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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 113 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 51)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access  
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 68)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Developments in Atmospheric Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access  
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 210)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Journal of Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Large Marine Ecosystems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorological Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 144)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Nīvār     Open Access  
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Revista Brasileira de Meteorologia     Open Access  
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access  
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal  
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access  
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Weather     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access  
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2511-1280 - ISSN (Online) 2511-1299
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2658 journals]
  • Emission Tax, Health Insurance, and Information: A Mechanism Design for
           Reducing Energy Consumption and Emission Risk

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      Abstract: A major share of the energy demand in the United States and around the world is met by energy sources derived from conventional fossil fuels. Combustion of fossil fuels causes serious emission of greenhouse gases and particle pollution, that translates into health hazards. Consumption of renewable energy can help reduce the carbon footprint and cut down the health risk. In this study we present results from a lab experiment in which subjects participated in a context-rich, incentivized game with elements of an impure public good, risk, and intertemporal discounting. The subjects played the role of a household head to decide on how much to spend on energy saving technologies. The spending reduced the future energy cost and emission, as well as emission related health risk and associated medical costs for everyone in the group. The discounting was characterized by allowing to save with interest earnings across multiple rounds. Each subject played three sections (baseline, a treatment, and a repeated baseline) and each section was comprised of 30 rounds. The treatment had a threshold public good feature, where the emission tax level was dependent on the overall energy-saving investments made by the group. Subjects exhibited significant learning and wealth effect in adopting more energy saving technologies over time. Furthermore, subjected were given the option to purchase health insurance to mitigate risk. The result shows that the adoption rate is higher when the emission tax is framed as a reward rather than a punishment and average energy savings are crowded out with the option to purchase health insurance. However, on average subjects who decide to purchase health insurance also save more energy than those who refuse to purchase it.
      PubDate: 2021-10-16
       
  • Pandemics and Economic Growth: Evidence from the 1968 H3N2 Influenza

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      Abstract: We evaluate the 1968 H3N2 Flu pandemic’s economic cost in a cross-section of 52 countries. Using excess mortality rates as a proxy for the country-specific severity of the pandemic, we find that the average mortality rate (0.0062% per pandemic wave) was associated with a decline in output of 2.4% over the two pandemic waves. Our estimates also suggest the losses in consumption (-1.9%), investment (-1.2%), and productivity (-1.9%) over the two pandemic waves. The results are robust across regressions using alternative measures of mortality and output loss. The study adds to the current literature new empirical evidence on the economic consequences of the past pandemics in light of the potential impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic on productivity.
      PubDate: 2021-10-12
       
  • The Far Reach of Hurricane Maria:

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      Abstract: Environmental degradation raises the frequency of natural disasters, and the growing reliance on global value chains exposes domestic labor markets to the ripple effects of these international calamities. To date, we know relatively little about such implications for U.S. labor markets. We leverage the significant disruption of Puerto Rican production and exports due to Hurricane Maria to study the spillover effects on employment in mainland U.S. labor markets. We find that the reduction in Puerto Rican import competition raises U.S. employment and the number of manufacturing establishments, particularly among pharmaceutical sectors with the highest level of industry exposure.
      PubDate: 2021-10-11
       
  • Lockdowns and the US Unemployment Crisis

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      Abstract: The Covid-19 pandemic led to an unprecedented decline of economic activity at the globe scale. To slow down the spread of the virus, most governments reacted with various measures of social distancing, such as mobility controls, business and school closures, etc. We investigate the short-term impact of social distancing measures on the US labour market, using a panel threshold model with high frequency (weekly) data on unemployment across US states allowing for heteroscedasticity. Labour is a key input in production, and thus a good proxy for the state of the economy. We find that changes in the restrictiveness of mandated social distancing, as measured by the Oxford Stringency Index, exert a strong impact on unemployment. The bulk of the reaction of unemployment to a change in the social distancing restrictions does not arise immediately, but with a delay of 2–4 weeks. In addition, the impact is asymmetric. If the policies switch to tighter regulations, the increase in unemployment is quicker and higher in absolute value than a decrease after relaxation. The state of the pandemic, proxied by the number of new infections and fatalities, constitutes only a marginal factor.
      PubDate: 2021-10-11
       
