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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 164)
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 151)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 71)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 62)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 59)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Economic Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Climate Change and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Oxford Open Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Meteorological Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nīvār     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Weather and Climate Dynamics
Number of Followers: 1  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 2698-4008 - ISSN (Online) 2698-4016
Published by Copernicus Publications Homepage  [54 journals]
  • Model-simulated hydroclimate variability of the East Asian Summer Monsoon
           across different climates: insights from a moisture source perspective

    • Abstract: Model-simulated hydroclimate variability of the East Asian Summer Monsoon across different climates: insights from a moisture source perspective
      Astrid Fremme, Paul Hezel, Øyvind Seland, and Harald Sodemann
      Weather Clim. Dynam. Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/wcd-2022-52,2022
      Preprint under review for WCD (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      We study the atmospheric moisture transport into East China for past, present and future climate. To this end, we use different climate and weather prediction model data with a moisture source identification method. We find that the moisture sources are relatively similar for different climates when comparing the same climate models, while differences between models are partly larger than between different climates, which has important implications for interpreting the hydroclimate from models.
      PubDate: Tue, 20 Sep 2022 15:47:52 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-2022-522022

       
  • Modulation of the El Niño teleconnection to the North Atlantic by the
           tropical North Atlantic during boreal spring and summer

    • Abstract: Modulation of the El Niño teleconnection to the North Atlantic by the tropical North Atlantic during boreal spring and summer
      Jake W. Casselman, Bernat Jiménez-Esteve, and Daniela I. V. Domeisen
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 1077–1096, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-1077-2022, 2022
      Using an atmospheric general circulation model, we analyze how the tropical North Atlantic influences the El Niño–Southern Oscillation connection towards the North Atlantic European region. We also focus on the lesser-known boreal spring and summer response following an El Niño–Southern Oscillation event. Our results show that altered tropical Atlantic sea surface temperatures may cause different responses over the Caribbean region, consequently influencing the North Atlantic European region.
      PubDate: Fri, 16 Sep 2022 15:47:52 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-1077-2022 2022

       
  • Predictability of a tornado environment index from El Niño–Southern
           Oscillation (ENSO) and the Arctic Oscillation

    • Abstract: Predictability of a tornado environment index from El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Arctic Oscillation
      Michael K. Tippett, Chiara Lepore, and Michelle L. L’Heureux
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 1063–1075, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-1063-2022, 2022
      The El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Arctic Oscillation (AO) are phenomena that affect the weather and climate of North America. Although ENSO hails from from the tropical Pacific and the AO high above the North Pole, the spatial patterns of their influence on a North American tornado environment index are remarkably similar in computer models. We find that when ENSO and the AO act in concert, their impact is large, and when they oppose each other, their impact is small.
      PubDate: Wed, 14 Sep 2022 08:56:40 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-1063-2022 2022

       
  • Meridional-energy-transport extremes and the general circulation of
           Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes: dominant weather regimes and preferred
           zonal wavenumbers

    • Abstract: Meridional-energy-transport extremes and the general circulation of Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes: dominant weather regimes and preferred zonal wavenumbers
      Valerio Lembo, Federico Fabiano, Vera Melinda Galfi, Rune Grand Graversen, Valerio Lucarini​​​​​​​, and Gabriele Messori
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 1037–1062, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-1037-2022, 2022
      Eddies in mid-latitudes characterize the exchange of heat between the tropics and the poles. This exchange is largely uneven, with a few extreme events bearing most of the heat transported across latitudes in a season. It is thus important to understand what the dynamical mechanisms are behind these events. Here, we identify recurrent weather regime patterns associated with extreme transports, and we identify scales of mid-latitudinal eddies that are mostly responsible for the transport.
      PubDate: Wed, 07 Sep 2022 01:04:23 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-1037-2022 2022

       
  • Supercell convective environments in Spain based on ERA5: hail and
           non-hail differences

    • Abstract: Supercell convective environments in Spain based on ERA5: hail and non-hail differences
      Carlos Calvo-Sancho, Javier Díaz-Fernández, Yago Martín, Pedro Bolgiani, Mariano Sastre, Juan Jesús González-Alemán, Daniel Santos-Muñoz, José Ignacio Farrán, and María Luisa Martín
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 1021–1036, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-1021-2022, 2022
      Supercells are among the most complex and dangerous severe convective storms due to their associated phenomena (lightning, strong winds, large hail, flash floods, or tornadoes). In this survey we study the supercell synoptic configurations and convective environments in Spain using the atmospheric reanalysis ERA5. Supercells are grouped into hail (greater than 5 cm) and non-hail events in order to compare and analyze the two events. The results reveal statistically significant differences.
      PubDate: Mon, 05 Sep 2022 01:04:23 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-1021-2022 2022

