A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
The end of the list has been reached or no journals were found for your choice.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.353
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 33  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 30 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 1756-8692 - ISSN (Online) 1756-8706
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Assessment of climate change mitigation readiness in the Kingdom of
           Bahrain

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Maha Alsabbagh, Waheeb Essa Alnaser
      Abstract: This study aims to assess readiness for climate change mitigation in the Kingdom of Bahrain. Two stages were followed aiming at understanding the situation related to climate change mitigation in Bahrain and assessing the mitigation readiness. Baseline and mitigation scenarios for the period 2019–2040 were developed using the Low Emissions Analysis Platform software based on historical emissions and energy data for the period 1990–2018. Using the analytic hierarchy process, the mitigation readiness was assessed by 13 experts, and priority areas for mitigation action were identified. CO2e emissions are projected to grow continuously. However, no explicit climate change strategy is in place yet. Mitigation is tackled implicitly through energy efficiency and renewable energy initiatives. These initiatives can make 23% reduction in CO2e emissions by 2040. Adopting additional measures is needed to achieve the recently set emission reduction target of 30% by 2035. The findings revealed potential areas for improving mitigation efforts in Bahrain. Priority areas for mitigation actions, as identified by experts, were mainly related to policy and governance. Focus needs to be paid to the social aspect of climate change mitigation. Literature on mitigation readiness in developing countries is sparse. Knowledge of the requirements for climate change mitigation and assessment of the country’s performance can prioritize areas for improving mitigation action. Several lessons can be learnt from the case of Bahrain. In addition, the adopted methodology can be applied to other developing or Arab countries at local or institutional levels. However, its application to specific sectors may require adjustments.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2023-01-25
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-08-2021-0096
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Environmental outcomes of climate migration and local governance: an
           empirical study of Ontario

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Haijuan Yang, Gail Krantzberg, Xiaohuan Dong, Xiwu Hu
      Abstract: This study aims to examine the impact of migration growth on environmental outcomes and local governance and assess how well the existing local municipal governance has responded to the environmental impact of increased migration influx in Ontario, Canada using the annual data during 2012–2021. This study used the grey relational analysis (GRA) to examine the correlation degree between migrant growth, environmental outcomes and local governance, used coupling coordination degree model (CCDM) to access to what extent the existing local governance systems have responded to the environmental impact of immigrant growth. Results show that higher immigrant populations are associated with worse environmental outcomes and the need for more municipal environmental investment and service. The present local municipal environmental service in Ontario lags behind in response to the environmental impacts of increased migration. Good local governance practices and environmental services are required to improve the environmental adaptation capacity of host countries to migrant influx. Climate change has been regarded as an important driver of internal and international human migration. The mass influxes of migrants will threaten cities’ environmental quality and put considerable pressure on municipal services. This study provides empirical evidence for Ontario’s municipal environmental governance and relevant authorities on how to deal with the environmental impact of increased migration and contributes to call the attention of other countries to the urban environmental pressure caused by migration influx due to the changing climate world wide.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2023-01-19
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-07-2022-0081
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Increasing social resilience against climate change risks: a case of
           extreme climate affected countries

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Xiaobing Huang, Yousaf Ali Khan, Noman Arshed, Sultan Salem, Muhammad Ghulam Shabeer, Uzma Hanif
      Abstract: Social development is the ultimate goal of every nation, and climate change is a major stumbling block. Climate Risk Index has documented several climate change events with their devastations in terms of lives lost and economic cost. This study aims to link the climate change and renewable energy with the social progress of extreme climate affected countries. This research used the top 50 most climate-affected countries of the decade and estimated the impact of climate risk on social progress with moderation effects of renewable energy and technology. Several competing panel data models such as quantile regression, bootstrap quantile regression and feasible generalized least square are used to generate robust estimates. The results confirm that climate hazards obstruct socioeconomic progress, but renewable energy and technology can help to mitigate the repercussion. Moreover, improved institutions enhance the social progress of nations. Government should improve the institutional quality that enhances their performance in terms of Voice and Accountability, Political Stability and Absence of Violence, Government Effectiveness, Regulatory Quality, Rule of Law and Control of Corruption to increase social progress. In addition, society should use renewable energy instead of fossil fuels to avoid environmental degradation and health hazards. Innovation and technology also play an important role in social progress and living standards, so there should be free hand to private business research and development, encouraging research institutes and universities to come forward for innovation and research. The ultimate goal of all human struggle is to have progress that facilitates human beings to uplift their living standard. One of the best measures that can tell us about a nation’s progress is Social Progress Index (SPI), and one of many factors that can abruptly change it is the climate; so this study is an attempt to link the relationship among these variables and also discuss the situation where the impact of climate can be reduced. Although social progress is an important concept of today’s economics discussion, relatively few studies are using the SPI to measure social well-being. Similarly, there is consensus about the impact of climate on people, government and crops but relatively less study about its overall impact on social progress, so this study attempts to fill the gap about the relationship between social progress and climate change. The main contribution of this study is the solution for the impact of climate risk. Climate risk is not in human control, and we cannot eliminate it, but we can reduce the negative impacts of climate change. Moderator impact of renewable energy decreases the negative impact of climate change, so there is a need to use more renewable energy to mitigate the bad consequences of climate on social progress. Another moderator is technology; using technology will also mitigate the negative consequences of the climate, so there is a need to facilitate technological advancement.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2023-01-11
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-04-2022-0051
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Reconsidering India’s climate diplomacy and domestic preferences
           with a two-level approach

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Juan Zhang, Xiaolong Zou, Anmol Muhkia
      Abstract: International climate politics are gradually changing in terms of new and ground-breaking policies and decision-making spearheaded by national governments. The growing global demand to combat climate change reflects the current challenges the world is facing. India’s negotiations at United Nations Conference on Climate Change are based on “equity,” “historical responsibility” and the “polluter pays” agenda, until a shift in the voluntary reduction of carbon emissions takes place. The purpose of this study is to understand why India, a “deal breaker”, is seen as a “deal maker” in climate governance' For a state like India, domestic preferences are equally important in introducing climate policies alongside its concerns over poverty reduction and economic development, which also stand with its sustainable development goals. This paper explains India’s decision-making using a two-level approach focusing on “domestic preferences.” This rationale is based on India’s historical background as well as new upcoming challenges. This paper shows that India has both the domestic needs and long-term benefits of combating climate change to cut carbon emissions, which gives the responsibility primarily to domestic audiences and international societies. This paper uses an international political lens to critically analyze India’s climate positions and politics from both domestic and international levels, demonstrating the importance of considering both short- and long-term goals. The outcome benefits not only the policymakers in India but also stakeholders in the Asia-Pacific and beyond.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2023-01-06
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-07-2022-0088
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Indigenous knowledge, climate change and transformations of Gwadar fishing
           community

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Shakir Ullah, Usman Khan, Abida Begum, Heesup Han, Abdullah Mohamed
      Abstract: This paper explores the indigenous climate knowledge (ICK) of the Gwadar fishing community in Pakistan. The main purpose of this paper is to explore the accuracy of ICK and how climatic change brings changes to it and the social lives of local fishers. Qualitative research methods, including participant observation, in-depth interviews and oral histories, were used to collect the data. Finding from this long fieldwork shows that this fishing community has a harmonious relationship with nature and local ecology. Their knowledge of local ecology enables them to have equal access to natural resources, sustainable resource management, disaster risk reduction and strong social organization on the coast of Gwadar. Recently their deep relationship with local ecology and sociocultural organization has been disturbed due to huge climate changes caused by human manipulation of the environment. Their ability to foresee climatic events has been reduced. They are finding it impossible to estimate fish availability due to massive climate changes. Local communities are losing their traditional livelihoods and socioeconomic autonomy as a result of growing climate change. Climatic change adds to the existing poverty situation and increases political instability in the region. The study suggests using the fishermen’s valuable indigenous knowledge of local ecology, climate and its ties to local traditions, culture and resource management for a scientific understanding of climate change and marine resource management in Gwadar, Pakistan. This is an ethnographic study based on a long term field work. Fishing community is passing through catastrophic climatic changes in the region. This community has been ignored by both government and researchers to record their problems and bring them to academia and media. Therefore, this study will help them raise their voices.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2023-01-02
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-06-2022-0069
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Coping with floods: impacts, preparedness and resilience capacity of Greek
           micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises in flood-affected areas

