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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 65)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Climate Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 72)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 184)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Journal of Climate Change and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Economic Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorological Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 208)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
Nīvār     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Oxford Open Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

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Journal Cover
Climate Dynamics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.445
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 46  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1432-0894 - ISSN (Online) 0930-7575
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Distinct diurnal characteristics of summer precipitation and underlying
           mechanisms in the Tibetan Plateau and surrounding basins

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      Abstract: Abstract The climatological characteristics and mechanisms of diurnal variation in summer precipitation over the Tibetan Plateau and its adjacent basins (i.e., the Tarim Basin, Ganges Basin, and Sichuan Basin) are investigated using observational/reanalysis data and a high-resolution dataset from convection-permitting regional climate downscaling. The results indicate that the diurnal variations of precipitation are nearly out of phase between the central Tibetan Plateau and the surrounding basins. Precipitation in the main body of the plateau preferentially occurs in the afternoon-evening hours, primarily attributed to daytime solar heating induced enhancement of local convective instability and large-scale moisture convergence. In contrast, precipitation in the surrounding basins favors the midnight-early-morning period. The diurnal oscillation of the mountain-plain solenoid circulation, which is resultant from the elevated daytime solar heating and nighttime longwave radiative cooling along the topographical slope, is identified as a crucial mechanism governing the diurnal precipitation pattern in all the basins. Additional factors contributing to the midnight-early-morning precipitation include the nocturnal strengthening of the low-level southwest monsoon flow for the Ganges and Sichuan Basins, as well as propagating convection originating from the eastern plateau and leading to a diurnal phase lag in the Sichuan Basin. These results further enhance our knowledge and understanding of the complex diurnal precipitation cycle and associated physical processes over the Tibetan Plateau and nearby regions.
      PubDate: 2024-07-18
       
  • Dynamical downscaling CMIP6 models over New Zealand: added value of
           climatology and extremes

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      Abstract: Abstract Dynamical downscaling provides physics-based high-resolution climate change projections across regional and local scales. This is particularly important for island nations characterized by complex terrain, where the coarse resolution of global climate model (GCM) output often prohibits direct use. One of the main motivations for dynamical downscaling is to reduce biases relative to the host GCM at the local scale, which can be quantified through assessing ‘added value’. However, added value from downscaling is not guaranteed; quantifying this can help users make informed decisions about how best to use available climate projection data. Here we describe the experiment design of the updated national climate projections for New Zealand based on dynamical downscaling. The global non-hydrostatic Conformal Cubic Atmospheric Model (CCAM) is primarily used for downscaling, with a global stretched grid targeting high resolution over New Zealand (12-km) and the wider South Pacific region (12–35-km). Focusing on the historical simulations, we assess added value for a range of metrics, climatological fields, extreme indices, and tropical cyclones. The main strengths of the downscaling include generally large improvements relative to the host GCM for temperature and orographic precipitation. Inter-annual variability in temperature is well captured across New Zealand, and several temperature and precipitation-based extreme indices show large improvements. The representation of tropical cyclones reaching at least category 2 intensity is generally improved relative to the large consistent under-representation in the host GCMs. The remaining biases are explored and discussed forming the basis for ongoing bias-correction work.
      PubDate: 2024-07-17
       