  • Estimated Economic Impacts of the 2019 Midwest Floods

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      Abstract: In the spring of 2019, U.S. agriculture experienced a record high number of prevented planted acres primarily due to historic rainfall across large portions of the Corn Belt and Mid-South. Producers of corn, upland cotton, soybean, and wheat were impacted with a substantial loss of revenue due to no crops being produced and marketed. With about 11.4 million acres of corn not planted, foregone gross revenue from crop sales likely exceeded $6 billion alone. Instead of focusing on the loss of producers’ incomes as a result of prevented planted acres, our analysis focuses on the economic impacts, due to lost sales, for firms that provide inputs to farmers. Acres prevented from planting resulted in producers not incurring typical expenditures for planting and post planting inputs such as seed, crop nutrients, and crop protection (herbicides, insecticides, fungicides, etc.). Agricultural input manufacturers, wholesalers, and retailers do not have similar opportunities to insure against foregone sales and have received no disaster assistance payments. Normally, the large geographic footprint of many of these firms mitigates the impact of localized weather effects. However, given the widespread nature of the wet spring, these firms were negatively affected across Corn Belt and Mid-South representing a substantial production area. Regional economic impact of declines in sales by agricultural input providers due to wet weather-based prevented plantings on 13.1 million acres. Direct sale losses of $2.9 billion led to $4.5 billion losses in total sales that were concentrated in parts of Minnesota, South Dakota, and Illinois.
      PubDate: 2021-09-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-021-00095-2
       
  • Simulating the Long-Term Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic on the
           Sustainability of the Population-Economy-Environment Nexus

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      Abstract: The COVID19 pandemic has created a massive shock, unexpectedly increasing mortality levels and generating economic recessions all around the world. In recent years, several efforts have been made to develop models that link the environment, population and the economy which may be used to estimate potential longer term effects of the pandemic. Unfortunately, many of the parameters used in these models lack appropriate empirical identification. In this study, first I estimate the parameters of “Wonderland”, a system dynamics model of the population-economy-environment nexus, and posteriorly, add external GDP and mortality shocks to the model. The estimated parameters are able to closely match world data, while future simulations point, on average and regardless of the COVID19 pandemic, to a world reaching dangerous environmental levels in the following decades, in line with consensus forecasts. On the other hand, the effects of the pandemic on the economy are highly uncertain and may last for several decades.
      PubDate: 2021-08-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-021-00094-3
       
  • Is Climate Change Induced by Humans' The Impact of the Gap in
           Perceptions on Cooperation

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      Abstract: Climate change is a serious problem that requires people’s cooperation to solve, and it has been reported that there exist gaps in perceptions about the cause. However, little is known about what makes people perceive that climate change is human-induced, nature-induced or induced by some other factor and the linkage between perception and cooperation. We analyze the determinants of human-induced perception and the impact of the gap in perceptions on cooperative behaviors toward climate change by conducting a survey experiment with a climate donation game with 400 Japanese subjects. First, the analysis identifies the importance of people’s scientific literacy in explaining the perception gaps in that those with high scientific literacy tend to have the perception of human-induced climate change. Second, people are identified as being cooperative toward climate change, as they have a prosocial value orientation, high scientific literacy and the perception of human-induced climate change, demonstrating two important roles of scientific literacy as not only a direct determinant but also an indirect one, through a mediator of people’s perceptions. Overall, the results suggest that scientific literacy shall be a key to enhancing cooperation toward climate change by promoting the perception of human-induced climate change.
      PubDate: 2021-08-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-021-00090-7
       
  • Global Economic Responses to Heat Stress Impacts on Worker Productivity in
           Crop Production

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      Abstract: The impacts of climate change on the food system are a key concern for societies and policy makers globally. Assessments of the biophysical impacts of crop productivity show modest but uncertain impacts. But crop growth is not the only factor that matters for the food production. Climate impacts on the labour force through increased heat stress also need to be considered. Here, we provide projections for the integrated climate-induced impacts on crop yields and worker productivity on the agro-economy in a global multi-sector economic model. Biophysical impacts are derived from a multi-model ensemble, which is based on a combination of climate and crop models, and the economic analysis is conducted for different socio-economic pathways. This framework allows for a comprehensive assessment of biophysical and socio-economic risks, and outlines rapid risk increases for high-warming scenarios. Considering heat effects on labour productivity, regional production costs could increase by up to 10 percentage points or more in vulnerable tropical regions such as South and South-East Asia, and Africa. Heat stress effects on labour might offset potential benefits through productivity gains due to the carbon dioxide fertilisation effect. Agricultural adaptation through increased mechanisation might allow to alleviate some of the negative heat stress effects under optimistic scenarios of socio-economic development. Our results highlight the vulnerability of the food system to climate change impacts through multiple impact channels. Overall, we find a consistently negative impact of future climate change on crop production when accounting for worker productivity next to crop yields.
      PubDate: 2021-08-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-021-00091-6
       
  • Can We Hedge an Investment Against A Potential Unexpected Environmental
           Disaster'

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      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to examine whether there is a possible hedging technique against a potential unexpected hazard, that can secure the capital invested by individuals or corporations. More specifically, the traditional hedging techniques are presented and illustrating whether they can be applicable against unexpected environmental disasters. Moreover, the evolution of hedging techniques regarding the catastrophe disasters are presented in the papers. After illustrating hazard-prone areas with the use of mapping visualization, techniques or catastrophe risk management and risk minimizations are proposed in an attempt to reduce the direct and indirect losses after a disastrous events while at the same time increase the trustworthiness of corporations and governments.
      PubDate: 2021-08-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-021-00085-4
       
