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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
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Weather and Climate Dynamics
Number of Followers: 1  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 2698-4008 - ISSN (Online) 2698-4016
Published by Copernicus Publications Homepage  [54 journals]
  • The role of boundary layer processes in summer-time Arctic cyclones

    • Abstract: The role of boundary layer processes in summer-time Arctic cyclones
      Hannah L. Croad, John Methven, Ben Harvey, Sarah P. E. Keeley, and Ambrogio Volonté
      Weather Clim. Dynam. Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/wcd-2022-60,2022
      Preprint under review for WCD (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      The interaction between Arctic cyclones and the sea ice surface in summer is investigated by analysing the friction and sensible heat flux processes acting in two cyclones with contrasting evolution. The major finding is that the effects of friction on cyclone strength are dependent on a particular feature of cyclone structure; whether they have a warm or cold core during growth. Friction leads to cooling within both cyclone types in the lower atmosphere, which may contribute to their longevity.
      PubDate: Mon, 05 Dec 2022 14:25:46 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-2022-602022

       
  • Reanalysis representation of low-level winds in the Antarctic near-coastal
           region

    • Abstract: Reanalysis representation of low-level winds in the Antarctic near-coastal region
      Thomas Caton Harrison, Stavroula Biri, Thomas J. Bracegirdle, John C. King, Elizabeth C. Kent, Étienne Vignon, and John Turner
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 1415–1437, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-1415-2022, 2022
      Easterly winds encircle Antarctica, impacting sea ice and helping drive ocean currents which shield ice shelves from warmer waters. Reanalysis datasets give us our most complete picture of how these winds behave. In this paper we use satellite data, surface measurements and weather balloons to test how realistic recent reanalysis estimates are. The winds are generally accurate, especially in the most recent of the datasets, but important short-term variations are often misrepresented.
      PubDate: Fri, 02 Dec 2022 14:25:46 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-1415-2022 2022

       
  • Signatures of Eurasian heat waves in global Rossby wave spectra

    • Abstract: Signatures of Eurasian heat waves in global Rossby wave spectra
      Iana Strigunova, Richard Blender, Frank Lunkeit, and Nedjeljka Žagar
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 1399–1414, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-1399-2022, 2022
      We show that the Eurasian heat waves (HWs) have signatures in the global circulation. We present changes in the probability density functions (PDFs) of energy anomalies in the zonal-mean state and in the Rossby waves at different zonal scales in relation to the changes in intramonthly variability. The skewness of the PDF of planetary-scale Rossby waves is shown to increase during HWs, while their intramonthly variability is reduced, a process referred to as blocking.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Dec 2022 14:17:33 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-1399-2022 2022

       
  • Decadal variability and trends in extratropical Rossby wave packet
           amplitude, phase, and phase speed

    • Abstract: Decadal variability and trends in extratropical Rossby wave packet amplitude, phase, and phase speed
      Georgios Fragkoulidis
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 1381–1398, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-1381-2022, 2022
      Assessing the seasonal distributions of local Rossby wave packet (RWP) amplitude, phase, and phase speed on reanalysis data of the 1979–2019 period reveals that patterns of robust trends emerge and vary substantially between seasons and regions. While an absence of covariance is evident between RWP amplitude and phase speed at decadal scales, the frequency of DJF large-amplitude quasi-stationary RWPs increases in several areas of the N Pacific and N America during 1999–2019.
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Nov 2022 14:17:33 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-1381-2022 2022

       
  • Classification of Large-Scale Environments that drive the formation of
           Mesoscale Convective Systems over Southern West Africa

    • Abstract: Classification of Large-Scale Environments that drive the formation of Mesoscale Convective Systems over Southern West Africa
      Francis Nkrumah, Cornelia Klein, Kwesi Akumenyi Quagraine, Rebecca Berkoh-Oforiwaa, Nana Ama Browne Klutse, Patrick Essien, Gandomè Mayeul Leger Davy Quenum, and Hubert Azoda Koffi
      Weather Clim. Dynam. Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/wcd-2022-61,2022
      Preprint under review for WCD (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      The study identified six types of favourable Mesoscale Convective System (MCS) environments in Southern West Africa using Self Organizing Maps (SOM). The identified environmental types are noted to represent patterns of the seasonal rainfall cycle. Our results show that MCSs develop on average in similar high moisture, high shear local environments under all large-scale situations throughout the year. The latter however defines the frequency at which favourable MCS environments can occur.
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Nov 2022 14:17:33 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-2022-612022