  • Characteristics of the temperature correlation network of climate models

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      Abstract: Abstract Temperature correlation network has been commonly used in climate monitoring, diagnosing and prediction using reanalysis data, however its application in the network analysis of climate dynamical models hasn’t been deeply studied. We construct a temperature correlation network based on near-surface 2m air temperature of four climate models by comparing their capability of properly capturing the structural characteristics of the temperature networks, and further conduct a comparative analysis of the topological differences among different models. The features of temperature correlation networks varied significantly among the four models, in which the ECMWF-SYSTEM5 model network has the highest connectivity among the four models, while the NCEP_CFS2 model has the lowest one. It is also revealed that the model with higher connectivity normally has a stronger correlation between the nodes of the air temperature correlation network, which is likely attributed to the model’s stronger teleconnection, regional consistency and smaller standard deviation between predicted temperature series of most two grid points. It is also implied that the model’s prediction skills have a probable relationship with the network structure. For each model, the 1-month lead prediction has the highest prediction skill corresponding to the model having the connectivity close to the observation. With the increase of prediction lead times, connectivity bias has a quick rise, and the prediction skill has an obvious decrease. However, for different models at the same prediction lead time, it is not the case that the larger the connectivity deviation the lower the prediction skill, for example, the ECMWF_SYSTEM5 model has the highest prediction skill and the largest connectivity deviation, we find that the ECMWF_SYSTEM5 model network possesses significantly higher connectivity and more distinctive small-world characteristics, which implies a stable network structure helps to improve the prediction skills of the model. Therefore, this study can deepen our understanding of climate models and provide guidance for improving the ability of models to properly simulate climate features.
      PubDate: 2024-07-17
       
  • Shifts from surface density compensation to projected warming, freshening
           and stronger stratification in the subpolar North Atlantic

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      Abstract: Abstract The hydrography and stratification of the subpolar North Atlantic is highly variable, with convection activating and deactivating across parts of the Labrador and Irminger seas. Likely consequential for the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), this variability is examined in an eddy-rich ocean model hindcast spanning 1958–2021 and in 1950–2050 simulations with four climate models, spanning differences in ocean resolution (eddy-rich or eddy-permitting), code and implementation. Stratification of the Labrador and Irminger seas is quantified with the Potential Energy Anomaly (PEA) in the upper 1000 m of the water column. Monthly PEA anomalies are evaluated alongside corresponding anomalies of sea surface temperature, salinity, and density. For 30-year windows, moving correlations between PEA and surface properties are obtained over the 100-year simulations to characterize the evolving relationships. As climate change progresses, stratification in three of the four models is increasingly associated with variable surface salinity, in both regions. Lagrangian analyses of surface flow pathways in the decades preceding 1990 and 2040 are undertaken for one of the models in which surface salinity grows in influence. The subpolar presence of low-salinity Arctic waters and high-salinity subtropical Atlantic waters are found to increase and decrease respectively by 2040. Furthermore, in three of the four models, surface density compensation associated with correlation of surface temperature and salinity anomalies is progressively replaced by combined surface warming and freshening, lowering surface density, and strengthening stratification. The extent of these model-dependent changes and processes are of consequence for the projected fate of the AMOC by the mid twenty-first century.
      PubDate: 2024-07-17
       
  • A simple framework for likely climate projections applied to tropical
           width

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      Abstract: Abstract The increasing use of climate projections in adaptation necessitates a consistent method for producing estimates of likely future conditions from available climate model data. Many climate projections are produced using high emission scenarios and an evenly weighted ensemble of all available climate models despite substantial evidence that the continuously rising emissions in high emission scenarios are unrealistic, and that some models are more reliable than others. While high emission scenarios can be used to generate a more significant climate change signal and are often not intended to be interpreted as projections, a reader who is a non-expert on climate scenarios may not understand this nuance. As a result, unlikely climate projections could be inadvertently used to plan crucial adaptation efforts for future warming. Here, we present a simple and easy to use framework for creating projections of our likely future climate by combining existing methods. The framework involves three measures: selecting the most likely emission scenario, choosing the most reliable models, and debiasing against observational or reanalysis data. Each of these steps allows for a range of methods with varying complexity, precision, and utility. To demonstrate our framework and its components, we use the simplest applicable methods to estimate future changes in tropical width, a hydrologically important climate feature. Our projections show that the likely tropical expansion by the end of this century is roughly half of some previously reported estimates, largely due to the selected emission scenario. This simple framework can be easily applied to other climate features, allowing for better estimates of likely future conditions.
      PubDate: 2024-07-13
       
  • Correction: Response of regional circulation features to the Indian Ocean
           dipole and influence on Central Africa climate

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      PubDate: 2024-07-11
       
  • Simulation of climate changes in Northern Eurasia by two versions of the
           INM RAS Earth system model

