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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted by number of followers
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 201)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 182)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 72)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 64)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Economic Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Climate Change Research Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Climate Change and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Oxford Open Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Meteorological Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nīvār     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change
Number of Followers: 18  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2511-1280 - ISSN (Online) 2511-1299
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Adapting to Climate Risk' Local Population Dynamics in the United
           States

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      Abstract: Abstract Using a new composite climate-risk index, we show that population in high-risk counties has grown disproportionately over the last few decades, even relative to the corresponding commuting zone. We also find that the agglomeration is largely driven by increases in the (white) working-age population. In addition, we show that high-risk tracts have typically grown more than low-risk tracts within the same county, suggesting the presence of highly localized amenities. We also document heterogeneous population dynamics by degree of urbanization, region and type of natural hazard. Specifically, population has been retreating from high-risk, low-urbanization locations, but continues to grow in high-risk areas with high residential capital. Net migration flows have contributed to the higher growth of high-risk counties in the South and Northeast of the country, but the opposite has happened in the West and Midwest. Last, we provide evidence of microretreat in the case of coastal flooding: tracts with high levels of this risk have grown significantly less than other tracts in the same county, suggesting that residents are willing to relocate within short distances to avoid predictably risky locations.
      PubDate: 2024-02-19
       
  • Wish You Were Here' The Economic Impact of the Tourism Shutdown from
           Australia’s 2019-20 ‘Black Summer’ Bushfires

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      Abstract: Abstract Tourism, including education-related travel, is one of Australia’s top exports and generates substantial economic stimulus from Australians travelling in their own country, attracting visitors to diverse areas including World Heritage rainforests, picturesque beachside villages, winery townships and endemic wildlife. The globally unprecedented 2019-20 bushfires burned worst in some of these pristine tourist areas. The fires resulted in tourism shutting down in many parts of the country over the peak tourist season leading up to Christmas and into the New Year, and tourism dropped in many areas not physically affected by the fires. Our research quantified the cost of the short-term shock from tourism losses across the entire supply chain using input-output (IO) analysis, which is the most common method for disaster analysis; to this end, we also developed a framework for disaggregating the direct fire damages in different tourism sectors from which to quantify the impacts, because after the fires, the economy was affected by COVID-19. We calculated losses of AU$2.8 billion in total output, $1.56 billion in final demand, $810 million in income and 7300 jobs. Our estimates suggest aviation shouldered the most losses in both consumption and wages/salaries, but that accommodation suffered the most employment losses. The comprehensive analysis highlighted impacts throughout the nation, which could be used for budgeting and rebuilding in community-and-industry hotspots that may be far from the burn scar.
      PubDate: 2024-01-30
       
  • Climate Changes Affect Human Capital

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      Abstract: Abstract Climate change severely impacts critical facets of human capital across the life cycle. This is particularly alarming as both the frequency and intensity of extreme weather shocks continue to increase, and extremes appear to be the main channel of causality. At the same time, human capital has a vital role in driving effective climate change mitigation and adaptation. While substantial progress has been made in recent years in assessing the economic impacts of climate on economic outcomes, there has been comparatively less advancement in evaluating its effects on human capital. In this paper we provide a framework for analyzing the multiple interlinkages between climate change and human capital. We document the existing evidence on the impacts of climate change damages, and the effects of climate change mitigation and adaptation, on human capital across the life cycle. The framework distinguishes between two channels through which human capital is affected: direct effects on health, nutrition, and wellbeing, and indirect effects through changes in economic systems, markets, and through damage to infrastructure. These two channels call for different policy interventions, focusing on the different stages of the life cycle. For mitigation and adaptation, we find that while these are overall clearly beneficial, they are also associated with significant human capital costs for specific sectors and groups in society. Ignoring these costs can only lead to worse outcomes, as it can lead to diminishing public support for the required mitigation and adaptation responses.
      PubDate: 2024-01-16
       
  • Extreme Weather Events and the Performance of Critical Utility
           Infrastructures: A Case Study of Hurricane Harvey