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Antonis Skouloudis, Walter Leal Filho, Georgios Deligiannakis, Panagiotis Vouros, Ioannnis Nikolaou, Konstantinos Evangelinos
      Abstract: This paper aims to investigate aspects of flood experience, attitudes and responses of micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs) in Greece and to indicate a typology of strategies associated with their relative effort to build flood resilience capacity. A qualitative study protocol was used, based on pertinent literature that considers how business entities withstand, adapt and/or recover from non-linear climate change impacts, natural hazards and extreme weather. Data was obtained by conducting semi-structured interviews with 82 MSMEs’ owners-managers who had recently experienced flooding. The study reports limited activities of MSMEs towards flood resilience capacity despite the threat of relevant disasters. Findings suggest that most owners-managers of these enterprises are not adequately preparing their businesses for the impacts of flooding. The findings call for multi-level and dynamic perspectives to be examined in assessing MSME resilience capacity to floods. It is attitudinal, managerial, organisational, behavioural and regulatory (as well as other institutional) factors that merit further investigation. Such an investigation would allow a better understanding as to whether these factors hinder or enable conditions for microeconomic flood preparedness and resilience as well as how they may interact with each other or create feedback loops. The study carries managerial implications and policy recommendations in terms of nurturing opportunities towards awareness-raising campaigns for reducing deficits in managerial knowledge and competencies. It also encapsulates practical implications in terms of emphasising supporting mechanisms from key institutional stakeholders to allow MSMEs scan available options they have in effectively reinforcing the business premises from the forces of rising waters. Most of the related studies have examined flood impacts, responses and/or resilience capacity at the household- or community-level. Empirical work that is conducted to ascertain how MSMEs cope with flooding remains thin on the ground. In response to this, the current study and the typology of MSMEs’ strategic postures that are suggested seek to contribute to this under-researched topic.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2023-01-02
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-09-2022-0122
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Greenhouse gas emissions and stock market volatility: an empirical
           analysis of OECD countries

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jung Hee Noh, Heejin Park
      Abstract: This study aims to explore empirical evidence of the impact of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on stock market volatility. Using panel data of 35 Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development countries from 1992 to 2018, we conduct both fixed effects panel model and Prais-Winsten model with panel-corrected standard errors. The authors document that there is a significant positive relationship between GHG emissions and stock market volatility. The results remain robust after controlling for potential endogeneity problems. This study contributes to the literature in that it provides additional empirical evidence for the financial risk posed by climate change.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2023-01-02
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-10-2021-0124
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • China’s power industry’s carbon emission intensity in the context of
           

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Pinjie Xie, Baolin Sun, Li Liu, Yuwen Xie, Fan Yang, Rong Zhang
      Abstract: To cope with the severe situation of the global climate, China proposed the “30 60” dual-carbon strategic goal. Based on this background, the purpose of this paper is to investigate scientifically and reasonably the interprovincial pattern of China’s power carbon emission intensity and further explore the causes of differences on this basis. Considering the principle of “shared but differentiated responsibilities,” this study measures the carbon emissions within the power industry from 1997 to 2019 scientifically, via the panel data of 30 provinces in China. The power carbon emission intensity is chosen as the indicator. Using the Dagum Gini coefficient to explore regional differences and their causes. The results of this paper show that, first, China’s carbon emission intensity from the power industry overall is significantly different. From the perspective of geospatial distribution, the three regions have unbalanced characteristics. Second, according to the decomposition results of the Gini coefficient, the overall difference in power carbon emission intensity is generally expanding. The geospatial and economic development levels are examined separately. The gaps between the eastern and economically developed regions are the smallest, and the regional differences are the source of the overall disparity. Further exploring the causes of differences on this basis is crucial for relevant departments to formulate differentiated energy conservation and emission reduction policies. This study provides direction for analyzing the green and low carbon development of China’s power industry. As an economic indicator of green and low-carbon development, CO2 intensity of power industry can directly reflect the dependence of economic growth on the high emission of electricity and energy. and further exploring the causes of differences on this basis is crucial for relevant departments to formulate differentiated energy conservation and emission reduction policies. For a long time, with the rapid economic development, resulting in the unresolved contradiction between low energy efficiency and high carbon emissions. To this end, scientifically and reasonably investigating the interprovincial pattern of China’s power carbon emission intensity, and further exploring the causes of differences on this basis, is crucial for relevant departments to formulate differentiated energy conservation and emission reduction policies. Third, considering the influence of spatial factors on the convergence of power carbon emission intensity, a variety of different spatial weight matrices are selected. Based on the β-convergence theory from both absolute and conditional perspectives, we dig deeper into the spatial convergence of electricity carbon emission intensity across the country and the three regions.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-12-09
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-08-2022-0119
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Climate change and extremes: implications on city livability and
           associated health risks across the globe