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      Abstract: Abstract The study presents a simulation of climate change across Northern Eurasia during the 20th and 21st centuries using two different versions of the Earth system model developed by the Marchuk Institute of Numerical Mathematics at the Russian Academy of Sciences (INMCM). Model version INMCM5 participates in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6) and has the lowest equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) among the CMIP6 models. In the next model version, INMCM6, changes in the physical parameterisations lead to an increase in ECS by a factor of 2. Changes in near-surface temperature, precipitation, snow cover area and sea ice extent simulated by both model versions are compared with available observational and reanalysis data. Climate change predictions for the middle and end of the twenty-first century are provided by two model versions. Both model versions simulate similar climate changes for the upcoming two decades. After the middle of twenty-first century, the model version with high equilibrium climate sensitivity simulates stronger climate changes over Northern Eurasia than the model version with low sensitivity. But, in general, the ratio of predicted warming is much less than the ratio of ECS.
      PubDate: 2024-07-10
       
  • A machine learning based deep convective trigger for climate models

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      Abstract: Abstract The present study focuses on addressing the issue of too frequent triggers of deep convection in climate models, which are primarily based on physics-based classical trigger functions such as convective available potential energy (CAPE) or cloud work function (CWF). To overcome this problem, the study proposes using machine learning (ML) based deep convective triggers as an alternative. The deep convective trigger is formulated as a binary classification problem, where the goal is to predict whether deep convection will occur or not. Two elementary classification algorithms, namely support vector machines and neural networks, are adopted in this study. Additionally, a novel method is proposed to rank the importance of input variables for the classification problem, which may aid in understanding the underlying mechanisms and factors influencing deep convection. The accuracy of the ML-based methods is compared with the widely used convective available potential energy (CAPE)-based and dynamic generation of CAPE (dCAPE) trigger function found in many convective parameterization schemes. Results demonstrate that the elementary machine learning-based algorithms can outperform the classical CAPE-based triggers, indicating the potential effectiveness of ML-based approaches in dealing with this issue. Furthermore, a method based on the Mahalanobis distance is presented for binary classification, which is easy to interpret and implement. The Mahalanobis distance-based approach shows accuracy comparable to other ML-based methods, suggesting its viability as an alternative method for deep convective triggers. By correcting for deep convective triggers using ML-based approaches, the study proposes a possible solution to improve the probability density of rain in the climate model. This improvement may help overcome the issue of excessive drizzle often observed in many climate models.
      PubDate: 2024-07-10
       
  • A new dipole index for the North Pacific Victoria mode

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      Abstract: Abstract A novel index, the Victoria mode Dipole Index (VMDI), is proposed to quantify the North Pacific Victoria mode (VM) variability. The VM demonstrates a distinctive ‘dipole’ configuration in sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies, characterized by two principal centers of action and fluctuations spanning annual to decadal periods. This pattern is encapsulated by the second empirical orthogonal function (EOF) of SST anomalies (SSTA) in the North Pacific. The VMDI is determined by calculating the variance in SSTA between the average values in the northwest and southeast areas of the North Pacific. The VMDI, which is not based on EOF, offers a simple method for tracking the variability of SST from year to decade that is linked to the VM. The VMDI time series exhibits a strong correspondence with previously established EOF-based indices while offering the benefits of a more straightforward computation and consistency with methods employed for other climate variability indices. The reliability of VMDI has been demonstrated through the evaluation of the modal patterns described, the analysis of the evolution of surface SST, subsurface SST, and low-level wind field, and the assessment of its impact on other climate modes. The VMDI proves to be a robust and reliable indicator of the VM in both observational and modeled datasets.
      PubDate: 2024-07-10
       
  • Interdecadal variability of the warm Arctic-cold Eurasia: synergetic
           modulation by the Arctic Oscillation and Barents sea ice