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      Abstract: Abstract Extreme weather events have significant economic and social impacts, disrupting essential public services like electricity, phone communication, and transportation. This study seeks to understand the performance and resilience of critical infrastructure systems in Houston, Texas, using Hurricane Harvey (2017) as a case study. We surveyed 500 Houston Metropolitan Statistical Area residents after Hurricane Harvey’s landfall about disruption experience in electricity, water, phone/cellphone, internet, public transportation, workplace, and grocery stores. Our household survey data revealed the proportion and duration of disruption in each system. Approximately 70% of respondents reported experiencing electricity outages, while half (51%) had no access to water for up to six days. Two-thirds of surveyed households lacked internet access, and 50% had their phone services disconnected. Additionally, around 71% of respondents were unable to commute to work, and 73% were unable to purchase groceries for their families during this period. We incorporated the household survey responses into the Dynamic Inoperability Input-Output Model (DIIM) to estimate inoperability and economic losses across interconnected sectors. The projected economic loss was estimated to be in the range of $6.7- $9.7 billion when sensitivity analysis is performed with respect to the number of working days. Understanding the resilience of each sector and the inherent interdependencies among them can provide beneficial insight to policymakers for disaster risk management, notably preparedness and recovery planning for future events.
      PubDate: 2023-12-20
       
  • What Influences the Demand for a Potential Flood Insurance Product in an
           Area with Low Previous Exposure to Insurance' – A Case Study in the West
           African Lower Mono River Basin (LMRB)

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      Abstract: Abstract Floods portray a severe problem in the riverine areas of West Africa while more frequent and intense heavy precipitation events are projected under climatic change scenarios. Already, floods cause manifold impacts, leaving the population to cope with the financial impacts of floods through their own means. As formal risk transfer mechanisms (e.g., insurance) are not yet widely available to the population, efforts to increase their accessibility are being intensified. However, studies assessing flood insurance demand currently mostly focus on regions with more established markets. Also, they are majorly applying conventional statistical modeling approaches that consider only a small number of parameters. Contrarily, this study aims to provide an approach for assessing flood insurance in a context of low previous exposure to such products, to allow for a better consideration of the research context. Therefore, a parameter selection framework is provided and machine learning and deep learning models are applied to selected parameters from an existing household survey data set. In addition, the deep learning sequential neural networks outperformed all machine learning models achieving an accuracy between 93.5—100% depending on the loss function and optimizer used. The risk to be covered, insurance perception, no access to any source, access to support from community solidarity funds, access to governmental support, or drawing upon own resources for financial coping, financial recovery time, lack of means and prioritizing more essential needs emerged as important model parameters in researching insurance demand. Future roll-out campaigns could consider the parameters pointed out by this study.
      PubDate: 2023-12-18
       
  • What Do We Know About Drought, Household Consumption and Seasonality:
           Evidence Review from Sub-Saharan Africa

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      Abstract: Abstract There is little discussion, let alone systemic evidence, on how droughts affect seasonal/intra-annual consumption within a drought year and subsequent years. This paper reviews the evidence on whether households can smooth food and non-food consumption and how factors constraining consumption smoothing are experienced in the context of drought, focusing primarily on empirical evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa. Households are unable to smooth consumption for various reasons including income seasonality, imperfect credit markets, incomplete insurance, storage constraints, and liquidity constraints. They reduce non-food consumption to partly smooth food consumption during lean season, and there is an overwhelming amount of evidence that households reduce food consumption to cope with drought. Droughts not only exacerbate seasonality in income and price through crop losses and changes in prices and wages, which are triggered by the initial losses, but also extend the lean season. Access to formal or informal credit markets is further constrained for covariate shocks such as drought. This paper recommends further research into the following areas: i) What is the timing of any reduction in food and non-food consumption in response to drought' ii) How do the patterns and timing of consumption reduction vary by household' What are the characteristics that that make some households more vulnerable to drought' iii) Which type of households can afford to smooth consumption by destabilising assets instead of dangerously reducing consumption and smoothing assets' iv) Does access to internet and telecommunications reduce the incompleteness of informal insurance by facilitating information sharing and reducing transaction costs. The empirics of understanding drought's effects on seasonal consumption are limited by costly and infrequent data. “Big data” and “modern methods of data collection” could be explored and leveraged-either on their own or linked with traditional surveys- to obtain more frequent and disaggregated observations of household consumption.
      PubDate: 2023-09-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-023-00137-x
       