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Walter Leal Filho, Liza Tuladhar, Chunlan Li, Abdul-Lateef Babatunde Balogun, Marina Kovaleva, Ismaila Rimi Abubakar, Hossein Azadi, Felix Kwabena Kwabena Donkor
      Abstract: As global warming intensifies, climatic conditions are changing dramatically, potentially affecting specific businesses and cities’ livability. The temperature increase in cities significantly affects urban residents whose percentage is to reach about 70% by 2050. This paper aimed at highlighting the climate change risks in cities, particularly focusing on the threats to people’s health due to a continuous temperature increase. This study was conducted in three main steps. First, the literature review on the effects of climate change, particularly on the continuous temperature rise in cities, was conducted based on the publications retrieved from PubMed, Science Direct, Google Scholar and Research Gate. Second, the survey was conducted for the sample cities for one month. Third, the questionnaire was used to assess possible climate change threats to the livability of cities. The findings showed that urban areas are usually warmer than the surrounding rural areas, mainly due to the urban heat island effect, causing more hot days in metropolitan areas compared to rural areas. This paper outlines some mitigation and adaptation measures, which can be implemented to improve the livability in cities, their sustainability and the well-being of their populations. This study reports on the climate change impacts on the health and livability of 15 cities, in industrialized and developing countries. It examines the average and maximum temperature and relative humidity of each city and its correlation with their livability. It was complemented by a survey focused on 109 cities from Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, North America and Oceania.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-12-07
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-07-2021-0078
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Climate change, extreme events and mental health in the Pacific region
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Walter Leal Filho, Murukesan Krishnapillai, Aprajita Minhas, Sannia Ali, Gabriela Nagle Alverio, Medhat Sayed Hendy Ahmed, Roselyn Naidu, Ravinesh R. Prasad, Navjot Bhullar, Ayyoob Sharifi, Gustavo J. Nagy, Marina Kovaleva
      Abstract: This paper aims to address a gap in investigating specific impacts of climate change on mental health in the Pacific region, a region prone to extreme events. This paper reports on a study on the connections between climate change, public health, extreme weather and climate events (EWEs), livelihoods and mental health, focusing on the Pacific region Islands countries. This paper deploys two main methods. The first is a bibliometric analysis to understand the state of the literature. For example, the input data for term co-occurrence analysis using VOSviewer is bibliometric data of publications downloaded from Scopus. The second method describes case studies, which outline some of the EWEs the region has faced, which have also impacted mental health. The results suggest that the increased frequency of EWEs in the region contributes to a greater incidence of mental health problems. These, in turn, are associated with a relatively low level of resilience and greater vulnerability. The findings illustrate the need for improvements in the public health systems of Pacific nations so that they are in a better position to cope with the pressures posed by a changing environment. This paper contributes to the current literature by identifying the links between climate change, extreme events, environmental health and mental health consequences in the Pacific Region. It calls for greater awareness of the subject matter of mental health among public health professionals so that they may be better able to recognise the symptoms and relate them to their climate-related causes and co-determinant factors.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-12-06
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-03-2022-0032
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Climate risk, climate risk distance and foreign direct investment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zhaopeng Xing, Yawen Wang
      Abstract: Climate risk greatly increases the risk exposure of global investments. Both the climate risks of home countries and host countries may affect international investment behaviors. The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of climate risk and climate risk distance on foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows and outflows. Targeted proposals are provided to promote international economic and trade cooperation and the authors provide suggestions for the FDI strategies of multinational enterprises. The authors define “climate risk distance” as the difference in climate risks between two countries. This paper uses both a theoretical model and a generalized least squares test to investigate the impact of climate risk distance on FDI from the perspectives of FDI inflows and outflows. In addition, the authors subdivide the samples according to the sign of climate risk distance and rank the FDI share from home country to host country into four groups according to the host country’s climate risk index. Finally, the authors undertake empirical tests with outward foreign direct investment (OFDI) data to support the empirical results. Investors from countries with low climate risks have the upper hand due to their competitive advantages, like their skills, trademarks and patent rights, which they can transfer abroad to offset the disadvantage of being non-native. This is generally defined as ownership advantage. The impact of climate risk distance on FDI depends on the sign of climate risk distance. Specifically, host countries with higher climate risks compared with the climate risk levels of home countries may experience insignificant reductions in FDI inflows. For investors from home countries with higher climate risks, they are less likely to invest in host countries with lower climate risks. The results for samples from emerging market economies are shown to be more significant. This study advances the O (ownership advantage) part of the ownership, location and internationalization (OLI) paradigm by incorporating the climate risk distance between the home country and the host country into the influencing factors of FDI. Both the O part and the L (location advantage, the advantage that host countries offers to make internationalization worthwhile to undertake FDI) part of the OLI paradigm concerning climate risks are validated with FDI and OFDI data.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-12-05
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-09-2021-0100
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The spatial-temporal evolution analysis of carbon emission of China's
           thermal power industry based on the three-stage SBM—DEA model

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Guoquan Xu, Shiwei Feng, Shucen Guo, Xiaolan Ye
      Abstract: China has proposed two-stage goals of carbon peaking by 2030 and carbon neutralization by 2060. The carbon emission reduction effect of the power industry, especially the thermal power industry, will directly affect the progress of the goal. This paper aims to reveal the spatial-temporal characteristics and influencing factors of carbon emission efficiency of the thermal power industry and proposes policy suggestions for realizing China’s carbon peak and carbon neutralization goals. This paper evaluates and compares the carbon emission efficiency of the thermal power industry in 29 provinces and regions in China from 2014 to 2019 based on the three-stage slacks-based measure (SBM) of efficiency in data envelopment analysis (DEA) model of undesired output, excluding the influence of environmental factors and random errors. Empirical results show that during the sample period, the carbon emission efficiency of China’s thermal power industry shows a fluctuating upward trend, and the carbon emission efficiency varies greatly among the provincial regions. The carbon emission efficiency of the interregional thermal power industry presents a pattern of “eastern> central> western,” which is consistent with the level of regional economic development. Environmental factors such as economic level and environmental regulation level are conducive to the improvement of carbon emission efficiency of the thermal power industry, but the proportion of thermal power generation and industrial structure is the opposite. This paper adopts the three-stage SBM–DEA model of undesired output and takes CO2 as the undesired output to reveal the spatial-temporal characteristics and influencing factors of carbon emission efficiency in China’s thermal power industry. The results provide a more comprehensive perspective for regional comparative evaluation and influencing factors of carbon emission efficiency in China’s thermal power industry.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-11-09
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-08-2022-0115
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Critical findings of the sixth assessment report (AR6) of working Group I
           of the intergovernmental panel on climate change (IPCC) for global climate
           change policymaking a summary for policymakers (SPM) analysis

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Majid Asadnabizadeh
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to assess how intergovernmental panel on climate change’s (IPCC’s) sixth assessment report of Working Group I (WGI), a Summary for Policymakers (SPM), has evaluated the current climate change situation. The author uses the qualitative content analysis (QCA) method (i.e. summative content analysis [SCA]) to identify critical points of the SPM. To better understand the WGI report and its SPM, the author uses the thematic analysis, often called the QCA method. This study takes more steps and uses one of the main qualitative content analysis approaches (i.e. SCA). Therefore, QCA (SCA) can help the author count the occurrence of certain words using computer-assisted qualitative data analysis software that quantifies the words in the data. This process helps the author to understand codes and patterns (e.g. the concept in the results section). Interestingly, the AR6 says more about adaptation for policy makers in sections C (Climate information for risk assessment) and D (Mitigation of future climate change) than in sections A and D. Finally, this study concludes that the IPCC WGI SPM has addressed evidence on global climate change policymaking for SPMa, SPMd (mitigation-based strategies and mitigation policy [MP]) and SPMb, SPMc (adaptation policy and adaptation-based strategy). First, this study refers only to the contribution of WGI, a SPM. The findings of this study do not necessarily provide a full understanding of what the AR6 WGI SPM says about climate change. It points out that the QDA Miner software and Voyant tool do not include all variables and examples where mitigation and adaptation-based strategies are discussed. The guidance for coding is based on the approved version of IPCC AR6 WGI SPM. The final limitation is that the relatedness of key words (e.g. confidence, high and warming) is sometimes ambiguous; even experts may disagree on how the words are linked to form a concept. Thus, this method works at the keyword level. A more intelligent method would use more meaningful information than keywords. This study used qualitative data analysis (SCA) to explore what was said about climate change in four sections of the IPCC AR6 WGI SPM, which may influence current and future global climate change policymaking.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-11-08
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-04-2022-0049
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Smallholder farmers’ perceptions and adaptation strategies to climate
           change risks in northwest Ethiopia

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Aimro Likinaw, Woldeamlak Bewket, Aragaw Alemayehu
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper was to examine smallholder farmers’ perceptions of climate change risks, adaptation responses and the links between adaptation strategies and perceived/experienced climate change risks in South Gondar, Ethiopia. This paper used a convergent mixed methods design, which enables us to concurrently collect quantitative and qualitative data. Survey data was collected from 352 households, stratified into Lay Gayint 138 (39%), Tach Gayint 117 (33%) and Simada district 97 (28%). A four-point Likert scale was used to produce a standardised risk perception index for 14 climate events. Moreover, using a one-way analysis of variance, statistical differences in selecting adaptation strategies between the three districts were measured. A post hoc analysis was also carried out to identify the source of the variation. The findings of this paper are supplemented by qualitative data gathered through focus group discussions and key informant interviews of households who were chosen at random. The standardised climate change risk perception index suggests that persistent drought, delayed onset of rainfall, early termination of rainfall and food insecurity were the major potentially dangerous climate change risks perceived by households in the study area. In response to climate change risks, households used several adaptation strategies such as adjusting crop planting dates, crop diversification, terracing, tree planting, cultivating drought-tolerant crop varieties and off-farm activities. A Tukey’s post hoc test revealed a significant difference in off-farm activities, crop diversification and planting drought-tolerant crop types among the adaptation strategies in the study area between Lay Gayint and Simada districts (p < 0.05). This difference reconfirms that adaptation strategies are location-specific. Although many studies are available on coping and adaptation strategies to climate change, this paper is one of the few studies focusing on the linkages between climate change risk perceptions and adaptation responses of households in the study area. The findings of this paper could be helpful for policymakers and development practitioners in designing locally specific, actual adaptation options that shape adaptation to recent and future climate change risks.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-11-04
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-01-2022-0001
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Influence mechanism of technological innovation of electric power industry
           on carbon emission reduction in China