       
  • Transient Anticyclonic Eddies and Their Relationship to Atmospheric Block
           Persistence

    • Abstract: Transient Anticyclonic Eddies and Their Relationship to Atmospheric Block Persistence
      Charlie C. Suitters, Oscar Martínez-Alvarado, Kevin I. Hodges, Reinhard K. H. Schiemann, and Duncan Ackerley
      Weather Clim. Dynam. Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/wcd-2022-59,2022
      Preprint under review for WCD (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Atmospheric blocking describes large and persistent high surface pressure. In this study, the relationship between block persistence and smaller-scale systems is examined. Persistent blocks result from more interactions with small systems, but a block’s persistence does not depend on the strength of these smaller features. This work is important because it provides more knowledge as to how blocks can be allowed to persist, which is something we still do not yet fully understand.
      PubDate: Mon, 28 Nov 2022 14:17:33 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-2022-592022

       
  • Can low-resolution CMIP6 ScenarioMIP models provide insight into future
           European post-tropical-cyclone risk'

    • Abstract: Can low-resolution CMIP6 ScenarioMIP models provide insight into future European post-tropical-cyclone risk'
      Elliott Michael Sainsbury, Reinhard K. H. Schiemann, Kevin I. Hodges, Alexander J. Baker, Len C. Shaffrey, Kieran T. Bhatia, and Stella Bourdin
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 1359–1379, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-1359-2022, 2022
      Post-tropical cyclones (PTCs) can bring severe weather to Europe. By tracking and identifying PTCs in five global climate models, we investigate how the frequency and intensity of PTCs may change across Europe by 2100. We find no robust change in the frequency or intensity of Europe-impacting PTCs in the future. This study indicates that large uncertainties surround future Europe-impacting PTCs and provides a framework for evaluating PTCs in future generations of climate models.
      PubDate: Thu, 24 Nov 2022 15:48:49 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-1359-2022 2022

       
  • Non-linear intensification of monsoon low-pressure systems by the BSISO

    • Abstract: Non-linear intensification of monsoon low-pressure systems by the BSISO
      Kieran M. R. Hunt and Andrew G. Turner
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 1341–1358, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-1341-2022, 2022
      More than half of India's summer monsoon rainfall arises from low-pressure systems: storms originating over the Bay of Bengal. In observation-based data, we examine how the generation and pathway of these storms are changed by the boreal summer intraseasonal oscillation – the chief means of large-scale control on the monsoon at timescales of a few weeks. Our study offers new insights for useful prediction of these storms, important for both water resources planning and disaster early warning.
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Nov 2022 10:55:26 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-1341-2022 2022

       
  • Stratospheric influence on the winter North Atlantic storm track in
           subseasonal reforecasts

    • Abstract: Stratospheric influence on the winter North Atlantic storm track in subseasonal reforecasts
      Hilla Afargan-Gerstman, Dominik Büeler, C. Ole Wulff, Michael Sprenger, and Daniela I. V. Domeisen
      Weather Clim. Dynam. Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/wcd-2022-58,2022
      Preprint under review for WCD (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      The stratosphere is a layer of Earth's atmosphere found above the weather systems. Changes in the stratosphere can affect the winds and the storm tracks in the North Atlantic region for a relatively long time, lasting for several weeks and even months. We show that the stratosphere can be important for weather forecasts beyond 1 week, but more work is needed to improve the accuracy of these forecasts for 3–4 weeks.
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Nov 2022 10:55:26 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-2022-582022

       
  • A climate-change attribution retrospective of some impactful weather
           extremes of 2021

    • Abstract: A climate-change attribution retrospective of some impactful weather extremes of 2021
      Davide Faranda, Stella Bourdin, Mireia Ginesta, Meriem Krouma, Robin Noyelle, Flavio Pons, Pascal Yiou, and Gabriele Messori
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 1311–1340, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-1311-2022, 2022
      We analyze the atmospheric circulation leading to impactful extreme events for the calendar year 2021 such as the Storm Filomena, Westphalia floods, Hurricane Ida and Medicane Apollo. For some of the events, we find that climate change has contributed to their occurrence or enhanced their intensity; for other events, we find that they are unprecedented. Our approach underscores the importance of considering changes in the atmospheric circulation when performing attribution studies.
      PubDate: Thu, 17 Nov 2022 10:55:26 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-1311-2022 2022