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      Abstract: Abstract Arctic and Eurasian wintertime temperature displays a north-south dipole distribution, characterized by a marked inter-decadal reversal between 1988–2003 and 2003–2016. This study unveils the roles of winter Arctic Oscillation (AO) characterized by opposite sea level pressure anomalies between the Arctic and mid-latitude regions such as North Pacific and North Atlantic, and Barents sea ice in driving this reversal. Specifically, in the negative phase of warm Arctic-cold Eurasian (WACE–) (positive phase of warm Arctic-cold Eurasian, WACE+), Arctic exhibits a cyclonic (an anticyclonic) anomaly while central Eurasia experiences an anticyclonic (a cyclonic) anomaly, which is attributed to the subtropical and subpolar wave trains over Eurasia under the modulation of positive (negative) AO. Moreover, more (less) Barents sea ice decreases (increases) the upward net heat flux, which tends to cool (heat) the lower-level atmosphere and triggers circulation anomalies resembling the positive (negative) Polar-Eurasian teleconnection, intensifying the cyclonic (anticyclonic) anomaly over Arctic and anticyclonic (cyclonic) anomaly over central Eurasia, favouring the weakening (strengthening) of Ural ridge and East Asian trough. Zonal (Meridional) circulations tend to be established and unfavorable (favorable) for the exchange of warm and cold air between middle-high latitudes, ultimately promoting the WACE– (WACE+) pattern.
      PubDate: 2024-07-09
       
  • Added value of EURO-CORDEX downscaling over the complex orography region
           of the Pyrenees

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      Abstract: Abstract This study presents an assessment of the added value of downscaling utilizing Regional Climate Models (RCMs) compared to Global Climate Models (GCMs) in the high mountain region of the Pyrenees, characterized by complex topography. The EURO-CORDEX ensemble was investigated, employing a gridded high-resolution observational database as a reference. A recently proposed method is applied to quantify the performance gains or losses associated with dynamic downscaling. Our analysis focuses on calculating the added value by exploring the extremes of the Probability Density Function (PDF), spatial distribution patterns, and its relationship with elevation. Overall, our findings reveal significant improvements in the representation and general characterization of precipitation, minimum temperature, and maximum temperature in the Pyrenean region. Furthermore, RCMs demonstrate enhanced performance in capturing maximum precipitation events; however, they struggle to represent low precipitation rates, particularly in the Mediterranean area of the mountain range. Regarding temperature extremes, dynamical downscaling exhibits improvements in capturing maximum events. Nevertheless, deficiencies are observed in the RCMs’ representation of minimum temperature events for both minimum and maximum temperature variables, as well as in representing near-freezing temperatures.
      PubDate: 2024-07-08
       
  • Assessing CMIP6 uncertainties at global warming levels

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      Abstract: Abstract IPCC reports and climate change impact studies generally exploit ensembles of climate projections based on different socio-economic pathways and climate models, which provide the temporal evolution of plausible future climates. However, The Paris Agreement and many national and international commitments consider adaptation and mitigation plans targeting future global warming levels. Model uncertainty and scenario uncertainty typically affect both the crossing-time of future warming levels and the climate features at a given global warming level. In this study, we assess the uncertainties in a multi-model multi-member CMIP6 ensemble (MME) of seasonal and regional temperature and precipitation projections. In particular, we show that the uncertainties of regional temperature projections are considerably reduced if considered at a specific global warming level, with a limited effect of the emission scenarios and a reduced influence of GCM sensitivity. We also describe in detail the large uncertainties related to the different behavior of the GCMs in some regions.
      PubDate: 2024-07-08
       
  • Response of streamflow and sediment variability to cascade dam development
           and climate change in the Sai Gon Dong Nai River basin

