A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

              [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 113 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 51)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access  
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 68)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Developments in Atmospheric Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access  
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 210)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Journal of Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Large Marine Ecosystems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorological Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 144)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Nīvār     Open Access  
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Revista Brasileira de Meteorologia     Open Access  
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access  
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal  
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access  
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Weather     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access  
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

              [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Climate Dynamics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.445
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 44  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1432-0894 - ISSN (Online) 0930-7575
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2658 journals]
  • Evaluating cloud radiative effect from CMIP6 and two satellite datasets
           over the Tibetan Plateau based on CERES observation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Based on 12 years (March 2000–February 2012) of monthly data from Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System energy balanced and filled (CERES-EBAF), this study systematically evaluates the applicability of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and second Along-Track Scanning Radiometer and advanced ATSR (AATSR) flux products at the top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA), and the ability of atmosphere-only simulations of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase6 (CMIP6/AMIP) model in reproducing the observed spatial–temporal patterns of TOA cloud radiative effect (CRE) over the Tibetan Plateau (TP). Results show that TOA radiative fluxes from AVHRR and AATSR can be used to analyze their spatial/temporal characteristics over TP region, especially for AVHRR, but none of them can capture the observed CRE trend since 2000. In particular, when using AATSR TOA radiative flux in clear-sky of TP, the large bias of SW flux (regional mean about 30.48 Wm−2) compared with CERES-EBAF must be taken seriously. The multimodel ensemble mean (MEM) can sufficiently reproduce the temporal changes of CREs, particularly the shortwave CRE. Regarding the geographical pattern of CREs of MEM, the annual mean deviations of longwave CRE are very small, while obvious underestimations can be found in the southeastern TP for shortwave CRE. Additionally, the spatial distribution of CREs is difficult to reproduce for many individual models due to albedo and temperature biases of surface. Our results also demonstrated that MEM still has evident difficulties to capture realistic CRE trends in TP due to poor simulations in surface and cloud properties (particularly cloud fraction).
      PubDate: 2021-10-15
       
  • Cyclonic activity in the Mediterranean region from a high-resolution
           perspective using ECMWF ERA5 dataset

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This study focuses on developing a new Cyclone Detection and Tracking Method (CDTM) to take advantage of the recent availability of a high-resolution reanalysis dataset of ECMWF ERA5. The proposed algorithm is used to perform a climatological analysis of the cyclonic activity in the Mediterranean Region (MR) into a 40-year window (1979–2018). The tuning of the new CDTM was based on the comparison with currently available CDTMs and verified through careful subjective analysis to fully exploit the finer details of MR cyclones features. The application of the new CDTM to the ERA5 high-resolution dataset resulted in an increase of 40% in the annual number of cyclones, mainly associated with subsynoptic and baroclinic driven lows. The main cyclogenetic areas and seasonal cycle were properly identified into the MR context, including areas often underestimated, such as the Aegean Sea, and emerging new ones with cyclogenetic potential such as the coast of Tunisia and Libya. The better cyclone features description defined three distinct periods of cyclonic activity in the MR with peculiar and persistent characteristics. In the first period (Apr–Jun), cyclones develop more frequently and present higher velocities and deepening rates. In the second (Jul–Sep), the cyclonic activity is governed by thermal lows spreading slowly over short tracks without reaching significant depths. In the last and longest season (Oct–Mar), cyclones become less frequent, but with the highest deepening rates and the lowest MSLP values, ranking this period as the most favourable to intense storms.
      PubDate: 2021-10-15
       