       
  • Stratospheric intrusion depth and its effect on surface cyclogenetic
           forcing: an idealized potential vorticity (PV) inversion experiment

    • Abstract: Stratospheric intrusion depth and its effect on surface cyclogenetic forcing: an idealized potential vorticity (PV) inversion experiment
      Michael A. Barnes, Thando Ndarana, Michael Sprenger, and Willem A. Landman
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 1291–1309, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-1291-2022, 2022
      Stratospheric air can intrude into the troposphere and is associated with cyclonic development throughout the atmosphere. Through a highly idealized systematic approach, the effect that different intrusion characteristics have on surface cyclogenetic forcing is investigated. The proximity of stratospheric intrusions to the surface is shown to be the main factor in surface cyclogenetic forcing, whilst its width is an additional contributing factor.
      PubDate: Wed, 09 Nov 2022 22:02:35 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-1291-2022 2022

       
  • The impact of microphysical uncertainty conditional on initial and
           boundary condition uncertainty under varying synoptic control

    • Abstract: The impact of microphysical uncertainty conditional on initial and boundary condition uncertainty under varying synoptic control
      Takumi Matsunobu, Christian Keil, and Christian Barthlott
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 1273–1289, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-1273-2022, 2022
      This study quantifies the impact of poorly constrained parameters used to represent aerosol–cloud–precipitation interactions on precipitation and cloud forecasts associated with uncertainties in input atmospheric states. Uncertainties in these parameters have a non-negligible impact on daily precipitation amount and largely change the amount of cloud. The comparison between different weather situations reveals that the impact becomes more important when convection is triggered by local effects.
      PubDate: Mon, 07 Nov 2022 13:46:38 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-1273-2022 2022

       
  • The stratosphere: a review of the dynamics and variability

    • Abstract: The stratosphere: a review of the dynamics and variability
      Neal Butchart
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 1237–1272, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-1237-2022, 2022
      In recent years, it has emerged that there is an affinity between stratospheric variability and surface events. Waves from the troposphere interacting with the mean flow drive much of the variability in the polar vortex, sudden stratospheric warmings and tropical quasi-biennial oscillation. Here we review the historical evolution of established knowledge of the stratosphere's global structure and dynamical variability, along with recent advances and theories, and identify outstanding challenges.
      PubDate: Mon, 07 Nov 2022 13:46:38 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-1237-2022 2022

       
  • The Teleconnection of Extreme ENSO Events to the Tropical North Atlantic
           in Coupled Climate Models

    • Abstract: The Teleconnection of Extreme ENSO Events to the Tropical North Atlantic in Coupled Climate Models
      Jake W. Casselman, Joke F. Lübbecke, Tobias Bayr, Wenjuan Huo, Sebastian Wahl, and Daniela I. V. Domeisen
      Weather Clim. Dynam. Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/wcd-2022-57,2022
      Preprint under review for WCD (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) has remote effects on the tropical North Atlantic (TNA), but the connections’ nonlinearity (strength of response to an increasing ENSO signal) is not always well represented in models. Using the Community Earth System Model version 1-– Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Mode (CESM-WACCM) and the Flexible Ocean and Climate Infrastructure version 1, we find that the TNA responds linearly to extreme El Niño, but nonlinearly to extreme La Niña for CESM-WACCM.
      PubDate: Mon, 07 Nov 2022 13:46:38 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-2022-572022

       
  • Stratospheric downward wave reflection events modulate North American
           weather regimes and cold spells

    • Abstract: Stratospheric downward wave reflection events modulate North American weather regimes and cold spells
      Gabriele Messori, Marlene Kretschmer, Simon H. Lee, and Vivien Wendt
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 1215–1236, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-1215-2022, 2022
      Over 10 km above the ground, there is a region of the atmosphere called the stratosphere. While there is very little air in the stratosphere itself, its interactions with the lower parts of the atmosphere – where we live – can affect the weather. Here we study a specific example of such an interaction, whereby processes occurring at the boundary of the stratosphere can lead to a continent-wide drop in temperatures in North America during winter.
      PubDate: Fri, 04 Nov 2022 13:46:38 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-1215-2022 2022