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      Abstract: Abstract Future changes in streamflow and sediment, influenced by anthropogenic activities and climate change, have a crucial role in watershed management. This study aimed to quantify the effects of anthropogenic and natural drivers on future streamflow and sediment changes in the tropical Sai Gon Dong Nai River basin using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. Specifically, the model incorporated thirty-six reservoirs and analyzed twenty future climate projected scenarios from four Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6) General Circulation Models (GCMs) for 2023–2100. These models include BCC-CSM2-MR (China), CanESM5 (Canada), MIROC6 (Japan), and MRI-ESM2-0 (Japan). Our findings indicate that (1) dam operation and diversion lead to a 0.5% decrease in streamflow during the dry season and a 4.1% increase during the rainy season compared to those in scenarios without dams; (2) there is a 37.4% decrease in annual sediment across the entire basin under same climate conditions; and (3) rainfall is projected to decrease (24.6% – 6.2%), resulting in a decrease in streamflow (0.2 – 32.2%) and sediment (39.3 – 56.0%) compared to historical records. Streamflow is expected to decrease during the rainy season (16.7 – 23.1%) and increase during the dry season (14.5 – 25.4%). Further potential degradation of the environmental conditions and water mismanagement are caused by the synergies between too much and too little rainfall conditions. The anticipated reductions in future streamflow and sediment could adversely affect ecological streamflow, water security, and sediment dynamics in the Sai Gon Dong Nai River basin. Our approach effectively identifies future changes in streamflow and sediment due to the combined effects of climate change and reservoir operations, providing valuable insights for integrated water resource management in tropical regions.
      PubDate: 2024-07-05
       
  • Investigating the seasonal SST Predictability in the Northern Tropical
           Atlantic Ocean in an ensemble prediction system

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      Abstract: Abstract The present study comprehensively investigates the practical and intrinsic predictability of the sea surface temperature (SST) in the Northern Tropical Atlantic (NTA) based on the 138-year-long coupled hindcasts with a recently developed seasonal ensemble prediction system. This system can yield skillful deterministic predictions for the prominent warm and cold events at least 6 months ahead. Notably, it excels in providing probabilistic predictions for below- and above-normal events rather than for neutral events. The predictability of SST in the NTA undergoes remarkable seasonal variation with two peaks of predictability targeted at April and October regardless of the lead time. Various sources of predictability for these target months are revealed. For the target month of April, the preceding remote forcing from the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the tropical Pacific Ocean combined with local signal results in the phase locking of the SST variation and seasonality of signal component over the NTA. This ultimately contributes to the high predictability targeted at April. However, From the perspective of potential predictability of the predictability targeted at October, which has been rarely mentioned in previous studies. It is also encouraging that, similar to the Indian Ocean Dipole, ENSO and the signal-to-noise ratio of the system mainly contribute to predictability beyond persistence at long lead times for the spring SST in the NTA. This indicates that potential future ENSO improvements may leave much room for improvement in the current SST prediction in the NTA.
      PubDate: 2024-07-05
       
  • Exploring the influence of improved horizontal resolution on extreme
           precipitation in Southern Africa major river basins: insights from CMIP6
           HighResMIP simulations

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      Abstract: Abstract This study investigates the impact of enhanced horizontal resolution on simulating mean and extreme precipitation in the major river basins of southern Africa. Seven global climate models (GCMs) from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6) High-Resolution Model Intercomparison Project (HighResMIP) are used, which are available at both high-resolution (HR) and low-resolution (LR). The models are assessed using three observational datasets from 1983–2014 during December-January–February. The performance of the models in simulating nine extreme precipitation indices, as defined by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI), is quantitatively assessed using various of statistical metrics. Results show that the distributions of daily precipitation from the HR models are nearly identical to those of their LR counterparts. However, model biases are not consistent across the three observations. Most HR and LR models reasonably simulate mean precipitation, maximum consecutive dry and wet days (CDD and CWD), number of rainy days (RR1) and heavy precipitation events (R10mm and R20mm), albeit with some biases. Enhanced horizontal resolution improves the simulation of mean precipitation, CDD, CWD, RR1 and R10mm, as indicated by high spatial correlation coefficients (SCCs), low root mean square errors (RMSEs), and reduced biases in most HR models. The majority of the HighResMIP models (i.e., both LR and HR models) overestimates extreme wet days precipitation (R95p and R99p), maximum one-day precipitation (Rx1day), and simple daily intensity (SDII), with a pronounced wet bias in HR models for R95p and R99p. Most LR models outperforms HR models in simulating R95p, R99p, and SDII. By means of a Comprehensive Ranking Metrics, EC-EARTH_HR is identified as the best performing model for simulating all nine extreme precipitation indices across the basins, except for the Zambezi, where EC-EARTH_LR performs best. Our findings indicate that increased resolution can either improve or worsen performance depending on the model and basin. Therefore, no clear evidence exist that enhanced horizontal resolution under HighResMIP enhances the simulation of extreme precipitation in southern Africa.
      PubDate: 2024-07-04
       
