00:00Z
       
  • Alkaline mineral addition to anoxic to hypoxic Baltic Sea sediments as a
           potentially efficient CO2-removal technique

    • Authors: Michael Fuhr, Klaus Wallmann, Andrew W. Dale, Habeeb Thanveer Kalapurakkal, Mark Schmidt, Stefan Sommer, Christian Deusner, Timo Spiegel, Jannes Kowalski, Sonja Geilert
      Abstract: Recent studies have begun to explore the potential of enhanced benthic weathering (EBW) in the Baltic Sea as a measure for climate change mitigation. To augment the understanding of EBW under seasonally changing conditions, this study aims to investigate weathering processes under anoxia to hypoxia in corrosive bottom waters, which reflect late summer conditions in the Baltic Sea. Dunite and calcite were added to sediment cores retrieved from Eckernförde Bay (Western Baltic Sea) with a constant flow-through of deoxygenated, CO2-enriched Baltic Sea bottom water. The addition of both materials increased benthic alkalinity release by 2.94 μmol cm−2 d−1 (calcite) and 1.12 μmol cm−2 d−1 (dunite), compared to the unamended control experiment. These excess fluxes are significantly higher than those obtained under winter conditions. The comparison with bottom water oxygen concentrations emphasizes that highest fluxes of alkalinity were associated with anoxic phases of the experiment. An increase in Ca and Si fluxes showed that the enhanced alkalinity fluxes could be attributed to calcite and dunite weathering. First order rate constants calculated based on these data were close to rates published in previous studies conducted under different conditions. This highlights the suitability of these proxies for mineral dissolution and justifies the use of these rate constants in modeling studies investigating EBW in the Baltic Sea and areas with similar chemical conditions. Generally stable pH profiles over the course of the experiment, together with the fact that the added minerals remained on the sediment surface, suggest that corrosive bottom waters were the main driving factor for the dissolution of the added minerals. These factors have important implications for the choice of mineral and timing for EBW as a possible marine carbon dioxide removal method in seasonally hypoxic to anoxic regions of the Baltic Sea.
      PubDate: 2024-02-02T00:00:00Z
       
  • Projected climate oligotrophication of the Adriatic marine ecosystems

    • Authors: Lorenzo Mentaschi, Tomas Lovato, Momme Butenschön, Jacopo Alessandri, Leonardo Aragão, Giorgia Verri, Roberta Guerra, Giovanni Coppini, Nadia Pinardi
      Abstract: The Adriatic Sea hosts diverse marine ecosystems, characterized by rich biodiversity and unique ecological dynamics. Its intricate coastal habitats and open waters support a range of species and contribute to the region's ecological and economic significance. Unraveling the consequences of the ongoing climate changes on this delicate environment is essential to ensure the future safeguard of this basin. To tackle this problem, we developed a biogeochemical model for the entire basin, with a horizontal resolution of about 2 km and 120 vertical levels, forced by the projections of atmosphere, hydrology and ocean circulation between 1992 and 2050, under emission scenario RCP8.5. The changes projected between 2031–2050 and 1992–2011 were evaluated on ecoregions characterized by different trophic conditions, identified using a k-medoid classification technique. The results point toward a generalized oligotrophication of the basin, especially intense in the northern estuarine areas, driven by a substantial decrease in river discharge projected for the rivers of the Po Plain. This scenario of unproductive and declining resources, together with the ongoing warming, salinization, and acidification of marine waters, cast doubt on the long-term resilience of the Northern Adriatic food web structure, which has evolved to thrive in high trophic conditions. The outcome of this study provides the stakeholders with a tool to understand how potential long-term decreases in the regimes of the Northern Adriatic Rivers could affect the marine ecosystem and its goods and services in the future.
      PubDate: 2024-02-02T00:00:00Z
       
  • Climate smart agriculture' Adaptation strategies of traditional
           agriculture to climate change in sub-Saharan
           Africa|Introduction|Methods|Results|Discussion