  • The Indian summer monsoon and Indian Ocean Dipole connection in the IITM
           Earth System Model (IITM-ESM)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) is recognised as an important driver of interannual climate variability over different regions of the globe, including the regional monsoon systems. In particular, positive (negative) phases of IOD tend to be associated with above-normal (below-normal) monsoon rainfall over the Indian subcontinent. Realistic simulation of the IOD and Indian summer monsoon connection, however, remains a challenge in many of the state-of-the-art climate models. This study presents an analysis of IOD and its links to the Indian monsoon based on the historical simulations from the IITM Earth System Model (IITM-ESM) and other models that participated in the 6th phase of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP6). Our findings indicate that the IITM-ESM provides not only a fairly realistic simulation of the ocean–atmosphere coupled interactions and the Bjerknes feedback processes associated with IOD events but also better captures the summer monsoon precipitation response over the Indian subcontinent during IOD events, as compared to several CMIP6 models. The physical mechanisms contributing to the improved simulation of IOD and its monsoon connection in the IITM-ESM are evaluated in this study.
      PubDate: 2021-10-15
       
  • Evaluation of non-stationarity in summer precipitation and the response of
           vegetation over the typical steppe in Inner Mongolia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The typical steppe in Inner Mongolia is an important component of the Eurasian steppes. It plays a dominant role in preventing desertification and against sandstorms, but highly sensitive and vulnerable to climate change. Based on long-term observed precipitation data and remotely sensed Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) images, the non-stationary behavior of summer precipitation and its linkage with vegetation change were investigated, by means of incorporating time-varying and physical based explanatory covariates in non-stationary modeling. Results indicated that time-dependent models exhibited good performance to reproduce the temporal variations of eco-hydrological variables. The non-stationarity of summer precipitation was prominently visible for the majority of sites during the period from 1957 to 2017, with the mean behavior described as a linear or nonlinear time-varying pattern. In general, the steppe has experienced a decreasing trend in summer precipitation, but whether the decline tends to maintain or weaken or strengthen depends on the spatial location of the site studied. Differences appeared in the changes of vegetation in summer from 1998 to 2017 in different sub-regions. Evidences for the presence of stationary evolution was found in most sub-regions in the middle part, together with a linear increase in the westernmost sub-regions while a non-linear decrease in the easternmost sub-regions. Covariate analyses further highlighted the role of precipitation variabilities in the modeling of the NDVI-related vegetation dynamics over the steppe. The potential relations of summer precipitation to vegetation growth were characterized as both linear and non-linear positive forms. In particular, precipitation extremes could be responsible for the occurrences of exceptional cases in vegetation condition. The fluctuations in summer precipitation have crucial significance for future predictions of vegetation succession. Findings from this study would lead to additional insights to understanding the effect of climate change on grassland ecosystem processes.
      PubDate: 2021-10-15
       
  • Warm-season mesoscale convective systems over eastern China:
           convection-permitting climate model simulation and observation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are important warm-season precipitation systems in eastern China. However, our knowledge of their climatology and capability in their simulation is still insufficient. This paper examines their characteristics over the 2008–2017 warm seasons using convection-permitting climate simulations (CPCSs) with a 3-km grid spacing that explicitly resolves MCSs, as well as a high-resolution gauge-satellite merged precipitation product. An object-based tracking algorithm is applied to identify MCSs. Results indicate that the MCS genesis and occurrence are closely related to the progression of the East Asian monsoon and are modulated by the underlying topography. On average, about 243 MCSs are observed each season and contribute 19% and 47% to total and extreme warm-season precipitation. The climatological attributes and variabilities are reasonably reproduced in the CPCS. The major model deficiencies are excessive small MCS occurrence and overmuch MCS rainfall, consequently overestimating the precipitation contributions, whereas observational uncertainties may play a role too. Both the observed and simulated MCS precipitation feature a nocturnal or morning maximum and an eastward delayed diurnal peak east of the Tibetan Plateau, in contrast to the dominant afternoon peak of non-MCS precipitation. The favorable comparison with observations demonstrates the capability of CPCSs in simulating MCSs in the Asian monsoon climate, and its usefulness in projecting the future changes of MCSs under global warming. The finding that non-MCS precipitation is responsible for the high biased afternoon precipitation provides helpful guidance for further model improvement.
      PubDate: 2021-10-14
       
  • Extreme swell wave energy and its directional characteristics in the
           Indian Ocean