  • The Divergent Effects of Remittance Transfers for Post-Disaster States

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper asks how remittances flows, the value of which has increased substantially in the last 20 years, moderate disruptions in state capacity generated by rapid-onset natural disasters. Focusing specifically on earthquakes, we consider how remittances affect social welfare and unrest. We propose two causal pathways that reflect the complex effects both natural disasters and remittances have on states and societies. First, we argue that remittances can mitigate political instability by smoothing disruptions in individual consumption, which are most salient during times when states are struggling to supply public goods, as in the aftermath of natural disasters. Second, we argue that remittance flows can supply financial resources that empower dissident groups to mobilize protests and other anti-state action. Although these pathways appear conflicting, we contend that they stem from the same causal mechanism—income smoothing—which is an important refinement in existing research that reports contradictory findings. Our results are supportive of our theoretical argument and show that remittances can paradoxically improve social welfare while also heightening the conditions for social unrest.
      PubDate: 2023-08-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-023-00136-y
       
  • Does Green Infrastructure Work' Precipitation, Protected Areas, Floods
           and Landslides

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      Abstract: Abstract We evaluate whether floods and landslides are more likely when rain falls inside versus outside protected areas (PAs). We use monthly municipality data for the period 2000–2015 in Guatemala and monthly district data for the period 1992–2019 in Costa Rica. We define relevant catchment areas using water flows to the population centers of the administrative units. Then, we calculate the precipitation inside and outside PAs within the relevant catchment areas, and test how the frequency of floods and landslides is affected by whether rain falls inside or outside PAs. We use a two-way fixed-effects panel data model. For Guatemala, we find no robust statistically significant effects on these types of disasters. However, in Costa Rica, we find that shifts in precipitation towards PAs significantly reduce floods. These results are highly robust. We also find effects on landslides in densely populated districts as well as reductions in flood-related deaths.
      PubDate: 2023-08-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-023-00134-0
       
  • Do Sovereign Catastrophe Bonds Improve Fiscal Resilience' An Application
           of Synthetic Control Method to Mexico

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      Abstract: Abstract Natural disasters exert a significant impact on government finances. Catastrophe bonds (CAT bonds) constitute risk-transfer instruments that could help governments improve their fiscal resilience when catastrophic events occur. However, given the very limited issuance of sovereign CAT bonds so far, their actual impact on fiscal resilience is difficult to quantify. There is no literature on this topic currently available. I attempt to fill this gap and assess the impact of CAT bond payouts on the fiscal balance of the Mexican government using the synthetic control method. As an early adopter and repeated issuer of sovereign CAT bonds since 2006, Mexico received its first CAT bond payout in 2017. The payout was triggered by a high-magnitude earthquake that stroke the country in September 2017, with an estimated impact of 0.24% of Mexico’s gross domestic product (GDP). I identify 12 countries that experienced natural disasters with a similar impact on GDP in 2017, but which unlike Mexico have not received a CAT bond payout that year. I then compare post-2017 fiscal balances for Mexico with a synthetic control unit that combines the characteristics of the 12 similar but untreated countries, while controlling for other factors that could have had an impact on this fiscal variable. I find a positive and statistically significant impact of the 2017 CAT bond payout on Mexico’s fiscal balance compared to its synthetic control unit. A series of placebo studies and robustness tests confirm the validity of these findings.
      PubDate: 2023-07-31
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-023-00135-z
       
  • Residential Electricity Consumption and Adaptation to Climate Change by
           Colombian Households