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ming Yang, Duoxiang Wang, Xiaofeng Chen, Xiaomiao Lei, Linxiang Cao
      Abstract: This study aims to analyse the scientific relationship between technological innovation and carbon emissions. Taking the Chinese electric power industry as the empirical research object, this study examined the effect of power technological innovation on carbon emissions and proposed policy recommendations for the development of technological innovation in China. This study first calculated the energy consumption and carbon emission level of the Chinese electric power industry from 2005 to 2018. Secondly, this study built an evaluation index system for technological innovation of electric power with six indicators: average utilisation hours of power generation equipment; power consumption rate of power plant; line loss rate; standard coal consumption for power generation; standard coal consumption for power supply; and number of patent applications granted for generation, conversion or distribution of electric power in China. Finally, from a practical point of view, the relationship between technological innovation and carbon emissions of the Chinese electric power industry from 2005 to 2018 is evaluated and analysed. Power technology innovation has been found to have a long-term and relatively large effect on carbon emissions, and carbon emissions have a short-term and insignificant impact on power technology innovation. This study puts forward relevant suggestions for developing technological innovation and technology transfer, which is essential to establishing a low-carbon or zero-carbon power system in China. This study provides empirical evidence for clarifying the relationship between technological innovation and carbon emissions in the power industry and further develops research theories on technological innovation and carbon emissions. Relevant authorities will adopt measures to promote technological innovation and development in the power sector to reduce carbon emissions. This study built an evaluation index system with six indicators for technological innovation of electric power. The evaluation method was used to measure the technological innovation level of the Chinese electric power industry. The causal link between technological innovation and carbon emissions in China was analysed.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-11-03
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-04-2022-0055
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Assessing climate change vulnerability of smallholder farmers in northwest
           Ethiopia: application of a household intrinsic vulnerability index

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dereje Amene Yimam, Nathalie Holvoet
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to identify the most vulnerable households and districts in Northwest Ethiopia and help decision-makers in developing and prioritising effective adaptive strategies and actions. A multi-scale analytical tool and hazard-generic socio-economic indicators were developed to identify and prioritise the most vulnerable households and districts in Northwest Ethiopia. Categorical principal component analysis with 36 indicators was used to develop weights for different indicators and construct a household intrinsic vulnerability index. Data were collected through key information interviews, focus group discussions and a household survey with 1,602 randomly selected households in three districts of Northwest Ethiopia. Drawing on intrinsic vulnerability index computation, this study highlights that low levels of education, low access to climate information and credit services, long distance travelled to fetch water and frequent food shortages are the dominant factors contributing to high levels of intrinsic vulnerability at district level, while lack of livelihood support and income diversification are the key drivers of vulnerability at household level. The findings of this study further show that the majority of households (78.01%) falls within the very high to moderately high vulnerable category. Disaggregating the data according to agro-climatic zones highlights that the prevalence of high intrinsic vulnerability is most widespread in the lowland agro-climatic zone (82.64%), followed by the highland (81.97%) and midland zones (69.40%). From a policy intervention vantage point, addressing the drivers of vulnerability provides a reliable approach to reduce the current vulnerability level and manage potential climate change-induced risks of a system. Specifically, reliable information on inherent vulnerability will assist policymakers in developing policies and prioritising actions aimed at reducing vulnerability and assisting in the rational distribution of resources among households at a local level. This study contributes to the existing vulnerability literature by showing how hazard-generic socio-economic indicators in the vulnerability assessment adopted by the IPCC (2014) are important to identify drives of vulnerability which ultimately may feed into a more fundamental treatment of vulnerability.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-10-13
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-02-2022-0019
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Will temperature affect the export quality of firms' Evidence from
           China

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Junmei Zhang, Hongyi Li
      Abstract: This study aims to investigate whether temperature affects the product quality of exporters and whether the effect is non-linear. More specifically, whether the impact of high temperatures differs from the impact of low temperatures, and whether different types of companies or industries are affected differently. The paper uses detailed data covering all Chinese exporters from 2000 to 2016 to estimate the effects of temperature on the product quality of export firms. To clarify the relationship between them, the authors use a semi-parametric regression method, trying to test whether there is a non-linear relationship between temperature and the export quality of firms. The increase in the number of high temperature days significantly reduces the quality of exported products, and this negative effect increases as the temperature rises. High temperature has the most significant negative impact on export quality for firms with low technical complexity, private firms and firms with no intermediate imports and located in historical hot cities. Product quality of both labor-intensive and capital-intensive firms will be affected by heat. High temperatures have the greatest negative impact on the export quality of newly entering products, followed by exiting products, with the least negative impact on persisting product. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this paper is the first to examine the impact of temperature on the quality of economic development. The findings of this paper again show that the potential economic impacts of global warming are huge. In addition to some potentially devastating impacts in the future, global warming is already causing imperceptible impacts in the present. Public and economic agents need to fully understand the possible adverse impacts of climate change and take corresponding adaptation measures to cope with global warming.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-10-13
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-05-2022-0066
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Smallholder farmers' perception of climate change and choice of adaptation
           strategies in East Hararghe Zone, Eastern Ethiopia

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Titay Zeleke, Fekadu Beyene, Temesgen Deressa, Jemal Yousuf, Temesgen Kebede
      Abstract: Change of climate is attributed to human activity that alters the composition of the global atmosphere observed over comparable periods. The purpose of this paper is to explore smallholder farmers' perceptions of climate change and compare it with meteorological data, as well as to identify perceived adaptation barriers and examine the factors that influence the choice of adaptation options in eastern Ethiopia. In total, 384 sample households were chosen from four districts of the zone. A cross-sectional survey was used to conduct the study. Primary data was acquired through key informant interviews, focus group discussions and semistructured interviews, whereas meteorological data was collected from the National Meteorological Service Agency of Ethiopia. A Mann–Kendall statistical test was used to analyze temperature and rainfall trends over 33 years. A multivariate probit (MVP) model was used to identify the determinants of farmers' choice of climate change adaptation strategies. The result indicated that temperature was significantly increased, whereas rainfall was significantly reduced over the time span of 33 years. This change in climate over time was consistently perceived by farmers. Smallholder farmers use improved varieties of crops, crop diversification, adjusting planting dates, soil and water conservation practices, reducing livestock holdings, planting trees and small-scale irrigation adaptation strategies. Moreover, this study indicated that sex of the household head, landholding size, livestock ownership, access to extension, access to credit, social capital, market distance, access to climate change-related training, nonfarm income, agroecological setting and poverty status of the households significantly influence farmers’ choice of adaptation strategies. Further research is required to evaluate the economic impact of each adaptation options on the livelihood of smallholder farmers. Institutional variables significantly influenced how farmers adapted to climate change, and all of these issues might potentially be addressed by improving institutional service delivery. To improve farm-level adaptation, local authorities are recommended to investigate the institutional service provision system while also taking demographic and agroecological factors in to account. This study compared farmers' perceptions with temperature and rainfall trend analysis, which has been rarely addressed by other studies. This study adopts an MVP model and indicated the adaptation strategies that complement/substitute strategies each other. Furthermore, this study discovered that the choice of adaptation options differed between poor and nonpoor households, which has been overlooked in previous climate change adaptation research.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-10-11
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-01-2022-0014
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Impact of climate change on agricultural productivity: a combination of
           spatial Durbin model and entropy approaches