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Directional characteristics of wind-waves is an important quantity in wave prediction and in the design of offshore engineering facilities. Dissipative and non-dissipative processes contribute to the changes in direction and energy flux of waves, and the resulting sea-state. This study carried out an extreme climatological analysis of swell waves in terms of energy flux (PSW) and directional distribution of energy (DS) using 42 years (1979–2020) of ERA5 reanalysis data. A Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution is used to produce the seasonal and monthly extremes. During JJA (June–July–August), the monsoon swells that dominate over the Arabian Sea and the northern Bay of Bengal are exceptionally stable. The western coasts of Madagascar, Sumatra, Myanmar are also stable in context to swell energy due to wave refraction effects. The Ds for extra-tropical swells are influenced by the presence of several island arcs in the TIO (Tropical Indian Ocean). A comprehensive analysis was performed to establish the dependence of climate indices on PSW and DS using Multi-linear regression analysis. Study reveals that the influence of Southern Annular Mode (SAM) on the swell energy distribution is significant in the extra-tropical regions and moderate over the North Indian Ocean. The directional swell energy flux distribution has a strong dependence with the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and El-Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the TIO, in particular for the nearshore regions. Interestingly, the positive IOD phase is found to actively influence the DS along the East coast of India. Spectral characteristics of swells are critically influenced by island barriers in the TIO during its propagation, in addition the climate indices also play an important role in the modulation effect.
      PubDate: 2021-10-12
       
  • Occurrence of heatwave in Korea by the displacement of South Asian high

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The South Asian high (SAH) index was defined using the 200 hPa geopotential height for 1973–2019. Of the movements of the SAH center in the north–south, east–west, northwest-southeast, and southwest-northeast directions, the movements in the northwest-southeast direction showed the highest positive correlation with heatwave days (HWDs) in South Korea. Thirteen years with the highest values in the northwestward shift of the SAH (positive SAH years) and 13 years with the highest values in the southeastward shift of the SAH (negative SAH years) were selected from a time series of SAH indices from which the linear trend was removed, and the differences between these two groups were analyzed. An analysis of vertical meridional circulation averaged along 120°–130° E showed that in the latitude zones containing Korea, anomalous downward flows with anomalous high pressures formed in the entire troposphere and coincided with a positive anomaly of air temperature and specific humidity. An analysis of stream flows and geopotential heights showed that in the positive SAH years, anomalous anticyclones developed in Korea, the North Pacific, North America, Western Europe, and the Iranian Plateau. These anticyclones had the wavenumber-5 pattern and showed more distinct barotropic vertical structures at higher altitudes, which resembled the circumglobal teleconnection (CGT) pattern. The maintenance of CGT depends on the interaction between the CGT circulation and the Indian summer monsoon (ISM), which has a major influence on the mid-latitude atmosphere. Strengthening of the ISM results in the formation of upper-level anomalous anticyclones in the northwestern Iranian Plateau and produces continuous downstream cells along the waveguide due to the Rossby wave dispersion. When diabatic heating by Indian summer monsoon precipitation is strengthened, the SAH is strengthened to the northwest of India, and a positive CGT pattern is formed. As a result, anomalous anticyclones formed in all layers of the Korean troposphere, resulting in heatwaves, tropical nights, and droughts exacerbated in South Korea.
      PubDate: 2021-10-10
       
  • Decadal-scale variations in extreme precipitation and implications for
           seasonal scale drought