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper provides the first empirical estimates of the relationship between temperatures and household electricity consumption in Colombia, using electricity billing and weather data from 2010 to 2019. I find that higher temperatures (or higher values of the heat index) increase electricity consumption, with the largest effects observed for high-income households in regions with hot climates. However, I show that there has been partial convergence between low- and high-income households, with the effect of temperature on electricity consumption in lower-income neighborhoods more than doubling between 2011 and 2019. These results align with survey evidence of increased air conditioning adoption. Nevertheless, further growth in air conditioning adoption and use is required to alleviate the health effects of more frequent and severe heatwaves due to climate change.
      PubDate: 2023-07-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-023-00131-3
       
  • Vulnerability and Resilience to Drought and Saltwater Intrusion of Rice
           Farming Households in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

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      Abstract: Abstract Adverse impacts of climate and environmental hazards are unevenly distributed between socioeconomic groups due to differences in exposure, vulnerability and resilience. This study examines the distribution of vulnerability and resilience to drought and salt intrusion impacts among rice farmers in the rural Mekong Delta in Vietnam. By defining both aspects independently, we can study potential differences in the socio-economic factors that steer them and analyse how these two aspects of adaptive capacity are related. Using fixed-effect regressions, we find that poorer communes are more vulnerable to direct environmental impacts (loss in rice yield). Several household characteristics that reflect a low socioeconomic status, such as low asset values, small plots, and limited education level, are linked with higher vulnerability to direct drought impacts. High vulnerability does, however, not necessarily translate to low resilience, which we proxy by measuring indirect impacts (loss in household income). Several household activities and characteristics help mitigate indirect impacts. Our results suggest that the least resilient household group consists of smallholder, asset-low households that are unable to diversify to non-crop agriculture or off-farm employment. Supportive policies targeting this particular socioeconomic group to enable transition to non-crop or off-farm labour would substantially improve their resilience to future environmental events. Distinguishing between resilience and vulnerability enables a broader understanding of the mechanisms influencing the distribution of direct and indirect adverse impacts, which enables drafting targeted policy measures for specific socioeconomic groups.
      PubDate: 2023-06-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-023-00133-1
       
  • Disasters and Climate Change in Latin America and the Caribbean: An
           Introduction to the Special Issue

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      Abstract: Abstract This introduction seeks to provide context for the papers included in this special issue by drawing on the broader literature. Salient development challenges for Latin America and the Caribbean, which can be aggravated by climate change, are low economic growth, high poverty and inequality, and fiscal vulnerabilities. This paper summarizes some of the evidence on the economic implications of climate change with an emphasis on the evidence pertaining to Latin America and the Caribbean; and how the research papers included in this special issue provide answers for some of the relevant and remaining questions about this topic.
      PubDate: 2023-06-05
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-023-00132-2
       
  • Weather Disasters, Material Losses and Income Inequality: Evidence from a
           Tropical, Middle-Income Country

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      Abstract: Abstract The origins of inequality are as old as human history. This persistent phenomenon has attracted the attention of scholars and policymakers due to its repercussions for social and economic outcomes in society. However, despite national and international efforts, inequality is still prevalent within and across countries worldwide. Although many studies and debates have vastly addressed the causes of inequality, little has been said about the relationship between human and material losses and inequality and poverty. This relationship is important to understand since climate change is expected to increase the frequency and intensity of weather disasters in the near future. In this paper, I identify the effect of weather disasters on income inequality considering the case of Ecuador, a disaster-prone, unequal country. I construct a panel of provinces, municipalities and districts, including information to calculate the Gini coefficient and records of weather events in the country from 2007 to 2017. My findings suggest that weather disasters persistently affect income inequality, especially when disasters are measured in terms of damages to roads, public infrastructure and productive assets. Interestingly, human losses (i.e., the number of fatalities and injured people) and damages to productive assets show no effect on inequality levels. The results suggest the importance of disaster-resilient infrastructure as a mechanism to reduce the impacts of climate change on individual wellbeing and living conditions.
      PubDate: 2023-06-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-023-00129-x
       
  • Droughts and Local Labor Markets. Studying Heterogenous Effects on Women
           and Indigenous People in Chile