       
  • The impact of the Agulhas Current System on precipitation in southern
           Africa in regional climate simulations covering the recent past and future
           

    • Abstract: The impact of the Agulhas Current System on precipitation in southern Africa in regional climate simulations covering the recent past and future
      Nele Tim, Eduardo Zorita, Birgit Hünicke, and Ioana Ivanciu
      Weather Clim. Dynam. Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/wcd-2022-47,2022
      Preprint under review for WCD (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      As stated in the IPCC, southern Africa is one of the two land regions that are projected to suffer from the strongest precipitation reductions in the future. Simulated drying in this region is linked to the adjacent oceans and prevailing winds as warm and moist air masses are transported towards the continent. Precipitation trends in past and future climate can be partly attributed to the strength of the Agulhas Current System, the current along the east and south coast of Southern Africa.
      PubDate: Mon, 05 Sep 2022 01:04:23 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-2022-472022

       
  • Anomalous subtropical zonal winds drive decreases in southern Australian
           frontal rain

    • Abstract: Anomalous subtropical zonal winds drive decreases in southern Australian frontal rain
      Acacia Sarah Pepler and Irina Rudeva
      Weather Clim. Dynam. Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/wcd-2022-50,2022
      Preprint under review for WCD (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      In recent decades, cold fronts have rained less often in southeast Australia, which contributes to decreasing cool season rainfall. The largest changes in front dynamics are found to the north of the area where rain changes. Wet fronts have strong westerly winds that reach much further north than dry fronts do, and these fronts are becoming less common, linked to weakening subtropical winds and changes in the southern hemisphere circulation.
      PubDate: Fri, 02 Sep 2022 13:16:23 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-2022-502022

       
  • Identifying quasi-periodic variability using multivariate empirical mode
           decomposition: a case of the tropical Pacific

    • Abstract: Identifying quasi-periodic variability using multivariate empirical mode decomposition: a case of the tropical Pacific
      Lina Boljka, Nour-Eddine Omrani, and Noel S. Keenlyside
      Weather Clim. Dynam. Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/wcd-2022-51,2022
      Preprint under review for WCD (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      This study examines quasi-periodic variability in the tropical Pacific on interannual timescales and related physics using a recently developed timeseries analysis tool. We find that wind stress in the West-Pacific and recharge-discharge of ocean heat content are likely related to each other on ~2–4.5-year timescales (but not on other) and dominate variability in sea surface temperatures on those timescales. Further implications for climate models and long-term prediction are also discussed.
      PubDate: Fri, 02 Sep 2022 13:16:23 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-2022-512022

       
  • Effects on Early Monsoon Rainfall in West Africa due to Recent
           Deforestation in a Convection-permitting Ensemble

    • Abstract: Effects on Early Monsoon Rainfall in West Africa due to Recent Deforestation in a Convection-permitting Ensemble
      Julia Crook, Cornelia Klein, Sonja Folwell, Christopher M. Taylor, Douglas J. Parker, Adama Bamba, and Kouakou Kouadio
      Weather Clim. Dynam. Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/wcd-2022-49,2022
      Preprint under review for WCD (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      This is the first study to analyze the impact of realistic historical deforestation in West Africa using a model that does not rely on parameterization of convection. Unlike previous studies, we find rainfall increases from 18:00 to 6:00 with changes driven by changes in mesoscale circulations, in line with observations in the region. This shows the potential for future studies using similar models to examine the impact of realistic deforestation in West Africa on multi-annual time scales.
      PubDate: Wed, 24 Aug 2022 13:17:58 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-2022-492022

       
  • Validation of boreal summer tropical-extratropical causal links in
           seasonal forecasts

    • Abstract: Validation of boreal summer tropical-extratropical causal links in seasonal forecasts
      Giorgia Di Capua, Dim Coumou, Bart van der Hurk, Antje Weissheimer, Andrew G. Turner, and Reik V. Donner
      Weather Clim. Dynam. Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/wcd-2022-48,2022
      Preprint under review for WCD (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Heavy rainfall in tropical regions interacts with mid-latitude circulation patterns and this interaction can explain weather patterns in the Northern Hemisphere during summer. . In this analysis we detect these tropical – extratropical interaction pattern both in observational datasets and data obtained by atmospheric models and assess how well can atmospheric model reproduce the observed patterns. We find a good agreement although these relationships are too weak in model data.
      PubDate: Wed, 24 Aug 2022 13:17:58 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-2022-482022

       
  • Dynamics of gap winds in the Great Rift Valley, Ethiopia: emphasis on
           strong winds at Lake Abaya