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This study examines the relationship between low decadal mean precipitation and monthly-scale wet and dry extremes over the global land area. We characterise how precipitation distributions change on decadal timescales, and how these changes are linked to seasonal scale drought. The relationship between decadal mean precipitation and extremes is assessed at the grid point level via correlations between decadal mean and extreme percentiles, and through an analysis of indices of seasonal scale drought. A novel metric is also used that determines how the first three statistical moments change monthly precipitation distributions during dry decades for several drought-prone regions. Changes to monthly-scale wet extremes are most significantly associated with low decadal mean precipitation for almost 80% of the globe. Monthly-scale dry extremes show significant, but generally weaker, relationships to low decadal-mean precipitation for 55% of the globe. Consistent with the strong link between decreasing wet extremes and decadal dryness, we find that dry decades are predominatly modulated by changes in positive skewness in monthly precipitation distributions, whilst shifts in the mean of these distributions play an important, but typically secondary, role. There is a negligible role for changes in variance. Lastly, we show that a decadal-scale decline in mean precipitation is rarely accompanied by an increase in the severity of seasonal-scale drought, while the impact on seasonal-scale drought frequency and duration varies depending on global location. Our results have implications for how we think about seasonal-scale drought in the context of decadal variability in precipitation.
      PubDate: 2021-10-10
       
  • Convection-permitting regional climate simulations over Tibetan Plateau:
           re-initialization versus spectral nudging

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Two regional climate simulation experiments (spectral nudging and re-initialization) at convection-permitting scale are conducted using the WRF model driven by the 4th generation Global Reanalysis data (ERA5) from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts over the Tibetan Plateau (TP). The surface air temperature (T2m) and the precipitation in summer during 2016–2018 are evaluated against the in-situ station observations and the Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMaP) dataset. The results show that both experiments as well as ERA5 can successfully capture the spatial distribution and the daily variation of T2m and precipitation, with reasonable cold bias for temperature and dry bias for precipitation when compared with the station observations. In addition, the diurnal cycle of precipitation is investigated, indicating that both experiments tend to simulate the afternoon precipitation peak in advance and postpone the night precipitation peak. The precipitation bias is reduced by using the spectral nudging technique, especially at night and early morning. Both WRF experiments outperform ERA5 in reproducing the diurnal cycle of precipitation amount. Possible causes for the differences between the two experiments are also analyzed. In the re-initialization experiment, the daytime net shortwave radiation contributes a lot to the cold biases of Tmax, and the stronger vertically integrated moisture flux convergence leads to more precipitation compared with the spectral nudging experiment over the central and southeastern TP. These results can provide valuable guidance for further fine-scale simulation studies over the TP.
      PubDate: 2021-10-09
       
  • Evaluation of convective parameters derived from pressure level and native
           ERA5 data and different resolution WRF climate simulations over Central
           Europe

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The mean climatological distribution of convective environmental parameters from the ERA5 reanalysis and WRF regional climate simulations is evaluated using radiosonde observations. The investigation area covers parts of Central and Eastern Europe. Severe weather proxies are calculated from daily 1200 UTC sounding measurements and collocated ERA5 and WRF pseudo-profiles in the 1985–2010 period. The pressure level and the native ERA5 reanalysis, and two WRF runs with grid spacings of 50 and 10 km are verified. ERA5 represents convective parameters remarkably well with correlation coefficients higher than 0.9 for multiple variables and mean errors close to zero for precipitable water and mid-tropospheric lapse rate. Monthly mean mixed-layer CAPE biases are reduced in the full hybrid-sigma ERA5 dataset by 20–30 J/kg compared to its pressure level version. The WRF model can reproduce the annual cycle of thunderstorm predictors but with considerably lower correlations and higher errors than ERA5. Surface elevation differences between the stations and the corresponding grid points in the 50-km WRF run lead to biases and false error compensations in the convective indices. The 10-km grid spacing is sufficient to avoid such discrepancies. The evaluation of convection-related parameters contributes to a better understanding of regional climate model behavior. For example, a strong suppression of convective activity might explain precipitation underestimation in summer. A decreasing correlation of WRF-derived wind shear away from the western domain boundaries indicates a deterioration of the large-scale circulation as the constraining effect of the driving reanalysis weakens.
      PubDate: 2021-10-08
       
  • Correction to: Evaluation of a new 12 km regional perturbed parameter
           ensemble over Europe

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2021-10-06
       
  • How to determine the statistical significance of trends in seasonal
           records: application to Antarctic temperatures