       
  • Impact of grid spacing, convective parameterization and cloud microphysics
           in ICON simulations of a warm conveyor belt

    • Abstract: Impact of grid spacing, convective parameterization and cloud microphysics in ICON simulations of a warm conveyor belt
      Anubhav Choudhary and Aiko Voigt
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 1199–1214, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-1199-2022, 2022
      The warm conveyor belt (WCB), which is a stream of coherently rising air parcels, is an important feature of extratropical cyclones. This work presents the impact of model grid spacing on simulation of cloud diabatic processes in the WCB of a North Atlantic cyclone. We find that the refinement of the model grid systematically enhances the dynamical properties and heat releasing processes within the WCB. However, this pattern does not have a strong impact on the strength of associated cyclones.
      PubDate: Thu, 27 Oct 2022 09:29:10 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-1199-2022 2022

       
  • Subseasonal precipitation forecasts of opportunity over central southwest
           Asia

    • Abstract: Subseasonal precipitation forecasts of opportunity over central southwest Asia
      Melissa L. Breeden, John R. Albers, and Andrew Hoell
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 1183–1197, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-1183-2022, 2022
      We use a statistical dynamical model to generate precipitation forecasts for lead times of 2–6 weeks over southwest Asia, which are needed to support humanitarian food distribution. The model signal-to-noise ratio is used to identify a smaller subset of forecasts with particularly high skill, so-called subseasonal forecasts of opportunity (SFOs). Precipitation SFOs are often related to slowly evolving tropical phenomena, namely the El Niño–Southern Oscillation and Madden–Julian Oscillation.
      PubDate: Thu, 27 Oct 2022 09:29:10 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-1183-2022 2022

       
  • Similarity and variability of blocked weather-regime dynamics in the
           Atlantic-European region

    • Abstract: Similarity and variability of blocked weather-regime dynamics in the Atlantic-European region
      Franziska Teubler, Michael Riemer, Christopher Polster, Christian M. Grams, Seraphine Hauser, and Volkmar Wirth
      Weather Clim. Dynam. Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/wcd-2022-56,2022
      Preprint under review for WCD (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Weather regimes govern an important part of the sub-seasonal variability of the mid-latitude circulation. The year-round dynamics of blocked regimes in the Atlantic European region are investigated in over 40 years of data. We show that the dynamics between the regimes are on average very similar at regime location. However, the average picture experiences some cancellation due to different pathways especially before onset of the regime and some processes maximize outside of that location.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Oct 2022 14:20:36 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-2022-562022

       
  • Recurrent Rossby waves and south-eastern Australian heatwaves

    • Abstract: Recurrent Rossby waves and south-eastern Australian heatwaves
      S. Mubashshir Ali, Matthias Röthlisberger, Tess Parker, Kai Kornhuber, and Olivia Martius
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 1139–1156, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-1139-2022, 2022
      Persistent weather can lead to extreme weather conditions. One such atmospheric flow pattern, termed recurrent Rossby wave packets (RRWPs), has been shown to increase persistent weather in the Northern Hemisphere. Here, we show that RRWPs are also an important feature in the Southern Hemisphere. We evaluate the role of RRWPs during south-eastern Australian heatwaves and find that they help to persist the heatwaves by forming upper-level high-pressure systems over south-eastern Australia.
      PubDate: Wed, 19 Oct 2022 13:10:17 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-1139-2022 2022

       
  • Identification of high-wind features within extratropical cyclones using a
           probabilistic random forest – Part 1: Method and case studies

    • Abstract: Identification of high-wind features within extratropical cyclones using a probabilistic random forest – Part 1: Method and case studies
      Lea Eisenstein, Benedikt Schulz, Ghulam A. Qadir, Joaquim G. Pinto, and Peter Knippertz
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 1157–1182, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-1157-2022, 2022
      Mesoscale high-wind features within extratropical cyclones can cause immense damage. Here, we present RAMEFI, a novel approach to objectively identify the wind features based on a probabilistic random forest. RAMEFI enables a wide range of applications such as probabilistic predictions for the occurrence or a multi-decadal climatology of these features, which will be the focus of Part 2 of the study, with the goal of improving wind and, specifically, wind gust forecasts in the long run.
      PubDate: Wed, 19 Oct 2022 13:10:17 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-1157-2022 2022

       
 
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