    • Authors: David John Okoronkwo, Remigius Ikechukwu Ozioko, Rachael Ujunwa Ugwoke, Uzoh Victor Nwagbo, Cynthia Nwobodo, Chidiebere Happiness Ugwu, Gozie Godswill Okoro, Esther C. Mbah
      Abstract: IntroductionSub-Saharan Africa faces increasingly unpredictable and extreme weather patterns due to climate change, posing significant threats to food security and rural livelihoods. Traditional agriculture, deeply rooted in the region's history and culture, is particularly vulnerable to these changes. This study investigates the adaptation strategies of traditional agricultural farmers to climate change using southeast Nigeria as a microcosm of the broader challenges facing sub-Saharan Africa.MethodsMultistage sampling procedure was used to select 75 farmer group leaders in the study region. Cross-sectional data were collected through semi-structured interview schedules and focus group discussions. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and principal component analysis using Varimax rotated matrix.ResultsFindings showed that farmers rely on face-to-face discussions with neighbors (76.0%), fellow farmers (66.7%), and radio (54.7%) as their primary sources of information on climate change. Results showed that traditional adaptation practices such as use of organic manure (x¯ = 3.89), traditional organic composting (x¯ = 3.80), afforestation (x¯ = 3.71), agroforestry (x¯ = 3.61) were the topmost traditional agricultural practices use to cushion the effect of climate change. Conserving the overall soil health, soil moisture retention, reducing CO2 emissions and maintaining crop productivity were the major reasons for using the traditional approaches. Climate-induced drought and high cost of accessing weather information (x¯ = 1.93), and inadequate funding (x¯ = 1.92), among others were the key constraints to adaptation.DiscussionResults showed that farmers prioritize agronomic manipulation and integrated research approaches as key strategies to adapting traditional agriculture to climate anomalies. Although farmers used their indigenous practices, continuous learning and improvement through capacity-building workshops and progress monitoring are essential for effective climate change adaptation. Policymakers should invest in promoting indigenous knowledge, provide access to credit for climate-resilient infrastructure, promote climate-smart agricultural practices and foster collaborative research as the cornerstone for sustainable rural development.
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T00:00:00Z
       
  • Advances, gaps and way forward in provision of climate services over the
           Greater Horn of Africa

    • Authors: Masilin Gudoshava, George Otieno, Eunice Koech, Herbert Misiani, Jemimah Gacheru Ongoma, Claudio Heinrich-Mertsching, Calistus Wachana, Hussen Seid Endris, Anthony Mwanthi, Mary Kilavi, Emmah Mwangi, Andrew Colman, Douglas Parker, Joseph Nzau Mutemi, Paula Machio, Paulino Omoj Omay, Paul Ombai, Doreen Anande, Alfred Kondowe, Isaac Mugume, Prosper Ayabagabo, Houda Youssouf Houssein, Mahado Salah Waiss, Bekele Abeshu, Ezechiel Kayoya, Mohamud Nor Sharawe, Titike Bahaga, Martin Todd, Zewdu Segele, Zachary Atheru, Guleid Artan
      Abstract: The Greater Horn of Africa is prone to extreme climatic conditions, thus, making climate services increasingly important in supporting decision-making processes across a range of climate sensitive sectors. This study aims to provide a comprehensive review of the recent advances, gaps and challenges in the provision of climate services over the region, for each of the components of the Global Framework for Climate Services. The study explores various milestones that have been achieved toward climate service delivery. The achievements include improvement of station network coverage, and enhancing the capacity of member states to utilize various tools in data analysis and generate routine climate products. The advancement in science, and availability of High-Performance Computing has made it possible for forecast information to be provided from nowcasting to seasonal timescales. Moreover, operationalizing of the objective forecasting method for monthly and seasonal forecasts has made it possible to translate tercile forecasts for applications models. Additionally, innovative approaches to user engagement through co-production, communication channels, user-friendly interfaces, and dissemination of climate information have also been developed. Despite the significant progress that has been made in the provision of climate services, there are still many challenges and gaps that need to be overcome in order to ensure that these services are effectively meeting the needs of users. The research of the science underpinning climate variability, capacity building and stakeholder engagement, as well as improved data management and quality control processes are some of the gaps that exist over the region. Additionally, communication and dissemination of climate information, including timely warnings and risk communication, require improvement to reach diverse user groups effectively. Addressing these challenges will require strengthened partnerships, increased investment in capacity building, enhanced collaboration between the climate information producers and stakeholders, and the development of user-friendly climate products. Bridging these gaps will foster greater resilience to climate-related hazards and disasters in the Greater Horn of Africa and support sustainable development in the region.
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T00:00:00Z
       
  • Transboundary hydropower projects: allocation of competence and
           cooperation between the federation and its federating units in Switzerland
           

    • Authors: Chukwuebuka Edum
      Abstract: (i) The Swiss Constitution places cantons (federating units) in charge of managing all water uses. At the same time, it gives the federation decision-making authority over transboundary water uses, including for hydropower purposes. (ii) It further mandates the Federation to consult and consider the concerns and interests of the affected cantons when deciding on transboundary hydropower projects. (iii) Aside from the possibility of intertwining competence between the Federation and cantons on the transboundary hydropower project, the situation creates ambiguity around the obligation to consult between parties on such projects. (iv) Cooperation in good faith in implementing relevant procedural rules of consultation between parties seems to be the most promising approach to finding solutions acceptable to all.
      PubDate: 2024-01-23T00:00:00Z
       