  • Can Parametric Microinsurance Improve the Financial Resilience of
           Low-Income Households in the United States'

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      Abstract: Natural disaster risk is escalating around the globe and in the United States. A large body of research has found that lower-income households disproportionally suffer from disasters and are less likely to recover. Poorer households often lack the financial resources for rebuilding, endangering other aspects of wellbeing. Parametric microinsurance has been used in many developing countries to improve the financial resilience of low-income households. This paper presents a review of the evidence for implementing parametric microinsurance in the U.S., with spillover lessons for other highly developed countries. We discuss the benefits and the challenges of microinsurance in a US context and explore 4 possible distribution models that could help overcome difficulties, with policies being provided: (1) by an aggregator, (2) through a mobile-based technology, (3) by linking to other products or retailers, or (4) through a public sector insurer.
      PubDate: 2021-07-30
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-021-00088-1
       
  • Extreme Events, Entrepreneurial Start-Ups, and Innovation: Theoretical
           Conjectures

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      Abstract: In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, we scrutinize what has been established in the literature on whether entrepreneurship can cause and resolve extreme events, the immediate and long-run impacts of extreme events on entrepreneurship, and whether extreme events can positively impact (some) entrepreneurship and innovation. Based on this, we utilize a partial equilibrium model to provide several conjectures on the impact of COVID-19 on entrepreneurship, and to derive policy recommendations for recovery. We illustrate that while entrepreneurship recovery will benefit from measures such as direct subsidies for start-ups, firms’ revenue losses, and loan liabilities, it will also benefit from aggregate demand-side support and income redistribution measures, as well as from measures that facilitate the innovation-response to the Keynesian supply-shock caused by the pandemic, such as access to online retail and well-functioning global transportation and logistics.
      PubDate: 2021-07-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-021-00089-0
       
  • Children in Monetary Poor Households: Baseline and COVID-19 Impact for
           2020 and 2021

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      Abstract: The impact of the global economic crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic will not affect all children equally: those in poorer households and children who are disadvantaged face the most serious consequences. As parents lose their jobs and incomes, the impact on children living in impoverished households must be measured. In this article, we assess the economic consequences of the pandemic on these children. Given that poorer families have a larger number of children than other families, the analysis first establishes the proportion of children living in monetary poor households, as defined by national standards, across developing countries. Then, using historical changes and trends of income distribution per country, the latest projections about economic decline due to the pandemic, and demographic information about the distribution of children by deciles, we estimate the expected increase in the number of children in monetary poor households in developing countries as of end of 2020 to be an additional 122–144 million and, at best, a moderate decline in these numbers by end of 2021.
      PubDate: 2021-05-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-021-00086-3
       
  • Assessing the Optimality of a COVID Lockdown in the United States

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      Abstract: Though COVID vaccines have been available since December 2020, the rate at which they are administered remains slow, and in the meantime the pandemic continues to claim about as many lives every day as the 9/11 tragedy. I estimate that with the promised rate of vaccinations, if no additional non-pharmaceutical interventions are implemented, 203 thousand additional lives will be lost and the future cost of the pandemic will reach $1.3 trillion, or 6% of GDP. Using a cost-benefit analysis, I assess whether it is optimal for the United States to follow the lead of many European countries and introduce a nation-wide lockdown. I find that a lockdown would be indeed optimal and, depending on the assumptions, it should last between two and four weeks and will generate a net benefit of up to $653 billion.
      PubDate: 2021-05-08
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-021-00083-6
       
  • The Economics of Volcanoes

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      Abstract: Volcanic hazards pose a potential threat to 8% of the world’s population, yet the economic literature on their short- and long-term consequences on household behavior and economic development is still in its infancy. In this article, we present the state of the literature and highlight knowledge gaps and methodological challenges inherent to the economic analysis of volcanic hazards and disasters. We first present the physical aspects of volcanic activity and describe available physical data. We then examine the concepts related to cost assessment of volcanic disasters. Finally, we discuss key micro and macroeconomic research questions economists should investigate and identify relevant methodological and data challenges. By highlighting research gaps in the “economics of volcanoes”, we provide future avenues of research that will address policy-relevant debates in the context of greater focus on risk mitigation, adaptation, and resilience policies aimed at mitigating natural hazards and disasters.
      PubDate: 2021-04-20
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-021-00087-2
       