  • Historical and future extreme climate events in highly vulnerable small
           Caribbean Islands

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      Abstract: Abstract Small Caribbean islands are on the frontline of climate change because of sea level rise, extreme rainfall and temperature events, and heavy hurricanes. The Archipelago of San Andrés, Providencia, and Santa Catalina (SAI), are Caribbean islands belonging to Colombia and declared a Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO. SAI is highly vulnerable to climate change impacts but no hydroclimatological study quantified the extreme climatic changes yet. This study analyzes historical (1960s-2020, 7 stations) and future (2071–2100, CMIP6 multi-model ensemble, for four scenarios: SSP1-2.6, SSP2-4.5, SSP3-7.0, and SSP5-8.5) trends in mean and extreme precipitation and temperature duration, frequency, and intensity. We find that heatwaves have more than tripled in frequency and doubled their maximum duration since the end of the ‘80 s. Precipitation is historically reduced by 5%, with a reduction recorded in 5 stations and an increase in 2, while extreme rainfall events significantly increased in frequency and intensity in most stations. The hotter-and-drier climate is amplified in the future for all scenarios, with much drier extremes (e.g., -0.5─-17% wet days, +8%─30% consecutive dry days, and +60%─89% in hot days). Although we show that hurricanes Categories IV and V near SAI (< 600 km) more than doubled since the’60 s, only a small fraction of extreme rainfall in the archipelago is associated with hurricanes or tropical storms. La Niña events also have no substantial influence on extreme precipitation. Interestingly, opposite and heterogeneous historical extreme rainfall trends are found across such small territory (< 30 km2). Thus, downscaled hydrometeorological data and model simulations are essential to investigate future extreme climatic events and strengthen small Caribbean islands' climate change adaptation efforts.
      PubDate: 2024-07-03
       
  • Impact of vegetation greening on TOA clear-sky shortwave radiation in
           Northwest India

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      Abstract: Abstract  Since 2000, Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments on Aqua and Terra satellites have recorded top-of-atmosphere (TOA) clear-sky outgoing radiation fluxes. Over northwest India, analysis of these two decades of data revealed significant negative trends in reflected shortwave radiation, indicating positive shortwave radiative forcing. To understand the drivers of this trend, we investigate changes in the surface reflectance, aerosol optical depth (AOD), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), and land surface temperature from MODIS observations during the same period. We find decreasing trends in surface reflectance and AOD, while NDVI shows a pronounced increase. Notably, despite positive shortwave radiative forcing, daytime land surface temperature exhibits a significant decrease, with only a slight nighttime increase. Sensitivity analysis using a radiative transfer model identifies decrease in the surface reflectance as the primary contributor to the decrease in TOA shortwave fluxes. This suggests that the observed greening, potentially linked to expanded irrigation projects, has played a crucial role by reducing both surface reflectance and aerosol production. Our findings highlight the potential for increasing vegetation as a locally effective strategy to mitigate the effects of global warming through enhanced evapotranspiration process, even in the presence of positive shortwave radiative forcing. Investigating regional climate trends is vital for understanding and quantifying climate change; these results highlight the need for future climate change impact studies to consider interplay between vegetation dynamics and regional climate.
      PubDate: 2024-07-03
       
  • Investigating the spatial propagation patterns of meteorological drought
           events and underlying mechanisms using complex network theory: A case
           study of the Yangtze River Basin, China