  • China's transboundary hydropower development at home and abroad: exploring
           the regulatory interface between international water law and international
           economic law

    • Authors: Patricia Wouters, Ana Maria Daza-Clark, David J. Devlaeminck
      Abstract: China, located upstream on most of the major transboundary waters shared with vast populations across Asia, is heavily invested in developing hydropower at home and abroad. Some of this hydropower development involves freshwaters that cross national borders raising complex issues in international law, a situation exacerbated by growing economic, environmental, and regional security pressures. In such a context, where conflicts-of-use are almost certain to arise, it is essential to understand the rules that apply so as to enhance opportunities for enhanced transboundary water cooperation. This paper examines the rules of international water law and international economic law that apply to transboundary hydropower development, with a focus on China as one of the key actors in this field. The aim is to examine the regulatory interface of relevant legal frameworks with a focus on China's approach to transboundary hydropower development at home and abroad. While international economic—and more specifically international investment law—is not directly concerned with international water law, host states and foreign investors must be informed, and take into account, the legal obligations governing transboundary waters. China's position as a major water user (at home) and significant investor (abroad) on transboundary waters, makes it a unique case study for exploring the rules of international law that apply in two different regulatory settings. The work examines the rules of law in each of these domains and reveals the inapparent linkages across these seemingly unconnected areas of international regulation.
      PubDate: 2024-01-23T00:00:00Z
       
  • Editorial: Decision making for the net zero transformation: considerations
           and new methodological approaches

    • Authors: Mark Workman, Adrian Gault, Katy Roelich, Geoff Darch, Gireesh Shrimali
      PubDate: 2024-01-22T00:00:00Z
       
  • Freeboard life-cycle benefit-cost analysis of a rental single-family
           residence for landlord, tenant, and insurer

    • Authors: Ehab Gnan, Rubayet Bin Mostafiz, Md Adilur Rahim, Carol J. Friedland, Robert V. Rohli, Arash Taghinezhad, Ayat Al Assi
      Abstract: Flood risk to single-family rental housing remains poorly understood, leaving a large and increasing population underinformed to protect themselves, including regarding insurance. This research introduces a life-cycle benefit-cost analysis for the landlord, tenant, and insurer [i.e., (U.S.) National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP)] to optimize freeboard [i.e., additional first-floor height above the base flood elevation (BFE)] selection for a rental single-family home. Flood insurance premium; apportioned flood risk among the landlord, tenant, and NFIP by insurance coverage and deductible; rental loss; moving and displacement costs; freeboard construction cost; and rent increase upon freeboard implementation are considered in estimating net benefit (NB) by freeboard. For a 2,500 square-foot case study home in Metairie, Louisiana, a two-foot freeboard optimizes the combined savings for landlord and tenant, with joint life-cycle NB of $23,658 and $14,978, for a 3% and 7% real discount rate, respectively. Any freeboard up to 2.5 feet benefits the tenant and NFIP, while the landlord benefits for freeboards up to 4.0 feet. Collectively, results suggest that at the time of construction, even minimal freeboard provides substantial savings for the landlord, tenant, and NFIP. The research provides actionable information, supporting the decision-making process for landlords, tenants, and others, thereby enhancing investment and occupation decisions.
      PubDate: 2024-01-18T00:00:00Z
       
  • Five tensions in climate adaptation research

    • Authors: Lauren A. Rickards, Jason Alexandra, Todd Denham, Anna Sanders
      Abstract: Climate change adaptation is a maturing field of research imbued with many complexities and tensions. In this article, we outline five tensions that we observe in our own adaptation research. These are between: adaptation as a research topic and practical challenge; uncertainty in adaptation research and decision-makers' desire for certainty; the global scope of adaptation research and its highly context-specific nature; the newness of climate adaptation research and its push to address old problems; adaptation as a specialization and the need for all researchers to engage. Our aim is to encourage critical discussion and reflection among researchers about how adaptation research is positioned within, shaped by and influences social and institutional settings. Given its emplaced character, adaptation research needs to attend to its content and context.
      PubDate: 2024-01-15T00:00:00Z
       
  • Whose negative emissions' Exploring emergent perspectives on CDR from the
           EU's hard to abate and fossil industries