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      Abstract: Abstract Climate change is a pressing issue, affecting the lives of all people across the world. However, poorer and excluded communities are usually more affected, especially in low-income countries. Among them, women but particularly indigenous groups in rural areas seem to carry the bulk of the impacts produced by climate change and its many manifestations. We study the relationship between droughts and incomes and labor market outcomes in Chile over the period 1990–2017, focusing in particular on indigenous women. Our results show that overall indigenous women are the group most severely affected by droughts, decreasing their income, their probability of working in agriculture, and increasing their likelihood of working as an unpaid family worker or being out of the labor force. Results are robust to the use of different variables to measure droughts and to different econometric specifications. Our study corroborates the existence of marked heterogenous effects of climate change on different population groups and the vulnerability of indigenous communities to these shocks.
      PubDate: 2023-06-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-023-00130-4
       
  • An Integrated Assessment of Climate Change Impacts and Implications on
           Bonaire

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      Abstract: Abstract Bonaire’s topographic and geographic characteristics, in combination with the island’s high dependency on economic sectors that are susceptible to the impacts of climate change, make this Caribbean island particularly vulnerable to climatic changes. In this study, biophysical and economic models are combined and complemented with stakeholder consultation to assess and quantify environmental effects and associated socio-economic impacts of climate change on Bonaire. We apply three climate scenarios of the 2021 IPCC report (SSP1-2.6, 2–4.5, and 5–8.5) and combine them with local conditions to conduct a site-specific integrated assessment. The results show that various buildings, critical infrastructure, and identified tangible cultural heritage, especially at the south of Bonaire, are at risk of climate change induced coastal inundation by 2050, even under the least severe climate projection. In addition, the overall health of coral reefs declines under the climate scenarios SSP2-4.5 and SSP5-8.5 due to sea level rise, acidification, and increasing temperatures. In the most pessimistic scenario, Bonaire could experience a reduction in dive tourist arrivals of 118,000, which can lead to an economic contraction of 174 USDm (25%) in Bonaire’s GDP. In the absence of timely planning and implementation of adaptation measures, the impacts of climate change may have serious implications for inhabitants’ lifestyles and wellbeing. These results are imperative for various stakeholders, and stress that decision-makers should focus on the development and implementation of effective and feasible adaptation strategies urgently. Moreover, future researchers confronted with data scarcity in comparable contexts can utilise the novel methodologies employed in this study.
      PubDate: 2023-05-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-023-00127-z
       
  • The Impact of Tropical Storms on International Trade: Evidence from
           Eastern Caribbean Small Island Developing States

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      Abstract: Abstract Eastern Caribbean Small Island Developing States (SIDS) have a high dependence on international trade for income, employment, and poverty reduction given their extreme openness, small market size, narrow range of resources, and productive capabilities and specialized economic structures. These features make them vulnerable to external shocks, the most frequent being tropical storms. The objective of this paper is to investigate the impact of tropical storms on international trade for 8 Eastern Caribbean SIDS over the period 2000–2019, as well as the mediating role of the Real Effective Exchange Rate (REER). The paper uses panel regression techniques along with mediation analysis applied to monthly export, import, and exchange rate data taken from the Eastern Caribbean Central Bank combined with a measure of hurricane destruction that accounts for ex-ante economic exposure to damage. The results indicate that hurricanes reduce exports of goods by 20 percent in the month of a strike and up to three months thereafter. The impact on imports is more immediate and less severe, reducing imports of goods by 11 per cent only in the month of a strike. The mediation analysis suggests that the REER plays no mediation role in explaining the impact of tropical storm damage on exports and imports in the region.
      PubDate: 2023-05-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-023-00128-y
       
  • Differential Fiscal Performances of Plausible Disaster Events: A Storyline
           Approach for the Caribbean and Central American Governments under CCRIF