  • The Distributional Impact of Climate Change: Why Food Prices Matter

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      Abstract: We analyze the impact of agricultural productivity losses stemming from climate change in an economy without frictions. The first-order GDP impacts are expected to be small. But the poor have higher food budget shares and food prices will rise. How do distributional impacts diverge from the GDP impact' This is the question that is addressed. The paper considers two major sets of comparative statics: the effect of trade and the effect of economic growth. The model is calibrated to Indian data of 2009 and projections for 2030. The percentage loss of income for the landless is six times the GDP impact in a closed economy. Trade halves this effect and economic growth moderates it substantially. Despite the food price rise, nearly all farmers lose from climate change. The model is simple enough for impact channels to be transparent.
      PubDate: 2021-04-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-021-00084-5
       
  • Hurricane Sandy: Damages, Disruptions and Pathways to Recovery

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      Abstract: Critical infrastructure and public utility systems are often severely damaged by natural disasters like hurricanes. Based on a framework of household disaster resilience, this paper focuses on the role of utility disruption on household-level recovery in the context of Hurricane Sandy. Using data collected through a two-stage household survey, it first confirms that the sample selection bias is not present, thus the responses can be estimated sequentially. Second, it quantitatively examines factors contributing to hurricane-induced property damages and household-level recovery. The finding suggests that respondents who suffered from a longer period of utility disruptions (e.g., electricity, water, gas, phone/cell phone, public transportation) are more likely to incur monetary losses and have more difficulty in recovering. Effective preparedness activities (e.g., installing window protections, having an electric generator) can have positive results in reducing adverse shocks. Respondents with past hurricane experiences and higher educational attainments are found to be more resilient compared to others. Finally, the paper discusses the implications of the findings on effective preparation and mitigation strategies for future disasters.
      PubDate: 2021-03-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-021-00082-7
       
  • Drought and Property Prices: Empirical Evidence from Provinces of Iran

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      Abstract: This study examines the effect of drought on housing and residential land prices in Iran. Using panel data covering the 2006–2015 period for 31 provinces of Iran and applying a dynamic system and the difference Generalized Methods of Moments (GMM) methods, we find that an increase in the balance of water (reducing the severity of drought) within provinces has a positive effect on property prices. Our results are robust, controlling for province fixed effects, time trend, and a set of control variables that may affect property prices.
      PubDate: 2020-12-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-020-00081-0
       
  • COVID-19: The impact of social distancing policies, cross-country analysis

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      Abstract: At the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic a large number of countries introduced a range of non-pharmaceutical interventions. Whereas the policies are similar across countries, country characteristics vary substantially. We examine the effectiveness of such policies using a cross-country variation in socio-economic, environmental and geographic, and health system dimensions. The effectiveness of policies that prescribe closures of schools and workplaces is declining with population density, country surface area, employment rate and proportion of elderly in the population; and increasing with GDP per capita and health expenditure. Cross-country human mobility data reinforce some of these results. We argue that the findings can be explained by behavioural response to risk perceptions and resource constraints. Voluntary practice of social distancing might be less prevalent in communities with lower perceived risk, associated with better access to health care and smaller proportion of elderly population. Higher population density, larger geographical area, and higher employment rate may require more resources to ensure compliance with lockdown policies.
      PubDate: 2020-10-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-020-00076-x
       
  • Projection of the Effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic on the Welfare of
           Remittance-Dependent Households in the Philippines

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      Abstract: The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is inevitably affecting remittance-dependent countries through economic downturns in the destination countries, and restrictions on travel and sending remittances to their home country. We explore the potential impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the welfare of remittance-dependent households using a dataset collected in the Philippines prior to the outbreak. First, we confirm that remittances are associated with welfare of households, particularly for those whose head is male or lower educated. Then, we use the revision of the 2020 GDP projections before and after the COVID-19 crisis to gauge potential impacts on households caused by the pandemic. We find that remittance inflow will decrease by 14–20% and household spending per capita will decline by 1–2% (food expenditure per capita by 2–3%) in one year as a result of the pandemic.
      PubDate: 2020-09-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-020-00078-9
       
  • Short-, Medium-, and Long-Term Growth Impacts of Catastrophic and
           Non-catastrophic Natural Disasters

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      Abstract: Using disaster data from 1960, this paper examines the effects of natural disasters on economic growth. The analysis considers disaster effects by combining the following four dimensions: 1) short-, medium-, and long-term impacts, 2) disaster severity, categorized as catastrophic (CAT) or non-catastrophic (NCAT), 3) disaster type: hydro-meteorological, geophysical, and other specific disaster types, and 4) four income groups. The results show that the impacts of a disaster event on economic growth vary depending on the time frame, severity, disaster type, and income level. Overall, CAT disasters have negative impacts regardless of the time frame, while NCAT disasters may have positive impacts depending on the disaster type. The results also indicate that economic growth in lower-middle-income countries is most sensitive to natural disasters, but developed countries also experience negative impacts from CAT disasters.
      PubDate: 2020-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-020-00074-z
       
 
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