    • Authors: Alina Brad, Tobias Haas, Etienne Schneider
      Abstract: Net zero targets have rapidly become the guiding principle of climate policy, implying the use of carbon dioxide removal (CDR) to compensate for residual emissions. At the same time, the extent of (future) residual emissions and their distribution between economic sectors and activities has so far received little attention from a social science perspective. This constitutes a research gap as the distribution of residual emissions and corresponding amounts of required CDR is likely to become highly contested in the political economy of low-carbon transformation. Here, we investigate what function CDR performs from the perspective of sectors considered to account for a large proportion of future residual emissions (cement, steel, chemicals, and aviation) as well as the oil and gas industry in the EU. We also explore whether they claim residual emissions to be compensated for outside of the sector, whether they quantify these claims and how they justify them. Relying on interpretative and qualitative analysis, we use decarbonization or net zero roadmaps published by the major sector-level European trade associations as well as their statements and public consultation submissions in reaction to policy initiatives by the EU to mobilize CDR. Our findings indicate that while CDR technologies perform an important abstract function for reaching net zero in the roadmaps, the extent of residual emissions and responsibilities for delivering corresponding levels of negative emissions remain largely unspecified. This risks eliding pending distributional conflicts over residual emissions which may intersect with conflicts over diverging technological transition pathways advocated by the associations.
      PubDate: 2024-01-15T00:00:00Z
       
  • New insights into the biennial-to-multidecadal variability of the water
           level fluctuation in Lake Titicaca in the 20th century

    • Authors: Juan Sulca, James Apaéstegui, José Tacza
      Abstract: The water disponibility of Lake Titicaca is important for local ecosystems, domestic water, industry, fishing, agriculture, and tourism in Peru and Bolivia. However, the water level variability in Lake Titicaca (LTWL) still needs to be understood. The fluctuations of LTWL during the 1921–2018 period are investigated using continuous wavelet techniques on high- and low-pass filters of monthly time series, ERA-20C reanalysis, sea surface temperature (SST), and water level. We also built multiple linear regression (MLR) models based on SST indices to identify the main drivers of the LTWL variability. LTWL features annual (12 months), biennial (22–28 months), interannual (80–108 months), decadal (12.75–14.06 years), interdecadal (24.83–26.50 years), and multidecadal (30–65 years) signals. The high- and low-frequency components of the LTWL are triggered by the humidity transport from the lowland toward the Lake Titicaca basin, although different forcings could cause it. The biennial band is associated with SST anomalies over the southeastern tropical Atlantic Ocean that strengthen the Bolivian High-Nordeste Low system. The interannual band is associated with the southern South Atlantic SST anomalies, which modulate the position of the Bolivian High. According to the MLR models, the decadal and interdecadal components of the LTWL can be explained by the linear combination of the decadal and interdecadal variability of the Pacific and Atlantic SST anomalies (r> 0.83, p < 0.05). In contrast, the multidecadal component of the LTWL is driven by the multidecadal component of the North Atlantic SST anomalies (AMO) and the southern South Atlantic SST anomalies. Moreover, the monthly time series of LTWL exhibits four breakpoints. The signs of the first four trends follow the change of phases of the multidecadal component of LTWL, while the fifth trend is zero attributable to the diminished amplitude of the interdecadal component of LTWL.
      PubDate: 2024-01-12T00:00:00Z
       
  • Local knowledge matters: understanding the decision-making processes of
           communities under climate change in
           Suriname|Introduction|Methodology|Results|Discussion

    • Authors: Gwendolyn Smith, Mawie Chowenga, Jethro Karsters
      Abstract: IntroductionTraditionally, local communities have relied on practical observations accumulated over extended periods to inform their decision-making. This knowledge is now recognized as a viable solution for communities to adapt to climate change effectively. The impact of climate change brings an extra layer of complexity to local communities' detection- and decision-making processes, which needs to be better comprehended.MethodologyOur study builds on the foundation of conflict resolution and examines the knowledge systems and corresponding decision-making processes of local communities living in urban, rural, and tropical forest regions of Suriname, South America.ResultsThe mixed-method study showed that the autonomous decision-making processes of these communities are guided by their knowledge systems, intertwined with values and interests. Forest communities in remote locations rely solely on their robust knowledge base for crafting adaptation solutions, while urban and rural communities near the administrative centers develop adaptation strategies primarily considering their access to social networks and relative power.DiscussionThe study highlights local knowledge as the primary determinant for the direction communities take in adaptation, with tradeoffs becoming evident as communities navigate the broader social context. The recognition and integration of this knowledge emerge as a critical factor in enhancing climate change adaptation at the local level.
      PubDate: 2024-01-12T00:00:00Z
       
 
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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted by number of followers
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 201)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 182)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 72)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 64)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Economic Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Climate Change Research Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Climate Change and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Oxford Open Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Meteorological Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nīvār     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  

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Heriot-Watt University
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Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
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