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dongbei Bai, Lei Ye, ZhengYuan Yang, Gang Wang
      Abstract: Global climate change characterized by an increase in temperature has become the focus of attention all over the world. China is a sensitive and significant area of global climate change. This paper specifically aims to examine the association between agricultural productivity and the climate change by using China’s provincial agricultural input–output data from 2000 to 2019 and the climatic data of the ground meteorological stations. The authors used the three-stage spatial Durbin model (SDM) model and entropy method for analysis of collected data; further, the authors also empirically tested the climate change marginal effect on agricultural productivity by using ordinary least square and SDM approaches. The results revealed that climate change has a significant negative effect on agricultural productivity, which showed significance in robustness tests, including index replacement, quantile regression and tail reduction. The results of this study also indicated that by subdividing the climatic factors, annual precipitation had no significant impact on the growth of agricultural productivity; further, other climatic variables, including wind speed and temperature, had a substantial adverse effect on agricultural productivity. The heterogeneity test showed that climatic changes ominously hinder agricultural productivity growth only in the western region of China, and in the eastern and central regions, climate change had no effect. The findings of this study highlight the importance of various social connections of farm households in designing policies to improve their responses to climate change and expand land productivity in different regions. The study also provides a hypothetical approach to prioritize developing regions that need proper attention to improve crop productivity. The paper explores the impact of climate change on agricultural productivity by using the climatic data of China. Empirical evidence previously missing in the body of knowledge will support governments and researchers to establish a mechanism to improve climate change mitigation tools in China.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-10-05
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-02-2022-0016
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Research on the emission reduction effects of carbon trading mechanism on
           power industry: plant-level evidence from China

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yonghui Han, Shuting Tan, Chaowei Zhu, Yang Liu
      Abstract: Carbon trading mechanism has been adopted to foster the green transformation of the economy on a global scale, but its effectiveness for the power industry remains controversial. Given that energy-related greenhouse gas emissions account for most of all anthropogenic emissions, this paper aims to evaluate the effectiveness of this trading mechanism at the plant level to support relevant decision-making and mechanism design. This paper constructs a novel spatiotemporal data set by matching satellite-based high-resolution (1 × 1 km) CO2 and PM2.5 emission data with accurate geolocation of power plants. It then applies a difference-in-differences model to analyse the impact of carbon trading mechanism on emission reduction for the power industry in China from 2007 to 2016. Results suggest that the carbon trading mechanism induces 2.7% of CO2 emission reduction and 6.7% of PM2.5 emission reduction in power plants in pilot areas on average. However, the reduction effect is significant only in coal-fired power plants but not in gas-fired power plants. Besides, the reduction effect is significant for power plants operated with different technologies and is more pronounced for those with outdated production technology, indicating the strong potential for green development of backward power plants. The reduction effect is also more intense for power plants without affiliation relationships than those affiliated with particular manufacturers. This paper identifies the causal relationship between the carbon trading mechanism and emission reduction in the power industry by providing an innovative methodology for identifying plant-level emissions based on high-resolution satellite data, which has been practically absent in previous studies. It serves as a reference for stakeholders involved in detailed policy formulation and execution, including policymakers, power plant managers and green investors.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-09-21
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-06-2022-0074
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • “Can seawalls help American cities adapt to coastal
           flooding'”

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jonghyun Yoo, Vaishnavi Sinha, Robert Mendelsohn
      Abstract: This study aims to combine information about sea level rise (SLR), the probability distribution of storm surge, a flood damage function and the value of property by elevation along the coast of selected cities to measure expected flood damage. The selected six cities all have nearby long-term tidal stations that can be used to estimate the probability distribution of floods. The model is calibrated to each city. The study then compares the cost of building higher seawalls today along the coast versus the benefit of each wall (the reduction in expected flood damage). The combination of coastal storms and SLR has led to extensive flood damage across American cities. This study creates a simple generic model that evaluates whether seawalls would be effective at addressing this flooding problem. The paper develops an approach that readily measures the expected flood benefits and costs of alternative coastal seawalls. The approach takes account of near term SLR and the probability distribution of storm surge. The model finds seawalls are effective only in cities where many buildings are in the 25-year flood plain. Cities with many buildings built on land below 2 m in elevation (the 25-year flood plain) have high expected flood damage from storms and SLR. Cities which already have many buildings in this flood plain would benefit from seawalls. Assuming seawalls are built above the high tide line, the optimal wall height that maximizes net benefits is between 0.9 to 1.2 m. These relatively low seawalls block 70%–83% of expected flood damage in these cities. Fair flood insurance is the least cost strategy for handling the remaining damages that overtop the optimal seawalls. The analysis evaluates whether or not to build a seawall the length of each city at high tide lines. However, the analysis also finds several long stretches of coast in two cities where a wall is not warranted because there are few vulnerable buildings. Future analyses should consider seawalls in more spatially detailed sections of each city. Each section could then be analyzed independently. Whether or not more complex hydrodynamic models are needed to evaluate coastal resilience planning should also be explored. Alternative solutions such as planned retreat and nature-based solutions should be compared with seawalls in future studies as well. Cities should be careful to avoid development in the 25-year flood plain because of high expected flood damage. Cities that have low elevation areas subject to frequent flooding should consider seawalls to reduce frequent flooding. Because they are very costly and have low expected benefits, high walls that can stop a one-hundred-year storm are generally not worth building. The analysis reveals that the most important factor determining the vulnerability of cities along the eastern coastline of the USA is the number of buildings built below 2 m in elevation (the 25-year flood plain). Cities should use zoning to discourage further development in the 25-year flood plain. Cities which already have many buildings in this flood plain would benefit from city-wide seawalls. Assuming these walls are built at mean high-high tide, the optimal height of current seawalls should be relatively modest – averaging about 0.9–1.2 m above ground. Using fair insurance for the remaining risk is less expensive than building taller walls. In particular, the cost of seawalls that protect against a major hurricane surge are over three times the expected benefit and should not be built. As decades pass and observed sea level progresses, seawalls and the boundary of the 25-year flood plain should be reevaluated. This paper develops a coastal flood model that combines SLR and the probability distribution of storm surges with the value of property by elevation to estimate the expected damage from storm surge. The model is relatively easy to calibrate making it a practical tool to guide city flood planning. The authors illustrate what insights such a model gives about coastal resilience to flooding across six cities along the Eastern US coastline.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-09-19
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-02-2022-0020
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Appraisal of climate change mitigation and adaptation regulatory
           frameworks in Ethiopia and their congruency with the UN climate change
           convention

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bilate Bisare Bitire
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to critically investigate the Ethiopia’s climate change adaptation and mitigation regulatory frameworks and their congruency with the guiding principles under the United Nations (UN) Climate Convention, to show the alignment of the regulatory frameworks with the UN Climate Change rules. Rising temperatures, erratic rainfall distribution, recurrent droughts and floods require robust climate change mitigation and adaptation policies and effective implementation in the country. Through the doctrinal legal research method, the author has used a detailed analysis of primary sources, both national and international legislative enactments. Besides, the research has benefitted from secondary sources like research reports, online publications, scientific journals, international reports, books and journal articles. The findings reveal that in Ethiopia, there is no national climate change-specific policy and legislation. Although there are scattered sectoral climate-related policies and strategies, they are not consistent with the principles of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). This study argues that having comprehensive specific climate change policy and legislative frameworks consistent with UNFCCC guiding principles could help to mitigate and adapt to the adverse effects of climate change in the country.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-09-07
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-03-2022-0036
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • An economic assessment of the impact of climate change on the Gambia’s
           agriculture sector: a CGE approach