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: We consider trends in the m seasonal subrecords of a record. To determine the statistical significance of the m trends, one usually determines the p value of each season either numerically or analytically and compares it with a significance level \({{\tilde{\alpha }}}\) . We show in great detail for short- and long-term persistent records that this procedure, which is standard in climate science, is inadequate since it produces too many false positives (false discoveries). We specify, on the basis of the family wise error rate and by adapting ideas from multiple testing correction approaches, how the procedure must be changed to obtain more suitable significance criteria for the m trends. Our analysis is valid for data with all kinds of persistence. Specifically for long-term persistent data, we derive simple analytical expressions for the quantities of interest, which allow to determine easily the statistical significance of a trend in a seasonal record. As an application, we focus on 17 Antarctic station data. We show that only four trends in the seasonal temperature data are outside the bounds of natural variability, in marked contrast to earlier conclusions.
      PubDate: 2021-10-05
       
  • Evaluation of the performance of the non-hydrostatic RegCM4 (RegCM4-NH)
           over Southeastern China

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This study evaluates for the first time the performance of the latest version of the non-hydrostatic RegCM4 (RegCM4-NH) customized over two vast urban agglomerations in China (i.e., the Pearl River Delta, PRD, and the Yangtze River Delta, YRD). A one-way double nesting configuration is used, with a mother domain (20 km grid spacing) driven by ERA-Interim data (0.75°) forcing and two nested domains (4 km grid spacing). The analysis focuses on how the dynamical core (hydrostatic versus non-hydrostatic) employed in the driving mother domain simulation can affect the regional characteristics of temperature and precipitation patterns in the PRD and YRD regions simulated by the 4 km resolution nested RegCM4-NH. In addition, we assess the sensitivity of the 4 km model results to the use of a convective parameterization scheme (CPS), since the 4 km grid size can be considered as a grey-zone resolution at which deep convection is partially resolved and may still need to be parameterized. For mean temperature, a reasonably good performance is shown by all simulations, with the summer season mean bias being mostly less than ± 1 °C when averaged over the PRD and YRD. However, the simulated daily temperature distribution is excessively peaked around the median value, indicating a large probability concentrated on a small temperature range. Although the higher resolution slightly ameliorates this deficiency, the effect of the dynamical core and CPS tends to be marginal. Conversely, precipitation behaves quite differently across simulations. The forcing from the non-hydrostatic mother domain simulation helps to reduce a severe dry bias seen over the PRD due to a reduction in convection inhibition. Also, the use of the Emanuel CPS tends to intensify localized precipitation events over mountainous regions in connection with stronger ascending motions over topographical features. The higher resolution also improves the phase of the diurnal cycle of precipitation, both with and without the use of the CPS. In general, the performance of RegCM4-NH over the PRD and YRD is found to be the best when driven by a non-hydrostatic mother domain simulation and when turning on the Emanuel CPS. With the growing demand for high-resolution climate information, our evaluation study of RegCM4-NH will be a valuable reference to facilitate a wider use of this non-hydrostatic version of the model.
      PubDate: 2021-10-05
       
  • Interpretation of interannual variability of the zonal contrasting thermal
           conditions in the winter South China Sea

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The distinct winter temperature difference between the eastern South China Sea (ESCS) and western South China Sea (WSCS) has a crucial impact on regional air–sea interactions. By utilizing satellite and reanalysis data, the zonal contrasting winter thermal conditions and their formation mechanisms are investigated. The second empirical orthogonal function (EOF) mode of winter sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies is responsible for this east–west contrasting temperature pattern (EWCTP), with warming (cooling) in the ESCS (WSCS) and cooling (warming) in the WSCS (ESCS) during the positive (negative) phase events. A mixed layer heat budget analysis reveals that the net heat flux plays a primary role in the WSCS. In the ESCS, the temperature variation is instead mainly dominated by the horizontal heat advection term. In the positive phase events, an anomalous cyclonic circulation promotes an  eastern boundary current (EBC) anomaly, which enhances the northward heat transport and thus warms the ESCS. In contrast, an anomalous anticyclonic circulation pattern weakens the heat transport by the southward EBC anomaly and cools the ESCS in the negative phase events. The water exchange through the Mindoro Strait and the vertical entrainment term also contribute to the ESCS SST anomalies. Further analyses show that although there are many EWCTP events that co-occur with the central Pacific El Niño-Southern Oscillation (CP ENSO) events, they have a complex relationship. The EWCTP could appear without CP ENSO events and some CP ENSO events do not lead to the EWCTP. It is because of the different temperature state in the WSCS and ESCS during October–December months and the different contributions of net heat flux and ocean processes to the temperature changes during October–February months.
      PubDate: 2021-10-04
       