    • Abstract: Dynamics of gap winds in the Great Rift Valley, Ethiopia: emphasis on strong winds at Lake Abaya
      Cornelius Immanuel Weiß, Alexander Gohm, Mathias Walter Rotach, and Thomas Torora Minda
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 1003–1019, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-1003-2022, 2022
      Two gap flow events in the Great Rift Valley in Ethiopia were investigated based on observations, ERA5 reanalysis data, and simulations with the numerical weather prediction model WRF. The main focus was on strong winds in the area around Lake Abaya since the winds may generate waves on the lake which help to sustain the lake's ecology. That is important in terms of food supply for the local population. The gap winds exhibit a diurnal cycle and a seasonal dependence.
      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2022 13:17:58 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-1003-2022 2022

       
  • Quantifying stratospheric biases and identifying their potential sources
           in subseasonal forecast systems

    • Abstract: Quantifying stratospheric biases and identifying their potential sources in subseasonal forecast systems
      Zachary D. Lawrence, Marta Abalos, Blanca Ayarzagüena, David Barriopedro, Amy H. Butler, Natalia Calvo, Alvaro de la Cámara, Andrew Charlton-Perez, Daniela I. V. Domeisen, Etienne Dunn-Sigouin, Javier García-Serrano, Chaim I. Garfinkel, Neil P. Hindley, Liwei Jia, Martin Jucker, Alexey Y. Karpechko, Hera Kim, Andrea L. Lang, Simon H. Lee, Pu Lin, Marisol Osman, Froila M. Palmeiro, Judith Perlwitz, Inna Polichtchouk, Jadwiga H. Richter, Chen Schwartz, Seok-Woo Son, Irina Statnaia, Masakazu Taguchi, Nicholas L. Tyrrell, Corwin J. Wright, and Rachel W.-Y. Wu
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 977–1001, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-977-2022, 2022
      Forecast models that are used to predict weather often struggle to represent the Earth’s stratosphere. This may impact their ability to predict surface weather weeks in advance, on subseasonal-to-seasonal (S2S) timescales. We use data from many S2S forecast systems to characterize and compare the stratospheric biases present in such forecast models. These models have many similar stratospheric biases, but they tend to be worse in systems with low model tops located within the stratosphere.
      PubDate: Fri, 19 Aug 2022 05:16:44 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-977-2022 2022

       
  • Improved teleconnection between Arctic sea ice and the North Atlantic
           Oscillation through stochastic process representation

    • Abstract: Improved teleconnection between Arctic sea ice and the North Atlantic Oscillation through stochastic process representation
      Kristian Strommen, Stephan Juricke, and Fenwick Cooper
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 951–975, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-951-2022, 2022
      Observational data suggest that the extent of Arctic sea ice influences mid-latitude winter weather. However, climate models generally fail to reproduce this link, making it unclear if models are missing something or if the observed link is just a coincidence. We show that if one explicitly represents the effect of unresolved sea ice variability in a climate model, then it is able to reproduce this link. This implies that the link may be real but that many models simply fail to simulate it.
      PubDate: Wed, 17 Aug 2022 05:16:44 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-951-2022 2022

       
  • European heatwaves in present and future climate simulations: A Lagrangian
           analysis

    • Abstract: European heatwaves in present and future climate simulations: A Lagrangian analysis
      Lisa Schielicke and Stephan Pfahl
      Weather Clim. Dynam. Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/wcd-2022-45,2022
      Preprint under review for WCD (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Future European temperature extremes associated with heatwaves will be even more amplified compared to the mean increase of summer temperatures. Following the airstreams associated with heatwaves backwards in time shows, that this amplification is probably linked to a feedback between boundary-layer air and dryer soils. Moreover, in some regions stronger descent contributes to a further amplification of 2 m temperatures.
      PubDate: Wed, 17 Aug 2022 05:16:44 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-2022-452022

       
  • Jet stream variability in a polar warming scenario – a laboratory
           perspective

    • Abstract: Jet stream variability in a polar warming scenario – a laboratory perspective
      Costanza Rodda, Uwe Harlander, and Miklos Vincze
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 937–950, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-937-2022, 2022
      We report on a set of laboratory experiments that reproduce a global warming scenario. The experiments show that a decreased temperature difference between the poles and subtropics slows down the eastward propagation of the mid-latitude weather patterns. Another consequence is that the temperature variations diminish, and hence extreme temperature events might become milder in a global warming scenario. Our experiments also show that the frequency of such events increases.
      PubDate: Tue, 16 Aug 2022 05:16:44 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-937-2022 2022