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Christopher Belford, Delin Huang, Yosri Nasr Ahmed, Ebrima Ceesay, Lang Sanyang
      Abstract: Climate change and its imminent threat to human survival adversely impact the agriculture sector. In an impoverished country like The Gambia, economic costs of climate change are colossal. This study aims to establish a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model for The Gambia’s agriculture sector to examine the effects of climate change on crops, livestock and sea-level rise. This study used a CGE model with other climate change impact models to compute the impacts of climate change on The Gambia’s agriculture sector. The social accounting matrix calibrates the results from the various models, thereby generating the baseline results which exemplify a “steady-state” and policy shock results illustrating the medium- and long-term effects of climate change on the country’s agriculture sector. The baseline results indicate the status quo showing the neglect of the agriculture sector due to limited investment in the sector. Hence, the sector is the “hardest hit” sector as a result of climate change. When the model factored in climate change in the medium term (2055) and long term (2085), the macroeconomic indicators of gross domestic product, national savings, wages, disposable income and consumer price index deteriorated, elucidating the vulnerability of the economy to climate change. The consumption of groundnuts, cattle and fish will decline by 5%, 5% and 4%, respectively, in the long term. However, the production of all agricultural commodities will decline by an average of 35% for the same period. The results for international trade show that exportation would decline while importation will increase over time. The general price level for agricultural commodities would increase by 3% in 2055 and 5% in 2085. Generally, the results manifest the severity of climate change in the agriculture sector which will have a multiplier effect on the economy. The impact of climate change would result in agriculture and economic decline causing hunger, poverty and human misery. The caveat of this study revealed the nuances not captured by previous Gambian climate change studies, thus the novelty of the study.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-01-2022-0003
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Research on the synergies between low-carbon pilot city policy and
           high-speed railways in improving Chinese urban electricity efficiency

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yu Chen, Di Jin, Changyi Zhao
      Abstract: Global climate change is a serious threat to the survival and development of mankind. Reducing carbon emissions and achieving carbon neutrality are the keys to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and promoting sustainable human development. For many countries, taking China as an example, the electric power sector is the main contributor to the country’s carbon emissions, as well as a key sector for reducing carbon emissions and achieving carbon neutrality. The low-carbon transition of the power sector is of great significance to the long-term low-carbon development of the economy. Therefore, on the one hand, it is necessary to improve the energy supply structure on the supply side and increase the proportion of new energy in the total power supply. On the other hand, it is necessary to improve energy utilization efficiency on the demand side and control the total primary energy consumption by improving energy efficiency, which is the most direct and effective way to reduce emissions. Improving the utilization efficiency of electric energy and realizing the low-carbon transition of the electric power industry requires synergies between the government and the market. The purpose of this study is to investigate the individual and synergistic effects of China’s low-carbon policy and the opening of urban high-speed railways (HSRs) on the urban electricity consumption efficiency, measured as electricity consumption per unit of gross domestic product (GDP). This study uses a panel of 289 Chinese prefecture-level cities from the years 1999–2019 as the sample and uses the time-varying difference-in-difference method to test the relationship between HSR, low-carbon pilot cities and urban electricity consumption efficiency. In addition, the instrumental variable method is adopted to make a robustness check. Empirical results show that the low-carbon pilot policy and the HSR operation in cities would reduce the energy consumption per unit of GDP, and synergies occur in both HSR operated and low-carbon pilot cities. This study has limitations that would provide possible starting points for future studies. The first limitation is the choice of the proxy variable of government and market factors. The second limitation is that the existing data is only about whether the high-speed rail is opened or not and whether it is a low-carbon pilot city, and there is no more informative data to combine the two aspects. The findings of this study can inform policymakers and regulators about the effects of low-carbon pilot city policies. In addition, the government should consider market-level factors in addition to policy factors. Only by combining various influencing factors can the efficient use of energy be more effectively achieved so as to achieve the goal of carbon neutrality. From the social perspective, the findings indicate that improving energy utilization is dependent on the joint efforts of the government and market. The study provides quantitative evidence to assess the synergic effect between government and the market in the low-carbon transition of the electric power industry. Particularly, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, it is the first to comprehend the role of the city low-carbon pilot policy and the construction of HSR in improving electricity efficiency.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-07-2022-0078
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The evolution of electric technology in the context of China’s
           low-carbon transformation: a patent analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ruifeng Hu, Weiqiao Xu, Yalin Yang
      Abstract: Owing to increased energy demands, China has become the world’s top CO2 emitter, with electricity generation accounting for the majority of emissions. Therefore, the Chinese Government aspires to achieve a low-carbon transformation of the electric industry by enhancing its green innovation capacity. However, little attention has been paid to the green development of electric technology. Thus, this paper aims to uncover the spatiotemporal evolution of electric technology in the context of China’s low-carbon transformation through patent analysis. Using granted green invention patent data for China’s electric industry between 2000 and 2021, this paper conducted an exploratory, spatial autocorrelation and time-varying difference-in-differences (DID) analysis to reveal the landscape of electric technology. Exploratory analysis shows that the average growth rate of electric technology is 8.1%, with spatial heterogeneity, as there is slower growth in the north and west and faster growth in the south and east. In addition, electric technology shows spatial clustering in local areas. Finally, the time-varying DID analysis provides positive evidence that low-carbon policies improve the green innovation capacity of electric technology. The different effects of the low-carbon pilot policy (LCPC) on R&D subjects and the LCPC’s effectiveness in enhancing the value of patented technology were not revealed. This paper reveals the spatiotemporal evolutionary characteristics of electric technology in mainland China. The results can help the Chinese Government clarify how to carry out innovative development in the electric industry as part of the low-carbon transformation and provide a theoretical basis and research direction for newcomers in this field.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-08-26
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-04-2022-0050
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Could green finance facilitate low-carbon transformation of power
           generation' Some evidence from China

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ziqiang Lin, Xianchun Liao, Haoran Jia
      Abstract: The decarbonization of power generation is key to achieving carbon neutrality in China by the end of 2060. This paper aims to examine how green finance influences China’s low-carbon transition of power generation. Using a provincial panel data set as an empirical study example, green finance is assessed first, then empirically analyses the influences of green finance on the low-carbon transition of power generation, as well as intermediary mechanisms at play. Finally, this paper makes relevant recommendations for peak carbon and carbon neutrality in China. To begin with, an evaluation index system with five indicators is constructed with entropy weighting method. Second, this paper uses the share of coal-fired power generation that takes in total power generation as an inverse indicator to measure the low-carbon transition in power generation. Finally, the authors perform generalized method of moments (GMM) econometric model to examine how green finance influences China’s low-carbon transition of power generation by taking advantage of 30 provincial panel data sets, spanning the period of 2007–2019. Meanwhile, the implementation of the 2016 Guidance on Green Finance is used as a turning point to address endogeneity using difference-in-difference method (DID). The prosperity of green finance can markedly reduce the share of thermal power generation in total electricity generation, which implies a trend toward China’s low-carbon transformation in the power generation industry. Urbanization and R&D investment are driving forces influencing low-carbon transition, while economic development hinders the low-carbon transition. The conclusions remain robust after a series of tests such as the DID method, instrumental variable method and replacement indicators. Notably, the results of the mechanism analysis suggest that green finance contributes to low-carbon transformation in power generation by reducing secondary sectoral share, reducing the production of export products, promoting the advancement of green technologies and expanding the proportion of new installed capacity of renewable energy. This paper puts forward relevant suggestions for promoting the green finance development with countermeasures such as allowing low interest rate for renewable energy power generation, facilitating market function and using carbon trade market. Additional policy implication is to promote high quality urbanization and increase R&D investment while pursuing high quality economic development. The last implication is to develop mechanism to strengthen the transformation of industrial structure, to promote high quality trade from high carbon manufactured products to low-carbon products, to stimulate more investment in green technology innovation and to accelerate the greening of installed structure in power generation industry. This paper first attempts to examine the low-carbon transition in power generation from a new perspective of green finance. Second, this paper analyses the mechanism through several aspects: the share of secondary industry, the output of exported products, advances in green technology and the share of renewable energy in new installed capacity, which has not yet been done. Finally, this study constructs a system of indicators to evaluate green finance, including five indicators with entropy weighting method. In conclusion, this paper provides scientific references for sustainable development in China, and meanwhile for other developing countries with similar characteristics.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-08-16
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-03-2022-0039
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Study on the influence of carbon trading pilot policy on energy efficiency
           in power industry