  • Influence of natural climate variability on extreme wave power over
           Indo-Pacific Ocean assessed using ERA5

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: In recent decades, wave power (WP) energy from the ocean is one of the cleanest renewable energy sources associated with oceanic warming. In Indo-Pacific Ocean, the WP is significantly influenced by natural climate variabilities, such as El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). In this study, the impact of major climate variability modes on seasonal extreme WP is examined over the period 1979–2019 using ERA5 reanalysis data and the non-stationary generalized extreme value analysis is applied to estimate the climatic extremes. Independent ENSO influence after removing the IOD impact (ENSO IOD) on WP are evident over the northeast and central Pacific during December–February, and March–May, respectively, which subsequently shifts towards the western Pacific in June–August (JJA) and September–November (SON). The ENSO PDO impact on WP exhibits similar yet weaker intensity year round compared to ENSO. Extreme WP responses due to the IOD ENSO include widespread decreases over the tropical and eastern Indian Ocean, with localized increases only over South China and Philippine seas and Bay of Bengal during JJA, and the Arabian Sea during SON. Lastly, for the PDO ENSO, the significant increases in WP are mostly confined to the Pacific, and most prominent in the North Pacific. Composite analysis of different phase combinations of PDO (IOD) with El Niño (La Niña) reveals stronger (weaker) influences year-round. The response patterns in significant wave height, peak wave period, sea surface temperatures, and sea level pressure help to explain the seasonal variations in WP.
      PubDate: 2021-10-04
       
  • Evaluating the impact of climate change on extreme temperature and
           precipitation events over the Kashmir Himalaya

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The frequency and severity of climatic extremes is expected to escalate in the future primarily because of the increasing greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. This study aims to assess the impact of climate change on the extreme temperature and precipitation scenarios using climate indices in the Kashmir Himalaya. The analysis has been carried out for the twenty-first century under different representative concentration pathways (RCPs) through the Statistical Downscaling Model (SDSM) and ClimPACT2. The simulation reveals that the climate in the region will get progressively warmer in the future by increments of 0.36–1.48 °C and 0.65–1.07 °C in mean maximum and minimum temperatures respectively, during 2080s (2071–2100) relative to 1980–2010 under RCP8.5. The annual precipitation is likely to decrease by a maximum of 2.09–6.61% (2080s) under RCP8.5. The seasonal distribution of precipitation is expected to alter significantly with winter, spring, and summer seasons marking reductions of 9%, 5.7%, and 1.7%, respectively during 2080s under RCP8.5. The results of extreme climate evaluation show significant increasing trends for warm temperature-based indices and decreasing trends for cold temperature-based indices. Precipitation indices on the other hand show weaker and spatially incoherent trends with a general tendency towards dry regimes. The projected scenarios of extreme climate indices may result in large-scale adverse impacts on the environment and ecological resource base of the Kashmir Himalaya.
      PubDate: 2021-10-03
       