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      Abstract: Abstract The spatial propagation patterns of meteorological drought events (MDEs) and underlying mechanisms contribute to elucidating and forecasting drought evolution. In this study, gridded MDEs in the Yangtze River Basin (YRB) throughout the entire year, wet season and dry season were extracted from 3-month Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI-3) series. Event synchronization (ES) and complex networks (CN) were employed to construct the MDE synchronization networks and MDE spatial propagation networks for various periods. The former were utilized to identify MDE synchronized subregions where MDEs co-occur and co-evolve in the YRB, while the latter were used to quantify the MDE spatial propagation patterns over both the basin and its subregions. The driving mechanisms behind MDE spatial propagation were further investigated by diagnosing the concomitant drought-inducing climate systems. The findings reveal the presence of four MDE synchronized subregions during the wet season and five subregions during the entire year and dry season. These subregions exhibited distinct spatial propagation patterns of MDEs, aligning with overall findings across the YRB. Notable differences were observed between wet and dry seasons, with various subregions exhibiting distinctive spatial propagation patterns during each season. These patterns are driven by variations in the controlling atmospheric circulation systems, leading to anomalies of wind patterns and moisture distribution, ultimately resulting in deficient moisture supply. The variations of tropical sea surface thermal conditions, influences of the Tibetan Plateau and MDE self-propagation triggered by land–atmosphere feedback are considered as three primary influencing factors for MDE spatial propagation in the YRB.
      PubDate: 2024-07-02
       
  • Impacts of a shallow convection scheme on kilometer-scale atmospheric
           simulations over the Tibetan Plateau

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      Abstract: Abstract Satellite observations show that cumulus is one of the dominant cloud types in the summer over the Tibetan Plateau (TP), indicating prevalent shallow convection (ShCn). However, the impacts of ShCn parameterization on simulations of near-surface atmospheric variables and land-atmosphere interaction over the TP remain largely unknown. This study conducts simulations at 5-km grid-spacing with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model for the TP in July and August of three years. The result with/without the University of Washington (UW) ShCn scheme is evaluated against in situ observations. The evaluation shows that the ShCn scheme improves the simulations of 2-m air temperature, relative humidity, precipitation amount, and the diurnal cycle of precipitation. It also reduces light rainfall, implying its potential to lessen the general bias of “too much light rain” in climate models. Furthermore, the simulation with the scheme shows that ShCn brings moist air from the planetary boundary layer (PBL) into the free atmosphere, generally lowering and delaying the accumulation of convective available potential energy, reducing precipitation amount and soil moisture. This air exchange also reduces cloud water content and enhances surface net radiation, strengthening sensible heat flux and evaporation. This, in turn, enables the PBL to grow through both air entrainment and surface sensible heating, leading to warmer and drier low-level profiles. These impacts are most pronounced in the interior of the TP, where strong surface sensible heat and low-level convergence trigger convection, but the lack of water vapor inhibits deep convection.
      PubDate: 2024-07-01
       
  • Sub-seasonal prediction skill: is the mean state a good model evaluation
           metric'

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      Abstract: Abstract Evaluating forecast models encompasses assessing their ability to accurately depict observed climate states and predict future climate variables. Various evaluation methods, from computationally efficient measures like the anomaly correlation coefficient to more intricate approaches, have been formulated. While simpler methods provide limited information, climatology, due to its simplicity and immediate linkage to model performance, is a commonly utilized primary evaluation metric. In this study focusing on temperature and precipitation, we propose a novel metric based on the model’s mean state, integrating both climatology and the seasonal cycle for a more accurate assessment of the relationship between mean state performance and prediction skill on weather and sub-seasonal time scales compared to relying solely on climatology. This integrated metric reveals a robust correlation between temperature and precipitation across diverse geographical locations, with a more pronounced effect in tropical areas when considering the seasonal cycle. Additionally, we find that temperature exhibits higher prediction skill compared to precipitation. The discovered relationship serves as a potential early indicator for predicting the efficacy of Seasonal to Sub-seasonal (S2S) models and offers valuable insights for model development, emphasizing the significance of this integrated metric in enhancing S2S model performance and advancing climate prediction capabilities.
      PubDate: 2024-06-28
       
 
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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 65)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Climate Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 72)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 184)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Journal of Climate Change and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Economic Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorological Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 208)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
Nīvār     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Oxford Open Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

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School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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