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Shiqian Hu, Dan Li, Xiaodan Wang
      Abstract: To cope with climate change and achieve the dual carbon goal, China has actively promoted the implementation of carbon trading pilot policy, among which the power industry plays an important role in China’s carbon emission reduction work. The purpose of this paper is to study the influence of carbon trading policy on the energy efficiency of power industry and achieve the comprehensive goal of carbon emission reduction, carbon peak and carbon neutralization. This paper constructs the difference-in-differences model based on 2012–2019 provincial data to study the impact of carbon trading policy on energy efficiency in the power industry and its effect path. Heterogeneity analysis was conducted to compare the effects of carbon trading policy in eastern, central and western regions as well as at different levels of power structures. Carbon trading policy can significantly improve the energy efficiency of the power industry, and the policy effect is more significant in eastern and western regions and areas with high power structure. Mechanism analysis shows that carbon trading policy mainly influences the energy efficiency of power industry by environmental protection investment, power consumption demand and industrial structure. This paper uses provincial panel data to deeply study the influence of carbon trading policy on energy efficiency of the power industry and its effect path. By constructing the difference-in-differences model, this paper empirically analyzes the governance effect of carbon trading policy. Meanwhile, it controls individual and time effects to solve the endogeneity problem prevalent in previous literature.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-08-04
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-04-2022-0046
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Analysis of nonlinear evolution mechanism of power technology progress
           under the constraints of net-zero carbon dioxide emissions in China

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Huaihua Zheng
      Abstract: Striving to achieve the goal of carbon neutrality before 2060 indicates that China, as the most extensive power system in the world and a country based on coal power, is imperative to improve the technical level of electric power utilization. This paper aims to explore the nonlinear evolution mechanism of power technology progress under the constraints of net-zero carbon dioxide emissions in China. This paper, first, based on China’s provincial panel data from 2000 to 2019, uses global direction distance function to measure power technological progress. Second, the threshold regression model is used to explore the nonlinear relationship between carbon emission reduction constraints on electric power technological progress. There is a significant inverted U-shaped relationship between China’s provincial carbon emission reduction constraints and electric power technological progress. Meanwhile, the scale of regional economic development has a significant moderating effect on the relationship between carbon emission reduction constraints and power technological progress. This paper puts forward targeted suggestions for perfecting regional carbon emission reduction policy and improving electric power technological progress. Based on the global directional distance function, this paper extracts power as a production factor in total factor productivity and calculates the total factor electric power technological progress. This paper objectively reveals the influence mechanism of carbon emission reduction constraints on electric power technology progress based on the threshold regression model.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-07-27
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-03-2022-0030
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Risk allocation for energy performance contract from the perspective of
           incomplete contract: a study of commercial buildings in China

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Shiyu Wan, Yisheng Liu, Grace Ding, Goran Runeson, Michael Er
      Abstract: This article aims to establish a dynamic Energy Performance Contract (EPC) risk allocation model for commercial buildings based on the theory of Incomplete Contract. The purpose is to fill the policy vacuum and allow stakeholders to manage risks in energy conservation management by EPCs to better adapt to climate change in the building sector. The article chooses a qualitative research approach to depict the whole risk allocation picture of EPC projects and establish a dynamic EPC risk allocation model for commercial buildings in China. It starts with a comprehensive literature review on risks of EPCs. By modifying the theory of Incomplete Contract and adopting the so-called bow-tie model, a theoretical EPC risk allocation model is developed and verified by interview results. By discussing its application in the commercial building sector in China, an operational EPC three-stage risk allocation model is developed. This study points out the contract incompleteness of the risk allocation for EPC projects and offered an operational method to guide practice. The reasonable risk allocation between building owners and Energy Service Companies can realize their bilateral targets on commercial building energy-saving benefits, which makes EPC more attractive for energy conservation. Existing research focused mainly on static risk allocation. Less research was directed to the phased and dynamic risk allocation. This study developed a theoretical three-stage EPC risk allocation model, which provided the theoretical support for dynamic EPC risk allocation of EPC projects. By addressing the contract incompleteness of the risk allocation, an operational method is developed. This is a new approach to allocate risks for EPC projects in a dynamic and staged way.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-07-04
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-11-2021-0130
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Exploring the role of environmental literacy and social norms in farmers'
           LMTT adoption: evidence from China

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Songqing Li, Xuexi Huo, Ruishi Si, Xueqian Zhang, Yumeng Yao, Li Dong
      Abstract: Climatic changes caused by greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions are an urgent challenge for all regions around the globe while the livestock sector is an important source of GHGs emissions. The adoption of low-carbon manure treatment technology (LMTT) by farmers is emerging as an effective remedy to neutralize the carbon emissions of livestock. This paper aims to incorporate environmental literacy and social norms into the analysis framework, with the aim of exploring the impact of environmental literacy and social norms on farmers' adoption of LMTT and finally reduce GHGs emission and climate effects. This research survey is conducted in Hebei, Henan and Hubei provinces of China. First, this research measures environmental literacy from environmental cognition, skill and responsibility and describes social norms from descriptive and imperative social norms. Second, this paper explores the influence of environmental literacy and social norms on the adoption of LMTT by farmers using the logit model. Third, Logit model's instrumental approach, i.e. IV-Logit, is applied to address the simultaneous biases between environmental skill and farmers’ LMTT adoption. Finally, the research used a moderating model to analyze feasible paths of environmental literacy and social norms that impact the adoption of LMTT by farmers. The results showed that environmental literacy and social norms significantly and positively affect the adoption of LMTT by farmers. In particular, the effects of environmental literacy on the adoption of LMTT by farmers are mainly contributed by environmental skill and responsibility. The enhancement of social norms on the adoption of LMTT by farmers is mainly due to the leading role of imperative social norms. Meanwhile, if the endogeneity caused by the reverse effect between environmental skill and farmers’ LMTT adoption is dealt with, the role of environmental skill will be weakened. Additionally, LMTT technologies consist of energy and resource technologies. Compared to energy technology, social norms have a more substantial moderating effect on environmental literacy, affecting the adoption of farmer resource technology. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, a novel attempt is made to examine the effects of environmental literacy and social norms on the adoption of LMTT by farmers, with the objective of identifying more effective factors to increase the intensity of LMTT adoption by farmers.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-06-17
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-12-2021-0138
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • A decision model for sustainable informal entrepreneurship in cities
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Eijaz Ahmed Khan, Md Maruf Hossan Chowdhury, Pradip Royhan, Sunaina Gowan, Mohammed Mizanur Rahman, Mehregan Mahdavi
      Abstract: Sustainable development goals and the climate change agenda are becoming widely promoted topics of research for the 21st century. The role of cities is increasingly recognised as central to investigating these topics. Yet, the field of informal sector entrepreneurship which so many urban entrepreneurs in developing countries depend upon is seldom considered. To redress this imbalance, this study aims to develop a decision model in accordance with institutional theory (IT) and resource dependency theory (RDT) for city managers to deploy. The model identifies and prioritises optimal strategies to address the three areas of sustainability requirements environment society and economy within the study context of Bangladesh. This study used a mixed methods research design. In the qualitative part, the authors identified the three areas of sustainability requirements (i.e. environment, society and economy) and their corresponding strategies involving the informal sector that operates within the urban environment. In the quantitative part, the authors applied fuzzy quality function deployment (QFD) integrated with the 0-1 non-linear optimisation technique to identify optimal strategies. The findings show that strategies such as legitimate frameworks, waste management, allocation of urban public space and training programs contribute in important ways to the three areas of sustainability requirements. The proposed decision model will assist policy-makers and city managers to prioritise sustainability requirements and implement optimal strategies to address those requirements. Through the integration of IT and RDT, the decision model developed in this study is unique in its application to urban-based informal entrepreneurship in the context of developing countries. The effective application of the fuzzy QFD approach and the optimisation model in the context of urban-based informal entrepreneurship also offers unique contributions to the field of study.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-02-2022-0026
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Near-zero carbon stochastic dispatch optimization model for
           power-to-gas-based virtual power plant considering information gap status
           theory