       
  • Summertime Rossby waves in climate models: substantial biases in surface
           imprint associated with small biases in upper-level circulation

    • Abstract: Summertime Rossby waves in climate models: substantial biases in surface imprint associated with small biases in upper-level circulation
      Fei Luo, Frank Selten, Kathrin Wehrli, Kai Kornhuber, Philippe Le Sager, Wilhelm May, Thomas Reerink, Sonia I. Seneviratne, Hideo Shiogama, Daisuke Tokuda, Hyungjun Kim, and Dim Coumou
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 905–935, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-905-2022, 2022
      Recent studies have identified the weather systems in observational data, where wave patterns with high-magnitude values that circle around the whole globe in either wavenumber 5 or wavenumber 7 are responsible for the extreme events. In conclusion, we find that the climate models are able to reproduce the large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns as well as their associated surface variables such as temperature, precipitation, and sea level pressure.
      PubDate: Mon, 08 Aug 2022 12:24:52 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-905-2022 2022

       
  • Towards a diagnostic framework unifying different perspectives on blocking
           dynamics: insight into a major blocking in the North Atlantic-European
           region

    • Abstract: Towards a diagnostic framework unifying different perspectives on blocking dynamics: insight into a major blocking in the North Atlantic-European region
      Seraphine Hauser, Franziska Teubler, Michael Riemer, Peter Knippertz, and Christian M. Grams
      Weather Clim. Dynam. Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/wcd-2022-44,2022
      Preprint under review for WCD (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Blocking describes a flow configuration in midlatitudes where stationary high-pressure systems block the propagation of weather systems. This study presents a unified framework to capture blocking dynamics from three different perspectives and quantifies the importance of different processes in the formation of a major blocking in 2016. In future work, this framework will enable a holistic view on the dynamics and the role of moist processes in different life cycle stages of the blocking.
      PubDate: Mon, 08 Aug 2022 12:24:52 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-2022-442022

       
  • Stratospheric modulation of Arctic Oscillation extremes as represented by
           extended-range ensemble forecasts

    • Abstract: Stratospheric modulation of Arctic Oscillation extremes as represented by extended-range ensemble forecasts
      Jonas Spaeth and Thomas Birner
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 883–903, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-883-2022, 2022
      Past research has demonstrated robust stratosphere–troposphere dynamical coupling following stratospheric circulation extremes. Here, we use a large set of extended-range ensemble forecasts to robustly quantify the increased risk for tropospheric circulation extremes following stratospheric extreme events. In particular, we provide estimates of the fraction of tropospheric extremes that may be attributable to preceding stratospheric extremes.
      PubDate: Fri, 05 Aug 2022 12:24:52 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-883-2022 2022

       
  • Diabatic processes modulating the vertical structure of the jet stream
           above the cold front of an extratropical cyclone: sensitivity to deep
           convection schemes

    • Abstract: Diabatic processes modulating the vertical structure of the jet stream above the cold front of an extratropical cyclone: sensitivity to deep convection schemes
      Meryl Wimmer, Gwendal Rivière, Philippe Arbogast, Jean-Marcel Piriou, Julien Delanoë, Carole Labadie, Quitterie Cazenave, and Jacques Pelon
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 863–882, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-863-2022, 2022
      The effect of deep convection representation on the jet stream above the cold front of an extratropical cyclone is investigated in the global numerical weather prediction model ARPEGE. Two simulations using different deep convection schemes are compared with (re)analysis datasets and NAWDEX airborne observations. A deeper jet stream is observed with the less active scheme. The diabatic origin of this difference is interpreted by backward Lagrangian trajectories and potential vorticity budgets.
      PubDate: Thu, 04 Aug 2022 12:24:52 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-863-2022 2022

       
  • Pacific Decadal Oscillation modulates the Arctic sea-ice loss influence on
           the midlatitude atmospheric circulation in winter

    • Abstract: Pacific Decadal Oscillation modulates the Arctic sea-ice loss influence on the midlatitude atmospheric circulation in winter
      Amélie Simon, Guillaume Gastineau, Claude Frankignoul, Vladimir Lapin, and Pablo Ortega
      Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 845–861, https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-845-2022, 2022
      The influence of the Arctic sea-ice loss on atmospheric circulation in midlatitudes depends on persistent sea surface temperatures in the North Pacific. In winter, Arctic sea-ice loss and a warm North Pacific Ocean both induce depressions over the North Pacific and North Atlantic, an anticyclone over Greenland, and a stratospheric anticyclone over the Arctic. However, the effects are not additive as the interaction between both signals is slightly destructive.
      PubDate: Thu, 04 Aug 2022 12:24:52 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/wcd-3-845-2022 2022

       
 
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