  • Quantifying the rarity of extreme multi-decadal trends: how unusual was
           the late twentieth century trend in the North Atlantic Oscillation'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Climate trends over multiple decades are important drivers of regional climate change that need to be considered for climate resilience. Of particular importance are extreme trends that society may not be expecting and is not well adapted to. This study investigates approaches to assess the likelihood of maximum moving window trends in historical records of climate indices by making use of simulations from climate models and stochastic time series models with short- and long-range dependence. These approaches are applied to assess the unusualness of the large positive trend that occurred in the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index between the 1960s to 1990s. By considering stochastic models, we show that the chance of extreme trends is determined by the variance of the trend process, which generally increases when there is more serial correlation in the index series. We find that the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5 + 6) historical simulations have very rarely (around 1 in 200 chance) simulated maximum trends greater than the observed maximum. Consistent with this, the NAO indices simulated by CMIP models were found to resemble white noise, with almost no serial correlation, in contrast to the observed NAO which exhibits year-to-year correlation. Stochastic model best fits to the observed NAO suggest an unlikely chance (around 1 in 20) for there to be maximum 31-year NAO trends as large as the maximum observed since 1860. This suggests that current climate models do not fully represent important aspects of the mechanism for low frequency variability of the NAO.
      PubDate: 2021-10-03
       
  • Correction to: Dryline characteristics in North America’s historical
           and future climates

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2021-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00382-021-05862-1
       
  • Possible semi-circumglobal teleconnection across Eurasia driven by deep
           convection over the Sahel

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The Sahel region, located between the tropical rainforests of Africa and the Sahara Desert, has rainfall that varies widely from year to year, associated with extremely deep convection. This deep convection, strongly heated by water vapor condensation, suggests the possibility of exerting a remote influence on mid- and high-latitude climate similar to the well-known influences of tropical oceanic convection on global climate. Here we investigate the possibility that deep convection over the Sahel initiates a semi-circumglobal teleconnection extending to eastern Eurasia. Statistical analysis and numerical experiments support the possible existence of this teleconnection at an interannual time scale. We propose that the anomalous heat source due to deep convection over the Sahel in the late monsoon season influences meandering of the mid-latitude jet stream over Europe through the combination of a Matsuno-Gill response and advection of absolute vorticity. This subtropical jet meander may in turn drive an eastward propagation of a Rossby wave across Eurasia as far as East Asia. Because deep convection over other subtropical land areas may exert a similar remote influence upon extratropical extreme weather, further studies of the influence of overland convection may provide us with an expanded comprehension of teleconnections.
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00382-021-05804-x
       
  • Impacts of orography on large-scale atmospheric circulation: application
           of a regional climate model

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Orography has considerable impacts on the large-scale atmospheric circulation, emphasizing the necessity of adequate representation of the impacts of orography in numerical models. The regional climate model version 4 (RegCM4) is used to investigate the impacts of orography on the large-scale atmospheric circulation. Three numerical experiments in four different years for winter and summer have been conducted over a large geographical area, covering Eurasia, Africa and Oceania. These experiments include control simulations using the real orography, simulations with the removed orography of the whole domain and simulations with the removed orography of the whole domain except the Tibetan Plateau. In winter, the Tibetan Plateau prevents the development of the sea-level high pressure in South Asia and contributes to the intensification of the Siberian high through blocking cold air advection from Siberia toward India. The Tibetan Plateau is also responsible for the southward displacement of low-level easterly flows in the North Indian Ocean, such that elimination of this Plateau is associated with more zonal orientation and intensification of easterly winds, as well as an increase of moisture flux over India and the Arabian Sea. Descending motions associated with lee waves of the Western Ghat Mountains contribute to a decrease of precipitation over the Arabian Sea. In summer, the Tibetan Plateau reinforces the South Asian low-pressure system and pushes the South Asian monsoon to South Asia. Both the tropical easterly jet stream over the southern Tibetan Plateau and the subtropical westerly jet stream over the Tibetan Plateau are weakened when the whole orography is removed. Removal of the whole orography is associated with a considerable equatorward displacement of the intertropical convergence zone over South Asia. In austral winter, low-level subtropical anticyclones in Southern Africa and Australia are intensified when the whole orography is removed.
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00382-021-05790-0
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 35.172.217.174
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-