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Liwei Ju, Zhe Yin, Qingqing Zhou, Li Liu, Yushu Pan, Zhongfu Tan
      Abstract: This study aims to form a new concept of power-to-gas-based virtual power plant (GVPP) and propose a low-carbon economic scheduling optimization model for GVPP considering carbon emission trading. In view of the strong uncertainty of wind power and photovoltaic power generation in GVPP, the information gap decision theory (IGDT) is used to measure the uncertainty tolerance threshold under different expected target deviations of the decision-makers. To verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed model, nine-node energy hub was selected as the simulation system. GVPP can coordinate and optimize the output of electricity-to-gas and gas turbines according to the difference in gas and electricity prices in the electricity market and the natural gas market at different times. The IGDT method can be used to describe the impact of wind and solar uncertainty in GVPP. Carbon emission rights trading can increase the operating space of power to gas (P2G) and reduce the operating cost of GVPP. This study considers the electrical conversion and spatio-temporal calming characteristics of P2G, integrates it with VPP into GVPP and uses the IGDT method to describe the impact of wind and solar uncertainty and then proposes a GVPP near-zero carbon random scheduling optimization model based on IGDT. This study designed a novel structure of the GVPP integrating P2G, gas storage device into the VPP and proposed a basic near-zero carbon scheduling optimization model for GVPP under the optimization goal of minimizing operating costs. At last, this study constructed a stochastic scheduling optimization model for GVPP.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-04-19
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-02-2022-0018
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Carbon footprint of maize planting under intensive subsistence cultivation
           in South Korea

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zhirun Li, Yinsheng Yang, Namho So, Jong-In Lee
      Abstract: During the planting process, agricultural products produce large amounts of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This has placed tremendous pressure on sustainable global development. Many countries and regions in the world have adopted intensive subsistence cultivation methods when planting maize; however, limited studies exist on these methods. The main purpose of this research is to show the impact of climate change on maize yields and carbon footprint (CF) in South Korea over 10 years, find the proper operating method and promote the advanced combination of inputs for the sustainable development of maize farmers. This study used survey data from the South Korea Rural Development Administration of 2010, 2014 and 2019 to estimate the CF of maize planting under intensive subsistence cultivation. Life-cycle assessment was used to determine the CF. Farmers were grouped according to significant differences in yield and GHG emissions. Linear regression was used to measure the dependence of the main contributors on the CF production and carbon efficiency. In South Korean maize planting, N in chemical fertiliser was the most significant contributor to the CF and organic fertiliser was the most significant input. The use of chemical and organic fertilisers significantly affects the production of the CF and carbon efficiency. Households in the high-yield and low-GHG emission groups are more sustainable because they generate the least GHG when producing and earning through maize cultivation. Globally, maize production in South Korea has a relatively low CF and maize production produces fewer GHG. This study provides information for policymakers to determine key operational options for reducing GHG emissions using intensive subsistence cultivation of maize production in South Korea and other countries.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-04-12
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-12-2021-0141
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Farmer’s environmental orientation as an antecedent to the intention for
           adopting conservational agriculture practices: the moderation analysis

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Syed Hussain Mustafa Gillani, Malkah Noor Kiani, Saifullah Abid
      Abstract: Pakistan has long been regarded as one of the most vulnerable countries to climate change. The Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations promotes conservational agricultural practices (CAP); however, they received little attention. Therefore, this study aims to explore the antecedents of farmers’ intention to adopt CAP with empirical evidence to enhance CAP in developing countries. Using a random sampling strategy, the data has been gathered from 483 Pakistani’s farmers of the most agriculture-producing province, Punjab and Sindh via a questionnaire survey. Regression-analysis (Haye’s process approach) is implied for testing the hypothesis. The findings indicated that a farmer’s environmental orientation positively affects the farmer’s intention to adopt CAP. Furthermore, the farmer’s attitude towards agricultural production and the farmer’s belief in climate change also positively moderate the relationship. Based on findings, this research suggests a need for efforts by the government to encourage farmers to engage themselves in technical support for the adoption of CAP. The educational campaigns and training sessions need to be arranged by the government for this purpose. This may help the farmers to adopt strategies relating to climate change concerning their education, credit access and extension services. This paper explores the antecedents of farmers' intention for CAP in Pakistan. The empirical evidence previously missing in the body of knowledge will support the governments, researchers and FAO to establish a mechanism for enhancing CAP in developing countries like Pakistan. Further research is recommended to explore the outcomes of farmers' intentions to adopt more CAP to gauge the effectiveness of adaptation strategies
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-03-18
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-09-2021-0106
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Exploring the influencing factors of environmental deterioration: evidence
           from China employing ARDL–VECM method with structural breaks

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hongwei Wang
      Abstract: The environmental deterioration has become one of the most economically consequential and charged topics. Numerous scholars have examined the driving factors failing to consider the structural breaks. This study aims to explore sustainability using the per capita ecological footprints (EF) as an indicator of environmental adversities and controlling the resources rent [(natural resources (NR)], labor capital (LC), urbanization (UR) and per capita economic growth [gross domestic product (GDP)] of China. Through the analysis of the long- and short-run effects with an autoregressive distributed lag model (ARDL), structural break based on BP test and Granger causality test based on vector error correction model (VECM), empirical evidence is provided for the policies formulation of sustainable development. The long-run equilibrium between the EF and GDP, NR, UR and LC is proved. In the long run, an environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) relationship existed, but China is still in the rising stage of the curve; there is a positive relationship between the EF and NR, indicating a resource curse; the UR is also unsustainable. The LC is the most favorable factor for sustainable development. In the short term, only the lagged GDP has an inhibitory effect on the EF. Besides, all explanatory variables are Granger causes of the EF. A novel attempt is made to examine the long-term equilibrium and short-term dynamics under the prerequisites that the structural break points with its time and frequencies were examined by BP test and ARDL and VECM framework and the validity of the EKC hypothesis is tested.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2022-03-08
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-10-2021-0114
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 34.225.194.102
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-