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      Abstract: Abstract Fiscal resilience against disasters is vital for the recovery in the aftermath of climate hazards. Without swift access to available funds for disaster relief, damages to human and the economy would be further exacerbated. How insurance may influence fiscal performance over time and can increase fiscal resilience for today and under a future climate has not been looked at yet in detail. Focusing on the Caribbean region and on the fiscal performance of governments after disaster events, we empirically analyze the effectiveness of the Caribbean Catastrophe Risk Insurance Facility (CCRIF) regarding the reduction of short-term fiscal effects. We embed this analysis within a novel climate impact storyline approach where we produce past plausible events and investigate the usefulness of insurance under such events. The storylines were modified according to global and climate change related boundary conditions to address the issue whether the CCRIF is fit for purpose or will need to be adapted in the future. We found that both hurricane strikes and the CCRIF affect fiscal outcomes of Caribbean countries. Furthermore, there are indications that CCRIF can counteract the negative fiscal consequences over the short term period induced by the disaster. Our analysis should shed some light on the current discussions on how development related assistance can be structured to enhance climate resilience in highly exposed countries for both direct and fiscal impacts of disasters.
      PubDate: 2023-05-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-023-00126-0
       
  • International Evidence on Vaccines and the Mortality to Infections Ratio
           in the Pre-Omicron Era

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      Abstract: Abstract Prior to the appearance of the Omicron variant, observations on countries like the UK that have accumulated a large fraction of inoculated individuals suggest that, although initially, vaccines have little effect on new infections, they strongly reduce the share of mortality out of a given pool of infections. This paper examines the extent to which this phenomenon is more general by testing the hypothesis that the ratio of lagged mortality to current infections is decreasing in the total number of vaccines per one hundred individuals in the pre-Omicron period, in a pooled time-series, cross-section sample with weekly observations for up to 208 countries. The main finding is that vaccines moderate the share of mortality from a given pool of lagged infections at sufficiently high levels of vaccination rates, which is essentially a favorable shift in the tradeoff between life preservation and economic performance. The practical lesson is that, in the presence of a sufficiently high share of inoculated individuals, governments can shade down containment measures, even as infections are still rampant, without significant adverse effects on mortality.
      PubDate: 2023-04-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-023-00125-1
       
  • Losses from Fluvial Floods in Poland over the 21st Century – Estimation
           Using the Productivity Costs Method

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper aims at the estimation of the impact of climate change on future losses caused by fluvial floods in Poland over the twenty-first century at the local level with the productivity costs valuation method. The daily data on river discharges published by (Piniewski et al., Hydrol Process 31:2210–2225, 2017), map of flood risk and value added generated in each county are used to estimate of the impact of climate change on the fluvial flood damage at the county level. This study supplements the findings of (Koks et al., Environ Res Lett 14:084042, 2019), (Alfieri et al., Clim Change 136:507–521, 2016) and (Feyen et al., Clim Change 112:47–62, 2012) with estimates of future flood losses in Poland using the productivity costs valuation that considers also the costs of disruptions of production chains and lost production at the finer level of spatial disaggregation. This method shows the overall increase in losses caused by fluvial floods in Poland due to climate change in comparison to the reference period of 1974–2000 by 47% in RCP4.5 and 83% in RCP8.5 scenario in 2024–2050 and by 32% in RCP4.5 and 51% in the RCP8.5 in 2074–2100.
      PubDate: 2023-04-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-023-00124-2
       
  • Economic Activity, Fiscal Space and Types of COVID-19 Containment Measures

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper argues that the type of COVID-19 containment measures affects the trade-offs between infection cases, economic activity and sovereign risk. Using local projection methods and a year and a half of high-frequency daily data covering 44 advanced and emerging economies, we find that smart (e.g. testing) as opposed to physical (e.g. lockdown) measures appear to be best placed to tackle these trade-offs. Initial conditions also matter whereby containment measures can be less disruptive when public health response time is fast and public debt is low. We also construct a database of daily fiscal announcements for Euro area countries, and find that sovereign risk is improved under a combination of large support packages and smart measures.
      PubDate: 2023-04-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s41885-022-00121-x
       
 
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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted by number of followers
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 201)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 182)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 72)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 64)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Economic Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Climate Change Research Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Climate Change and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Oxford Open Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Meteorological Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nīvār     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  

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School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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